Sample records for non-energy intensive processes

  1. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  2. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    teChnologIes Program IntroduCtIon the research and development (r&d) portfolio for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy...

  3. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pdf More Documents &...

  4. Compton Process in Intense Short Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Krajewska; J. Z. Kaminski

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectra of Compton radiation emitted during electron scattering off an intense laser beam are calculated using the framework of strong-field quantum electrodynamics. We model these intense laser beams as finite length plane-wave-fronted pulses, similar to Neville and Rohrlich [Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 3}, 1692 (1971)], or as trains of such pulses. Expressions for energy and angular distributions of Compton photons are derived such that a comparison of both situations becomes meaningful. Comparing frequency distributions for both an isolated laser pulse and a laser pulse train, we find a very good agreement between the results for long pulse durations which breaks down however for ultrashort laser pulses. The dependence of angular distributions of emitted radiation on a pulse duration is also investigated. Pronounced asymmetries of angular distributions are found for very short laser pulses, which gradually disappear with increasing the number of laser field oscillations. Those asymmetries are attributed to asymmetries of the vector potential describing an incident laser beam.

  5. Consistent parametric estimation of the intensity of a spatial-temporal point process.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    Consistent parametric estimation of the intensity of a spatial-temporal point process. Frederic under which parametric estimates of the intensity of a spatial-temporal point process are consistent. Although the actual point process being estimated may not be Poisson, an estimate involving maximizing

  6. Manipulation of the Raman process via incoherent pump, tunable intensity, and phase control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Li-Gang; Qamar, Sajid; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a proposal to manipulate the Raman process via incoherent pump, tunable intensity, and phase control of the driving fields. It is found that Raman absorptive peaks can become Raman gain peaks by controlling the incoherent pump...

  7. Breit-Wheeler Process in Intense Short Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Krajewska; J. Z. Kaminski

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-angular distributions of electron-positron pair creation in collisions of a laser beam and a nonlaser photon are calculated using the $S$-matrix formalism. The laser field is modeled as a finite pulse, similar to the formulation introduced in our recent paper in the context of Compton scattering [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 85}, 062102 (2012)]. The nonperturbative regime of pair creation is considered here. The energy spectra of created particles are compared with the corresponding spectra obtained using the modulated plane wave approximation for the driving laser field. A very good agreement in these two cases is observed, provided that the laser pulse is sufficiently long. For short pulse durations, this agreement breaks down. The sensitivity of pair production to the polarization of a driving pulse is also investigated. We show that in the nonperturbative regime, the pair creation yields depend on the polarization of the pulse, reaching their maximal values for the linear polarization. Therefore, we focus on this case. Specifically, we analyze the dependence of pair creation on the relative configuration of linear polarizations of the laser pulse and the nonlaser photon. Lastly, we investigate the carrier-envelope phase effect on angular distributions of created particles, suggesting the possibility of phase control in relation to the pair creation processes.

  8. Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    $on of Renewables (Distributed) Co-genera$on of electricity and heat Storage Microgrids21 Mul$-scale Demand-Side Management for Con$nuous Power-intensive Processes Megan, Nikhil Arora #12;Facing the challenge of variability, the power grid

  9. Clay fabric intensity in natural and artificial fault gouges: Implications for brittle fault zone processes and sedimentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clay fabric intensity in natural and artificial fault gouges: Implications for brittle fault zone processes and sedimentary basin clay fabric evolution Samuel H. Haines,1 Ben A. van der Pluijm,1 Matt J intensity measurements using X-ray texture goniometry on 22 natural clay-rich fault gouges from low

  10. Needs of Non Energy-Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, C.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the informational needs of non energy-focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  11. Intense few-cycle hard-UV-pulse-induced internal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kis, Daniel; Kalman, Peter; Keszthelyi, Tamas [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Technics, Department of Nuclear Energy, Muegyetem rkpt. 9, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Physics, Budafoki ut 8 F, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal conversion coefficient for bound-free electron transition of originally energetically forbidden internal conversion processes induced by intense, few-cycle UV laser pulse of Gaussian shape in the case of isomers {sup 107}Ag{sup m} (K shell, E3, 25.47 keV), {sup 90}Nb{sup m} (L{sub 2} shell, M2+E3, 2.3 keV), {sup 183}W{sup m1}(M{sub 5} shell, E2, 1.79 keV), {sup 183}W{sup m2} (N{sub 1} shell, E1, 548 eV), and {sup 188}Re{sup m} (M{sub 2} shell, M3+E4, 2.63 keV), and {sup 235}U{sup m} (O{sub 4} and O{sub 5} shells, E3, 73.5 eV) is determined numerically. Experimental conditions and possibilities of the laser-induced internal conversion process of {sup 183}W{sup m2} from the N{sub 1} shell are discussed in more detail.

  12. Hybrid intensity and time-of-flight signal processing techniques for intelligent distance sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi, Itariu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of "smart" consumer electronics, distance sensing is an increasingly important field in optical sensing. A novel approach to active infrared(IR) 1D distance sensing is proposed, employing both intensity and ...

  13. Nonlinear Magnetoresistance Oscillations in Intensely Irradiated Two-Dimensional Electron Systems Induced by Multiphoton Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vavilov, Maxim G

    '' mechanism stepping from the nonequilibrium energy distribution [10]. MIROs are con- trolled by a parameter- wave quanta was suggested by numerous experiments [13] reporting MIRO-like features in the vicinity of multiphoton processes near the cyclotron resonance and its har- monics was not considered either

  14. Challenges and opportunities in accounting for non-energy use CO2 emissions: an editorial comment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patel M (2009) Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting2000, global non-energy use of fossil fuels was equivalentanalyzing non-energy uses of fossil fuels as petrochemical

  15. Processing of transient signals from damage in CFRP composite materials monitored with embedded intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors M. Weversa , L. Ripperta , J.-M. Papyb , S. Van Huffelb a Department-modulated fiber optic sensors, whose working principle is based on the microbending concept, are used to monitor. In this approach fibre optic sensors may offer an alternative for the robust piezoelectric transducers used

  16. AIJ in the Non-Energy Sector in India: Opportunities and Concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindranath, N.H.; Meili, A.; Anita, R.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) has been signed and ratified by 168 countries, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased substantially since the 1992 Rio Summit. In both developing countries (DCs) and industrialized countries (ICs), there has been a need to find mechanisms to facilitate environmentally sound mitigation strategies. This need led to the formation of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) at the first Conference-of the Parties (COP) in 1995. In Article 4A, para 2D, the COP established an AIJ pilot phase in which Annex I (IC) countries would enter into agreements to implement activities jointly with non-Annex I parties. DCs would engage in AIJ on a purely voluntary basis and all AIJ projects should be compatible with and supportive of national environment and development goals. AIJ does not imply GHG reduction commitments by DCs. Neither do all projects undertaken during the pilot phase qualify as a fulfillment of current commitment s of Annex I parties under the COP. The current pilot phase for AIJ ends in the year 2000, a date which may be extended. Current AIJ activities are largely focused on the energy sector. The Nordic countries, for example, feel that the most important potential areas for cooperation in AIJ are fuel conversion, more effective energy production, increased energy efficiency, and reforms in energy-intensive industry (Nordic Council of Ministers, 1995). Denmark does not want to include non-energy sector projects such as carbon sink enhancement projects in the pilot phase (Nordic Council of Ministers, 1995). However, other countries, including the US, have already funded a number of forestry sector projects (Development Alternatives, 1997). Moreover, energy-sector projects involving high technology or capital-intensive technology are often a source of controversy between DCs and ICs regarding the kind of technology transferred and sharing of costs and benefits. Further, the pilot phase provide s an opportunity for capacity-building and learning about methods of planning, implementation, and monitoring of GHG abatement in land-based non-energy sector projects.

  17. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOralGovernmentStandards for PackagedEthylene,Addressing

  18. Energy Intensity Strategy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappolee, D.; Shaw, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our presentation will cover how we began the journey of conserving energy at our facility. We’ll discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan and the impact our team has had on the process, what tools we’re using, what goals have been...

  19. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

  20. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  1. The Intense Radiation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

  2. Solar radiation intensity calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

  3. Intense Femtosecond Laser Interactions with Ions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ), ultra-short laser light with atoms and molecules has led to the discovery of new phenomena such as bondIntense Femtosecond Laser Interactions with Ions in Beams and Traps A thesis presented through a re-scattering process where an electron is ionized, propagated in the laser field and is driven

  4. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprangle, Phillip [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Hafizi, Bahman [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  5. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  6. Intensity-Intensity Correlations of Classically Entangled Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Ghose; Anirban Mukherjee

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is proposed to show that after initial frequency and polarization selection, classical thermal light from two independent sources can be made path-polarization entangled. Such light will show new intensity-intensity correlations involving both path and polarization phases, formally similar to those for four-particle GHZ states. For fixed polarization phases, the correlations reduce to the Hanbury Brown-Twiss phase correlations. It is also shown that these classical correlations violate noncontextuality.

  7. Iron and Steel Energy Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use...

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  11. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  12. FY06 LDRD Final Report Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulla, G M

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the data intensive LDRD was to investigate the fundamental research issues underlying the application of High Performance Computing (HPC) resources to the challenges of data intensive computing. We explored these issues through four targeted case studies derived from growing LLNL programs: high speed text processing, massive semantic graph analysis, streaming image feature extraction, and processing of streaming sensor data. The ultimate goal of this analysis was to provide scalable data management algorithms to support the development of a predictive knowledge capability consistent with the direction of Aurora.

  13. Neutrino physics with an intense \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Henning

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study some of the physics potential of an intense $1\\,\\mathrm{MCi}$ $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr}$ source combined with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} enriched germanium detector array. The {\\sc Demonstrator} will consist of detectors with ultra-low radioactive backgrounds and extremely low energy thresholds of~$\\sim 400\\,\\mathrm{eV}$. We show that it can improve the current limit on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment. We briefly discuss physics applications of the charged-current reaction of the $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr} neutrino with the $^{73}\\mathrm{Ge} isotope. Finally, we argue that the rate from a realistic, intense tritium source is below the detectable limit of even a tonne-scale HPGe experiment

  14. PNNL Data-Intensive Computing for a Smarter Energy Grid

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carol Imhoff; Zhenyu (Henry) Huang; Daniel Chavarria

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Middleware for Data-Intensive Computing (MeDICi) Integration Framework, an integrated platform to solve data analysis and processing needs, supports PNNL research on the U.S. electric power grid. MeDICi is enabling development of visualizations of grid operations and vulnerabilities, with goal of near real-time analysis to aid operators in preventing and mitigating grid failures.

  15. The Synoptic Regulation of Dryline Intensity DAVID M. SCHULTZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David

    1 The Synoptic Regulation of Dryline Intensity DAVID M. SCHULTZ Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale, Texas PAUL M. HOFFMAN Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts An Article of synoptic-scale processes in regulating the strength of the dryline, a dataset is constructed of all

  16. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  17. Best Management Practice #13: Other Water Intensive Processes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| Departmentof Energy 12: Laboratoryof

  18. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 at Iowasecurity isBusinesses and the

  19. ARM AOS Processing Status and Aerosol Intensive Properties VAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, and future

  20. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redwine, Robert

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  1. Intensive Observation Period Projects Scheduled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterimInvokingInspector XE 20131 Intensive

  2. Experimental transport of intensity diffraction tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Justin Wu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I perform intensity-based tomographic phase imaging in two ways. First, I utilize the paraxial transport of intensity equation (TIE) to construct phase maps of a phase object at multiple projection angles ...

  3. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  4. Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity R.F. Keim a,*, A Little is understood about how storage of water on forest canopies varies during rainfall, even though storage changes intensity of throughfall and thus affects a variety of hydrological processes

  5. Generation of Stable (3+1)-dimensional High-intensity Ultrashort Light Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, T. P.; Koprinkov, I. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorova, M. E. [College of Energetics and Electronics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorov, M. D. [Faculty of Appl. Math. and Informatics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses is studied within a rigorous physical model. The pulse propagation is described by the nonlinear envelope equation. The propagation and the material equations are solved self-consistently at realistic physical conditions. Self-compression of the pulse around single-cycle regime and dramatic increase of the pulse intensity is found. At certain conditions, the peak intensity, transversal width, time duration, and the spatiotemporal pulse shape remain stable with the propagation of the pulse, resembling a soliton formation process. This, to our knowledge, is the first simulation of high-intensity ultrashort soliton formation dynamics in the (3+1)-dimensional case.

  6. Recognizing targets from infrared intensity scan patterns using artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barshan, Billur

    Recognizing targets from infrared intensity scan patterns using artificial neural networks Tayfun complicating the localization and recognition process. We employ artificial neural networks to deter- mine differentiation; artificial neural networks; optimal brain surgeon; pattern recognition. Paper 080450R received

  7. Temperature Measurements Through Dust or Steam for Energy-Intensive Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan, K. D.; Pearce, J. A.; Wang, L.; Ryza, E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise measurement of temperature in energy-intensive processes can lead to energy conservation and improvements in the quality and consistency of products. While temperature measurement instruments are available for a wide variety...

  8. Intensity-resolved Above Threshold Ionization Yields of Atoms with Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Nathan Andrew

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The above threshold ionization (ATI) spectra provide a diversity of information about a laser-atom ionization process such as laser intensity, pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and atomic energy level spacing. However, the spatial distribution...

  9. Industrial Application of High Combustion Intensity Systems and Energy Conservation Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, F. D. M.; Anderson, L. E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process are quantified for vortex stabilized systems. Design analyses of the fuel injectors used with gaseous, liquid and pulverized coal fuels are also presented. The resulting high intensity combustion systems evolved are illustrated with photographs...

  10. Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program...

  11. Data Intensive Architecture for Scalable Cyber Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Bryan K.; Johnson, John R.; Critchlow, Terence J.

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyber analysts are tasked with the identification and mitigation of network exploits and threats. These compromises are difficult to identify due to the characteristics of cyber communication, the volume of traffic, and the duration of possible attack. In this paper, we describe a prototype implementation designed to provide cyber analysts an environment where they can interactively explore a month’s worth of cyber security data. This prototype utilized On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) techniques to present a data cube to the analysts. The cube provides a summary of the data, allowing trends to be easily identified as well as the ability to easily pull up the original records comprising an event of interest. The cube was built using SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS), with the interface to the cube provided by Tableau. This software infrastructure was supported by a novel hardware architecture comprising a Netezza TwinFin® for the underlying data warehouse and a cube server with a FusionIO drive hosting the data cube. We evaluated this environment on a month’s worth of artificial, but realistic, data using multiple queries provided by our cyber analysts. As our results indicate, OLAP technology has progressed to the point where it is in a unique position to provide novel insights to cyber analysts, as long as it is supported by an appropriate data intensive architecture.

  12. Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Hewett; H. Weerts; R. Brock; J. N. Butler; B. C. K. Casey; J. Collar; A. de Gouvea; R. Essig; Y. Grossman; W. Haxton; J. A. Jaros; C. K. Jung; Z. T. Lu; K. Pitts; Z. Ligeti; J. R. Patterson; M. Ramsey-Musolf; J. L. Ritchie; A. Roodman; K. Scholberg; C. E. M. Wagner; G. P. Zeller; S. Aefsky; A. Afanasev; K. Agashe; C. Albright; J. Alonso; C. Ankenbrandt; M. Aoki; C. A. Arguelles; N. Arkani-Hamed; J. R. Armendariz; C. Armendariz-Picon; E. Arrieta Diaz; J. Asaadi; D. M. Asner; K. S. Babu; K. Bailey; O. Baker; B. Balantekin; B. Baller; M. Bass; B. Batell; J. Beacham; J. Behr; N. Berger; M. Bergevin; E. Berman; R. Bernstein; A. J. Bevan; M. Bishai; M. Blanke; S. Blessing; A. Blondel; T. Blum; G. Bock; A. Bodek; G. Bonvicini; F. Bossi; J. Boyce; R. Breedon; M. Breidenbach; S. J. Brice; R. A. Briere; S. Brodsky; C. Bromberg; A. Bross; T. E. Browder; D. A. Bryman; M. Buckley; R. Burnstein; E. Caden; P. Campana; R. Carlini; G. Carosi; C. Castromonte; R. Cenci; I. Chakaberia; M. C. Chen; C. H. Cheng; B. Choudhary; N. H. Christ; E. Christensen; M. E. Christy; T. E. Chupp; E. Church; D. B. Cline; T. E. Coan; P. Coloma; J. Comfort; L. Coney; J. Cooper; R. J. Cooper; R. Cowan; D. F. Cowen; D. Cronin-Hennessy; A. Datta; G. S. Davies; M. Demarteau; D. P. DeMille; A. Denig; R. Dermisek; A. Deshpande; M. S. Dewey; R. Dharmapalan; J. Dhooghe; M. R. Dietrich; M. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; S. Dobbs; M. Duraisamy; B. Dutta; H. Duyang; D. A. Dwyer; M. Eads; B. Echenard; S. R. Elliott; C. Escobar; J. Fajans; S. Farooq; C. Faroughy; J. E. Fast; B. Feinberg; J. Felde; G. Feldman; P. Fierlinger; P. Fileviez Perez; B. Filippone; P. Fisher; B. T. Flemming; K. T. Flood; R. Forty; M. J. Frank; A. Freyberger; A. Friedland; R. Gandhi; K. S. Ganezer; A. Garcia; F. G. Garcia; S. Gardner; L. Garrison; A. Gasparian; S. Geer; V. M. Gehman; T. Gershon; M. Gilchriese; C. Ginsberg; I. Gogoladze; M. Gonderinger; M. Goodman; H. Gould; M. Graham; P. W. Graham; R. Gran; J. Grange; G. Gratta; J. P. Green; H. Greenlee; R. C. Group; E. Guardincerri; V. Gudkov; R. Guenette; A. Haas; A. Hahn; T. Han; T. Handler; J. C. Hardy; R. Harnik; D. A. Harris; F. A. Harris; P. G. Harris; J. Hartnett; B. He; B. R. Heckel; K. M. Heeger; S. Henderson; D. Hertzog; R. Hill; E. A Hinds; D. G. Hitlin; R. J. Holt; N. Holtkamp; G. Horton-Smith; P. Huber; W. Huelsnitz; J. Imber; I. Irastorza; J. Jaeckel; I. Jaegle; C. James; A. Jawahery; D. Jensen; C. P. Jessop; B. Jones; H. Jostlein; T. Junk; A. L. Kagan; M. Kalita; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; G. Karagiorgi; A. Karle; T. Katori; B. Kayser; R. Kephart; S. Kettell; Y. K. Kim; M. Kirby; K. Kirch; J. Klein; J. Kneller; A. Kobach; M. Kohl; J. Kopp; M. Kordosky; W. Korsch; I. Kourbanis; A. D. Krisch; P. Krizan; A. S. Kronfeld; S. Kulkarni; K. S. Kumar; Y. Kuno; T. Kutter; T. Lachenmaier; M. Lamm; J. Lancaster; M. Lancaster; C. Lane; K. Lang; P. Langacker; S. Lazarevic; T. Le; K. Lee; K. T. Lesko; Y. Li; M. Lindgren; A. Lindner; J. Link; D. Lissauer; L. S. Littenberg; B. Littlejohn; C. Y. Liu; W. Loinaz; W. Lorenzon; W. C. Louis; J. Lozier; L. Ludovici; L. Lueking; C. Lunardini; D. B. MacFarlane; P. A. N. Machado; P. B. Mackenzie; J. Maloney; W. J. Marciano; W. Marsh; M. Marshak; J. W. Martin; C. Mauger; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; G. McLaughlin; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; B. T. Meadows; R. Mehdiyev; D. Melconian; H. Merkel; M. Messier; J. P. Miller; G. Mills; U. K. Minamisono; S. R. Mishra; I. Mocioiu; S. Moed Sher; R. N. Mohapatra; B. Monreal; C. D. Moore; J. G. Morfin; J. Mousseau; L. A. Moustakas; G. Mueller; P. Mueller; M. Muether; H. P. Mumm; C. Munger; H. Murayama; P. Nath; O. Naviliat-Cuncin; J. K. Nelson; D. Neuffer; J. S. Nico; A. Norman; D. Nygren; Y. Obayashi; T. P. O'Connor; Y. Okada; J. Olsen; L. Orozco; J. L. Orrell; J. Osta; B. Pahlka; J. Paley; V. Papadimitriou; M. Papucci; S. Parke; R. H. Parker; Z. Parsa; K. Partyka; A. Patch; J. C. Pati; R. B. Patterson; Z. Pavlovic; G. Paz; G. N. Perdue; D. Perevalov; G. Perez; R. Petti; W. Pettus; A. Piepke; M. Pivovaroff; R. Plunkett; C. C. Polly; M. Pospelov; R. Povey; A. Prakesh; M. V. Purohit; S. Raby; J. L. Raaf; R. Rajendran; S. Rajendran; G. Rameika; R. Ramsey; A. Rashed; B. N. Ratcliff; B. Rebel; J. Redondo; P. Reimer; D. Reitzner; F. Ringer; A. Ringwald; S. Riordan; B. L. Roberts; D. A. Roberts; R. Robertson; F. Robicheaux; M. Rominsky; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; C. Rott; P. Rubin; N. Saito; M. Sanchez; S. Sarkar; H. Schellman; B. Schmidt; M. Schmitt; D. W. Schmitz; J. Schneps; A. Schopper; P. Schuster; A. J. Schwartz; M. Schwarz; J. Seeman; Y. K. Semertzidis; K. K. Seth; Q. Shafi; P. Shanahan; R. Sharma; S. R. Sharpe; M. Shiozawa; V. Shiltsev; K. Sigurdson; P. Sikivie; J. Singh; D. Sivers; T. Skwarnicki; N. Smith; J. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Soderberg; Y. H. Song; A. Soni; P. Souder; A. Sousa; J. Spitz; M. Stancari; G. C. Stavenga; J. H. Steffen

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

  13. Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewett, J L; Brock, R; Butler, J N; Casey, B C K; Collar, J; de Gouvea, A; Essig, R; Grossman, Y; Haxton, W; Jaros, J A; Jung, C K; Lu, Z T; Pitts, K; Ligeti, Z; Patterson, J R; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ritchie, J L; Roodman, A; Scholberg, K; Wagner, C E M; Zeller, G P; Aefsky, S; Afanasev, A; Agashe, K; Albright, C; Alonso, J; Ankenbrandt, C; Aoki, M; Arguelles, C A; Arkani-Hamed, N; Armendariz, J R; Armendariz-Picon, C; Diaz, E Arrieta; Asaadi, J; Asner, D M; Babu, K S; Bailey, K; Baker, O; Balantekin, B; Baller, B; Bass, M; Batell, B; Beacham, J; Behr, J; Berger, N; Bergevin, M; Berman, E; Bernstein, R; Bevan, A J; Bishai, M; Blanke, M; Blessing, S; Blondel, A; Blum, T; Bock, G; Bodek, A; Bonvicini, G; Bossi, F; Boyce, J; Breedon, R; Breidenbach, M; Brice, S J; Briere, R A; Brodsky, S; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Browder, T E; Bryman, D A; Buckley, M; Burnstein, R; Caden, E; Campana, P; Carlini, R; Carosi, G; Castromonte, C; Cenci, R; Chakaberia, I; Chen, M C; Cheng, C H; Choudhary, B; Christ, N H; Christensen, E; Christy, M E; Chupp, T E; Church, E; Cline, D B; Coan, T E; Coloma, P; Comfort, J; Coney, L; Cooper, J; Cooper, R J; Cowan, R; Cowen, D F; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Datta, A; Davies, G S; Demarteau, M; DeMille, D P; Denig, A; Dermisek, R; Deshpande, A; Dewey, M S; Dharmapalan, R; Dhooghe, J; Dietrich, M R; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Dobbs, S; Duraisamy, M; Dutta, B; Duyang, H; Dwyer, D A; Eads, M; Echenard, B; Elliott, S R; Escobar, C; Fajans, J; Farooq, S; Faroughy, C; Fast, J E; Feinberg, B; Felde, J; Feldman, G; Fierlinger, P; Perez, P Fileviez; Filippone, B; Fisher, P; Flemming, B T; Flood, K T; Forty, R; Frank, M J; Freyberger, A; Friedland, A; Gandhi, R; Ganezer, K S; Garcia, A; Garcia, F G; Gardner, S; Garrison, L; Gasparian, A; Geer, S; Gehman, V M; Gershon, T; Gilchriese, M; Ginsberg, C; Gogoladze, I; Gonderinger, M; Goodman, M; Gould, H; Graham, M; Graham, P W; Gran, R; Grange, J; Gratta, G; Green, J P; Greenlee, H; Guardincerri, E; Gudkov, V; Guenette, R; Haas, A; Hahn, A; Han, T; Handler, T; Hardy, J C; Harnik, R; Harris, D A; Harris, F A; Harris, P G; Hartnett, J; He, B; Heckel, B R; Heeger, K M; Henderson, S; Hertzog, D; Hill, R; Hinds, E A; Hitlin, D G; Holt, R J; Holtkamp, N; Horton-Smith, G; Huber, P; Huelsnitz, W; Imber, J; Irastorza, I; Jaeckel, J; Jaegle, I; James, C; Jawahery, A; Jensen, D; Jessop, C P; Jones, B; Jostlein, H; Junk, T; Kagan, A L; Kalita, M; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Karagiorgi, G; Karle, A; Katori, T; Kayser, B; Kephart, R; Kettell, S; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirch, K; Klein, J; Kneller, J; Kobach, A; Kohl, M; Kopp, J; Kordosky, M; Korsch, W; Kourbanis, I; Krisch, A D; Krizan, P; Kronfeld, A S; Kulkarni, S; Kumar, K S; Kuno, Y; Kutter, T; Lachenmaier, T; Lamm, M; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lane, C; Lang, K; Langacker, P; Lazarevic, S; Le, T; Lee, K; Lesko, K T; Li, Y; Lindgren, M; Lindner, A; Link, J; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L S; Littlejohn, B; Liu, C Y; Loinaz, W; Lorenzon, W; Louis, W C; Lozier, J; Ludovici, L; Lueking, L; Lunardini, C; MacFarlane, D B; Machado, P A N; Mackenzie, P B; Maloney, J; Marciano, W J; Marsh, W; Marshak, M; Martin, J W; Mauger, C; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLaughlin, G; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Meadows, B T; Mehdiyev, R; Melconian, D; Merkel, H; Messier, M; Miller, J P; Mills, G; Minamisono, U K; Mishra, S R; Mocioiu, I; Sher, S Moed; Mohapatra, R N; Monreal, B; Moore, C D; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Moustakas, L A; Mueller, G; Mueller, P; Muether, M; Mumm, H P; Munger, C; Murayama, H; Nath, P; Naviliat-Cuncin, O; Nelson, J K; Neuffer, D; Nico, J S; Norman, A; Nygren, D; Obayashi, Y; O'Connor, T P; Okada, Y; Olsen, J; Orozco, L; Orrell, J L; Osta, J; Pahlka, B; Paley, J; Papadimitriou, V; Papucci, M; Parke, S; Parker, R H; Parsa, Z; Partyka, K; Patch, A; Pati, J C; Patterson, R B; Pavlovic, Z; Paz, G; Perdue, G N; Perevalov, D; Perez, G; Petti, R; Pettus, W; Piepke, A; Pivovaroff, M; Plunkett, R; Polly, C C; Pospelov, M; Povey, R; Prakesh, A; Purohit, M V; Raby, S; Raaf, J L; Rajendran, R; Rajendran, S; Rameika, G; Ramsey, R; Rashed, A; Ratcliff, B N; Rebel, B; Redondo, J; Reimer, P; Reitzner, D; Ringer, F; Ringwald, A; Riordan, S; Roberts, B L; Roberts, D A; Robertson, R; Robicheaux, F; Rominsky, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Rott, C; Rubin, P; Saito, N; Sanchez, M; Sarkar, S; Schellman, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, M; Schmitz, D W; Schneps, J; Schopper, A; Schuster, P; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, M; Seeman, J; Semertzidis, Y K; Seth, K K; Shafi, Q; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Sharpe, S R; Shiozawa, M; Shiltsev, V; Sigurdson, K; Sikivie, P; Singh, J; Sivers, D; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N; Sobczyk, J; Sobel, H; Soderberg, M; Song, Y H; Soni, A; Souder, P; Sousa, A; Spitz, J; Stancari, M; Stavenga, G C; Steffen, J H; Stepanyan, S; Stoeckinger, D; Stone, S; Strait, J; Strassler, M; Sulai, I A; Sundrum, R; Svoboda, R; Szczerbinska, B; Szelc, A; Takeuchi, T; Tanedo, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proceedings of the 2011 workshop on Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier. Science opportunities at the intensity frontier are identified and described in the areas of heavy quarks, charged leptons, neutrinos, proton decay, new light weakly-coupled particles, and nucleons, nuclei, and atoms.

  14. High intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, J.M.; Roser, T.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience and results from recent high intensity proton running periods of the Brookhaven AGS, during which a record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse was reached, is presented. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of three high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the 1.5 GeV Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. Recently even higher intensity proton synchrotrons are studied for neutron spallation sources or proton driver for a muon collider. Implications of the experiences from the AGS to these proposals and also possible future upgrades for the AGS are discussed.

  15. Modeling Data-Intensive Web Sites 259 ModelingData-Intensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouras, Christos

    Modeling Data-Intensive Web Sites 259 ChapterXII ModelingData-Intensive Web Sites-by-stepapproachtothedesign,implementation and management of a Data-Intensive Web Site (DIWS). The approach introduces five data formulation is that of "Web fragments," that is an information decomposition technique that aids design, implementation

  16. Semiconductor lasers with uniform longitudinal intensity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrans, T.; Yariv, A. (Department of Applied Physics 128-95, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (USA))

    1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-dependent nonuniform longitudinal intensity distribution leading to spectral and spatial instabilities is a major problem in semiconductor lasers. It is shown theoretically that a proper choice of the longitudinal distribution of the gain as well as that of the magnitude of the grating coupling coefficient will lead to a uniform intensity distribution in distributed feedback lasers. We also show that the widely used phase, rather than magnitude, control of the coupling coefficient cannot lead to a uniform intensity distribution when the facet reflectivities are zero.

  17. Physics Prospects with an Intense Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Solomey

    2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    With new forthcoming intense neutrino beams, for the study of neutrino oscillations, it is possible to consider other physics experiments that can be done with these extreme neutrino fluxes available close to the source.

  18. Computational phase imaging based on intensity transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and a phase. However, optical frequencies are too high to allow direct detection of phase; thus, our eyes and cameras see only real values - intensity. Phase carries important ...

  19. Building dependability arguments for software intensive systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seater, Robert Morrison

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for structuring and guiding the development of end-to-end dependability arguments. The goal is to establish high-level requirements of complex software-intensive systems, especially properties that ...

  20. Midlevel ventilation's constraint on tropical cyclone intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian Hong-An

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a TC's intensity. An idealized ...

  1. Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian Hong-An

    Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclone’s intensity. An ...

  2. Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

  3. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  4. Evaluation of steelmaking processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of the AISI Direct Steelmaking Program is to develop a process for producing steel directly from ore and coal; the process should be less capital intensive, consume less energy, and have higher productivity. A task force was formed to examine available processes: trough, posthearth, IRSID, Electric Arc Furnace, energy optimizing furnace. It is concluded that there is insufficient incentive to replace a working BOF with any of these processes to refine hot metal; however, if new steelmaking capacity is required, IRSID and EOF should be considered. A fully continuous process should not be considered until direct ironmaking and continuous refining are perfected.

  5. Laser intensity effects in noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Heinzl; Anton Ilderton; Mattias Marklund

    2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a two-fold extension of QED assuming the presence of strong external fields provided by an ultra-intense laser and noncommutativity of spacetime. While noncommutative effects leave the electron's intensity induced mass shift unchanged, the photons change significantly in character: they acquire a quasi-momentum that is no longer light-like. We study the consequences of this combined noncommutative strong-field effect for basic lepton-photon interactions.

  6. Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

  7. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  8. What is Data-Intensive Science?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    What is Data Intensive Science? Today we are living in a digital world, where scientists often no longer interact directly with the physical object of their research, but do so via digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and, at times, visualized data. Advances in experimental and computational technologies have lead to an exponential growth in the volumes, variety and complexity of this data and while the deluge is not happening everywhere in an absolute sense, it is in a relative one. Science today is data intensive. Data intensive science has the potential to transform not only how we do science, but how quickly we can translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, decisions and ultimately economic success. Critically, data intensive science touches some of the most important challenges we are facing. Consider a few of the grand challenges outlined by the U.S. National Academy of Engineering: make solar energy economical, provide energy from fusion, develop carbon sequestration methods, advance health informatics, engineer better medicines, secure cyberspace, and engineer the tools of scientific discovery. Arguably, meeting any of these challenges requires the collaborative effort of trans-disciplinary teams, but also significant contributions from enabling data intensive technologies. Indeed for many of them, advances in data intensive research will be the single most important factor in developing successful and timely solutions. Simple extrapolations of how we currently interact with and utilize data and knowledge are not sufficient to meet this need. Given the importance of these challenges, a new, bold vision for the role of data in science, and indeed how research will be conducted in a data intensive environment is evolving.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of ionization stabilization of atoms in intense laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Norman; C. Chandre; T. Uzer; Peijie Wang

    2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the stabilization of ionization of atoms subjected to a superintense laser pulse using nonlinear dynamics. We provide an explanation for the lack of complete ionization at high intensity and for the decrease of the ionization probability as intensity is increased. We investigate the role of each part of the laser pulse (ramp-up, plateau, ramp-down) in this process. We emphasize the role of the choice for the ionization criterion, energy versus distance criterion.

  10. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  11. Intensity Limitations in Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, W.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design beam intensity of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) is 3 x 10{sup 13} ppp. This paper investigates possible limitations in the intensity upgrade. These include the space charge, transition crossing, microwave instability, coupled bunch instability, resistive wall, beam loading (static and transient), rf power, aperture (physical and dynamic), coalescing, particle losses and radiation shielding, etc. It seems that to increase the intensity by a factor of two from the design value is straightforward. Even a factor of five is possible provided that the following measures are to be taken: an rf power upgrade, a {gamma}{sub t}-jump system, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, rf feedback and feedforward, stopband corrections and local shieldings.

  12. Masking line foregrounds in intensity mapping surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breysse, Patrick C; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of line confusion in intensity mapping surveys and explore the possibility to mitigate line foreground contamination by progressively masking the brightest pixels in the observed map. We consider experiments targeting CO(1-0) at $z=3$, Ly$\\alpha$ at $z=7$, and CII at $z=7$, and use simulated intensity maps, which include both clustering and shot noise components of the signal and possible foregrounds, in order to test the efficiency of our method. We find that for CO and Ly$\\alpha$ it is quite possible to remove most of the foreground contribution from the maps via only 1%-3% pixel masking. The CII maps will be more difficult to clean, however, due to instrumental constraints and the high-intensity foreground contamination involved. While the masking procedure sacrifices much of the astrophysical information present in our maps, we demonstrate that useful cosmological information in the targeted lines can be successfully retrieved.

  13. Radiation Reaction in High-Intense Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Keita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the development of the radiating electron model by P. A. M. Dirac in 1938, many authors have tried to reformulate this model so-called radiation reaction. Recently, this effects has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. In our recent research, we found a method for the stabilization of radiation reaction in quantum vacuum [PTEP 2014, 043A01 (2014), PTEP 2015, 023A01 (2015)]. In the other hand, the field modification by high-intense fields should be required under 10PW lasers, like ELI-NP facility. In this paper, I propose the combined method how to adopt the high-intense field correction with the stabilization by quantum vacuum as the extension from the model by Dirac.

  14. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  15. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  16. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  17. Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-PhaseGlyoxal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal, and 2,3-Butanedione (Diacetyl) with Quantitative Infrared Intensity Studies of Vapor-Phase Glyoxal,Methylglyoxal,...

  18. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the mid-infrared at atmospheric pressure. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen...

  19. EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables...

  20. airglow intensities measured: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mark I 2013-01-01 23 Strongly Intensive Measures for Transverse Momentum and Particle Number Fluctuations Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: The strongly intensive measures ...

  1. Performances of BNL high-intensity synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AGS proton synchrotron was completed in 1960 with initial intensity in the 10 to the 10th power proton per pulse (ppp) range. Over the years, through many upgrades and improvements, the AGS now reached an intensity record of 6.3 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The intensity limitation caused by space charge tune spread and its relationship to injection energy at 50 MeV, 200 MeV, and 1,500 MeV will be presented as well as many critical accelerator manipulations. BNL currently participates in the design of an accumulator ring for the SNS project at Oak Ridge. The status on the issues of halo formation, beam losses and collimation are also presented.

  2. MERcury Intense Target (MERIT) Van Graves, ORNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    OF ENERGY Airline Hydraulics 28 Oct 2005 Hg System Schematic Double Window (2) Primary Containment SecondaryMERcury Intense Target (MERIT) Overview Van Graves, ORNL Syringe Procurement Kickoff Meeting Airline Hydraulics Bensalem, PA Oct 28, 2005 #12;2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT

  3. WHERE ARE THE MOST INTENSE THUNDERSTORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Steve

    provided unparalleled information on the global distribution of intense convective storms. T he Tropical-alti- tude, non-sun-synchronous orbit permits sampling throughout the diurnal cycle of precipitation. The cloud-top temperature of storms has been measured using infrared (IR) bright- ness temperature (Tb

  4. Name of Lecture Intensive Thermal Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name of Lecture Intensive Thermal Engineering Term 2nd semester (October) Units 2-0-0 Lecturers' understanding of the essential part of thermal engineering, comprehensively. The classes are given by three in Thermal Engineering field require the students to have fundamental concepts of thermodynamics and heat

  5. Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    dependencies in the light of energy price volatility and concerns as to long-term fossil energy availabilities ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . 232 6. FOOD WASTE AND ENERGY USE. . . . . . . . . . . . . Energy Intensity of Agriculture and Food Systems Nathan Pelletier,1 Eric Audsley,2 Sonja Brodt,3

  6. Comparison Study of Energy Intensity in the Textile Industry: A Case Study in Five Textile Sub-sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, A.; Hasanabadi, A.; Abdorrazaghi, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contributes to the understanding of energy use in the textile industry by comparing the energy intensity of textile plants in five major sub-sectors, i.e. spinning, weaving, wet-processing, worsted fabric manufacturing, and carpet...

  7. Metamorphic Rocks, Processes, and Resources Metamorphic rocks are rocks changed from one form to another by intense heat, intense pressure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    important ­ Rising temperature causes water to be released from unstable minerals ­ Hot water very reactive refers to the temperature and pressure under which a rock was metamorphosed, considered low grade or high ­ If range exceeded, new mineral structures result ­ If temperature gets high enough, melting will occur

  8. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Tajima; K. Homma

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last Century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers.

  9. Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Luo, Shengnian (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Arlington, VA); Paul, Stephen F. (West Orange, NJ)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

  10. Intensive Variables & Nanostructuring in Magnetostructural Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Laura

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this project, fundamental inquiry was carried out to investigate, understand and predict the effects of intensive variables, including the structural scale, on magnetostructural phase transitions in the model system of equiatomic FeRh. These transitions comprise simultaneous magnetic and structural phase changes that have their origins in very strong orbital-lattice coupling and thus may be driven by a plurality of effects.

  11. Laser intensity effects in noncommutative QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinzl, Thomas [School of Computing and Mathematics, University of Plymouth, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a twofold extension of QED assuming the presence of strong external fields provided by an ultraintense laser and noncommutativity of spacetime. While noncommutative effects leave the electron's intensity induced mass shift unchanged, photons change significantly in character: they acquire a quasimomentum that is no longer lightlike. We study the consequences of this combined noncommutative strong-field effect for the basic lepton-photon interactions.

  12. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Westerly, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Mackie, Thomas [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)] [Medical Devices, Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal falloff of a proton depth-dose distribution was found to provide sufficient control over the dose distribution to meet objectives, even with coarse lateral resolution and channel widths as large as 2 cm. Treatment plans on both phantom and patient data show that dose conformity suffers when treatments are delivered from less than approximately ten angles. Treatment time for a sample prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 min, and neutron production is estimated to be comparable to that found for existing collimated systems.Conclusions: Fan beam proton therapy is a method of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy which may be employed as an alternative to magnetic scanning systems. A fan beam of protons can be created by a set of quadrupole magnets and modified by a dual-purpose range and intensity modulator. This can be used to deliver inversely planned treatments, with spot intensities optimized to meet user defined dose objectives. Additionally, the ability of a fan beam delivery system to effectively treat multiple beam spots simultaneously may provide advantages as compared to spot scanning deliveries.

  13. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  14. Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense lasers promise to extend this down to femtosecond timescales. The process by which free-electron lasers of the free-electron laser saturation length, and the generation of nonlinear harmonics13 at 54 nm and 32 nm

  15. STABLE FREQUENCY RESPONSE TO VARYING STIMULUS INTENSITY IN A MODEL OF THE RAT OLFACTORY BULB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STABLE FREQUENCY RESPONSE TO VARYING STIMULUS INTENSITY IN A MODEL OF THE RAT OLFACTORY BULB Thomas Neurosciences et Systèmes sensoriels, CNRS UMR 5020, Lyon, France ABSTRACT In the rat olfactory bulb (OB), fast. Introduction The rat olfactory bulb (OB) is a rich and complex sensory processing system that shows stimulus

  16. High intensity proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS -- An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). AGS Dept.] [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AGS accelerator complex is into its third year of 60+ {times} 10{sup 12} (teraproton = Tp) per cycle operation. The hardware making up the complex as configured in 1997 is briefly mentioned. The present level of accelerator performance is discussed. This includes beam transfer efficiencies at each step in the acceleration process, i.e. losses; which are a serious issue at this intensity level. Progress made in understanding beam behavior at the Linac-to-Booster (LtB) injection, at the Booster-to-AGS (BtA) transfer as well as across the 450 ms AGS accumulation porch is presented. The state of transition crossing, with the gamma-tr jump is described. Coherent effects including those driven by space charge are important at all of these steps.

  17. Measuring beam intensity and lifetime in BESSY II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakker, R; Kuske, P; Kuszynski, J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the intensity of the beam in the transfer lines and the storage ring are based on current transformers. The pulsed current in the transfer lines is measured with passive Integrating Beam Current Transformers (ICT). The bunch charge is transferred to a DC-voltage and sampled with a multifunction I/O-board of a PC. The beam current of the storage ring is measured with a high precision Parametric Current Transformer (PCT) and sampled by a high quality digital volt meter (DVM). A stand alone PC is used for synchronisation, real-time data acquisition and signal processing. Current and lifetime data are updated every second and send via CAN- bus to the BESSY II control system. All PC programs are written in LabVIEW.

  18. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  19. Intensity-resolved ionization yields of aniline with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohaber, J.; Hart, N.; Zhu, F.; Nava, R.; Pham, F.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Paulus, G. G.; Schuessler, H. A. [Texas A and M University, Department of Physics, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States); Mohamed, T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, BeniSuef University (Egypt); Schroeder, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, DE-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental results for the ionization of aniline and benzene molecules subjected to intense ultrashort laser pulses. Measured parent molecular ions yields were obtained using a recently developed technique capable of three-dimensional imaging of ion distributions within the focus of a laser beam. By selecting ions originating from the central region of the focus, where the spatial intensity distribution is nearly uniform, volumetric-free intensity-dependent ionization yields were obtained. The measured data revealed a previously unseen resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI)-like process. Comparison of benzene, aniline, and Xe ion yields demonstrates that the observed intensity-dependent structures are not due to geometric artifacts in the focus. Finally for intensities greater than {approx}3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}, we attribute the ionization of aniline to a stepwise process going through the {pi}{sigma}{sup *} state which sits three photons above the ground state and two photons below the continuum.

  20. High intensity discharge device containing oxytrihalides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lapatovich, W.P.; Keeffe, W.M.; Liebermann, R.W.; Maya, J.

    1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A fill composition for a high intensity discharge device including mercury, niobium oxytrihalide, and a molecular stabilization agent is provided. The molar ratio of niobium oxytrihalide to the molecular stabilization agent in the fill is in the range of from about 5:1 to about 7.5:1. Niobium oxytrihalide is present in the fill in sufficient amount to produce, by dissociation in the discharge, atomic niobium, niobium oxide, NbO, and niobium dioxide, NbO[sub 2], with the molar ratio of niobium-containing vapor species to mercury in the fill being in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.50:1; and mercury pressure of about 1 to about 50 atmospheres at lamp operating temperature. There is also provided a high intensity discharge device comprising a sealed light-transmissive arc tube; the arc tube including the above-described fill; and an energizing means for producing an electric discharge within the arc tube. 7 figs.

  1. ?-Decay in Ultra-Intense Laser Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serban Misicu; Margarit Rizea

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the \\alpha-decay of a spherical nucleus under the influence of an ultra-intense laser field for the case when the radius vector joining the center-of-masses of the \\alpha-particle and the daughter is aligned with the direction of the external field. The time-independent part of the \\alpha-daughter interaction is taken from elastic scattering compilations whereas the time-varying part describes the interaction between the decaying system with the laser field. The time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation is solved numerically by appealing to a modified scheme of the Crank-Nicolson type where an additional first-order time derivative appears compared to the field-free case. The tunneling probability of the \\alpha-cluster, and derived quantities (decay rate, total flux) is determined for various laser intensities and frequencies for either continous waves or few-cycle pulses of envelope function F(t)=1. We show that in the latter case pulse sequences containing an odd number of half-cycles determine an enhancement of the tunneling probability compared to the field-free case and the continuous wave case. The present study is carried out taking as example the alpha decaying nucleus $^{106}$Te.

  2. China's energy intensity and its determinants at the provincial level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy intensity is defined as the amount of energy consumed per dollar of GDP (Gross Domestic Product). The People's Republic of China's (China's) energy intensity has been declining significantly since the late 1970s. ...

  3. Modeling scattered intensity from microspheres in evanescent field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Suhani Kiran

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of the total scattered light intensity on microsphere size accounts for the scattered intensity distribution in a polydisperse microsphere sample. Understanding this variation in the scattered light with microsphere size will allow improved characterization...

  4. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1830 INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMSAC02-05CH11231. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION467 (1992). [38] R. W. Moir, Fusion Tech. 25, 5 (1994) [39

  5. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochoa, Ellen (Pleasanton, CA); Schils, George F. (San Ramon, CA); Sweeney, Donald W. (Alamo, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789 between the U.S. Department of Energy and AT&T Technologies, Inc.

  6. Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5 additional invitations for invited papers at upcoming conferences, we attracted collaborators who had SBIR funding, we are collaborating with scientists at CERN and GSI Darmstadt on gas desorption physics for submission to Physical Review Letters, and another PRL on absolute measurements of electron cloud density and Phys. Rev. ST-AB on electron emission physics are also being readied for submission.

  7. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgecock, T R; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Wildner, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Hansen, C; Benedetto, E; Jensen, E; Kosmicki, A; Martini, M; Osborne, J; Prior, G; Stora, T; Melo-Mendonca, T; Vlachoudis, V; Waaijer, C; Cupial, P; Chancé, A; Longhin, A; Payet, J; Zito, M; Baussan, E; Bobeth, C; Bouquerel, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Lepers, B; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V; Bielski, J; Kozien, M; Lacny, L; Skoczen, B; Szybinski, B; Ustrycka, A; Wroblewski, A; Marie-Jeanne, M; Balint, P; Fourel, C; Giraud, J; Jacob, J; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Mitrofanov, S; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, Th; Delbar, Th; Debray, F; Trophine, C; Veys, S; Daversin, C; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Skalyga, V; Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Collazuol, G; Laveder, M; Mazzocco, M; Mezzetto, M; Signorini, C; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Migliozzi, P; Moro, R; Palladino, V; Gelli, N; Berkovits, D; Hass, M; Hirsh, T Y; Schaumann, M; Stahl, A; Wehner, J; Bross, A; Kopp, J; Neuffer, D; Wands, R; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, P; Agarwalla, S K; Villanueva, A Cervera; Donini, A; Ghosh, T; Cadenas, J J Gómez; Hernández, P; Martín-Albo, J; Mena, O; Burguet-Castell, J; Agostino, L; Buizza-Avanzini, M; Marafini, M; Patzak, T; Tonazzo, A; Duchesneau, D; Mosca, L; Bogomilov, M; Karadzhov, Y; Matev, R; Tsenov, R; Akhmedov, E; Blennow, M; Lindner, M; Schwetz, T; Martinez, E Fernández; Maltoni, M; Menéndez, J; Giunti, C; García, M C González; Salvado, J; Coloma, P; Huber, P; Li, T; López-Pavón, J; Orme, C; Pascoli, S; Meloni, D; Tang, J; Winter, W; Ohlsson, T; Zhang, H; Scotto-Lavina, L; Terranova, F; Bonesini, M; Tortora, L; Alekou, A; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Kurup, A; Jenner, L J; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Pozimski, J; Back, J J; Harrison, P; Beard, K; Bogacz, A; Berg, J S; Stratakis, D; Witte, H; Snopok, P; Bliss, N; Cordwell, M; Moss, A; Pattalwar, S; Apollonio, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

  8. Intense ultraviolet perturbations on aquatic primary producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimarais, Mayrene; Horvath, Jorge

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade, the hypothesis that one or more biodiversity drops in the Phanerozoic eon, evident in the geological record, might have been caused by the most powerful kind of stellar explosion so far known (Gamma Ray Bursts) has been discussed in several works. These stellar explosions could have left an imprint in the biological evolution on Earth and in other habitable planets. In this work we calculate the short-term lethality that a GRB would produce in the aquatic primary producers on Earth. This effect on life appears as a result of ultraviolet (UV) re-transmission in the atmosphere of a fraction of the gamma energy, resulting in an intense UV flash capable of penetrating ~ tens of meters in the water column in the ocean. We focus on the action of the UV flash on phytoplankton, as they are the main contributors to global aquatic primary productivity. Our results suggest that the UV flash could cause an hemispheric reduction of phytoplankton biomass in the upper mixed layer of the World Ocean o...

  9. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

  10. An improved high intensity recycling helium-3 beam source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedgeland, H.; Kole, P. R.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.; Jardine, A. P. [Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an improved high intensity, recycling, supersonic atomic beam source. Changes address several issues previously limiting performance and reliability of the apparatus, including the use of newly available vacuum pumps and modifications to the recycling system. We achieve a source intensity of 2.5x10{sup 19} atoms/s/sr, almost twice that previously achievable during recycling. Current limits on intensity are discussed.

  11. Healing design: a phenomenological approach to the relation of the physical setting to positive social interaction in pediatric intensive care units in the United States and Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozcan, Hilal

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the impact of the physical setting in the care and healing process of hospitalized children, their families, and the caregivers in two selected pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in the U.S. and ...

  12. EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 These tables provide estimates of residential sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1978 -1984, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 based on the...

  13. Engineering Strength, Porosity, and Emission Intensity of Nanostructur...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the porosity, mechanical strength, and luminescence intensity of metal chalcogenide aerogels was probed by comparison of CdSe aerogels prepared from spherical and rod-shaped...

  14. Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the same coverage of the target volume when subjected to uncertainties. Conclusions: The authors find that the worst-case robust optimization provides robust target coverage without sacrificing, and possibly even improving, the sparing of normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the importance of robust optimization. The authors assert that all IMPT plans should be robustly optimized.

  15. Parallel In Situ Indexing for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jinoh; Abbasi, Hasan; Chacon, Luis; Docan, Ciprian; Klasky, Scott; Liu, Qing; Podhorszki, Norbert; Shoshani, Arie; Wu, Kesheng

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As computing power increases exponentially, vast amount of data is created by many scientific re- search activities. However, the bandwidth for storing the data to disks and reading the data from disks has been improving at a much slower pace. These two trends produce an ever-widening data access gap. Our work brings together two distinct technologies to address this data access issue: indexing and in situ processing. From decades of database research literature, we know that indexing is an effective way to address the data access issue, particularly for accessing relatively small fraction of data records. As data sets increase in sizes, more and more analysts need to use selective data access, which makes indexing an even more important for improving data access. The challenge is that most implementations of in- dexing technology are embedded in large database management systems (DBMS), but most scientific datasets are not managed by any DBMS. In this work, we choose to include indexes with the scientific data instead of requiring the data to be loaded into a DBMS. We use compressed bitmap indexes from the FastBit software which are known to be highly effective for query-intensive workloads common to scientific data analysis. To use the indexes, we need to build them first. The index building procedure needs to access the whole data set and may also require a significant amount of compute time. In this work, we adapt the in situ processing technology to generate the indexes, thus removing the need of read- ing data from disks and to build indexes in parallel. The in situ data processing system used is ADIOS, a middleware for high-performance I/O. Our experimental results show that the indexes can improve the data access time up to 200 times depending on the fraction of data selected, and using in situ data processing system can effectively reduce the time needed to create the indexes, up to 10 times with our in situ technique when using identical parallel settings.

  16. Processing Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

  17. Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear...

  18. Proposal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposal Process Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and...

  19. UMass Lowell Intensive Spanish Language & Culture in Cdiz, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    UMass Lowell Intensive Spanish Language & Culture in Cádiz, Spain Program Description Travel to Spain and study at the University of Cádiz in a specialized intensive language program established Lowell During the Summer in Cádiz, Spain! Complete Levels 1-4 (12 credit) of Spanish language in one

  20. A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe F. Aymea , C. Carioub , M is a great advantage. In this frame, a new intensity acoustic probe has been developed to compute acoustic quantities which can be input data for energetic identification methods. 1 Introduction Noise matters

  1. Intensive Summer Spanish Courses in Barcelona for Erasmus & University .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Intensive Summer Spanish Courses in Barcelona for Erasmus & University . 2014 -AUGUST 11th -SEPTEMBER- OCTOBER SpainBcn-Programs in Barcelona, is the best place to learn Spanish fast, in a warm in Barcelona or elsewhere in Spain (many students attending Spanish Universities take a 2/3/4 weeks Intensive

  2. The investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    , access to high temperature states of mat- ter capable of thermonuclear fusion and/or the effi- cientThe investigation of high intensity laser driven micro neutron sources for fusion materials. The application of fast pulse, high intensity lasers to drive low cost DT point neutron sources for fusion

  3. Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Laser Guiding at Relativistic Intensities and Wakefield Particle Acceleration in Plasma Channels C for the first time in a high gradient laser wakefield accelerator by guiding the drive laser pulse. Channels formed by hydrodynamic shock were used to guide acceleration relevant laser intensities of at least 1E18

  4. Probing the quantum vacuum with ultra intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Manuel Hegelich; Gerard Mourou; Johann Rafelski

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents: 1) The theoretical background of strong field physics and vacuum structure and stability; 2) The instrumental developments in the area of pulse lasers and considers the physics case for ultra intense laser facilities; and 3) Discussion of the applied and fundamental uses of ultra-intense lasers.

  5. Probing the quantum vacuum with ultra intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegelich, B Manuel; Rafelski, Johann

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents: 1) The theoretical background of strong field physics and vacuum structure and stability; 2) The instrumental developments in the area of pulse lasers and considers the physics case for ultra intense laser facilities; and 3) Discussion of the applied and fundamental uses of ultra-intense lasers.

  6. Superlinear growth of Rayleigh scattering-induced intensity noise in single-mode fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, James P; Zhou, Weimin; Menyuk, Curtis R; Carter, Gary M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh scattering generates intensity noise close to an optical carrier that propagates in a single-mode optical fiber. This noise degrades the performance of optoelectronic oscillators and RF-photonic links. When using a broad linewidth laser, we previously found that the intensity noise power scales linearly with optical power and fiber length, which is consistent with guided entropy mode Rayleigh scattering (GEMRS), a third order nonlinear scattering process, in the spontaneous limit. In this work, we show that this behavior changes significantly with the use of a narrow linewidth laser. Using a narrow linewidth laser, we measured the bandwidth of the intensity noise plateau to be 10 kHz. We found that the scattered noise power scales superlinearly with fiber length up to lengths of 10 km in the frequency range of 500 Hz to 10 kHz, while it scales linearly in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 Hz. These results suggest that the Rayleigh-scattering-induced intensity noise cannot be explained by third-ord...

  7. Cortical visual processing is temporally dispersed by luminance in human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortical visual processing is temporally dispersed by luminance in human subjects Thomas Kammer Abstract Increasing the intensity of a stimulus such as luminance results in faster processing the luminance of the spots from 1 to 1000 cd/m2 . The data show that processing time as a function of intensity

  8. Resonant high-order harmonic generation from plasma ablation: Laser intensity dependence of the harmonic intensity and phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimentally observed strong enhancement of a single high-order harmonic in harmonic generation from low-ionized laser plasma ablation is explained as resonant harmonic generation. The resonant harmonic intensity increases regularly with the increase of the laser intensity, while the phase of the resonant harmonic is almost independent of the laser intensity. This is in sharp contrast with the usual plateau and cutoff harmonics, the intensity of which exhibits wild oscillations while its phase changes rapidly with the laser intensity. The temporal profile of a group of harmonics, which includes the resonant harmonic, has the form of a broad peak in each laser-field half cycle. These characteristics of resonant harmonics can have an important application in attoscience. We illustrate our results using examples of Sn and Sb plasmas.

  9. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bulanov; C. B. Schroeder; E. Esarey; W. P. Leemans

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high energy e-beam interacting with a counter-streaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  10. Process Modeling for Process Improvement A Process Conformance Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process Modeling for Process Improvement - A Process Conformance Approach Sigurd Thunem September processes. In order to improve these processes, knowledge about them is necessary. To support process improve- ment the organization should collect process data, transform process data into knowledge

  11. 2012 MULTIPHOTON PROCESSES GRC, JUNE 3-8, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Barry

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The sessions will focus on: ? Attosecond science; ? Strong-field processes in molecules and solids; ? Generation of harmonics and attosecond pulses; ? Free-electron laser experiments and theory; ? Ultrafast imaging; ? Applications of very high intensity lasers; ? Propagation of intense laser fields.

  12. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    "World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

  13. Isochoric heating of reduced mass targets by ultra-intense laser produced relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Offerman, D; Shipton, E; Kemp, A; Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Back, C A; Glenzer, S H

    2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the chlorine K-alpha emission from reduced mass targets, irradiated with ultra-high intensity laser pulses. Chlorinated plastic targets with diameters down to 50 micrometers and mass of a few 10{sup -8} g were irradiated with up to 7 J of laser energy focused to intensities of several 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The conversion of laser energy to K-alpha radiation is measured, as well as high resolution spectra that allow observation of line shifts, indicating isochoric heating of the target up to 18 eV. A zero-dimensional 2-temperature equilibration model, combined with electron impact K-shell ionization and post processed spectra from collisional radiative calculations reproduces the observed K-alpha yields and line shifts, and shows the importance of target expansion due to the hot electron pressure.

  14. Resource intensities of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.; Phathanapirom, U. [The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C2200, Austin TX 78712 (United States); Eggert, R.; Collins, J. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden CO 80401 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents resource intensities, including direct and embodied energy consumption, land and water use, associated with the processes comprising the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication and depleted uranium de-conversion. To the extent feasible, these impacts are calculated based on data reported by operating facilities, with preference given to more recent data based on current technologies and regulations. All impacts are normalized per GWh of electricity produced. Uranium extraction is seen to be the most resource intensive front end process. Combined, the energy consumed by all front end processes is equal to less than 1% of the electricity produced by the uranium in a nuclear reactor. Land transformation and water withdrawals are calculated at 8.07 m{sup 2} /GWh(e) and 1.37x10{sup 5} l/GWh(e), respectively. Both are dominated by the requirements of uranium extraction, which accounts for over 70% of land use and nearly 90% of water use.

  15. Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, E.; Phylipsen, D.; Einstein, D.; Martin, N.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11% of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20% of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks.The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical compound, used as basis for almost all products. Fuel use is estimated at 268 PJ (excluding feedstocks) while 368 PJ natural gas is used as feedstock. Electricity consumption is estimated at 14 PJ. We estimate the energy intensity of ammonia manufacture at 39.3 GJ/tonne (including feedstocks, HHV) and 140 kWh/tonne, resulting in a specific primary energy consumption of 40.9 GJ/tonne (HHV), equivalent to 37.1 GJ/tonne (LHV). Excluding natural gas use for feedstocks the primary energy consumption is estimated at 16.7 GJ/tonne (LHV). The third most important product from an energy perspective is the production of chlorine and caustic soda. Chlorine is produced through electrolysis of a salt-solution. Chlorine production is the main electricity consuming process in the chemical industry, next to oxygen and nitrogen production. We estimate final electricity use at 173 PJ (48 TWh) and fuel use of 38 PJ. Total primary energy consumption is estimated at 526 PJ (including credits for hydrogen export). The energy intensity is estimated at an electricity consumption of 4380 kWh/tonne chlorine and fuel consumption of 3.45 GJ/tonne chlorine, where all energy use is allocated to chlorine production. Assuming an average power generation efficiency of 33% the primary energy consumption is estimated at 47.8 GJ/tonne chlorine (allocating all energy use to chlorine).

  16. Capacity planning and admission control policies for intensive care units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaiwanon, Wongsakorn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poor management of the patient flow in intensive care units (ICUs) causes service rejections and presents significant challenges from the standpoint of capacity planning and management in ICUs. This thesis reports on the ...

  17. Intense ion beam propagation in a reactor sized chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.L.; Deutsch, C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams in a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber filled with lowIon Fusion, Intense Ion Beams, Reaction Chamber. P.A.C.S.heavy ion beam propagation in the reaction chamber, Fus.

  18. The Gamma Intensity Monitor at the Crystal-Barrel-Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, William R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the motivation, design, construction, and testing of the Gamma Intensity Monitor (GIM) for the Crystal-Barrel-Experiment at the Universität Bonn. The CB-ELSA collaboration studies the baryon excitation ...

  19. China energy issues : energy intensity, coal liquefaction, and carbon pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ning, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In my dissertation I explore three independent, but related, topics on China's energy issues. First, I examine the drivers for provincial energy-intensity trends in China, and finds that technology innovation is the key ...

  20. abscess requiring intensive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the journey of conserving energy at our facility. We?ll discuss a basic layout of our energy intensity plan... 75846 Ph 903 626-6242 Fax 903 626-6293 Dick.rappolee@nstexas.com...

  1. Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

  2. Thesis Oral Energy-efficient Data-intensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thesis Oral Energy-efficient Data-intensive Computing with a Fast Array of Wimpy Nodes Vijay classification and workload analysis showing when FAWN can be more energyefficient and under what workload

  3. Estimating material and energy intensities of urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, David James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to develop methods to estimate, analyze and visualize the resource intensity of urban areas. Understanding the resource consumption of the built environment is particularly relevant in cities ...

  4. abdominal intensity modulated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Optics, John Wiley, New York, NY, USA. ... Webb, S.: 2001a, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, Institute of Physics ... Ying X 2004-05-25 2 Trellis coded modulation and...

  5. accelerated hypofractionated intensity-modulated: Topics by E...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Optics, John Wiley, New York, NY, USA. ... Webb, S.: 2001a, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, Institute of Physics ... Ying X 2004-05-25 2 High Datarate in Multimode...

  6. Thermal Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

  7. Photolytic Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

  8. An investigation of how researchers in data intensive scientific fields use, process and curate data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobis, Yvonne

    of transistors on an integrated circuit double approximately every two years) gives surprising results: that the per capita capacity of the world’s general purpose computers has doubled every 18 months, however comparable storage capacity per capita has... . These may, or may not have benefits within communities or across domains. As one physicist reported : “It was very obvious that there were PhD students, sitting in little cupboards tapping away at their terminals reinventing the wheel, reinventing...

  9. Strong-field approximation for intense-laser-atom processes: The choice of gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong-field approximation (SFA) can be and has been applied in both length gauge and velocity gauge with quantitatively conflicting answers. For ionization of negative ions with a ground state of odd parity, the predictions of the two gauges differ qualitatively: in the envelope of the angular-resolved energy spectrum, dips in one gauge correspond to humps in the other. We show that the length-gauge SFA matches the exact numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation.

  10. Multi-scale Demand-Side Management for Continuous Power-intensive Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    (DR) Reduce demand on operational level Energy Efficiency (EE) Permanently reduce power consumption Demand-Side Management (DSM) "Systematic utility and government activities designed to change the amount and/or timing of the customer's use of electricity for the collective benefit of the society

  11. Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning for Power-Intensive Continuous Processes under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    -time basis. A set of measures, such as co-generation, micro-grids, future storage technologies and demand States. At the same time, the power grid is in transition to the so-called smart grid with the ambition- side management (DSM), is expected to play an important role in helping today's power grid, mastering

  12. Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning for Power-Intensive Continuous Processes under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    , Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Praxair, Inc., Danbury, CT Corresponding author. Email address: grossmann@cmu.edu 1

  13. Nonadiabatic approach for resonant molecular multiphoton absorption processes in intense infrared laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tak-San; Chu, Shih-I

    1983-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    -vibrational-rotational state of a fixed total quasi­ energy E:/J, the exact total quasienergy state wave func­ tion may be expanded as (24) Again, we have assumed that the system embodies a well-defined quantum number mJ' Substituting Eq. (24) into Eq. (1), and projecting..., 25 Nov 2014 17:02:27 4712 T-S. Ho and S-1. Chu: Nonadiabatic approach for resonant molecular MPA Where [G]= and .... P=2 P=1 P=O P=-1 P=-2 IG+2wl G+wl v=O v=1 (Goo) (Go,) (G,,)-wl j=O j=1 00 0' gvv, gvv' " g ••, G G-wl v=2 (GQ2) (G'2...

  14. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRS Issues NewDepartmentforAddressing

  15. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVAC |Department ofEnergy-EfficientAluminum | Contents

  16. ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGENDDepartmentSeptember 20092009 | UC

  17. VACUUM PRESSURE RISE WITH INTENSE ION BEAMS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.; BAI,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; HUANG,H.; MACKAY,W.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; SMART,L.A.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    When RHIC is filled with bunches of intense ion beams a pressure rise is observed. The pressure rise exceeds the acceptable limit for operation with the design intensities. Observations of events leading to a pressure rise are summarized. Relevant parameters include ion species, charge per bunch, bunch spacing, and the location in the ring. Effects that contribute to a pressure rise are discussed, including beam gas ionization and ion desorption, loss-induced gas desorption, and electron desorption from electron clouds.

  18. Process and Energy Optimization Revitalizes Energy Management at Eastman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwaldt, W. C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the Eastman-Texas Operations Energy Management Team (EMT), in response to rapidly increasing energy prices, initiated a new energy optimization program to optimize the site’s energy intensity. This new program utilized a process and energy...

  19. High intensity electron cyclotron resonance proton source for low energy high intensity proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) proton source at 50 keV, 50 mA has been designed, developed, and commissioned for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator (LEHIPA). Plasma characterization of this source has been performed. ECR plasma was generated with 400-1100 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz, with hydrogen as working gas. Microwave was fed in the plasma chamber through quartz window. Plasma density and temperature was studied under various operating conditions, such as microwave power and gas pressure. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current voltage variation. The typical hydrogen plasma density and electron temperature measured were 7x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and 6 eV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 42 mA was extracted, with three-electrode extraction geometry, at 40 keV of beam energy. The extracted ion current was studied as a function of microwave power and gas pressure. Depending on source pressure and discharge power, more than 30% total gas efficiency was achieved. The optimization of the source is under progress to meet the requirement of long time operation. The source will be used as an injector for continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 20 MeV LEHIPA. The required rms normalized emittance of this source is less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. The simulated value of normalized emittance is well within this limit and will be measured shortly. This paper presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and the status of ECR proton source.

  20. Modeling the time and energy behavior of the GCR intensity in the periods of low activity around the last three solar minima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krainev, M B; Kalinin, M S; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the simple model for the description of the GCR modulation in the heliosphere and the sets of parameters discussed in the accompanying paper we model some features of the time and energy behavior of the GCR intensity near the Earth observed during periods of low solar activity around three last solar minima. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying these features in the GCR behavior, we use the suggested earlier decomposition of the calculated intensity into the partial intensities corresponding to the main processes (diffusion, adiabatic losses, convection and drifts).

  1. RESONANT FREQUENCY EDDY CURRENT LIFTOFF MEASUREMENTS FOR SHOT PEENING INTENSITY ASSESSMENT IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Ray T.; Blodgett, Mark P. [Metals, Ceramics, and NDE Division, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States); Sathish, Shamachary; Boehnlein, Thomas R. [Structural Integrity Division, University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, Ohio 45469-0120 (United States)

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The shot peening intensity of nickel base materials has been examined with an innovative eddy current measurement. The goal is to provide a nondestructive tool to quantitatively evaluate the surface conditions after shot peening. Traditionally, the residual stress caused by the shot peening process can be examined by X-ray diffraction. Recent eddy current works have shown promising results in evaluating the small conductivity variation due to the residual stress. This study explores the feasibility of utilizing the cable which connects to a network analyzer and a conventional eddy current probe to monitor the surface conditions due to the shot peening.

  2. On the 27-day Variations of Cosmic Ray Intensity in Recent Solar Minimum 23/24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the 27-day variations and their harmonics of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity, solar wind velocity, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components in the recent prolonged solar minimum 23 24. The time evolution of the quasi-periodicity in these parameters connected with the Suns rotation reveals that their synodic period is stable and is aprox 26-27 days. This means that the changes in the solar wind speed and IMF are related to the Suns near equatorial regions in considering the differential rotation of the Sun. However, the solar wind parameters observed near the Earths orbit provide only the conditions in the limited local vicinity of the equatorial region in the heliosphere (within in latitude). We also demonstrate that the observed period of the GCR intensity connected with the Suns rotation increased up to aprox 33-36 days in 2009. This means that the process driving the 27-day variations of the GCR intensity takes place not only in the limited local surroundings of the equato...

  3. Meaningful Energy Efficiency Performance Metrics for the Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumana, J. D.; Sidhwa, N. R.

    industries have developed standard met- rics for their plant performance. A notable example is the Solomon Energy Intensity Index (EII) for Oil Refining, which builds up the overall plant energy index from the energy indices for individual process units.... Energy Intensity, Oil & Gas Industry 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Ce n t s / BO E Oil & Gas prod'n Oil Refining Gas Processing Figure 11. Energy Intensity Trends for Different Business Units The ?standard energy...

  4. Numerical solution of transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as boundary data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo

    Numerical solution of transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as boundary to solve transient eddy current problems with input current intensities as data, formulated in terms: Eddy current problems, time-dependent electromagnetic problems, input current intensities, finite

  5. Spicules Intensity Oscillations in SOT/HINODE Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavabi, E; Maralani, A R Ahangarzadeh; Zeighami, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. We study the coherency of solar spicules intensity oscillations with increasing height above the solar limb in quiet Sun, active Sun and active region using observations from HINODE/SOT. Existence of coherency up to transition region strengthens the theory of the coronal heating and solar wind through energy transport and photospheric oscillations. Methods. Using time sequences from the HINODE/SOT in Ca II H line, we investigate oscillations found in intensity profiles at different heights above the solar limb. We use the Fourier and wavelet analysis to measure dominant frequency peaks of intensity at the heights, and phase difference between oscillations at two certain heights, to find evidence for the coherency of the oscillations. Finally, we can calculate the energy and the mass transported by spicules providing energy equilibrium, according to density values of spicules at different heights. To extend this work, we can also consider coherent oscillations at different latitudes and suggest to study ...

  6. Measurement of Dynamic Light Scattering Intensity in Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochas, Cyrille

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the scientific literature little attention has been given to the use of dynamic light scattering (DLS) as a tool for extracting the thermodynamic information contained in the absolute intensity of light scattered by gels. In this article we show that DLS yields reliable measurements of the intensity of light scattered by the thermodynamic fluctuations, not only in aqueous polymer solutions, but also in hydrogels. In hydrogels, light scattered by osmotic fluctuations is heterodyned by that from static or slowly varying inhomogeneities. The two components are separable owing to their different time scales, giving good experimental agreement with macroscopic measurements of the osmotic pressure. DLS measurements in gels are, however, tributary to depolarised light scattering from the network as well as to multiple light scattering. The paper examines these effects, as well as the instrumental corrections required to determine the osmotic modulus. For guest polymers trapped in a hydrogel the measured intensity...

  7. Interpreting the unresolved intensity of cosmologically redshifted line radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Eric R; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Pen, Ue-Li; Voytek, Tabitha C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas, and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~10^2-10^3 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well-known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments, and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data itself. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they ...

  8. Energy Intensity Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy intensity (energy consumption per dollar of real GDP) indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate. During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8% per year from 1973 to 2008. In the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9% from 2008 to 2035.

  9. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  10. On the high intensity aspects of AGS Booster proton operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Bleser, E.J.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Roser, T.; Shoji, Y.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of high intensity effects on the proton performance of the AGS Booster are presented, including present operational limits and correction methods. The transverse emittances, optimum tune working points, damping of coherent transverse oscillations and correction of stopband resonances through third-order are discussed in addition to the observed tune spread due to space charge forces. The initial longitudinal phase space distribution, capture and acceleration parameters and measurements are also given. Operational tools and strategies relevant to the high intensity setup are mentioned.

  11. Data-intensive computing laying foundation for biological breakthroughs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hachigian, David J.

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Finding a different way is the goal of the Data-Intensive Computing for Complex Biological Systems (Biopilot) project—a joint research effort between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research. The two national laboratories, both of whom are world leaders in computing and computational sciences, are teaming to support areas of biological research in urgent need of data-intensive computing capabilities.

  12. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of Energy by Ultra-Intense Laser-Generated tronsof Energy by Ultra-Intense Laser-Generated Electrons inUltra-High In- tensity Lasers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Gamma Ray Bursts #12;The Case Sudden, intense flashes of gamma rays come from nowhere and disappear with out a trace. Incredibly powerful: A single gamma ray burst is hundreds of times brighter a supernova #12;Who Vela (1960's) Looking for arms testing, found gamma ray bursts Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

  14. Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: CONTROL AND TRANSPORT OF INTENSE ELECTRON BEAMS Hui Li, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 Dissertation Directed By: Professor, Patrick G. O'Shea Department of Electrical and Computer throughout the strong focusing lattice. We describe in this dissertation the main beam control techniques

  15. PNNLs Data Intensive Computing research battles Homeland Security threats

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Thurman; Joe Kielman; Katherine Wolf; David Atkinson

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys (PNNL's) approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architecture, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  16. Solar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Solar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to where they can be integrated to a building as solar panels on a roof or facades are. Ref. TU Delft OCT-13-022 TU Delft / Valorisation Centre of the window, integrated in the window frames, strip-shaped CIGS PV solar cells convert the light

  17. Intensity Modulated Beam Radiation Therapy Dose Optimization with Multiobjective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Intensity Modulated Beam Radiation Therapy Dose Optimization with Multiobjective Evolutionary will be di- agnosed with cancer. Half of these will be treated with radiation therapy [1]. In teletherapy or external radiotherapy beams of penetrating radiation are directed at the tumor. Along their path through

  18. PNNL pushing scientific discovery through data intensive computing breakthroughs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Deborah Gracio; David Koppenaal; Ruby Leung

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys approach to data intensive computing (DIC) is focused on three key research areas: hybrid hardware architectures, software architectures, and analytic algorithms. Advancements in these areas will help to address, and solve, DIC issues associated with capturing, managing, analyzing and understanding, in near real time, data at volumes and rates that push the frontiers of current technologies.

  19. Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyashuk, V I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neu...

  20. Computer-intensive rate estimation, diverging statistics, and scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politis, Dimitris N.

    Computer-intensive rate estimation, diverging statistics, and scanning Tucker McElroy U.S. Bureau in a very general setting without requiring the choice of a tun- ing parameter. The notion of scanning method is ap- plied to different scans, and the resulting estimators are then combined to improve

  1. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  2. How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    ! ! ! ! How Fish Communities Differ Across Stream Restoration Intensities Andrew Miano1 Mentor to their natural function. This is known as stream restoration. Unfortunately, ecological concepts can be left out during stream restoration JK$>*!*1!$9:!'LLMN. This is in part due to the fact that ecologists still do

  3. MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    /mechanical property changes experiment for baseline materials Carbon-Carbon composite This low-Z composite gives;PHASE I: Graphite & Carbon-Carbon Targets #12;E951 Results: ATJ Graphite vs. Carbon-Carbon CompositePLAN MATERIAL STUDIES FOR PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM TARGETS Nicholas Simos, Harold Kirk

  4. Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University, Princeton Plasma. Temperature of the streams. 2. Lithium jets. 3. Injection into vacuum chamber. 4. Propulsion inside the vacuum chamber. 5. Stability of the lithium streams. 6. Expulsion of the lithium. 7. Summary. PRINCETON PLASMA

  5. Intensity Histogram CMOS Image Sensor for Adaptive Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    Intensity Histogram CMOS Image Sensor for Adaptive Optics Yu M. Chi, Gary Carhart , Mikhail AAODisturbanceSource Update/Optimize Fig. 1. Intended real-time optical control application. The sensor computes histogram of Bioengineering University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 Intelligent Optics Lab U.S. Army Research

  6. Particle Acceleration by a Short-Intense Elliptically Polarized Electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Particle Acceleration by a Short-Intense Elliptically Polarized Electromagnetic Pulse Propagating to plasma physics and particle accelerators. The interaction physics of fields with particles has also been, Colchester CO4 3SQ, U.K. Abstract. The motion of a charged particle driven by an electromagnetic pulse

  7. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  8. Conceptual design of a superconducting high-intensity proton linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominic Chan, K.C.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SCRF (superconducting RF linac) has been developed for a high-intensity proton linac which will be used as the driver for neutron sources. This design is conservative, using current SCRF technologies. As well as lowering operating cost, the design offers performance advantages in availability, beam loss, and upgradability, which are important for the application as a neutron source.

  9. Cavitation level-acoustic intensity hysteresis: experimental and numerical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Cavitation level-acoustic intensity hysteresis: experimental and numerical characterization P such as sonoporation, inertial cavitation is commonly considered as the main candidate inducing membrane poration. Thus, characterizing inertial cavitation, as related to bubble size distribution and medium history, is of great

  10. Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc of these changes. Some scientists believe that global warming and increased sea surface temperatures are to blame, global warming and increased sea surface temperatures do appear to have influenced hurricane frequency

  11. Title of dissertation: NOVEL APPLICATIONS OF HIGH INTENSITY FEMTOSECOND LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    -cycle seed pulse of terahertz radiation: a short, intense optical pulse (or sequence of pulses) aligns for amplification of few-cycle, high energy pulses of terahertz radiation. We report the development of corrugated the limitations of diffraction, phase matching, and material damage thresholds and promise to allow high

  12. PanDA Beyond ATLAS: Workload Management for Data Intensive Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Nilsson, P; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Petrosyan, A; Vaniachine, A; Wenaus, T; Yu, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PanDA Production ANd Distributed Analysis system has been developed by ATLAS to meet the experiment's requirements for a data-driven workload management system for production and distributed analysis processing capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. After 7 years of impressively successful PanDA operation in ATLAS there are also other experiments which can benefit from PanDA in the Big Data challenge, with several at various stages of evaluation and adoption. The new project "Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data" is extending PanDA to meet the needs of other data intensive scientific applications in HEP, astro-particle and astrophysics communities, bio-informatics and other fields as a general solution to large scale workload management. PanDA can utilize dedicated or opportunistic computing resources such as grids, clouds, and High Performance Computing facilities, and is being extended to leverage next generation intelligent networks in automated workflow mana...

  13. Characterization of Molecular Breakup by Super-Intense, Femtosecond XUV Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue, Lun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the breakup of $\\text{H}_2^+$ exposed to super-intense, femtosecond laser pulses with frequencies greater than that corresponding to the ionization potential. By solving the time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation in an extensive field parameter range, it is revealed that highly nonresonant dissociation channels can dominate over ionization. By considering field-dressed Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves in the reference frame following a free electron in the field, we propose a simple physical model that characterizes this dissociation mechanism. The model is used to predict control of vibrational excitation, magnitude of the dissociation yields, and nuclear kinetic energy release spectra. Finally, the joint energy spectrum for the ionization process illustrates the energy sharing between the electron and the nuclei and the correlation between ionization and dissociation processes.

  14. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  15. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovered from the black liquor recovery process (combustingand development in black liquor gasification has not yetgreen liquor”, similar to the black liquor recovery process,

  16. Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Benthic Invertebrate Community Composition in Four Stream across a Restoration Intensity Gradient of cranberry farming on streams. These restoration projects vary in their intensity from low restoration streams with varying degrees of restoration intensity to determine if increased restoration intensity more

  17. Atlas of uranium emission intensities in a hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, B.A.; Keller, R.A.; Engleman, R. Jr.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium emission spectrum from a hollow cathode discharge is displayed from 11,000 to 26,000 cm/sup -1/. This atlas lists 4928 spectral lines of uranium; 3949 are classified to the neutral spectrum and 431 are classified to the singly ionized spectrum. Listed wavenumbers are accurate to +-0.003 cm/sup -1/ and the listed relative intensities to +-8%. The richness of the spectrum makes this atlas useful for wavenumber calibration of lasers, spectrographs, and monochromators to an accuracy of 1 part in 10/sup 7/. This atlas is also useful as a guide to the uranium spectrum, and relative oscillator strengths (gf values) can be calculated from the intensities to a precision of +-20%.

  18. Response of GaAs to fast intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, JS; Allen, Roland E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Hamiltonian is H ~ r !5 S ?1 V~r ! V ~ r ! ?2 D , ~1.1! so the bonding and antibonding states have energies ? 6 5 1 2 ~?11?2!6 1 2 @~?12?2! 2 14V ~ r !2#1/2. ~1.2! PRB 580163-1829/98/58~20!/13627~7!/$15.00 t intense laser pulses R. E... to TABLE II. Repulsive potential parameters for GaAs and Si. These values are appropriate when distances are measured in ? and energies in eV. a b g GaAs 263.7 -1227.5 3653.1 Si 263.2 -1027.0 2631.8 PRB 58D R. E. ALLEN an intense laser pulse...

  19. FNAL Proton Source High Intensity Operations and Beam Loss Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, F G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 40-year-old Fermilab Proton Source machines, constituted by the Pre-Injector, Linac and the synchrotron Booster, have been the workhorse of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). During this time, the High Energy Physics Program has demanded an increase in proton throughput, especially during the past decade with the beginning of the neutrino program at Fermilab. In order to achieve a successful program, major upgrades and changes were made in Booster. Once again, the Proton Source has been charged to double their beam throughput, while maintain the present residual activation levels, to meet the laboratory Intensity Frontier program goals until new machines are built and operational to replace the Proton Source machines. This paper discusses the present performance of Booster and the plans involved in reaching even higher intensities.

  20. Device for imaging scenes with very large ranges of intensity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance Albert (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for imaging scenes with a very large range of intensity having a pair of polarizers, a primary lens, an attenuating mask, and an imaging device optically connected along an optical axis. Preferably, a secondary lens, positioned between the attenuating mask and the imaging device is used to focus light on the imaging device. The angle between the first polarization direction and the second polarization direction is adjustable.

  1. Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Lyashuk; Yu. S Lutostansky

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neutron flux (i.e., powerful neutron source) is requested for realization of considered neutrino sources (neutrino factories). Different realizations of lithium antineutrino sources (lithium converter on the base of high purified 7Li isotope) are discussed: static regime (i.e., without transport of 8Li isotope to the neutrino detector); dynamic regime (transport of 8Li isotope to the remote detector in a closed cycle); an operation of lithium converter in tandem of accelerator with a neutron-producing target on the base of tungsten, lead or bismuth. Different chemical compounds of lithium (as the substance of the converter) are considered. Heavy water solution of LiOD is proposed as a serious alternative to high-pure 7Li in a metallic state.

  2. Intensive neutrino source on the base of lithium converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Lyashuk; Yu. S Lutostansky

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive antineutrino source with a hard spectrum (with energy up to 13 MeV, average energy 6.5 MeV) can be realized on the base of beta-decay of short living isotope 8Li (0.84 s). The 8Li isotope (generated in activation of 7Li isotope) is a prime perspective antineutrino source owing to the hard antineutrino spectrum and square dependence of cross section on the energy. Up today nuclear reactors are the most intensive neutrino sources. Antineutrino reactor spectra have large uncertainties in the summary antineutrino spectrum at energy E>6 MeV. Use of 8Li isotope allows to decrease sharply the uncertainties or to exclude it completely. An intensive neutron fluxes are requested for rapid generation of 8Li isotope. The installations on the base of nuclear reactors can be an alternative for nuclear reactors as traditional neutron sources. It is possible creation of neutrino sources another in principle: on the base of tandem of accelerators, neutron generating targets and lithium converter. An intensive neutron flux (i.e., powerful neutron source) is requested for realization of considered neutrino sources (neutrino factories). Different realizations of lithium antineutrino sources (lithium converter on the base of high purified 7Li isotope) are discussed: static regime (i.e., without transport of 8Li isotope to the neutrino detector); dynamic regime (transport of 8Li isotope to the remote detector in a closed cycle); an operation of lithium converter in tandem of accelerator with a neutron-producing target on the base of tungsten, lead or bismuth. Different chemical compounds of lithium (as the substance of the converter) are considered. Heavy water solution of LiOD is proposed as a serious alternative to high-pure 7Li in a metallic state.

  3. Note on the set of Bragg peaks with high intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Lenz; Nicolae Strungaru

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider diffraction of Delone sets in Euclidean space. We show that the set of Bragg peaks with high intensity is always Meyer (if it is relatively dense). We use this to provide a new characterization for Meyer sets in terms of positive and positive definite measures. Our results are based on a careful study of positive definite measures, which may be of interest in its own right.

  4. Dynamic Fiber Optic Sensors Under Intense Radioactive Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.; Earl, D.D.; Haines, J.R.; Tsai, C.C.

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid mercury target will be used as the neutron source for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility. This target is subjected to bombardment by short-pulse, high-energy proton beams. The intense thermal loads caused by interaction of the pulsed proton beam with the mercury create an enormous rate of temperature rise ({approximately}10{sup 7} K/s) during a very brief beam pulse ({approximately } 0.5 {micro}s). The resulting pressure waves in the mercury will interact with the walls of the mercury target and may lead to large stresses. To gain confidence in the mercury target design concept and to benchmark the computer design codes, we tested various electrical and optical sensors for measuring the transient strains on the walls of a mercury container and the pressures in the mercury. The sensors were attached on several sample mercury targets that were tested at various beam facilities: Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The effects of intense background radiation on measured signals for each sensor are described and discussed. Preliminary results of limited tests at these facilities indicate that the fiber optic sensors function well in this intense radiation environment, whereas conventional electrical sensors are dysfunctional.

  5. FNAL Booster intensity, extraction, and synchronization control for collider operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ducar, R.J.; Lackey, J.R.; Tawzer, S.R.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Booster operation for collider physics is considerably different than for fixed target operation. Various scenarios for collider physics, machine studies, and P-Bar targeting may require that the intensity vary from 5E10 PPP to 3E12 PPP at a 15 Hertz machine cycle rate. In addition to the normal Booster single turn extraction mode, collider operations require that the Booster inject into the Main Ring a small number of beam bunches for coalescing into a single high intensity bunch. These bunches must be synchronized such that the center bunch arrives in the RF bucket which corresponds to the zero phase of the coalescing cavity. The system implemented has the ability to deliver a precise fraction of the available 84 Booster beam bunches to Main Ring or to the P-Bar Debuncher via the newly installed AP-4 beam line for tune-up and studies. It is required that all of the various intensity and extraction scenarios be accommodated with minimal operator intervention.

  6. Excitation of intense acoustic waves in hexagonal crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshits, V. I., E-mail: alshits@ns.crys.ras.ru; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant excitation of an intense elastic wave using reflection of a pump wave from a free surface of hexagonal crystal is described. A resonance arises in the case of specially chosen propagation geometry where the reflecting boundary slightly deviates from symmetric orientation and the propagation direction of an intense reflected wave is close to that of an exceptional bulk wave, which satisfies the free boundary condition in unperturbed symmetric orientation. It is shown that, in crystals with elastic moduli c{sub 44}>c{sub 66}, a resonance arises when the initial boundary is chosen parallel to the hexagonal axis 6, whereas in crystals characterized by the relation c{sub 44}intensity can be increased by a factor of 5-10 at sufficiently high frequencies, with beam divergence remaining acceptable.

  7. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Vlahovic, Branislav [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  8. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golge, Serkan [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Vlahovic, Branislav [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  9. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore »beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  10. Fundamental physics at the intensity frontier. Report of the workshop held December 2011 in Rockville, MD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L.; Weerts, H.; Brock, R.; Butler, J.N.; Casey, B.C.K.; Lu, Z.T.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Dietrich, M.R.; Djurcic, Z.; Goodman, M.; Green, J.P.; Holt, R.J.; Mueller, P.; Paley, J.; Reimer, P.; Singh, J.; Upadhye, A. (High Energy Physics); ( PHY); (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center); (Univ. of Michigan); (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle physics aims to understand the universe around us. The Standard Model of particle physics describes the basic structure of matter and forces, to the extent we have been able to probe thus far. However, it leaves some big questions unanswered. Some are within the Standard Model itself, such as why there are so many fundamental particles and why they have different masses. In other cases, the Standard Model simply fails to explain some phenomena, such as the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and the mechanism that reconciles gravity with quantum mechanics. These gaps lead us to conclude that the universe must contain new and unexplored elements of Nature. Most of particle and nuclear physics is directed towards discovering and understanding these new laws of physics. These questions are best pursued with a variety of approaches, rather than with a single experiment or technique. Particle physics uses three basic approaches, often characterized as exploration along the cosmic, energy, and intensity frontiers. Each employs different tools and techniques, but they ultimately address the same fundamental questions. This allows a multi-pronged approach where attacking basic questions from different angles furthers knowledge and provides deeper answers, so that the whole is more than a sum of the parts. A coherent picture or underlying theoretical model can more easily emerge, to be proven correct or not. The intensity frontier explores fundamental physics with intense sources and ultra-sensitive, sometimes massive detectors. It encompasses searches for extremely rare processes and for tiny deviations from Standard Model expectations. Intensity frontier experiments use precision measurements to probe quantum effects. They typically investigate very large energy scales, even higher than the kinematic reach of high energy particle accelerators. The science addresses basic questions, such as: Are there new sources of CP violation? Is there CP violation in the leptonic sector? Are neutrinos their own antiparticles? Do the forces unify? Is there a weakly coupled hidden sector that is related to dark matter? Do new symmetries exist at very high energy scales? To identify the most compelling science opportunities in this area, the workshop Fundamental Physics at the Intensity Frontier was held in December 2011, sponsored by the Office of High Energy Physics in the US Department of Energy Office of Science. Participants investigated the most promising experiments to exploit these opportunities and described the knowledge that can be gained from such a program. The workshop generated much interest in the community, as witnessed by the large and energetic participation by a broad spectrum of scientists. This document chronicles the activities of the workshop, with contributions by more than 450 authors. The workshop organized the intensity frontier science program along six topics that formed the basis for working groups: experiments that probe (i) heavy quarks, (ii) charged leptons, (iii) neutrinos, (iv) proton decay, (v) light, weakly interacting particles, and (vi) nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. The conveners for each working group included an experimenter and a theorist working in the field and an observer from the community at large. The working groups began their efforts well in advance of the workshop, holding regular meetings and soliciting written contributions. Specific avenues of exploration were identified by each working group. Experiments that study rare strange, charm, and bottom meson decays provide a broad program of measurements that are sensitive to new interactions. Charged leptons, particularly muons and taus, provide a precise probe for new physics because the Standard Model predictions for their properties are very accurate. Research at the intensity frontier can reveal CP violation in the lepton sector, and elucidate whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles. A very weakly coupled hidden-sector that may comprise the dark matter in the univ

  11. Final Technical Report: Intensive Quenching Technology for Heat Treating and Forging Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronov, Michael A.

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive quenching (IQ) process is an alternative way of hardening (quenching) steel parts through the use of highly agitated water and then still air. It was developed by IQ Technologies, Inc. (IQT) of Akron, Ohio. While conventional quenching is usually performed in environmentally unfriendly oil or water/polymer solutions, the IQ process uses highly agitated environmentally friendly water or low concentration water/mineral salt solutions. The IQ method is characterized by extremely high cooling rates of steel parts. In contrast to conventional quenching, where parts cool down to the quenchant temperature and usually have tensile or neutral residual surface stresses at the end of quenching. The IQ process is interrupted when the part core is still hot and when there are maximum compressive stresses deep into the parts, thereby providing hard, ductile, better wear resistant parts. The project goal was to advance the patented IQ process from feasibility to commercialization in the heat-treating and forging industries to reduce significantly energy consumption and environmental impact, to increase productivity and to enhance economic competitiveness of these industries as well as Steel, Metal Casting and Mining industries. To introduce successfully the IQ technology in the U.S. metal working industry, the project team has completed the following work over the course of this project: A total of 33 manufacturers of steel products provided steel parts for IQ trails. IQT conducted IQ demonstrations for 34 different steel parts. Our customers tested intensively quenched parts in actual field conditions to evaluate the product service life and performance improvement. The data obtained from the field showed the following: Service life (number of holes punched) of cold-work punches (provided by EHT customer and made of S5 shock-resisting steel) was improved by two to eight times. Aluminum extrusion dies provided by GAM and made of hot work H-13 steel outperformed the standard dies by at least 50%. Dies provided by an AST customer, made of plain carbon 1045 steel and used for pellet manufacturing outperformed the standard dies by more than 100%. Concrete crusher liner wear plates provided by an EHT customer and made of 1045 steel, had the same surface hardness as the plates made of more expensive, pre-hardened high alloy HARDOX-500 material supplied by a Swedish company and used currently by the EHT customer. The 1045 material intensively quenched wear plates are currently in the field. Concrete block molding machine wear plates provided by an IQT customer and made of 8620 steel were processed at the AST production IQ system using a 40% reduced carburization cycle. An effective case depth in the intensively quenched wear plates was the same as in the standard, oil quenched parts. Base keys provided by an EHT customer and made of 8620 steel were processed using a 40% reduced carburization cycle. The intensively quenched parts showed the same performance as standard parts. IQT introduced the IQ process in heat treat practices of three commercial heat-treating shops: Akron Steel Treating Co., Summit Heat Treating Co. and Euclid Heat Treating Co. CWRU conducted a material characterization study for a variety of steels to develop a database to support changing/modification of recognized standards for quenching steel parts. IQT conducted a series of IQ workshops, published seven technical papers and participated in ASM Heat Treating Society conference and exposition and in Furnace North America Show. IQT designed and built a fully automated new IQ system installed at the Center for Intensive Quenching. This system includes the following major components: a stand-alone 1,900-gallon IQ water system, a 24'' x 24'' atmosphere pit furnace, and an automated load transfer mechanism. IQT established a ''Center for Intensive Quenching'' at the AST facilities. The 4,000 square feet Center includes the following equipment: High-velocity single part quenching IQ unit developed and built previously under EMTEC CT-65 project. The unit is equipped w

  12. Purification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.

    1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the removal of hydrogen sulphide from gases or liquid hydrocarbons, comprises contacting the gas or liquid hydrocarbon with an aqueous alkaline solution, preferably having a pH value of 8 to 10, comprising (A) an anthraquinone disulphonic acid or a water-soluble sulphonamide thereof (B) a compound of a metal which can exist in at least two valency states and (C) a sequestering agent.

  13. Hydropyrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

  14. Intensity, duration, and frequency of precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research on the projection of precipitation extremes has either focused on conceptual physical mechanisms that generate heavy precipitation or rigorous statistical methods that extrapolate tail behavior. However, informing both climate prediction and impact assessment requires concurrent physically and statistically oriented analysis. A combined examination of climate model simulations and observation-based reanalysis data sets suggests more intense and frequent precipitation extremes under 21st-century warming scenarios. Utilization of statistical extreme value theory and resampling-based uncertainty quantification combined with consideration of the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship reveals consistently intensifying trends for precipitation extremes at a global-average scale. However, regional and decadal analyses reveal specific discrepancies in the physical mechanisms governing precipitation extremes, as well as their statistical trends, especially in the tropics. The intensifying trend of precipitation extremes has quantifiable impacts on intensity-duration-frequency curves, which in turn have direct implications for hydraulic engineering design and water-resources management. The larger uncertainties at regional and decadal scales suggest the need for caution during regional-scale adaptation or preparedness decisions. Future research needs to explore the possibility of uncertainty reduction through higher resolution global climate models, statistical or dynamical downscaling, as well as improved understanding of precipitation extremes processes.

  15. Ultrafast electron cascades in semiconductors driven by intense femtosecond terahertz pulses H. Wen,1 M. Wiczer,3 and A. M. Lindenberg1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultrafast electron cascades in semiconductors driven by intense femtosecond terahertz pulses H. Wen processing. With wavelengths in the far infrared, near­ half-cycle THz pulses can be thought of as ultrafast,1 M. Wiczer,3 and A. M. Lindenberg1,2 1PULSE Institute, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo

  16. Reforming process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, W.C.

    1987-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reforming process is described comprising: (a) contacting a hydrocarbon feed with a first reforming catalyst at conditions which favor reforming to form a product stream. The first reforming catalyst is bifunctional and comprises a metallic oxide support which contains acidic sites having disposed therein a Group VIII metal; and (b) contacting the product stream with a second reforming catalyst at conditions which favor reforming. The second reforming catalyst is a monofunctional, non-acidic catalyst comprising a large-pore zeolite containing at least one Group VIII metal.

  17. Proposal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 HgPromising Magnesium BatteryProposal Process Network

  18. Industrial Fabrication of Medium-Beta SCRF Cavities for a High-Intensity Proton Linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzminski, J; Gentzlinger, R C; Maccioni, P

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1999, four 700-MHz, medium-beta (b = 0.64), superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities for a high-intensity proton linac project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were manufactured by industry. The SCRF cavities were designed by a LANL team in Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, and manufactured at a CERCA plant in Romans, France. The cavities were made of 4-mm-thick, solid niobium sheets with a residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250. These niobium sheets were supplied by Wah Chang (USA), Heraeus AG (Germany), and Tokyo Denkai (Japan). The SCRF cavities were shipped to LANL for performance testing. This paper describes the experience gained during the manufacturing process at CERCA.

  19. Left-Right Symmetric Models at the High-Intensity Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; Helo, Juan C; Kovalenko, Sergey G; Ortiz, Sebastian E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study constraints on Left-Right Symmetric models from searches of semileptonic decays of $D$, $D_{s}$, $B$ mesons, mediated by heavy neutrinos $N$ with masses $m_N\\sim $ GeV that go on their mass shell leading to a resonant enhancement of the rates. Using these processes we examine, as a function of $m_N$ and $M_{W_R}$, the physics reach of the recently proposed high-intensity beam dump experiment SHiP, which is expected to produce a large sample of $D_s$ mesons. We compare these results with the corresponding reach of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, as well as like-sign dilepton searches with displaced vertices at the LHC. We conclude that the SHiP experiment has clear advantages in probing the Left-Right Symmetric models for heavy neutrinos in the GeV mass range.

  20. Investigation of storm intensity by means of sferics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sievers, Henry Emmett

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was about 0. 02. On 15 May, a funnel aloft was sight- ed neer Fort Sherman~ Grayson County~ at a time when 175 kc ratio was about 0. 32. On 18 May~ a funnel aloft occurred at Port Neches when sferics ratio was 0. 1; on the 28th~ a funnel aloft occurred... LIBRARy' A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS INVESTIGATION OF STORM INTENSITY BY MEANS OF SFERICS A Thesis By HENRY EMMETT SIEVERS Major U. S. A. F. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial...

  1. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  2. Assessing Internet energy intensity: A review of methods and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coroama, Vlad C., E-mail: vcoroama@gmail.com [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hilty, Lorenz M. [Department of Informatics, University of Zurich, Binzmühlestrasse 14, 8050 Zurich (Switzerland) [Department of Informatics, University of Zurich, Binzmühlestrasse 14, 8050 Zurich (Switzerland); Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstr. 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Centre for Sustainable Communications, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Lindstedtsvägen 5, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the average energy intensity of Internet transmissions is a complex task that has been a controversial subject of discussion. Estimates published over the last decade diverge by up to four orders of magnitude — from 0.0064 kilowatt-hours per gigabyte (kWh/GB) to 136 kWh/GB. This article presents a review of the methodological approaches used so far in such assessments: i) top–down analyses based on estimates of the overall Internet energy consumption and the overall Internet traffic, whereby average energy intensity is calculated by dividing energy by traffic for a given period of time, ii) model-based approaches that model all components needed to sustain an amount of Internet traffic, and iii) bottom–up approaches based on case studies and generalization of the results. Our analysis of the existing studies shows that the large spread of results is mainly caused by two factors: a) the year of reference of the analysis, which has significant influence due to efficiency gains in electronic equipment, and b) whether end devices such as personal computers or servers are included within the system boundary or not. For an overall assessment of the energy needed to perform a specific task involving the Internet, it is necessary to account for the types of end devices needed for the task, while the energy needed for data transmission can be added based on a generic estimate of Internet energy intensity for a given year. Separating the Internet as a data transmission system from the end devices leads to more accurate models and to results that are more informative for decision makers, because end devices and the networking equipment of the Internet usually belong to different spheres of control. -- Highlights: • Assessments of the energy intensity of the Internet differ by a factor of 20,000. • We review top–down, model-based, and bottom–up estimates from literature. • Main divergence factors are the year studied and the inclusion of end devices. • We argue against extending the Internet system boundary beyond data transmission. • Decision-makers need data that differentiates between end devices and transmission.

  3. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlakov, V. M., E-mail: burlakov@maths.ox.ac.uk; Goriely, A. [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)] [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Foulds, I. [4700 King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)] [4700 King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  4. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  5. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  6. Signatures of Radiation Reaction in Ultra-Intense Laser Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Harvey; T. Heinzl; M. Marklund

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss radiation reaction effects on charges propagating in ultra-intense laser fields. Our analysis is based on an analytic solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. We suggest to measure radiation reaction in terms of a symmetry breaking parameter associated with the violation of null translation invariance in the direction opposite to the laser beam. As the Landau-Lifshitz equation is nonlinear the energy transfer within the pulse is rather sensitive to initial conditions. This is elucidated by comparing colliding and fixed target modes in electron laser collisions.

  7. Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Intensity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013Focusreceives .1Grid IntensityFermilab

  8. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  9. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  10. A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Aden, Nathaniel; Chunxia, Zhang; Xiuping, Li; Fangqin, Shangguan

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of iron and steel is an energy-intensive manufacturing process. In 2006, the iron and steel industry accounted for 13.6% and 1.4% of primary energy consumption in China and the U.S., respectively (U.S. DOE/EIA, 2010a; Zhang et al., 2010). The energy efficiency of steel production has a direct impact on overall energy consumption and related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for making an accurate comparison of the energy intensity (energy use per unit of steel produced) of steel production. The methodology is applied to the steel industry in China and the U.S. The methodology addresses issues related to boundary definitions, conversion factors, and indicators in order to develop a common framework for comparing steel industry energy use. This study uses a bottom-up, physical-based method to compare the energy intensity of China and U.S. crude steel production in 2006. This year was chosen in order to maximize the availability of comparable steel-sector data. However, data published in China and the U.S. are not always consistent in terms of analytical scope, conversion factors, and information on adoption of energy-saving technologies. This study is primarily based on published annual data from the China Iron & Steel Association and National Bureau of Statistics in China and the Energy Information Agency in the U.S. This report found that the energy intensity of steel production is lower in the United States than China primarily due to structural differences in the steel industry in these two countries. In order to understand the differences in energy intensity of steel production in both countries, this report identified key determinants of sector energy use in both countries. Five determinants analyzed in this report include: share of electric arc furnaces in total steel production, sector penetration of energy-efficiency technologies, scale of production equipment, fuel shares in the iron and steel industry, and final steel product mix in both countries. The share of lower energy intensity electric arc furnace production in each country was a key determinant of total steel sector energy efficiency. Overall steel sector structure, in terms of average plant vintage and production capacity, is also an important variable though data were not available to quantify this in a scenario. The methodology developed in this report, along with the accompanying quantitative and qualitative analyses, provides a foundation for comparative international assessment of steel sector energy intensity.

  11. Oligomerization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  12. Etherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  13. Etherification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figs.

  14. Oligomerization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  15. Precision monitoring of relative beam intensity for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For future experiments at the intensity frontier, precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment will utilize {approx}200 ns (FW) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} protons at 8 GeV with a bunch-to-bunch period of 1695 ns. The out-of-bunch beam must be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup -10} relative to in-bunch beam and continuously monitored. I propose a Cerenkov-based particle telescope to measure secondary production from beam interactions in a several tens of microns thick foil. Correlating timing information with beam passage will allow the determination of relative beam intensity to arbitrary precision given a sufficiently long integration time. The goal is to verify out-of-bunch extinction to the level 10{sup -6} in the span of several seconds. This will allow near real-time monitoring of the initial extinction of the beam resonantly extracted from Fermilabs Debuncher before a system of AC dipoles and collimators, which will provide the final extinction. The effect on beam emittance is minimal, allowing the necessary continuous measurement. I will present the detector design and some concerns about bunch growth during the resonant extraction.

  16. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 ?m) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  17. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  18. Ferroplasmons: Intense Localized Surface Plasmons in Metal-Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachan, Ritesh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Malasi, Abhinav [ORNL; Ge, Jingxuan [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Yadavali, Sagar P [ORNL; Gangopadhyay, Anup [Washington University, St. Louis; Krishna, Dr. Hare [Washington University, St. Louis; Garcia, Hernando [Southern Illinois University; Duscher, Gerd J M [ORNL; Kalyanaraman, Ramki [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of photons with matter at length scales far below their wavelengths has given rise to many novel phenomena, including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, LSPR with narrow bandwidth (BW) is observed only in a select few noble metals, and ferromagnets are not among them. Here, we report the discovery of LSPR in ferromagnetic Co and CoFe alloy (8% Fe) in contact with Ag in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser dewetting. These plasmons in metal-erromagnetic nanostructures, or ferroplasmons (FP) for short, are in the visible spectrum with comparable intensity and BW to those of the LSPRs from the Ag regions. This finding was enabled by electron energy-loss mapping across individual nanoparticles in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The appearance of the FP is likely due to plasmonic interaction between the contacting Ag and Co nanoparticles. Since there is no previous evidence for materials that simultaneously show ferromagnetism and such intense LSPRs, this discovery may lead to the design of improved plasmonic materials and applications. It also demonstrates that materials with interesting plasmonic properties can be synthesized using bimetallic nanostructures in contact with each other.

  19. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency in the petrochemical industry,” Chapter 3steel, petroleum and petrochemical, chemical, non-ferrousintensive process in the petrochemical industry with an

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  1. Detecting hazardous intensive care patient episodes using real-time mortality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hug, Caleb W. (Caleb Wayne)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern intensive care unit (ICU) has become a complex, expensive, data-intensive environment. Caregivers maintain an overall assessment of their patients based on important observations and trends. If an advanced ...

  2. Detecting Hazardous Intensive Care Patient Episodes Using Real-time Mortality Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hug, Caleb

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The modern intensive care unit (ICU) has become a complex, expensive, data-intensive environment. Caregivers maintain an overall assessment of their patients based on important observations and trends. If an advanced ...

  3. Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

  4. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-Short Pulse, Ultra-High In- tensity Lasers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ignition), an ultra-intense short pulse laser is brought inof the ultra-high intensity, short-pulse laser has opened up

  5. Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

  6. Department of Energy Commercial Building Benchmarks (New Construction): Energy Use Intensities, May 5, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This file contains the energy use intensities (EUIs) for the benchmark building files by building type and climate zone.

  7. Interaction of intense fields with plasmaInteraction of intense fields with plasma Strathclyde Intense Laser Interaction Studies (SILIS) Group, Department Of PhysicsStrathclyde Intense Laser Interaction Studies (SILIS) Group, Department Of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    . Large scale thermonuclear fusion processes, involving l i f i t t i tt t In an operating fusion reactor fusion is the process in which two or more atomic nuclei join together, or "fuse", to form a single at very high densities and temperatures. fusion reaction. It is one of the earliest controlled fusion

  8. Design of Industrial Process Refrigeration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherell, W. D.

    of the study is discussed in terms of identifying refrigeration intensive processes. Specific and general conclusions are presented to help faci I itate proper industrial refrigeration system design throughout fhe industry. This paper presents the resul ts... custaner's specifications. Most systems fall into two broad categories: Vapor Canpression Refrigeration Cycles - Mechanical or Steam Jet Canpression Systems Absorption Refrigeration Cycles - Heat Operated Cycles As shown in Table I, refrigerations...

  9. Parametric cascade downconverter for intense ultrafast mid-infrared generation beyond the ManleyRowe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    codes: 190.2620, 190.4970, 320.7160, 320.7110. Intense and ultrafast optical pulses (durations typ of optical sources that directly produce ultrafast intense pulses at long wavelengths. One technique that has from in- tense ultrafast pulses in the near infrared 800 nm . Recent results that produce intense

  10. Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Intensity and ENSO SUZANA J. CAMARGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    intensity in the western North Pacific basin is examined. Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), constructed from cyclones that are both more intense and longer-lived than in La Niña years. ACE leads ENSO indices: duringWestern North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Intensity and ENSO SUZANA J. CAMARGO International Research

  11. Title of Document: INTERACTION OF INTENSE SHORT LASER PULSES WITH GASES OF NANOSCALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: INTERACTION OF INTENSE SHORT LASER PULSES WITH GASES OF NANOSCALE-cluster interaction. #12;INTERACTION OF INTENSE SHORT LASER PULSES WITH GASES OF NANOSCALE ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering We study the interaction of intense laser pulses with gases

  12. Ultrahigh-Intensity Optical Slow-Wave Structure B. D. Layer,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    Ultrahigh-Intensity Optical Slow-Wave Structure B. D. Layer,1,3 A. York,1,3 T. M. Antonsen,2,3 S on the extended diffraction- suppressed propagation of extreme intensity laser pulses in plasma optical guiding structures. Plasma waveguides for intense optical pulses were first generated through the radial hydrodynamic

  13. Extracting mode components in laser intensity distribution by independent component analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hefei Institute of Intelligent Machines

    Extracting mode components in laser intensity distribution by independent component analysis Hai, a reliable method to charac- terize the intensity distribution of the laser beam has become a more and more important task. However, traditional optic and electronic methods can offer only a laser beam intensity

  14. Passive Network Performance Estimation for Large-Scale, Data-Intensive Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissman, Jon

    --Distributed computing applications are increasingly utilizing distributed data sources. However, the unpredictable cost- intensive scientific workflows [3], [4]. For such data- intensive tasks, data access cost is a significant to consider data access cost in launching data-intensive computing applications. Large-scale computing

  15. Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra- intense laser pulses S;Investigation of laser-driven proton acceleration using ultra-short, ultra-intense laser pulses S. Fourmaux,1,a metallic foils irradiated by ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses.8­10 Laser-driven ion beams take

  16. Photonuclear Reactions induced by Intense Short Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dietz; H. A. Weidenmueller

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the decay in time of nuclei excited by an intense short laser pulse of energy E(0) yields the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the associated scattering matrix. We determine the optimal length (in time) of the pulse and evaluate the time-decay function using random-matrix theory. That function is shown to contain information not otherwise available. We approximate that function in a manner that is useful for the analysis of data. For E(0) below the threshold energy E(n) of the first neutron channel, the time-decay function is exponential in time t while it is the product of an exponential and a power in t for E(0) > E(n). The comparison of the measured decay functions in both energy domains yields an unambiguous and novel test of random-matrix theory in nuclei.

  17. Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

  18. HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

  19. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  20. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­?energy-­? density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­?energy-­? density plasma the ideas for steady-­?state current drive developed for low-­?energy-­? density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­?energy-­?density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  1. Working Group Report: Computing for the Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebel, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Wolbers, S.

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  2. On Task Assignment in Data Intensive Scalable Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    , a crucial task in surviving the "Data Deluge". Recent works have shown that maintaining data locality- crease of data available for analytical processing­the so-called "Data Deluge" [7]. The cloud computing

  3. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  4. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  5. Process Control Minitoring by Stress Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Stahl, David A.

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental contamination with a variety of pollutants hasprompted the development of effective bioremediation strategies. But howcan these processes be best monitored and controlled? One avenue underinvestigation is the development of stress response systems as tools foreffective and general process control. Although the microbial stressresponse has been the subject of intensive laboratory investigation, theenvironmental reflection of the laboratory response to specific stresseshas been little explored. However, it is only within an environmentalcontext, in which microorganisms are constantly exposed to multiplechanging environmental stresses, that there will be full understanding ofmicrobial adaptive resiliency. Knowledge of the stress response in theenvironment will facilitate the control of bioremediation and otherprocesses mediated by complex microbial communities.

  6. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  7. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  8. Effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive sources on radiation intensity in beta-voltaic nuclear battery system: A preliminary result

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basar, Khairul, E-mail: khbasar@fi.itb.ac.id; Riupassa, Robi D., E-mail: khbasar@fi.itb.ac.id; Bachtiar, Reza, E-mail: khbasar@fi.itb.ac.id; Badrianto, Muldani D., E-mail: khbasar@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that one main problem in the application of beta-voltaic nuclear battery system is its low efficiency. The efficiency of the beta-voltaic nuclear battery system mainly depends on three aspects: source of radioactive radiation, interface between materials in the system and process of converting electron-hole pair to electric current in the semiconductor material. In this work, we show the effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive sources on radiation intensity of beta-voltaic nuclear battery system.

  9. Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured behind Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and in order to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the UV, visible or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental and theoretical methods we have found that the glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report for the first time that the measured reflectance intensity values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflectances arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are vertically shifted with intensity offsets in the hemispherical case leading to measured values up to ?6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ?3.8% too high for 10% reflecting materials, approximately correct for 40%- to 60%-diffuse reflecting surfaces, and ?1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for 99%-reflecting matte surfaces. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces as verified by both theory and experiment, and have some dependence on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300 to 2300 nm range.

  10. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  11. Intense pseudotransport of a cationic drug mediated by vacuolar ATPase: Procainamide-induced autophagic cell vacuolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morissette, Guillaume [Centre de recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada); Centre de recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada); Lodge, Robert [Centre de recherche en Infectiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada); Marceau, Francois [Centre de recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada); Centre de recherche en Rhumatologie et Immunologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec QC, G1V 4G2 (Canada)], E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cationic drugs frequently exhibit large apparent volumes of distribution, consistent with various forms of cellular sequestration. The contributions of organelles and metabolic processes that may mimic drug transport were defined in human vascular smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that procainamide-induced vacuolar cytopathology is driven by intense pseudotransport mediated by the vacuolar (V)-ATPase and pursued the characterization of vesicular trafficking alterations in this model. Large amounts of procainamide were taken up by intact cells (maximal in 2 h, reversible upon washout, apparent K{sub M} 4.69 mM; fluorometric determination of cell-associated drug). Procainamide uptake was extensively prevented or reversed by pharmacological inhibition of the V-ATPase with bafilomycin A1 or FR 167356, decreased at low extracellular pH and preceded vacuolar cell morphology. However, the uptake of procainamide was unaffected by mitochondrial poisons that reduced the uptake of rhodamine 6G. Large vacuoles induced by millimolar procainamide were labeled with the late endosome/lysosome markers Rab7 and CD63 and the autophagy effector LC3; their osmotic formation (but not procainamide uptake) was reduced by extracellular mannitol and parallel to LC3 II formation. Procainamide-induced vacuolization is associated with defective endocytosis of fluorophore-labeled bovine serum albumin, but not with induction of the unfolded protein response. The contents of a vacuole subset slowly ({>=} 24 h) become positive for Nile red staining (phospholipidosis-like response). V-ATPase-driven ion trapping is a form of intense cation pseudotransport that concerns the uncharged form of the drugs, and is associated with a vacuolar, autophagic and evolutive cytopathology and profound effects on vesicular trafficking.

  12. Differential Wiener process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Stochastic Processes Will Penny Stochastic Differential Equations Wiener process Sample Paths OU Process Stochastic Chain Rule Change of variables Time-varying functions Multivariate SDE Expectations Wiener Process OU Process Neural Population Fitzhugh Nagumo Gaussian approximation FN Population Fokker

  13. Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S. energy and carbon intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a lower energy-and-carbon-intensive mix of economicintensity into fuel mix and energy intensity terms. Thisof fuel mix and weather on energy and carbon intensity using

  14. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K{sup +} ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally, comparisons of improved experimental and calculated axial focus (> 100 x axial compression, < 2 ns pulses) and higher peak energy deposition on target are also presented. These achievements demonstrate the capabilities for near term target heating experiments to T{sub e} {approx} 0.1 eV and for future ion accelerators to heat targets to T{sub e} > 1 eV.

  15. MARS15 Code Developments Driven by the Intensity Frontier Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mokhov, N V; Rakhno, I L; Striganov, S I; Tropin, I S; Eidelman, Yu I; Aarnio, P; Gudima, K K; Konobeev, A Yu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MARS15(2012) is the latest version of a multi-purpose Monte-Carlo code developed since 1974 for detailed simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in an arbitrary 3-D geometry of shielding, accelerator, detector and spacecraft components with energy ranging from a fraction of an electronvolt to 100 TeV. Driven by needs of the intensity frontier projects with their Megawatt beams, e.g., ESS, FAIR and Project X, the code has been recently substantially improved and extended. These include inclusive and exclusive particle event generators in the 0.7 to 12 GeV energy range, proton inelastic interaction modeling below 20 MeV, implementation of the EGS5 code for electromagnetic shower simulation at energies from 1 keV to 20 MeV, stopping power description in compound materials, new module for DPA calculations for neutrons from a fraction of eV to 20-150 MeV, user-friendly DeTra-based method to calculate nuclide inventories, and new ROOT-based geometry.

  16. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

  17. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 24472457 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reitsma, Femke E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 2447­2457 (2007) Published online 18 May 2007 in Wiley for simulating watershed runoff. This data model, called nen, allows users to visualize and analyse the processes, such as raster, that do not give direct insight into the spatial dynamics and distribution of the processes

  18. Extensible packet processing architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

  19. DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING Carl D. Sorensen by the intense heat and light of the ·elding arc. To avoid these problems it is desirable to use the welding arc. The arc is treated as an electrical "black box" with the weld current as an input and the weld voltage

  20. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Greenberg, Richard [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  1. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  2. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H. [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); La Quaglia, Michael P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Happersett, Laura [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  3. Target Allocation Methodology for China's Provinces: Energy Intensity in the 12th FIve-Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohshita, Stephanie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to construction and heavy industry, contrary to the 20%intensive construction and heavy industry sectors, theand production in heavy industry and shift toward lower-

  4. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER ANDtemperature rise in the tungsten foil. A cross-calibrationis obtained with a 3µm thick tungsten foil calorimeter and

  5. Considering Possible Outcomes and the User's Environment in Designing User Interfaces to Data Intensive Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaud, K.V.

    Renaud,K.V. Cooper,R.L. User Interfaces to Data Intensive Systems. UIDIS'01. ETH, Zurich. 31 May - 1 June 2001. IEEE

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne intense pulsed Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laboratory with both types of facilities: the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) for neutron scattering... Argonne Update 1 Hardest, strongest materials combined UPDATE The...

  7. A Discrete-Time Scheduling Model for Continuous Power-intensive Process Networks with Various Electricity Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    formulation. Assigns prices to every time period Tracks cumulative power purchases for predefined meter reading times Can accommodate discount prices that depend on the amount of power purchased Can accommodate penalties for under- and overconsumption Power Purchase Price Power Purchase Penalty Discount

  8. Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Materials & Processes Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Energy Materials &...

  9. Selective emission and luminescence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} under intense laser excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, V M; Studenikin, M I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Iskhakova, L D [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals synthesised by laser heating is studied. The synthesis of erbium silicate (Er{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) layers was observed upon interaction of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} melts. The dependences of the selective emission (SE) and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 200 – 1700 nm on the intensity of laser-thermal (at the wavelength ? = 10.6 ?m) and resonant laser (? ? 975 nm) excitation are investigated. The emission of heated Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals arises as a result of multiphonon relaxation of absorbed energy and is a superposition of the SE at the electronic-vibrational transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions and the thermal radiation of the crystal lattice. The shape of the SE spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystals in the range 400 – 1700 nm almost does not change upon laser-thermal heating from 300 to 1500 K and subsequent cooling and corresponds to the absorption spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions. With increasing temperature, the thermal radiation intensity increases faster than the SE intensity, and the shape of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} spectrum becomes closer to the calculated spectrum of a blackbody. The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Er{sup 3+} ions formed under intense laser excitation of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} level are explained by additional SE caused by heating of the crystal matrix due to the Stokes losses. A difference between the SE and luminescence spectra is observed at low intensities of resonant laser excitation and low temperatures, when only the Stokes luminescence occurs. The temperature dependences of the SE and luminescence spectra of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} upon laser excitation testify to the fundamental role played by the interaction of the electronic f-shell of Er{sup 3+} ions with crystal lattice vibrations in the processes of multiphonon radiative and nonradiative relaxation. The laser-thermal synthesis is promising for inprocess variation of the chemical composition of rare-earth samples. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Photosensitive response of azobenzene containing films towards pure intensity or polarization interference patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadavalli, Nataraja Sekhar; Santer, Svetlana, E-mail: santer@uni-potsdam.de [Department of Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Saphiannikova, Marina [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report on differences in the response of photosensitive azobenzene containing films upon irradiation with the intensity or polarization interference patterns. Two materials are studied differing in the molecular weight: an azobenzene-containing polymer and a molecular glass formed from a much smaller molecule consisting of three connected azobenzene units. Topography changes occurring along with the changes in irradiation conditions are recorded using a homemade set-up combining an optical part for generation and shaping of interference patterns and an atomic force microscope for acquiring the kinetics of film deformation. In this way, we could reveal the unique behavior of photosensitive materials during the first few minutes of irradiation: the change in topography is initially driven by an increase in the azobenzene free volume along with the trans-cis isomerization, followed by the mass transport finally resulting in the surface relief grating. This study demonstrates the great potential of our setup to experimentally highlight puzzling processes governing the formation of surface relief gratings.

  11. Hardware Architectures for Data-Intensive Computing Problems: A Case Study for String Matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2012-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA analysis is an emerging application of high performance bioinformatic. Modern sequencing machinery are able to provide, in few hours, large input streams of data, which needs to be matched against exponentially growing databases of known fragments. The ability to recognize these patterns effectively and fastly may allow extending the scale and the reach of the investigations performed by biology scientists. Aho-Corasick is an exact, multiple pattern matching algorithm often at the base of this application. High performance systems are a promising platform to accelerate this algorithm, which is computationally intensive but also inherently parallel. Nowadays, high performance systems also include heterogeneous processing elements, such as Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), to further accelerate parallel algorithms. Unfortunately, the Aho-Corasick algorithm exhibits large performance variability, depending on the size of the input streams, on the number of patterns to search and on the number of matches, and poses significant challenges on current high performance software and hardware implementations. An adequate mapping of the algorithm on the target architecture, coping with the limit of the underlining hardware, is required to reach the desired high throughputs. In this paper, we discuss the implementation of the Aho-Corasick algorithm for GPU-accelerated high performance systems. We present an optimized implementation of Aho-Corasick for GPUs and discuss its tradeoffs on the Tesla T10 and he new Tesla T20 (codename Fermi) GPUs. We then integrate the optimized GPU code, respectively, in a MPI-based and in a pthreads-based load balancer to enable execution of the algorithm on clusters and large sharedmemory multiprocessors (SMPs) accelerated with multiple GPUs.

  12. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Dohee (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  13. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  14. Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-modulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Fabrication of nano-structural arrays by channeling pulsed atomic beams through an intensity-dimensional nano-structure arrays by passing a pulsed atomic beam through an intensity-modulated continuous of ``cooling'' along the longitudinal direction. This enables fabrication of vertically heterogeneous nano

  15. A Tale of Two Data-Intensive Paradigms: Applications, Abstractions, and Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Tale of Two Data-Intensive Paradigms: Applications, Abstractions, and Architectures Shantenu Jha1 for data-intensive applications, here- after referred to as the high-performance computing and the Apache of understanding and charac- terizing the most common application workloads found across the two paradigms. We

  16. Influence of local and remote SST on North Atlantic tropical cyclone potential intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camargo, Suzana J.

    Influence of local and remote SST on North Atlantic tropical cyclone potential intensity Suzana J of local and remote sea surface temperature (SST) on the tropical cyclone potential intensity in the North Atlantic using a suite of model simulations, while separating the impact of anthropogenic (external

  17. Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity BRIAN TANG AND KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity BRIAN TANG AND KERRY EMANUEL ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hy to assess how ventilation affects tropical cyclone intensity via two possible pathways: the first through

  18. Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of mega-electron-volt electron beams by an ultrafast intense laser pulse Xiaofang Wang emission from the interaction of an ultrafast ( 29 fs), intense ( 1018 W/cm2 ) laser pulse with underdense of such an ultrafast laser pulse with matter and possible new approaches to MeV electron generation. In this paper we

  19. Energy Policy 35 (2007) 52675286 The implications of the historical decline in US energy intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the projected expansion of the world's economies and their demand for energy from fossil fuels. Making progress, which, some have argued, has been the major influence on the intensity of fossil fuel use change) and adjustments in the energy demand of individual industries (intensity change), and identifies

  20. sonorensis | winter 2005 11 As the intense heat of day in the Sonoran Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín, Rodrigo

    sonorensis | winter 2005 11 As the intense heat of day in the Sonoran Desert gives way to cooler and fruit. Once the intense Sonoran Desert heat ebbs, and fall encroaches, the bats head southward, back as threatened in 1994. FORECAST FOR THE LESSER LONG-NOSED BAT A USFWS recovery plan in 1994 listed conservation

  1. OBSERBATION OF HIGH INTENSITY X-RAYS IN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBSERBATION OF HIGH INTENSITY X-RAYS IN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING EXPERIMENT S. Kashiwagi, M the first results of high intensity x-ray generation using Inverse Laser Compton scattering. This experiment Synchrotron Source (LSS). It is based on inverse Compton scattering via interaction between pulsed high power

  2. Consumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011­2015) aims to achieve a national carbon intensity reduction of 17's provinces is complicated by the fact that more than half of China's national carbon emissions are embodiedConsumption-Based Adjustment of China's Emissions-Intensity Targets: An Analysis of its Potential

  3. The Kuznets-Kaldor-Puzzle and Neutral Cross-Capital-Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Güting, Ralf Hartmut

    The Kuznets-Kaldor-Puzzle and Neutral Cross-Capital-Intensity Structural Change by Denis Stijepic://www.fernuni-hagen.de/ls_wagner/en/ #12;The Kuznets-Kaldor-Puzzle and Neutral Cross- Capital-Intensity Structural Change* Denis Stijepic The Kuznets-Kaldor stylized facts are one of the most striking empirical observations about the development

  4. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  5. Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser of methylamine (CH3NH2 + ), methanol (CH3OH+ ), and methyl fluoride (CH3F+ ) cations by short, intense laser 7 m laser pulses. This work is motivated by recent studies of methanol cations by Yamanouchi and co

  6. Optimization Intensive Energy Harvesting Mahsan Rofouei, Mohammad Ali Ghodrat, Miodrag Potkonjak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    Optimization Intensive Energy Harvesting Mahsan Rofouei, Mohammad Ali Ghodrat, Miodrag Potkonjak of primary limiting factors of MSs is their energy sensitivity. In order to overcome this limitation, we have developed an optimization intensive approach for energy harvesting. Our goal is to size and position

  7. Extreme organic carbon burial fuels intense methane bubbling in a temperate reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Extreme organic carbon burial fuels intense methane bubbling in a temperate reservoir Sebastian. Wehrli (2012), Extreme organic carbon burial fuels intense methane bubbling in a temperate reservoir; revised 25 November 2011; accepted 30 November 2011; published 4 January 2012. [1] Organic carbon (OC

  8. Light intensity, prey detection and foraging mechanisms of age 0 year yellow perch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mensinger, Allen F.

    Light intensity, prey detection and foraging mechanisms of age 0 year yellow perch H. E. RICHMOND feeding trials at varying light intensities. Perch were highly effective predators and captured Daphnia pulicaria with 94% overall foraging success at light levels ranging from 0 to 3400lx. Maximum average

  9. Measurement of laser intensities approaching 1015 with an accuracy of 1%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheifets, Anatoli

    , 2013) Accurate knowledge of the intensity of focused ultra-short laser pulses is crucial to the correctMeasurement of laser intensities approaching 1015 W/cm2 with an accuracy of 1% M. G. Pullen1,2 , W interpretation of experimental results in strong-field physics. We have developed a technique to measure laser

  10. Oecologia (2000) 124:270279 Springer-Verlag 2000 Abstract Disturbance frequency, intensity, and areal ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, Declan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oecologia (2000) 124:270­279 © Springer-Verlag 2000 Abstract Disturbance frequency, intensity The intensity, frequency, and area of disturbance may de- termine the abundance and species richness of an assem for recoloniza- tion. If disturbance frequency is greater than the rate of competitive exclusion, diversity may

  11. An Empirical Analysis of Energy Intensity and Its Determinants at the State Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 An Empirical Analysis of Energy Intensity and Its Determinants at the State Level Gilbert E in energy use within a sector and changes in sectoral activ- ity over time. As part of my analysis, I. Metcalf* Aggregate energy intensity in the United States has been declining steadily since the mid-1970s

  12. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  13. Issues and R&D Required for the Intensity Frontier Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Henderson, S.; Hurh, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation, upgrade and development of accelerators for Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges in order to satisfy both the near-term and long-term Particle Physics program. Here we discuss key issues and R&D required for the Intensity Frontier accelerators.

  14. MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1099 MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE in intensively (>80%) cultivated areas. From January 2001 to August 2002, we monitored movements of 77 (61 adult of seasonal migration, whereas crop emergence and harvest had minimal effects. Four deer (8%) dispersed a mean

  15. Information processing by a controlled coupling process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Wei; Shan Zhao

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter proposes a controlled coupling process for information processing. The net effect of conventional coupling is isolated from the dynamical system and is analyzed in depth. The stability of the process is studied. We show that the proposed process can locally minimize the smoothness and the fidelity of dynamical data. A digital filter expression of the controlled coupling process is derived and the connection is made to the Hanning filter. The utility and robustness of proposed approach is demonstrated by both the restoration of the contaminated solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and the estimation of the trend of a time series.

  16. Fundamental physics on natures of the macroscopic vacuum under high intense electromagnetic fields with accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kensuke Homma

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High intense electromagnetic fields can be unique probes to study natures of macroscopic vacua by themselves. Combining accelerators with the intense field can provide more fruitful probes which can neither be achieved by only intense fields nor only high energy accelerators. We will overview the natures of vacua which can be accessible via intense laser-laser and intense laser-electron interactions. In the case of the laser-laser interaction, we propose how to observe nonlinear QED effects and effects of new fields like light scalar and pseudo scalar fields which may contribute to a macroscopic nature of our universe such as dark energy. In the case of the laser-electron interaction, in addition to nonlinear QED effects, we can further discuss the nature of accelerating field in the vacuum where we can access physics related with event horizons such as Hawking-Unruh radiations. We will introduce a recent experimental trial to search for this kind of odd radiations.

  17. Process of [sup 196]Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Mellor, C.E.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of [sup 196]Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  18. Process of .sup.196 Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Mellor, Charles E. (Salem, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of .sup.196 Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  19. Asymmetric explosion of clusters in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine asymmetric expansion of argon clusters illuminated by 800 nm laser pulses of duration Almost-Equal-To 23fs, using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. For this short pulse duration, laser energy absorption by cluster electrons is dominated by the nonlinear resonance (NLR) absorption process [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 123401 (2006)]. In this work, we concentrate, particularly, on the ionic outcome in the NLR regime and show that higher charge states of argon ions are produced along the laser polarization than in the transverse directions leading to the anisotropy (asymmetry) in the ion energy distribution. This anisotropy already established during the short pulse duration (or in the early duration of a long pulse) may contribute to the anisotropic ion emission reported in cluster experiments with pulse duration longer than 100 fs. Our PIC results are compared with a charged-sphere model showing that cluster explosion is mainly due to Coulomb repulsion between the cluster ions.

  20. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 1 Toward process-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF 1 Toward process- ^ based modeling of geochemical soil formation across diverse 2 that integrates geochemical and geomorphic processes responsible for 11 soils' elemental and mineralogical). The model considers processes including the production of PDZ, weathering 15 front propagation, mineral

  1. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES INVITED COMMENTARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Ray

    - cific conditions, the pressure wave advance can be approximated as a kinematic wave (Phillip, 1969 and laboratory data indicate that a `pressure perturbation', `pressure wave' or `water content wave' may also with a ten fold spike increase in rain intensity. By comparing pressure wave velocity with approximate

  2. Modeling for Seasonal Marked Point Processes: An Analysis of Evolving Hurricane Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kottas, Athanasios

    Modeling for Seasonal Marked Point Processes: An Analysis of Evolving Hurricane Occurrences Sai and for the conditional mark distribution. The motivating application involves the analysis of hurricane landfalls the evolution of the intensity of the process of hurricane landfall occurrences, and the respective maximum wind

  3. Integrating Mobile Tasks with Business Processes: A Self-Healing Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Musiol, Manfred Reichert University of Ulm, Germany ABSTRACT Process management technology constitutes in knowledge-intensive areas in the enterprise as well. As a consequence, process management technology needs management technology offers promising perspectives based on a wide range of techniques (Reichert & Weber

  4. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran (Minneapolis, MN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  5. Separation Processes, Second Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, C. Judson

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Styrene Process Distillation Column Design, in "Professors'in Styrene Process Distillation Column Design, in "Profes-considered an easy distillation column design problem, but

  6. Salt Waste Processing Initiatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives...

  7. process.h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /* process.h Symbols and structures for process management. Copyright (c) Borland International 1987 All Rights Reserved. */ #if __STDC__ #define _Cdecl

  8. Postdoc Application Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Application Process Postdoc Application Process Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in...

  9. Approximation of Stochastic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alois Pichler

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    May 8, 2012 ... The approximation of stochastic processes by trees is an important topic in ... process ? is replaced by a finitely valued stochastic scenario ...

  10. SAGE Application Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application Process SAGE Application Process A National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program Contacts Institute Director Harald Dogliani-Los Alamos...

  11. Multiple System Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process Federal Register Notice Withdrawing Rate Proposal (PDF) Formal Process Extension Federal Register Notice (PDF) Customer Savisngs Under...

  12. Process Limits on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Limits Process Limits Limit Hard Soft core file size (blocks) 0 unlimited data seg size (kbytes) unlimited unlimited scheduling priority 0 0 file size (blocks) unlimited...

  13. Undergraduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Undergraduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich...

  14. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

  15. Performance Characteristics Of An Intensity Modulated Advanced X-Ray Source (IMAXS) For Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Brown, Craig; Condron, Cathie; Ingle, Mike [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Christensen, Phil A.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D. [HESCO/PTSE Inc., 2501 Monarch St., Alameda, CA 94501 (United States); Hernandez, Michael; Schonberg, Russell G. [XScell Corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Ross, Randy [Stangenes Industries, Inc., 1052 East Meadow Circle, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband must address stringent, competitive performance requirements. High x-ray intensity is needed to penetrate dense cargo, while low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint, i.e. the size of the controlled area, required shielding and the dose to personnel. In a collaborative effort between HESCO/PTSE Inc., XScell Corp., Stangenes Industries, Inc. and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., an Intensity Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) was designed and produced. Cargo inspection systems utilizing such a source have been projected to achieve up to 2 inches steel-equivalent greater penetration capability, while on average producing the same or smaller radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the design can be used to obtain the same penetration capability as with conventional sources, but reducing the radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to anticipate the needed intensity for each x-ray pulse by evaluating signal strength in the cargo inspection system detector array for the previous pulse. The IMAXS is therefore capable of changing intensity from one pulse to the next by an electronic signal provided by electronics inside the cargo inspection system detector array, which determine the required source intensity for the next pulse. We report on the completion of a 9 MV S-band (2998 MHz) IMAXS source and comment on its performance.

  16. 83www.acschemicalbiology.org VOL.3 NO.2 ACS CHEMICAL BIOLOGY In the hopes of avoiding a pandemic in humans by the deadly bird flu virus, intense efforts to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasisekharan, Ram

    in humans by the deadly bird flu virus, intense efforts to determine the molecular features responsible for species-specific infection are underway. A key step in the process by which influenza A viruses infect on the surface of host epithelial cells. Now, Chandrasekaran et al. (Nat. Biotechnol. 2008, 26, 107-113) report

  17. Multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation of He, Ne, and Ar atoms in intense pulsed laser fields: Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theoretical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Tong, Xiao-Min

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes of rare-gas atoms (He, Ne, and Ar) in intense pulsed laser fields by means of a self-interaction-free time-dependent density...

  18. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  19. Laser diffraction process and apparatus for width measurement of elongated objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naqwi, Amir A.; Fandrey, Christopher W.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Size distribution of elongated objects is measured by forward scattering radiation from the objects at a range of scatter angles. The scattered radiation is refracted to locations on a scatter detector based on the scatter angles and independent of the location of the objects along the radiation axis. The intensity of radiation is sensed at each position on the scatter detector, and signals representative of the intensities at the positions are processed and compared to masks to identify a size distribution. The scatter detector may include individual radiation detectors arranged to receive refracted radiation representing respective ranges of scatter angles to thereby compensate for lower radiation intensities scattered from smaller objects.

  20. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  1. Bragg cell laser intensity modulation: effect on laser Doppler velocimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mychkovsky, Alexander G.; Chang, Natasha A.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In most laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) systems, the frequency of one of the two laser beams that intersect to create the probe volume is shifted with an acousto-optic element. It is shown here that Bragg shifting can impose a problematic fluctuation in intensity on the frequency-shifted beam, producing spurious velocity measurements. This fluctuation occurs at twice the Bragg cell frequency, and its relative amplitude to the time average intensity is a function of the ratio of the laser beam diameter to the Bragg cell acoustic wavelength. A physical model and a configuration procedure to minimize adverse effects of the intensity modulations are presented.

  2. Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgers, C.P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom) [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Kirk, J.G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Duclous, R. [Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Blackburn, T.G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bell, A.R. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom) [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup ?2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

  3. Department of Energy Support of Energy Intensive Manufacturing Related to Refractory Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) richly supported refractory related research to enable greater energy efficiency processes in energy intensive manufacturing industries such as iron and steel, glass, aluminum and other non-ferrous metal production, petrochemical, and pulp and paper. Much of this support came through research projects funded by the former DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) under programs such as Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM), Industrial Materials of the Future (IMF), and the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). Under such initiatives, work was funded at government national laboratories such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at universities such as West Virginia University (WVU) and the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T) which was formerly the University of Missouri Rolla, and at private companies engaged in these manufacturing areas once labeled industries of the future by DOE due to their strategic and economic importance to American industry. Examples of such projects are summarized below with information on the scope, funding level, duration, and impact. This is only a sampling of representative efforts funded by the DOE in which ORNL was involved over the period extending from 1996 to 2011. Other efforts were also funded during this time at various other national laboratories, universities and private companies under the various programs mentioned above. Discussion of the projects below was chosen because I was an active participant in them and it is meant to give a sampling of the magnitude and scope of investments made by DOE in refractory related research over this time period.

  4. Hard Disk/Solid State Drive Synergy in Support of Data-Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu,Ke [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiang, Song [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Kei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Data-intensive applications are becoming increasingly common in high-performance computing. Examples include combustion simulation, human genome analysis, and satellite image processing. Efficient access of data sets is critical to the performance of these applications. Because of the size of the data today's economically feasible approach is to store the data files on an array of hard disks or data servers equipped with hard disks and managed by a parallel file system such as PVFS or Lustre wherein the data is striped over a (large) number of disks for high aggregate I/O throughout. With file striping, a request for a segment of logically contiguous file space is decomposed into multiple sub-requests, each to a different server. While the data unit for this striping is usually reasonably large to benefit disk efficiency, the first and/or last sub-requests can be much smaller than the striping unit if the request does not align with the striping pattern, severely compromising hard disk efficiency and thus application performance. We propose to exploit solid state drives (SSD), whose efficiency is much less sensitive to small random accesses, to enable the alignment of requests to disk with the data striping pattern. In this scheme hard disks mainly serve large, aligned, sequential requests, with SSDs serving small or unaligned requests, thus respecting the relative cost, performance, and durability characteristics of the two media, and thereby achieving synergy in performance/cost. We will describe the design of the proposed scheme, its implementation on CCS-7's Darwin cluster, and performance results.

  5. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kienzle, Stefan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 2902­2914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

  6. Process Algebra Rance Cleaveland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process Algebra Rance Cleaveland Department of Computer Science P.O. Box 7534 North Carolina State York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, NY 11794-4400 USA April 7, 1999 Abstract Process algebra represents a mathematically rigorous framework for modeling con- current systems of interacting processes. The process-algebraic

  7. Non-filamentated ultra-intense and ultra-short pulse fronts in three-dimensional Raman seed amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses may be generated up to the exawatt-zetawatt regime due to parametric processes in plasmas. The minimization of unwanted plasma processes leads to operational limits which are discussed here with respect to filamentation. Transverse filamentation, which originally was derived for plane waves, is being investigated for seed pulse propagation in the so called ?-pulse limit. A three-dimensional (3D) three-wave-interaction model is the basis of the present investigation. To demonstrate the applicability of the three-wave-interaction model, the 1D pulse forms are compared with those obtained from 1D particle in cell and Vlasov simulations. Although wave-breaking may occur, the kinetic simulations show that the leading pumped pulse develops a form similar to that obtained from the three-wave-interaction model. In the main part, 2D and 3D filamentation processes of (localized) pulses are investigated with the three-wave-interaction model. It is shown that the leading pulse front can stay filamentation-free, whereas the rear parts show transverse modulations.

  8. Absolute vs. Intensity Limits for CO2 Emission Control: Performance Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sue Wing, Ian.

    We elucidate the differences between absolute and intensity-based limits of CO2 emission when there is uncertainty about the future. We demonstrate that the two limits are identical under certainty, and rigorously establish ...

  9. A proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2-2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at about 3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at increasing beam intensities for neutron science, lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation, and gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, the authors are now proposing a third cavity for the RF system which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  10. Factorial Switching Kalman Filters for Condition Monitoring in Neonatal Intensive Care 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher; Quinn, J.; McIntosh, N.

    The observed physiological dynamics of an infant receiving intensive care are affected by many possible factors, including interventions to the baby, the operation of the monitoring equipment and the state of health. The Factorial Switching Kalman...

  11. Extreme rainfall intensities and long-term rainfall risk from tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langousis, Andreas, 1981-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a methodology for the frequency of extreme rainfall intensities caused by tropical cyclones (TCs) in coastal areas. The mean rainfall field associated with a TC with maximum tangential wind speed Vmax, radius ...

  12. Improved Heat Transfer and Performance of High Intensity Combustion Systems for Reformer Furnace Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, F. D. M.; Kondratas, H. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and should enable substantial capital cost savings in new furnace applications. Recent performance improvements established from tests of high intensity combustion systems are described along with advances made in the analytical prediction of design...

  13. Determinants of energy intensity in industrialized countries : a comparison of China and India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Feiya

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of final energy per unit of economic output (usually in terms of gross domestic product, or GDP), known as energy intensity, is often used to measure the effectiveness of energy use and the consumption patterns ...

  14. Correlation of intensity fluctuations in beams generated by quasi-homogeneous sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Taco D.

    of intensity fluctuations (the Hanbury Brown­Twiss effect) that occurs in electromagnetic beams.1364/JOSAA.31.002152 1. INTRODUCTION In the mid-1950s Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) deter- mined the angular

  15. Predicting Hurricane Intensity and Structure Changes Associated with Eyewall Replacement Cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kossin, James P.

    Predicting Hurricane Intensity and Structure Changes Associated with Eyewall Replacement Cycles replacement cycles are commonly observed in tropical cyclones and are well known to cause fluctuations associated with eyewall replacement cycles in Atlantic Ocean hurricanes. The model input comprises

  16. Self-organizing discovery, recognition, and prediction of hemodynamic patterns in the intensive care unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Ronald Glen

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to properly care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), clinicians must be aware of hemodynamic patterns. In a typical ICU a variety of physiologic measurements are made continuously and intermittently in an attempt...

  17. Ultrahigh intensity laser-plasma interaction: A Lagrangian approach* J.-M. Flax+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instability leading to collisionless heating. Second, in the generation of plasma wakes using ultrahigh of the wake amplitude occurs. Third, in the generation of third-harmonic waves using ultrahigh intensity, long should also consider a fourth regime, (iv) SW

  18. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  19. A high frequency polarization intensity electrooptic modulator in BSTN ferroelectric crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Erik James

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 78% have been realized. Optical intensity modulation up to 1.5 GHz has been observed, and a 3-dB frequency value of 1.28 GHz has been achieved....

  20. Bulk ablation of soft tissue with intense ultrasound: Modeling and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mast, T. Douglas

    , the thermal de- struction of large tissue volumes is most commonly per- formed using radiofrequency RF ablation electromagnetic radiation in the 400­700 kHz range .3,4 Intense ultrasound treatment, first

  1. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX) with a High Intensity Ion Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a High Intensity Ion Beam P. K. Roy 1* , S. S. Yu 1 , W. L.12 , 043102 (2005). [6] P. K. Roy et al. , Nucl. Instrum.2005), p.4006. [16] P. K. Roy, S. S. Yu, E. Henestroza, A.

  2. Manpower planning and cycle-time reduction of a labor-intensive assembly line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Shao Chong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for Gas Lift Mandrels(GLM) in the oil and gas industry is expected to increase over the next few years, requiring Schlumberger's GLM assembly line to increase their manufacturing capacity. Given the labor-intensive ...

  3. Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometrics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xiaoyu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), has ...

  4. Energy prices and energy intensity in China : a structural decomposition analysis and econometric study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xiaoyu, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the start of its economic reforms in 1978, China's energy prices relative to other prices have increased. At the same time, its energy intensity, i.e., physical energy consumption per unit of Gross Domestic Product ...

  5. Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GHG intensity among fossil fuels. We ?nd that the relativeunder a RFS while world fossil fuel price is the same orwith the more-polluting fossil fuels being consumed abroad

  6. Generation and search of axion-like light particle using intense crystalline field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Liao

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense electric field $\\sim 10^{10}-10^{11}$ V/cm in crystal has been known for a long time and has wide applications. We study the conversion of axion-like light particle and photon in the intense electric field in crystal. We find that the conversion of axion-like particle and photon happens for energy larger than keV range. We propose search of axion-like light particle using the intense crystalline field. We discuss the solar axion search experiment and a variety of shining-through-wall experiment using crystalline field. Due to the intense crystalline field which corresponds to magnetic field $\\sim 10^4-10^5$ Tesla these experiments are very interesting. In particular these experiments can probe the mass range of axion-like particle from eV to keV.

  7. Optically Interconnected Data Center Architecture for Bandwidth Intensive Energy Efficient Networking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    sophisticated cooling systems, further reducing overall data center energy efficiencies. Moreover, measurements feasibility of the system. Keywords: optical network architecture, data center networks, reconfigurableOptically Interconnected Data Center Architecture for Bandwidth Intensive Energy Efficient

  8. Intensity-based Valuation of Residential Mortgages: an Analytically Tractable Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    Intensity-based Valuation of Residential Mortgages: an Analytically Tractable Model Vyacheslav in Mathematical Finance Abstract This paper presents an analytically tractable valuation model for residential. Our solution method is based on explicitly constructing an eigenfunction expansion of the pricing

  9. Zone folding effect in Raman G-band intensity of twisted bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresselhaus, Mildred

    The G-band Raman intensity is calculated for twisted bilayer graphene as a function of laser excitation energy based on the extended tight binding method. Here we explicitly consider the electron-photon and electron-phonon ...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Magnesium-Intensive Front End Sub-Structure Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by USAMP at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about magnesium-intensive front end sub...

  11. aperture-based intensity modulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Optics, John Wiley, New York, NY, USA. ... Webb, S.: 2001a, Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, Institute of Physics ... Ying X 2004-05-25 2 Trellis coded modulation and...

  12. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

  13. The effects of stocking density on two Tilapia species raised in an intensive culture system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson-Arzapalo, Anne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS'OF STOCKING DENSITY ON TWO TILAPIA SPECIES RAISED IN AN INTENSIVE CULTURE SYSTEM A Thesis by ANNE HENDERSON-ARZAPALO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December l979 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Science THE EFFECTS OF STOCKING DENSITY ON TWO TILAPIA SPECIES RAISED IN AN INTENSIVE CULTURE SYSTEM A Thesis by ANNE HENDERSON-ARZAPALO Approved as to style...

  14. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  15. Drift Compression of an Intense Neutralized Ion Beam P. K. Roy,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Drift Compression of an Intense Neutralized Ion Beam P. K. Roy,1 S. S. Yu,1 E. Henestroza,1 A. Waldron,1 D. R. Welch,2 C. Thoma,2 A. B. Sefkow,3 E. P. Gilson,3 P. C. Efthimion,3 and R. C. Davidson3 1 of a velocity-tailored, intense neutralized K beam at 300 keV, 25 mA has been demonstrated. The compression

  16. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  17. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, J; Fellenz, B; Fitzgerald, J; Heikkinen, D; Ibrahim, M A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. During Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  18. Nighttime atmospheric stability changes and their effects on the temporal intensity of a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jeffrey Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TEMPORAL INTENSITY OF A MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX A Thesis JEFFREY SCOTT HOVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Meteorology NIGHTTIME ATMOSPHERIC STABILITY CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TEMPORAL INTENSITY OF A MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX A Thesis JEFFREY SCOTT HOVIS Approved as to style...

  19. A Business Process Explorer: Recovering Business Processes from Business Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Ying

    processes, and visualizing business processes using commercial business process modeling tools, such as IBM WebSphere Business Modeler (WBM) [4]. Traceability between business processes and business1 A Business Process Explorer: Recovering Business Processes from Business Applications Jin Guo

  20. Comparison of the Evolution of Energy Intensity in Spain and in the EU15. Why is Spain Different?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocaña, Carlos

    Energy intensity in Spain has increased since 1990, while the opposite has happened in the EU15. Decomposition analysis of primary energy intensity ratios has been used to identify which are the key sectors driving the ...

  1. Intensity-dependent enhancements in high-order above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosevic, D. B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hasovic, E.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Busuladzic, M. [Medical Faculty, University of Sarajevo, Cekalusa 90, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements of groups of peaks of high-order above-threshold-ionization spectra of rare-gas atoms are investigated using an improved version of the strong-field approximation, which realistically models the respective atom. Two types of enhancements are found and explained in terms of constructive interference of the contributions of a large number of long quantum orbits. The first type is observed for intensities slightly below channel closings. Its intensity dependence is comparatively smooth and it is generated by comparatively few (of the order of 20) orbits. The second type occurs precisely at channel closings and exhibits an extremely sharp intensity dependence. It requires constructive interference of a very large number of long orbits (several hundreds) and generates cusps in the electron spectrum at integer multiples of the laser-photon energy. An interpretation of these enhancements as a threshold phenomenon is also given. An interplay of different types of the threshold anomalies is observed. The position of both types of enhancements, in the photoelectron-energy--laser-intensity plane, shifts to the next channel closing intensity with the change of the ground-state parity. The enhancements gradually disappear with decreasing laser pulse duration. This confirms the interpretation of enhancements as a consequence of the interference of long strong-laser-field-induced quantum orbits.

  2. Intensity inhomogeneity correction for magnetic resonance imaging of human brain at 7T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Kudo, Kohsuke, E-mail: kkudo@huhp.hokudai.ac.jp; Goodwin, Jonathan; Harada, Taisuke [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and efficacy for intensity inhomogeneity correction of various sequences of the human brain in 7T MRI using the extended version of the unified segmentation algorithm. Materials: Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with four different sequences (2D spin echo [SE], 3D fast SE, 2D fast spoiled gradient echo, and 3D time-of-flight) by using a 7T MRI system. Intensity inhomogeneity correction was performed using the “New Segment” module in SPM8 with four different values (120, 90, 60, and 30 mm) of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in Gaussian smoothness. The uniformity in signals in the entire white matter was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (CV); mean signal intensities between the subcortical and deep white matter were compared, and contrast between subcortical white matter and gray matter was measured. The length of the lenticulostriate (LSA) was measured on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the original and corrected images. Results: In all sequences, the CV decreased as the FWHM value decreased. The differences of mean signal intensities between subcortical and deep white matter also decreased with smaller FWHM values. The contrast between white and gray matter was maintained at all FWHM values. LSA length was significantly greater in corrected MIP than in the original MIP images. Conclusions: Intensity inhomogeneity in 7T MRI can be successfully corrected using SPM8 for various scan sequences.

  3. Reduced crude processing with Ashland's RCC process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zandona, O.J.; Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashland Oil has long recognized the need to improve the process for the direct conversion of residual feedstocks into transportation fuels and other lighter products. The reduced crude oil conversion (RCC) unit now under construction at the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, refinery was developed to meet these demands. The facility incorporates RCC process innovations and recent catalyst technology improvements, and provides increased operating flexibility. Heavier, higher-sulfur crude oils can be processed under several economically attractive scenarios. They allow for an excellent balance between the production of transportation fuels, and reduced amounts of heavy fractions. An outstanding feature of the RCC process is the highoctane quality of full-boiling-range gasoline that results when converting residual feedstocks.

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 013405 (2011) Precision calculation of above-threshold multiphoton ionization in intense short-wavelength laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in intense short-wavelength laser fields: The momentum-space approach and time-dependent generalized to the advance of the intense and short pulse laser technology, the study of ATI phenomenon continues to attract) dynamics of atomic systems driven by intense laser fields. In this approach, the electron wave function

  5. Waste processing air cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases.

  6. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  7. Graduate Program Selection Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selection Process Graduate Program Selection Process Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in...

  8. BCP Annual Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 BCP Annual Rate Process (FY 2016 Base Charge & Rate) Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 11, 2015 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4...

  9. Design for Process Integration and Efficient Energy Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, A. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intensive. A refinery can internally consume anything between 5% to 10% of the crude feed as fuel, depending upon the complexity of the processing plant. Since oil refining is such a significant energy user, this paper gives particular attention... shows how Refinery Operating costs in Western Europe have changed in the period 1972 to 1980. 593 ESL-IE-82-04-113 Proceedings from the Fourth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 4-7, 1982 Figure 1. Refinery Operating Costs...

  10. Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harkins, H. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this energy source. Byproduct steam is produced in the recovery of chemicals in pulp and paper industry black liquor recovery boilers. On a bulk basis consideration, a large percentage of process steam is required by the energy intensive in dustries... SYSTEM Gasification Numerous programs are underway for gasification of solid fuels and heavy oils and it is among these systems that many feel medium Btu gas will be pro duced for use in combined cycle systems. Many of the problems now facing...

  11. Polarization dependence of two-photon transition intensities in rare-earth doped crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Nguyen, An-Dien

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarization dependence technique has been developed as a tool to investigate phonon scattering (PS), electronic Raman scattering (ERS), and two-photon absorption (TPA) transition intensities in vanadate and phosphate crystals. A general theory for the polarization dependence (PD) of two-photon transition intensities has been given. Expressions for the polarization dependent behavior of two-photon transition intensities have been tabulated for the 32 crystallographic point groups. When the wavefunctions for the initial and final states of a rare-earth doped in crystals are known, explicit PD expressions with no unknown parameters can be obtained. A spectroscopic method for measuring and interpreting phonon and ERS intensities has been developed to study PrVO{sub 4}, NdVO{sub 4}, ErVO{sub 4}, and TmVO{sub 4} crystals. Relative phonon intensities with the polarization of the incident and scattered light arbitrarily varied were accurately predicted and subsequently used for alignment and calibration in ERS measurements in these systems for the first time. Since ERS and PS intensities generally follow different polarization curves as a function of polar angles, the two can be uniquely identified by comparing their respective polarization behavior. The most crucial application of the technique in ERS spectroscopy is the establishment of a stringent test for the Axe theory. For the first time, the F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} ratio extracted from the experimental fits of the ERS intensities were compared with those predicted by theories which include both the second- and third-order contributions. Relatively good agreement between the fitted values of F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} and the predicted values using the second-order theory has been found.

  12. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  13. Semisolid Metal Processing Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apelian,Diran

    2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical modeling and simulations of semisolid filling processes remains a critical issue in understanding and optimizing the process. Semisolid slurries are non-Newtonian materials that exhibit complex rheological behavior. There the way these slurries flow in cavities is very different from the way liquid in classical casting fills cavities. Actually filling in semisolid processing is often counter intuitive

  14. Radiochemical Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in development, scale- up and deployment of first-of-a-kind processes to solve environmental problems in the fundamental chemistry of 4 RPL: RadiochemicalProcessingLaboratory Researchers design, build and operate small-scale-liquid suspensions. Developing Radiochemical Processes at All Scales Among the key features of the RPL are extensive

  15. Bolt Manufacture: Process Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    file · Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3 D P i ti· 3-D Printing · Light Engineered Net Shaping (LENS Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 20 #12;3D Printing Process (Soligen) ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 21 #12;3D Printing Head (Soligen)3D Printing

  16. Engineering in Process Metallurgy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    MATS3003 Engineering in Process Metallurgy Course Outline Session 1, 2014 School of Materials ................................................................................................... 7 Course Objective To introduce the basic operations in process metallurgy and to provide Course at a Glance What you will learn Weeks Assessment Task Introduction - What is process metallurgy

  17. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrofits for ESCOs and ESCO Customers. ” Nationalperformance of the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from theInstitutional Markets for ESCO Services: Comparing Programs,

  18. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    savings performance contract (ESPC)—the guaranteed savingsCongress permanently authorized ESPC in the federal market,performance contracting (ESPC) legislation. Life-cycle Cost

  19. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency and Energy Services definition of an ESCO, indefinition is consistent with the European Commission Directive (2006/32/EC) on Energy

  20. Nonaqueous processing methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coops, M.S.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature process utilizing molten salt extraction from molten metal alloys has been developed for purification of spent power reactor fuels. Experiments with laboratory-scale processing operations show that purification and throughput parameters comparable to the Barnwell Purex process can be achieved by pyrochemical processing in equipment one-tenth the size, with all wastes being discharged as stable metal alloys at greatly reduced volume and disposal cost. This basic technology can be developed for large-scale processing of spent reactor fuels. 13 references, 4 figures.

  1. On the description of the GCR intensity in the last three solar minima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalinin, M S; Krainev, M B; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the main characteristic features in the heliospheric parameters important for the GCR intensity modulation for the last three solar minima (1986--1987, 1996--1997 and 2008--2009). The model for the GCR intensity modulation is considered and the set of the model parameters is chosen which allows the description of the observed GCR intensity distributions at the moments of the maximum GCR intensity in two solar minima (1987 and 1997) normal for the second half of the last century. Then we try to describe with the above model and set of parameters the unusually soft GCR energy spectra at the moments of the maximum GCR intensity in the last solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24 (2009). Our main conclusion is that the most simple way to do so is to reduce the size of the modulation region and, probably, change the rigidity dependence of the diffusion coefficient. The change of both parameters is substantiated by the observations of the solar wind and heliospheric magnetic field.

  2. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  3. Laser Processing of Metals and Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthilraja Singaravelu

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser offers a unique set of opportunities for precise delivery of high quality coherent energy. This energy can be tailored to alter the properties of material allowing a very flexible adjustment of the interaction that can lead to melting, vaporization, or just surface modification. Nowadays laser systems can be found in nearly all branches of research and industry for numerous applications. Sufficient evidence exists in the literature to suggest that further advancements in the field of laser material processing will rely significantly on the development of new process schemes. As a result they can be applied in various applications starting from fundamental research on systems, materials and processes performed on a scientific and technical basis for the industrial needs. The interaction of intense laser radiation with solid surfaces has extensively been studied for many years, in part, for development of possible applications. In this thesis, I present several applications of laser processing of metals and polymers including polishing niobium surface, producing a superconducting phase niobium nitride and depositing thin films of niobium nitride and organic material (cyclic olefin copolymer). The treated materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution optical microscopy, surface profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Power spectral density (PSD) spectra computed from AFM data gives further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the treated niobium.

  4. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorf, Mikhail A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B {approx} 100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasma electrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electron dynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.

  5. SU-E-T-08: A Convolution Model for Head Scatter Fluence in the Intensity Modulated Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M; Mo, X; Chen, Y; Parnell, D; Key, S; Olivera, G; Galmarini, W; Lu, W

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To efficiently calculate the head scatter fluence for an arbitrary intensity-modulated field with any source distribution using the source occlusion model. Method: The source occlusion model with focal and extra focal radiation (Jaffray et al, 1993) can be used to account for LINAC head scatter. In the model, the fluence map of any field shape at any point can be calculated via integration of the source distribution within the visible range, as confined by each segment, using the detector eye's view. A 2D integration would be required for each segment and each fluence plane point, which is time-consuming, as an intensity-modulated field contains typically tens to hundreds of segments. In this work, we prove that the superposition of the segmental integrations is equivalent to a simple convolution regardless of what the source distribution is. In fact, for each point, the detector eye's view of the field shape can be represented as a function with the origin defined at the point's pinhole reflection through the center of the collimator plane. We were thus able to reduce hundreds of source plane integration to one convolution. We calculated the fluence map for various 3D and IMRT beams and various extra-focal source distributions using both the segmental integration approach and the convolution approach and compared the computation time and fluence map results of both approaches. Results: The fluence maps calculated using the convolution approach were the same as those calculated using the segmental approach, except for rounding errors (<0.1%). While it took considerably longer time to calculate all segmental integrations, the fluence map calculation using the convolution approach took only ?1/3 of the time for typical IMRT fields with ?100 segments. Conclusions: The convolution approach for head scatter fluence calculation is fast and accurate and can be used to enhance the online process.

  6. QoS support for end users of I/O-intensive applications using shared storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Marion Kei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Xuechen [WAYNE STATE UNIV; Jiang, Song [WAYNE STATE UNIV.

    2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    I/O-intensive applications are becoming increasingly common on today's high-performance computing systems. While performance of compute-bound applications can be effectively guaranteed with techniques such as space sharing or QoS-aware process scheduling, it remains a challenge to meet QoS requirements for end users of I/O-intensive applications using shared storage systems because it is difficult to differentiate I/O services for different applications with individual quality requirements. Furthermore, it is difficult for end users to accurately specify performance goals to the storage system using I/O-related metrics such as request latency or throughput. As access patterns, request rates, and the system workload change in time, a fixed I/O performance goal, such as bounds on throughput or latency, can be expensive to achieve and may not lead to a meaningful performance guarantees such as bounded program execution time. We propose a scheme supporting end-users QoS goals, specified in terms of program execution time, in shared storage environments. We automatically translate the users performance goals into instantaneous I/O throughput bounds using a machine learning technique, and use dynamically determined service time windows to efficiently meet the throughput bounds. We have implemented this scheme in the PVFS2 parallel file system and have conducted an extensive evaluation. Our results show that this scheme can satisfy realistic end-user QoS requirements by making highly efficient use of the I/O resources. The scheme seeks to balance programs attainment of QoS requirements, and saves as much of the remaining I/O capacity as possible for best-effort programs.

  7. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large bog in the Glacial Lake Agassiz cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal conductivity of 0Ð5 W m 1 °C 1

  8. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 21, 369378 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    report the results of an investigation on the processes controlling heat transport in peat under a large at 12 depth intervals from 0 to 400 cm within a vertical peat profile at the crest of the bog at sub-daily intervals. We also recorded air temperature 1 m above the peat surface. We calculate a peat thermal

  9. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  10. Narrowband inverse Compton scattering x-ray sources at high laser intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seipt, D; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrowband x- and gamma-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering of laser pulses suffer from a limitation of the allowed laser intensity due to the onset of nonlinear effects that increase their bandwidth. It has been suggested that laser pulses with a suitable frequency modulation could compensate this ponderomotive broadening and reduce the bandwidth of the spectral lines, which would allow to operate narrowband Compton sources in the high-intensity regime. In this paper we, therefore, present the theory of nonlinear Compton scattering in a frequency modulated intense laser pulse. We systematically derive the optimal frequency modulation of the laser pulse from the scattering matrix element of nonlinear Compton scattering, taking into account the electron spin and recoil. We show that, for some particular scattering angle, an optimized frequency modulation completely cancels the ponderomotive broadening for all harmonics of the backscattered light. We also explore how sensitive this compensation ...

  11. Constant-intensity waves and their modulation instability in non-Hermitian potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makris, Konstantinos G; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In all of the diverse areas of science where waves play an important role, one of the most fundamental solutions of the corresponding wave equation is a stationary wave with constant intensity. The most familiar example is that of a plane wave propagating in free space. In the presence of any Hermitian potential, a wave's constant intensity is, however, immediately destroyed due to scattering. Here we show that this fundamental restriction is conveniently lifted when working with non-Hermitian potentials. In particular, we present a whole new class of waves that have constant intensity in the presence of linear as well as of nonlinear inhomogeneous media with gain and loss. These solutions allow us to study, for the first time, the fundamental phenomenon of modulation instability in an inhomogeneous environment. Our results pose a new challenge for the experiments on non-Hermitian scattering that have recently been put forward.

  12. Constant-intensity waves and their modulation instability in non-Hermitian potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantinos G. Makris; Ziad H. Musslimani; Demetrios N. Christodoulides; Stefan Rotter

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In all of the diverse areas of science where waves play an important role, one of the most fundamental solutions of the corresponding wave equation is a stationary wave with constant intensity. The most familiar example is that of a plane wave propagating in free space. In the presence of any Hermitian potential, a wave's constant intensity is, however, immediately destroyed due to scattering. Here we show that this fundamental restriction is conveniently lifted when working with non-Hermitian potentials. In particular, we present a whole new class of waves that have constant intensity in the presence of linear as well as of nonlinear inhomogeneous media with gain and loss. These solutions allow us to study, for the first time, the fundamental phenomenon of modulation instability in an inhomogeneous environment. Our results pose a new challenge for the experiments on non-Hermitian scattering that have recently been put forward.

  13. Increase in the Intensity of Postmonsoon Bay of Bengal Tropical Cyclones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The post-monsoon (October-November) tropical cyclone (TC) season in the Bay of Bengal has spawned many of the deadliest storms in recorded history. Here it is shown that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs, and the contribution of major TCs to total TC power, increased during 1981-2010. It is found that changes in environmental parameters are responsible for the observed increases in TC intensity. Increases in sea surface temperature and upper ocean heat content made the ocean more conducive to TC development, while enhanced convective instability made the atmosphere more favorable for the growth of TCs. The largest changes in the atmosphere and ocean occurred in the eastern Bay of Bengal, where nearly all major TCs form. These changes are part of positive linear trends, suggesting that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs may continue to increase in the future.

  14. Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

  15. The effects of oxygen concentration and light intensity on the photostability of zwitterionic chromophores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, S. G.; Williams, G. V. M.; Lochocki, B.; Bhuiyan, M. D. H.; Kay, A. J.; Quilty, J. W. [Photonics Group, Industrial Research Ltd., P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photostability measurements at different oxygen partial pressures and light intensities have been made on host-guest films containing amorphous polycarbonate and an organic chromophore with a high second order nonlinear optical figure of merit. We find that the photodegradation quantum efficiency dramatically increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure. At very low oxygen partial pressures (8x10{sup -6} bar) the average number of photons required to photodegrade a chromophore is as high as 2x10{sup 8} at 655 nm. The photodegradation quantum efficiency in air is observed to decrease with increasing optical intensity. We show that this is due to a reduced oxygen content in the film caused by chromophore photodegradation rather than ground state bleaching. There is an anomalous increase and then decrease in the photoluminescence intensity that cannot easily be explained.

  16. Nonlinear relativistic single-electron Thomson scattering power spectrum for incoming laser of arbitrary intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R. F. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I.; Guasp, J.; Castejon, F. [Asociacion Euratom/Ciemat para Fusion, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical nonlinear incoherent Thomson scattering power spectrum from a single relativistic electron with incoming laser radiation of any intensity, investigated numerically by the present authors in a previous publication, displayed both an approximate quadratic behavior in frequency and a redshift of the power spectrum for high intensity incoming radiation. The present work is devoted to justify, in a more general setup, those numerical findings. Those justifications are reinforced by extending suitably analytical approaches, as developed by other authors. Moreover, our analytical treatment exhibits differences between the Doppler-like frequencies for linear and circular polarization of the incoming radiation. Those differences depend nonlinearly on the laser intensity and on the electron initial velocity and do not appear to have been displayed by previous authors. Those Doppler-like frequencies and their differences are validated by new Monte Carlo computations beyond our previuos ones and reported here.

  17. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T. [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Center for High Energy Density Science, C1510, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  18. Optimization of infrared two-color multicycle field synthesis for intense-isolated-attosecond-pulse generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Katsumi [Extreme Photonics Research Group, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the optimization of the two-color synthesis method for generating an intense isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) in the multicycle regime. By mixing an infrared assistant pulse with a Ti:sapphire main pulse, we show that an IAP can be produced using a multicycle two-color pulse with a duration longer than 30 fs. We also discuss the influence of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) and the relative intensity on the generation of IAPs. By optimizing the wavelength of the assistant field, IAP generation becomes insensitive to the CEP slip. Therefore, the optimized two-color method enables us to relax the requirements of pulse duration and easily produce the IAP with a conventional multicycle laser pulse. In addition, it enables us to markedly suppress the ionization of the harmonic medium. This is a major advantage for efficiently generating intense IAPs from a neutral medium by applying the appropriate phase-matching and energy-scaling techniques.

  19. A Review of Loss Mechanisms and Key Design Choices for High Intensity Hadron Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warsop, C.M. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The peak performance reached in a high intensity ring is closely related to the ability to minimise and control beam loss. The need to increase intensity has to be balanced against possible increased induction of radioactivity and the risk of interrupted operations. Losses are dependent on many factors and influence most aspects of machine design. In principle, only one aspect of low loss design needs to be sub-optimal to impose severe intensity limitations. Here, an outline is given of the key factors that need to be considered, focussing primarily on low to medium energy proton machines. Topics include space charge, instabilities, electron effects, injection and main lattice choices. Finally, we note that major progress has been made in refining low loss designs but there is still important work to be done in predicting loss levels and distributions in detail.

  20. Multiple hot images from an obscuration in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Youwen; Wen Shuangchun; You Kaiming; Tang Zhixiang; Deng Jianqin; Zhang Lifu; Fan Dianyuan

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical investigation on the formation of hot images in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks, to disclose the distribution and intensity of hot images in high-power disk amplifiers. It is shown that multiple hot images from an obscuration may be formed, instead of one hot image as reported previously in the literature. This gives a clear explanation for the curious damage pattern of hot images, namely, damage sites appearing on alternating optics in periodic trains. Further analysis demonstrates that the distribution and intensity of hot images depend closely on the number of Kerr medium disks, the distance from the obscuration to the front of the first disk downstream, the space between two neighboring disks, and the thickness and B integral of each disk. Moreover, we take two cascaded Kerr medium disks for example to detail multiple hot images from an obscuration and confirm the theoretical results by numerical simulations.

  1. Intensive Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin andInterimInvokingInspector XE 2013

  2. Future Steelmaking Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. R. J. Fruehan

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing demand for an ironmaking process with lower capital cost, energy consumption and emissions than a blast furnace. It is the hypothesis of the present work that an optimized combination of two reasonable proven technologies will greatly enhance the overall process. An example is a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) linked to a smelter (e.g., AISI, HIsmelt). The objective of this research is to select promising process combinations, develop energy, materials balance and productivity models for the individual processes, conduct a limited amount of basic research on the processes and evaluate the process combinations. Three process combinations were selected with input from the industrial partners. The energy-materials and productivity models for the RHF, smelter, submerged arc furnace and CIRCOFER were developed. Since utilization of volatiles in coal is critical for energy and CO{sub 2} emission reduction, basic research on this topic was also conducted. The process models developed are a major product developed in this research. These models can be used for process evaluation by the industry. The process combinations of an RHF-Smelter and a simplified CIRCOFER-Smelter appear to be promising. Energy consumption is reduced and productivity increased. Work on this project is continuing using funds from other sources.

  3. RECORD-SETTING COSMIC-RAY INTENSITIES IN 2009 AND 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of record-setting intensities of cosmic-ray nuclei from C to Fe, made with the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer carried on the Advanced Composition Explorer in orbit about the inner Sun-Earth Lagrangian point. In the energy interval from {approx}70 to {approx}450 MeV nucleon{sup -1}, near the peak in the near-Earth cosmic-ray spectrum, the measured intensities of major species from C to Fe were each 20%-26% greater in late 2009 than in the 1997-1998 minimum and previous solar minima of the space age (1957-1997). The elevated intensities reported here and also at neutron monitor energies were undoubtedly due to several unusual aspects of the solar cycle 23/24 minimum, including record-low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) intensities, an extended period of reduced IMF turbulence, reduced solar-wind dynamic pressure, and extremely low solar activity during an extended solar minimum. The estimated parallel diffusion coefficient for cosmic-ray transport based on measured solar-wind properties was 44% greater in 2009 than in the 1997-1998 solar-minimum period. In addition, the weaker IMF should result in higher cosmic-ray drift velocities. Cosmic-ray intensity variations at 1 AU are found to lag IMF variations by 2-3 solar rotations, indicating that significant solar modulation occurs inside {approx}20 AU, consistent with earlier galactic cosmic-ray radial-gradient measurements. In 2010, the intensities suddenly decreased to 1997 levels following increases in solar activity and in the inclination of the heliospheric current sheet. We describe the conditions that gave cosmic rays greater access to the inner solar system and discuss some of their implications.

  4. Preliminary overview of innovative industrial-materials processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hane, G.J.; Hauser, S.G.; Blahnik, D.E.; Eakin, D.E.; Gurwell, W.E.; Williams, T.A.; Abarcar, R.; Szekely, J.; Ashton, W.B.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In evaluating the potential for industrial energy conservation, 45 candidate processes were identified. The chemical and the iron and steel industries presented the most well-developed candidates, whereas those processes identified in the pulp and paper and textiles industries were the most speculative. Examples of the candidate processes identified include direct steelmaking and ore-to-powder systems, which potentially require 30 to 40% less energy, respectively, than conventional steelmaking systems; membrane separations and freeze crystallization, which offer up to 90% reductions in energy use when compared with distillation; the cold processing of cement, which offers a 50% reduction in energy requirements; and the dry forming of paper, which offers a 25% reduction in the energy needed for papermaking. A review of all the industries revealed that the revolutionary alternatives often use similar concepts in avoiding current process inefficiencies. These concepts include using chemical, physical, or biological processes to replace thermally intensive processes; using specific forms of energy to minimize wasteful thermal diffusion; using chemical, biological, or ultrasonic processes to replace physical reduction; combining multiple processing steps into a single reactor; using a dry processing to eliminate energy needed for evaporation; and using sterilization or biotechnology to reduce the need for refrigeration.

  5. Unveiling temporal correlations characteristic to phase transition in the intensity of a fibre laser radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Aragoneses; Laura Carpi; Nikita Tarasov; Dmitry V. Churkin; M. C. Torrent; Cristina Masoller; Sergei K. Turitsyn

    2015-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We use advanced statistical tools of time-series analysis to characterize the dynamical complexity of the transition to optical wave turbulence in a fibre laser. Ordinal analysis and the horizontal visibility graph applied to the experimentally measured laser output intensity reveal the presence of temporal correlations during the transition from the laminar to the turbulent lasing regimes. Both methods unveil coherent structures with well defined time-scales and strong correlations both, in the timing of the laser pulses and in their peak intensities. Our approach is generic and may be used in other complex systems that undergo similar transitions involving the generation of extreme fluctuations.

  6. Effect of turbulent velocity on the \\HI intensity fluctuation power spectrum from spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prasun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use numerical simulations to investigate effect of turbulent velocity on the power spectrum of \\HI intensity from external galaxies when (a) all emission is considered, (b) emission with velocity range smaller than the turbulent velocity dispersion is considered. We found that for case (a) the intensity fluctuation depends directly only on the power spectrum of the column density, whereas for case (b) it depends only on the turbulent velocity fluctuation. We discuss the implications of this result in real observations of \\HI fluctuations.

  7. Observations of beam-beam effects at high intensities in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, W; Laface, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Giachino, R; Schaumann, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First observations with colliding beams in the LHC with bunch intensities close to nominal and above are reported. In 2010 the LHC initially operated with few bunches spaced around the circumference. Beam-beam tune shifts exceeding significantly the design value have been observed. In a later stage crossing angles were introduced around the experiments to allow the collisions of bunch trains. We report the first experience with head-on as well as long range interactions of high intensity bunches and discuss the possible performance reach

  8. Picosecond buildup and relaxation of intense stimulated emission in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ageeva, N. N.; Bronevoi, I. L., E-mail: bil@cplire.ru; Zabegaev, D. N.; Krivonosov, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotelnikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the idea developed previously based on circumstantial evidence, we have found that stimulated emission emerges in GaAs and its intensity increases with a picosecond delay relative to the front of powerful picosecond optical pumping that produced a dense electron-hole plasma. The emission intensity relaxes with decreasing pumping with a characteristic time of {approx}10 ps. We have derived the dependences of the delay time, the relaxation time, and the duration of the picosecond emission pulse on its photon energy. The estimates based on the fact that the relaxation of emission is determined by electron-hole plasma cooling correspond to the measured relaxation time.

  9. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Aiello; F. Ameli; M. Anghinolfi; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; B. Bouhadef; C. Bozza; G. Cacopardo; M. Calamai; C. Calì; A. Capone; F. Caruso; A. Ceres; T. Chiarusi; M. Circella; R. Cocimano; R. Coniglione; M. Costa; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; V. De Luca; N. Deniskina; G. De Rosa; F. Di Capua; C. Distefano; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; F. Garufi; V. Giordano; A. Gmerk; R. Grasso; G. Grella; C. Hugon; M. Imbesi; V. Kulikovskiy; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; K. P. Leismueller; E. Leonora; P. Litrico; A. Lonardo; F. Longhitano; D. Lo Presti; E. Maccioni; A. Margiotta; A. Martini; R. Masullo; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; R. Papaleo; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; C. Pugliatti; S. Pulvirenti; A. Orselli; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Sanguineti; P. Sapienza; V. Sciacca; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; F. Speziale; M. Spina; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; S. M. Stellacci; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; C. Ventura; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  10. Metal enrichment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schindler; A. Diaferio

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many processes that can transport gas from the galaxies to their environment and enrich the environment in this way with metals. These metal enrichment processes have a large influence on the evolution of both the galaxies and their environment. Various processes can contribute to the gas transfer: ram-pressure stripping, galactic winds, AGN outflows, galaxy-galaxy interactions and others. We review their observational evidence, corresponding simulations, their efficiencies, and their time scales as far as they are known to date. It seems that all processes can contribute to the enrichment. There is not a single process that always dominates the enrichment, because the efficiencies of the processes vary strongly with galaxy and environmental properties.

  11. Poisson Point Processes Let (S ) be as in the preceding lectures. The goal of this lecture is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoshnevisan, Davar

    . A stochastic process := {(A)}0A is a Poisson point process with intensity [written as PPP()] if: (1) For all) for all A . Theorem 2. PPP() exists. Once you learn why PPP() exists, you should convince yourself does the job. Theorem 3 on page 23 yields the following byproduct for PPP's. Proposition 3

  12. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with good mechanical properties - Loading approaching targets - Process parameter optimization necessary to make thinner films with better density characteristics Images of dry...

  13. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  14. EMSL - Energy Materials & Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy Energy Materials and Processes focuses on the dynamic transformation mechanisms and physical and chemical properties at critical interfaces in catalysts and energy materials...

  15. Robust Markov Decision Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Probability and Measure. Wiley Blackwell, 1995. [8] E. Delage and S. Mannor. Percentile optimization for Markov decision processes with parameter uncertainty

  16. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  17. Fuel Processing Valri Lightner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Catalysts for Autothermal Reforming · Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor · Hydrogen Enhancement #12;Fuel Applications · Fuel Cell Distributed Power Package Unit: Fuel Processing Based on Autothermal Cyclic Reforming

  18. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  19. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  20. Business Process Modeling for developing Process Oriented IT Systems Track: Business Process Management Tools and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Business Process Modeling for developing Process Oriented IT Systems Track: Business Process should be like. Therefore, business process modeling becomes a pre-requisite for system requirements, the paradigm of Business Process Management contrasts with traditional information system development, which

  1. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  2. Analysis of Process Variable Effects on the Roller Imprinting Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Hayse-Gregson, Stuart; Valdez, Rodolfo; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of metal forming processes,” Computers and Structures, Vol.2006). “A roller embossing process for rapid fabrication ofdesign of industrial forging processes,” Journal of Material

  3. Internal-conversion process in superintense ultrashort x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kis, Daniel; Kalman, Peter; Keszthelyi, Tamas; Szivos, Janos [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Technics, Department of Nuclear Energy, Muegyetem rkpt. 9, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Budafoki ut 8. F. I. I. 10, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron-nucleus interaction in a super-intense few-cycle x-ray pulse is investigated. The super-intense few-cycle x-ray pulse-induced internal conversion (IC) process is discussed in detail. The x-ray laser-pulse induced IC coefficient is calculated, and in particular, it is derived in the case of a pulse of Gaussian shape and for a bound-free electron transition. The IC coefficient of the IC process induced by a super-intense few-cycle soft-x-ray laser pulse in the case of the {sup 99m}Tc isomer is determined numerically. The results obtained for the IC coefficient show significant carrier angular frequency, carrier-envelope phase, and pulse-length dependencies. The infinite pulse-length limit and experimental aspects are also discussed.

  4. Fiber Bragg grating inscription by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser light: comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikogosyan, David N.

    Fiber Bragg grating inscription by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser light: comparison with other 264-nm laser light and a phase mask technique, Bragg grating inscription in a range of different, that result in a significant photosensitivity enhancement of the in- vestigated fibers in comparison

  5. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical James B. Elsner1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kossin, James P.

    cyclones. We note separate upward trends in the estimated lifetime-maximum wind speeds of the veryLETTERS The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones James B. Elsner1 , James P. Kossin2 & Thomas H. Jagger1 Atlantic tropical cyclones are getting stronger on average, with a 30-year

  6. Preliminary tests of a second harmonic rf system for the intense pulsed neutron source synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx. 3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. Accelerator improvements are being directed at (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science, (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation, and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. We are now proposing a third cavity for the RF system which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses by providing more RF voltage at maximum acceleration. This paper presents an outline of the expected benefits together with recent results obtained during low energy operation with one of the two existing cavities operating at the second harmonic (2f/sub 0/).

  7. Proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the intense pulsed neutron source rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx.3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at: (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science; (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation; and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, we are now proposing a third cavity for the RF systems which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  8. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  9. Nonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    describe the plasma perturbations well.5 Here, we focus on the general case where the plasma density hasNonlinear plasma waves excitation by intense ion beams in background plasma Igor D. Kaganovich, Edward A. Startsev, and Ronald C. Davidson Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton

  10. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Craxton, R. Stephen (Rochester, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  11. Title of dissertation: Precision Control of Intense Electron Beams in a Low-Energy Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: Precision Control of Intense Electron Beams in a Low-Energy Ring. Research reported in this dissertation was done on the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER ELECTRON BEAMS IN A LOW-ENERGY RING by Chao Wu Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School

  12. Dirty Little Secrets: Inferring Fossil-Fuel Subsidies from Patterns in Emission Intensities1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spino, Claude

    Dirty Little Secrets: Inferring Fossil-Fuel Subsidies from Patterns in Emission Intensities1 database of directly measured fossil-fuel subsidies exists at the in- ternational level. I develop and to develop a database of comparable fossil-fuel subsidies for 155 countries from 1980 to 2010. Finally, I

  13. Dynamic Load Balancing for I/O-and Memory-Intensive Workload in Clusters Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yifeng

    Load-Balancing Scheme We consider the issue of a feedback control method in a cluster, M = {M1, ..., Mn/O, respectively, without any resource sharing. For a newly arrived job j at a node i, load balancing schemesDynamic Load Balancing for I/O- and Memory-Intensive Workload in Clusters Using a Feedback Control

  14. Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sue Wing, Ian.

    Recent events have revived interest in explaining the long-run changes in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy. We use a KLEM dataset for 35 industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ...

  15. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  16. Grazing intensity impacts soil carbon and nitrogen storage of continental steppe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qiang

    100049 China Abstract. Recent studies have underscored the importance of grasslands as potential carbon in the grasslands of northern China. Key words: carbon; carbon sequestration; carbon storage; grassland; grazingGrazing intensity impacts soil carbon and nitrogen storage of continental steppe N. P. HE,1,2 Y. H

  17. Intensity dependence narrowing of electromagnetically induced absorption in a Doppler-broadened medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimitrijevic, J.; Arsenovic, D.; Jelenkovic, B. M. [Institute of Physics, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a theoretical model for studying the interaction between linearly polarized laser light and near-degenerated Zeeman sublevels for a multiple V-type atomic system of {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}F{sub g}=2{yields}{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}F{sub e}=3 transition in {sup 87}Rb. We have calculated the laser absorption in a Hanle configuration, as well as the amplitudes and the widths of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in the range of laser intensities from 0.01 to 40 mW/cm{sup 2}. Our results, showing nonvanishing EIA amplitude, a nonmonotonic increase of the EIA width for the increase of laser intensity, and pronounced shape differences of the Hanle EIA curves at different laser intensities, are in good agreement with recent experimental results. We have found that the EIA behaves differently than the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) as a function of the laser intensity. Both the amplitude and width of the EIA have narrow maximums at 1 to 2 mW/cm{sup 2}. We have shown the strong influence of Doppler broadening of atomic transition on Hanle resonances and have suggested the explanation of it.

  18. DataRover: A Taxonomy Based Crawler for Automated Data Extraction from Data-Intensive Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davulcu, Hasan

    DataRover: A Taxonomy Based Crawler for Automated Data Extraction from Data-Intensive Websites H created a trend that brought thousands of catalogs online. Most of these websites are "taxonomy-directed". A Web site is said to be ``taxonomy- directed'' if it contains at least one taxonomy for organizing its

  19. Probing the spectral and temporal structures of high-order harmonic generation in intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I

    understanding of the origin of the har- monics with energies much in excess of the ionization po- tential Ip of the electronic wave packet with the parent ionic core. Based on this model, the cutoff energy is predicted in intense pulsed laser fields. Accurate time-dependent wave functions are obtained by means of the time

  20. Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

  1. Why did China's Energy Intensity Increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    takes up about 70 percent of the total energy consumption. Per capita oil, natural gas and coal deposits1 Why did China's Energy Intensity Increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and Policy Analysis Xiaoli Zhaoa,b, , Chunbo Mac, a Business School, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206

  2. Fractal dynamics of light scattering intensity fluctuation in disordered dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safaai, S. S.; Muniandy, S. V.; Chew, W. X.; Asgari, H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)] [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique is a simple and yet powerful technique for characterizing particle properties and dynamics in complex liquids and gases, including dusty plasmas. Intensity fluctuation in DLS experiments often studied using correlation analysis with assumption that the fluctuation is statistically stationary. In this study, the temporal variation of the nonstationary intensity fluctuation is analyzed directly to show the existence of fractal characteristics by employing wavelet scalogram approach. Wavelet based scale decomposition approach is used to separate non-scaling background noise (without dust) from scaling intensity fluctuation from dusty plasma. The Hurst exponents for light intensity fluctuation in dusty plasma at different neutral gas pressures are determined. At low pressures, weaker damping of dust motions via collisions with neutral gases results in stronger persistent behavior in the fluctuation of DLS time series. The fractal scaling Hurst exponent is demonstrated to be useful for characterizing structural phases in complex disordered dusty plasma, especially when particle configuration or sizes are highly inhomogeneous which makes the standard pair-correlation function difficult to interpret. The results from fractal analysis are compared with alternative interpretation of disorder based on approximate entropy and particle transport using mean square displacement.

  3. ECOS-LINCE: A HIGH INTENSITY MULTI-ION SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND REACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ECOS-LINCE: A HIGH INTENSITY MULTI-ION SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND REACTIONS I as part of the Long-Range Plan of the Nuclear-Physics community. LINCE will be a multi-user facility dedicated to ECOS science: fundamental physics, astrophysics, nuclear structure and reaction dynamics

  4. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

  5. Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experimenta...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experimenta... P. K. Roy, S. S. Yu,b) S. Eylon, E. Henestroza, A. Anders, F. M. Bieniosek, W. G. Greenway, B. G. Logan, W, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-3946 R. C. Davidson, P. C. Efthimion, E. P. Gilson, and A. B. Sefkow Princeton

  6. Examining food webs and trophic dynamics across a stream restoration intensity gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Examining food webs and trophic dynamics across a stream restoration intensity gradient Lena Weiss restoration, food webs, trophic dynamics Abstract: Stream ecosystems provide a plethora of important services in the stream channel itself. While there has been a recent push towards restoring these heavily degraded

  7. Development status of triple-junction solar cells optimized for low intensity low temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- III-V semiconductor materials, Jupiter, photovoltaic cells, temperature dependence, radiation effects the limit of the feasibility of photovoltaics due to the very low solar intensities (45-50W/m2 compared on the degradation behavior of the solar cells due to particle irradiation under LILT conditions which basically

  8. MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    in Europe will come from offshore sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being builtMODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models

  9. MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind

  10. Nestling begging intensity and parental effort in relation to prelaying carotenoid availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nestling begging intensity and parental effort in relation to prelaying carotenoid availability with their utilization for themselves. Carotenoid availability is thus likely to de- termine both the levels of yolk and the growing nestling, and it can be hypothesized that an increase in carotenoid availability during laying

  11. A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wauben, Wiel

    A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO Wiel M.F. Wauben precipitation sensor of Ott has been tested at KNMI in order to find out whether it is a suitable candidate for replacing the current operational KNMI precipitation gauge. Tests performed at the calibration facilities

  12. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS TPC-4 THE DEADLIEST, COSTLIEST, AND MOST INTENSE UNITED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    significant revisions to the period 1900-1914 and a revised intensity of Hurricane Andrew [Landsea et al TROPICAL CYCLONES FROM 1851 TO 2004 (AND OTHER FREQUENTLY REQUESTED HURRICANE FACTS) Updated August 2005) Christopher W. Landsea, HRD Miami Tropical Prediction Center National Hurricane Center Miami, Florida August

  13. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  14. Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while frictional dissipation rate balances the energy production rate near the radius of maximum wind (RMW

  15. Modeling proton intensity gradients and radiation dose equivalents in the inner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Modeling proton intensity gradients and radiation dose equivalents in the inner heliosphere using exposure in IP space. In this paper, we utilize EMMREM to study the radial dependence of proton peak crossfield diffusion at large radial distances. Our results show that radial dependencies of proton peak

  16. Submitted to Strain, July 2006, revised October 2006 STRESS INTENSITY FACTOR GAUGING BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the evaluation of the crack tip position (uncertainty of about 20 m for a 14.5-mm crack), stress intensity opening, identification technique, integrated approach, Photomechanics. 2 #12;1. Introduction One yielding. In many materials, small scale yielding arises in the vicinity of the crack tip. Therefore

  17. Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry to changes in C inputs following deforestation. Soil C stocks were also reduced in pastures relative, tropical deforestation Received 4 October 2005; revised version received 24 February 2006; accepted 23

  18. Math 421, Fourier Analysis Suppose we sample a periodically varying quantity such as an intensity or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offin, Dan

    Math 421, Fourier Analysis Suppose we sample a periodically varying quantity such as an intensity tone 200 400 600 800 100012001400 5 10 15 20 25 The Fourier analysis of the tone Which button was pressed? A general method was found by Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768 - 1830) in 1807. His method

  19. In addition to the intensive focus on operational energy reduction, the client and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In addition to the intensive focus on operational energy reduction, the client and design team carbon emissions of the building materials as well as the produced carbon emissions resulting from energy decommissioned Sebastiani vineyard wine vats. Due to the tight- grained quality of this old-growth wood no sealer

  20. Impact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    Impact of Low-Level Jets on the Nocturnal Urban Heat Island Intensity in Oklahoma City XIAO-MING HU Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma PETRA M. KLEIN AND MING XUE Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms and School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma

  1. Magnetic Propulsion of Intense Lithium Streams in a Tokamak Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Leonid E.

    Magnetic Propulsion of Intense Lithium Streams in a Tokamak Magnetic Field Leonid E. Zakharov the theory of magnetic propulsion of liquid lithium streams and their stability in tokamaks takes into account the propulsion e#11;ect, viscosity and the drag force due to magnetic pumping

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MOBILE COMPUTING 1 Mobile Relay Configuration in Data-intensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torng, Eric

    such as batteries or small solar panels. Therefore, a key chal- lenge faced by data-intensive WSNs is to minimize limited power supplies. We propose using low-cost disposable mobile relays to reduce the energy, it does not require complex motion planning of mobile nodes, so it can be implemented on a number of low-cost

  3. Temporary Acceleration of Electrons While Inside an Intense Electromagnetic Pulse Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Temporary Acceleration of Electrons While Inside an Intense Electromagnetic Pulse Kirk T. Mc. In­ tense electromagnetic pulses of astrophysical origin can lead to very energetic photons via potential'' associated with the envelope of the electromagnetic pulse [3]. The resulting temporary energy

  4. Temporary Acceleration of Electrons While Inside an Intense Electromagnetic Pulse Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Temporary Acceleration of Electrons While Inside an Intense Electromagnetic Pulse Kirk T. Mc. In- tense electromagnetic pulses of astrophysical origin can lead to very energetic photons via of the electromagnetic pulse [3]. The resulting temporary energy transfer to the longitudinal motion of the electron can

  5. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  6. Investigation of long-period fiber gratings induced by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikogosyan, David N.

    efficiency with that for other existing meth- ods of recording. We studied the temperature sensing properties changes in the fiber core induced by thermal heating, were developed. They include the use of a CO2 laserInvestigation of long-period fiber gratings induced by high-intensity femtosecond UV laser pulses

  7. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  8. Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials on the consumption, rather than production, of materials. Earlier analyses of trends in basic materials consumption materials consumption patterns on energy use is the recognition that physical units (kilograms) are more

  9. Journal of Philosophy, Inc. A Note on Extension, Intension, and Truth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belnap, Nuel

    Journal of Philosophy, Inc. A Note on Extension, Intension, and Truth Author(s): Anil Gupta and Nuel Belnap Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 84, No. 3 (Mar., 1987), pp. 168-174 Published by: Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2026597 Accessed: 28/05/2009 11

  10. The potential for intensity interferometry with {gamma}-ray telescope arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wit, W. J. de; Hinton, J. A.; White, R. J.; Daniel, M. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Le Bohec, S. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Holder, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware (United States)

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity interferometry exploits a quantum optical effect in order to measure objects with extremely small angular scales. The first experiment to use this technique was the Narrabri intensity interferometer, which was successfully used in the 1970s to measure 32 stellar diameters at optical wavelengths; some as small as 0.4 milli-arcseconds. The advantage of this technique, in comparison with Michelson interferometers, is that it requires only relatively crude, but large, light collectors equipped with fast (nanosecond) photon detectors. Ground-based {gamma}-ray telescope arrays have similar specifications, and a number of these observatories are now operating worldwide, with more extensive installations planned for the future. These future instruments (CTA, AGIS, completion 2015) with 30-90 telescopes will provide 400-4000 different baselines that range in length between 50 m and a kilometre. Intensity interferometry with such arrays of telescopes attains 50 {mu}-arcsecond resolution for a limiting m{sub v}{approx}8.5. Phase information can be extracted from the interferometric measurement with phase closure, allowing image reconstruction. This technique opens the possibility of a wide range of studies amongst others, probing the stellar surface activity and the dynamic AU scale circumstellar environment of stars in various crucial evolutionary stages. Here we focuse on the astrophysical potential of an intensity interferometer utilising planned new {gamma}-ray instrumentation.

  11. A reduced voltage polarization intensity electrooptic modulator in SBN:60 utilizing a step strain waveguide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottinger, Tina Lynette

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Electrooptic modulation via the linear electrooptic effect has been demonstrated by polarization intensity modulation at 0.633 gm wavelength in both substrates. LiNbo3 devices require a v,, of 10.75 V for a Tc-radian phase shift. SBN devices require a voltage...

  12. Tiled-Grating Compressor with Uncompensated Dispersion for Near-Field-Intensity Smoothing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.; Kessler, T.J.

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiled-grating compressor, in which the spatial dispersion is not completely compensated, reduces the near-field-intensity modulation caused by tiling gaps and provides near-field spatial filtering of the input laser beam, thus reducing the laser damage to the final optics.

  13. Abstract --Developing software for mobile or ad hoc scenarios is very cost intensive. Different software and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steimann, Friedrich

    for an appropriate development support for devices with short life cycles. Third-party solutions often do not reachAbstract -- Developing software for mobile or ad hoc scenarios is very cost intensive. Different processors and big memories are available in principle, they con- sume a great amount of valuable battery

  14. Microsystem process networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA)

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Various aspects and applications of microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of Microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having energetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

  15. Microsystem process networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. (Kennewick, WA); Whyatt, Greg A. (West Richland, WA)

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Various aspects and applications of microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having exergetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

  16. Microsystem process networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Whyatt, Greg A [West Richland, WA

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Various aspects and applications or microsystem process networks are described. The design of many types of microsystems can be improved by ortho-cascading mass, heat, or other unit process operations. Microsystems having energetically efficient microchannel heat exchangers are also described. Detailed descriptions of numerous design features in microcomponent systems are also provided.

  17. Cooking with Processed Cheese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    processed cheese. It can be sliced and placed on a cracker, on a hamburger or on bread to make a grilled cheese sandwich. You can also add shredded cheese to scrambled eggs and casseroles. How to store it For best taste, store processed American cheese...

  18. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  19. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Murphy, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  20. Inventory processes: Quasiregenerative property,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Reuven

    Inventory processes: Quasi­regenerative property, performance evaluation and sensitivity estimation­commodity, discrete­time, multiperiod (s; S)­ policy inventory model with backlog. The cost function may contain that the resulting inventory process is quasi­regenerative, i.e. admits a cycle decomposition and indicate how