Sample records for non-acid elution nae

  1. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

  2. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Nash, C.; Pennebaker, F.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Exchange column loading and elution of cesium from spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been conducted for two potential non-acid eluants -(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}. The results revealed encouraging cesium elution performance. 100% elution was achieved in at most 22 hours ({approx}28 bed volumes) of elution. Elution performance was fairly high at 6 hours ({approx}8 bed volumes) of elution for some of the eluants and also practically comparable to the benchmark acid eluant (HNO{sub 3}). Hence, it is quite possible 100% percent elution will be closer to the 6th hour than the 22nd hour. Elution is generally enhanced by increasing the concentration and pH of the eluants, and combining the eluants.

  3. PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion concerns, calcium acetate and magnesium acetate will be tested instead of calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively. Nitric acid is for benchmarking since it is the baseline sRF eluant. The information at hand indicates ammonium hydroxide, while a weak base, may hold promise as an effective eluant. Hence, its inclusion among the eluants to be studied despite the fact that it was not tested as a stand-alone eluant earlier.

  4. Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moody to participate in "Frontiers of Engineering" Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of Engineering" symposium Engineers between 30 to 45 who are...

  5. CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ResinCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/24/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  7. Sequential elution process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kingsley, I.S.

    1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

  8. Improved peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid chromatography-MS by incorporating peptide sequence Improved peptide elution time prediction for reversed-phase liquid...

  9. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  10. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

  11. Selective elution of uranium from amidoxime polymer. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirotsu, T.; Katoh, S.; Sugasaka, K.; Takai, N.; Seno, M.; Itagaki, T.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separative elution of uranium from an amidoxime polymer was examined by the column method with hydrochloric acid solutions. The amidoxime polymer was immersed in seawater for 40 d for preparation of an uranium-loaded polymer sample for the elution experiments; the metal ions adsorbed were Mg(II), Ca(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) as well as UO/sub 2/(VI). It was found from the pH dependence of elution extent by a batch method that the order of elution pH values is Fe(III) < UO/sub 2/(VI) < Cu(II) < Ni(II) < Zn(II) < Ca(II) < Mg(II). In the elution by a column method, Mg(II), Ca(II), Zn(II), and Ni(II) were eluted completely by 0.1 M HCl and the eluate of enriched uranium was obtained by a succeeding elution with 0.5 or 1 M HCl. This eluate contained Cu(II) and Fe(III), which could be removed in the succeeding step. The elution treatment with hydrochloric acid solutions hardly affected the adsorptivity for uranium in seawater. It was suggested that the elution of uranium with hydrochloric acid solutions from amidoxime polymers is satisfactorily applicable to uranium elution in the recovery of uranium from seawater with amidoxime polymers.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Infrapopliteal Drug-Eluting Stents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Siablis, Dimitris [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece)] [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    IntroductionThere are no cost-utility data about below-the-knee placement of drug-eluting stents. The authors determined the cost-effectiveness of infrapopliteal drug-eluting stents for critical limb ischemia (CLI) treatment. The event-free individual survival outcomes defined by the absence of any major events, including death, major amputation, and target limb repeat procedures, were reconstructed on the basis of two published infrapopliteal series. The first included spot Bail-out use of Sirolimus-eluting stents versus bare metal stents after suboptimal balloon angioplasty (Bail-out SES).The second was full-lesion Primary Everolimus-eluting stenting versus plain balloon angioplasty and bail-out bare metal stenting as necessary (primary EES). The number-needed-to-treat (NNT) to avoid one major event and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for a 3-year postprocedural period for both strategies. Overall event-free survival was significantly improved in both strategies (hazard ratio (HR) [confidence interval (CI)]: 0.68 [0.41-1.12] in Bail-out SES and HR [CI]: 0.53 [0.29-0.99] in Primary EES). Event-free survival gain per patient was 0.89 (range, 0.11-3.0) years in Bail-out SES with an NNT of 4.6 (CI: 2.5-25.6) and a corresponding ICER of 6,518 Euro-Sign (range 1,685-10,112 Euro-Sign ). Survival gain was 0.91 (range 0.25-3.0) years in Primary EES with an NNT of 2.7 (CI: 1.7-5.8) and an ICER of 11,581 Euro-Sign (range, 4,945-21,428 Euro-Sign ) per event-free life-year gained. Two-way sensitivity analysis showed that stented lesion length >10 cm and/or DES list price >1000 Euro-Sign were associated with the least economically favorable scenario in both strategies. Both strategies of bail-out SES and primary EES placement in the infrapopliteal arteries for CLI treatment exhibit single-digit NNT and relatively low corresponding ICERs.

  13. ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, NewDyer County,ECO2 AssetEDPEDIEGS EnergyELUTIONS

  14. Numerical modeling of elution peak profiles in supercritical fluid chromatography. Part I-Elution of an unretained tracer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland; Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When chromatography is carried out with high-density carbon dioxide as the main component of the mobile phase (a method generally known as 'supercritical fluid chromatography' or SFC), the required pressure gradient along the column is moderate. However, this mobile phase is highly compressible and, under certain experimental conditions, its density may decrease significantly along the column. Such an expansion absorbs heat, cooling the column, which absorbs heat from the outside. The resulting heat transfer causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature that may become large under certain conditions. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase velocity and most physico-chemical parameters of the system (viscosity, diffusion coefficients, etc.) are no longer constant throughout the column, resulting in a loss of column efficiency, even at low flow rates. At high flow rates and in serious cases, systematic variations of the retention factors and the separation factors with increasing flow rates and important deformations of the elution profiles of all sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the effects of the viscous friction heating of the mobile phase in HPLC is adapted here to account for the expansion cooling of the mobile phase in SFC and is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of an unretained compound in SFC. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides temperature and pressure profiles inside the column, and values of the retention time and efficiency for elution of this unretained compound that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data.

  15. Modeling Elution Histories of Copper and Lead from Contaminated Soil Treated by Poly,,amidoamine... Dendrimers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Modeling Elution Histories of Copper and Lead from Contaminated Soil Treated by Poly soil treated by poly amidoamine dendrimers. In the model, the metal sorption sites of the soil were

  16. Alternate Methods for Eluting Cesium from Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Heather Lauren [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small-column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high-level-waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent, or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The baseline method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid that would be used to elute the RF resin, using the current elution protocol, exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing environment in the glass melt. Installing a denitration evaporator at SRS is technically feasible but would add considerable cost to the project. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 BV of 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the baseline elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. A summary of the elution methods that have been tested are listed.

  17. Small-Column Cesium Ion Exchange Elution Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Garrett N.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed to evaluate multiple, cesium loading, and elution cycles for small columns containing SRF resin using a simple, high-level waste (HLW) simulant. Cesium ion exchange loading and elution curves were generated for a nominal 5 M Na, 2.4E-05 M Cs, 0.115 M Al loading solution traced with 134Cs followed by elution with variable HNO3 (0.02, 0.07, 0.15, 0.23, and 0.28 M) containing variable CsNO3 (5.0E-09, 5.0E-08, and 5.0E-07 M) and traced with 137Cs. The ion exchange system consisted of a pump, tubing, process solutions, and a single, small ({approx}15.7 mL) bed of SRF resin with a water-jacketed column for temperature-control. The columns were loaded with approximately 250 bed volumes (BVs) of feed solution at 45 C and at 1.5 to 12 BV per hour (0.15 to 1.2 cm/min). The columns were then eluted with 29+ BVs of HNO3 processed at 25 C and at 1.4 BV/h. The two independent tracers allowed analysis of the on-column cesium interaction between the loading and elution solutions. The objective of these tests was to improve the correlation between the spent resin cesium content and cesium leached out of the resin in subsequent loading cycles (cesium leakage) to help establish acid strength and purity requirements.

  18. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Susumu, E-mail: susumu1029@gmail.com; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Shibuya, Kazutoshi [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Japan); Homma, Sakae [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

  19. Comparing long-term antiplatelet strategies to prevent morbidity and mortality in patients with drug-eluting coronary stents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, J. Stewart (James Stewart)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The optimal long-term antiplatelet therapy (APT) that balances the benefit of preventing myocardial infarction (MI) with the risk of severe bleeding is unknown in patients greater than one year after drug-eluting ...

  20. USE OF DRUG ELUTING STENTS AS A FUNCTION OF PREDICTED BENEFIT: CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF CURRENT PRACTICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Amit P.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Benefits of drug-eluting stents (DES) in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are greatest in those at the highest risk of target vessel revascularization (TVR). While DES reduce restenosis, they cost more than bare metal stents (BMS...

  1. Bradycardia Associated With Drug-Eluting Beads Loaded With Irinotecan (DEBIRI) Infusion for Colorectal Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Intra-arterial injection of drug-eluting beads loaded with irinotecan (DEBIRI) is a new treatment option being investigated, with encouraging results, for unresectable colorectal liver metastases that are refractory to systemic chemotherapy (Martin et al., Ann Surg Oncol 18:192-198, 2011). Toxicity related to DEBIRI has also been described (Martin et al., Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 33:960-966, 2010). Nevertheless, experience and literature related to DEBIRI remain limited, and experience with this treatment is expected to increase. The purpose of this article is to describe bradycardia occurring during DEBIRI administration, which has not been reported thus far.

  2. Numerical modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained solutes in supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland; Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), the significant expansion of the mobile phase along the column causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase density, its viscosity, its velocity, its diffusion coefficients, etc. are not constant throughout the column. This results in a nonuniform flow velocity distribution, itself causing a loss of column efficiency in certain cases, even at low flow rates, as they do in HPLC. At high flow rates, an important deformation of the elution profiles of the sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the retention of an unsorbed solute in SFC is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained compounds. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides the temperature and the pressure profiles inside the column and values of the retention time and the band profiles of retained compounds that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data for large value of mobile phase reduced density. At low reduced densities, the band profiles can strongly depend on the column axial distribution of porosity.

  3. NAE National Meeting Thursday February 7, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Technologies" 18.Laser and Fiber Optics" 19.Nuclear Technologies" 20.High-performance Materials" #12;TECHNOLOGY #12;» Make Solar Energy Economical " » Provide Energy from Fusion" » Develop Carbon Sequestration"? (Plato)" > Most are Transformative: " » Energy from Fusion" » Reverse Engineering the Brain" > All

  4. Adsorption and elution in hollow-fiber-packed bed for recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, T.; Saito, K.; Ueza, K.; Furusaki, S. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113 (JP)); Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Takasaki, Gunma 370-12 (JP))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a 0.9-m-high fixed bed charged with hollow fibers containing amidoxime groups placed on the coast of the Pacific Ocean for the recovery of uranium from seawater. Continuous flow of seawater at a superficial velocity of 4 cm/s provided an averaged uranium content of 0.97 g of U/kg in the amidoxime hollow fiber along the bed after 30 days contact. An elution curve having a 230 g of U/m{sup 3} peak concentration and a 45 g of U/m{sup 3} integrated concentration of uranium was obtained at a superficial velocity of 1 N HCl of 0.0125 cm/s. The required cross-sectional area of the amidoxime hollow fiber-packed bed to produce 10 kg of U per annum was calculated as 9.4 m{sup 2} with a 0.9-m bed height.

  5. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asmis, Lars [Institute for Clinical Hematology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [Institute for Clinical Hematology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland) [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Sudano, Isabella [Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)] [Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Luescher, Thomas F. [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland) [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Camici, Giovanni G., E-mail: giovannic@access.uzh.ch [Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  6. A Budget Impact Model for Paclitaxel-eluting Stent in Femoropopliteal Disease in France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Cock, Erwin, E-mail: erwin.decock@unitedbiosource.com [United BioSource Corporation, Peri- and Post-Approval Services (Spain); Sapoval, Marc, E-mail: Marc.sapoval2@egp.aphp.fr [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (France)] [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (France); Julia, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.julia@egp.aphp.fr [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Cardiovascular Surgery Department (France)] [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Cardiovascular Surgery Department (France); Lissovoy, Greg de, E-mail: gdelisso@jhsph.edu [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management (United States); Lopes, Sandra, E-mail: Sandra.Lopes@CookMedical.com [Cook Medical, Health Economics and Reimbursement (Denmark)] [Cook Medical, Health Economics and Reimbursement (Denmark)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent (Cook Ireland Ltd., Limerick, Ireland) represents an advance in endovascular treatments for atherosclerotic superficial femoral artery (SFA) disease. Clinical data demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). This analysis assessed the likely impact on the French public health care budget of introducing reimbursement for the Zilver PTX stent. A model was developed in Microsoft Excel to estimate the impact of a progressive transition from BMS to Zilver PTX over a 5-year horizon. The number of patients undergoing SFA stenting was estimated on the basis of hospital episode data. The analysis from the payer perspective used French reimbursement tariffs. Target lesion revascularization (TLR) after primary stent placement was the primary outcome. TLR rates were based on 2-year data from the Zilver PTX single-arm study (6 and 9 %) and BMS rates reported in the literature (average 16 and 22 %) and extrapolated to 5 years. Net budget impact was expressed as the difference in total costs (primary stenting and reinterventions) for a scenario where BMS is progressively replaced by Zilver PTX compared to a scenario of BMS only. The model estimated a net cumulative 5-year budget reduction of Euro-Sign 6,807,202 for a projected population of 82,316 patients (21,361 receiving Zilver PTX). Base case results were confirmed in sensitivity analyses. Adoption of Zilver PTX could lead to important savings for the French public health care payer. Despite higher initial reimbursement for the Zilver PTX stent, fewer expected SFA reinterventions after the primary stenting procedure result in net savings.

  7. Recovery of uranium from seawater. 13. Long-term stability tests for high-performance chelating resins containing amidoxime groups and evaluation of elution process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egawa, Hiroaki; Kabay, Nalan; Shuto, Taketomi; Jyo, Akinori (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale adsorption/elution cycles were performed to investigate the long-term stability of the chelating resins employed. The adsorbed metal ions were rapidly and quantitatively eluted from the resins with acid eluants. The shrinkage of the resins with successive adsorption/elution cycles influenced the adsorption capacity. The uranium recovery was maintained at a nearly constant value by the employment of bicarbonate eluants. In particular, 2 mol dm[sup [minus]3] NH[sub 4]HCO[sub 3] yielded an efficient stripping for uranium. However, it was clarified that the elution with 0.25 mol dm[sup [minus]3] H[sub 2]SO[sub 4], which gave a high efficiency, was better than the bicarbonate eluants.

  8. Systematic Review of Infrapopliteal Drug-Eluting Stents: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [NHS Foundation Trust, King's Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospitals (United Kingdom); Spiliopoulos, Stavros [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece); Diamantopoulos, Athanasios [NHS Foundation Trust, King's Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospitals (United Kingdom); Karnabatidis, Dimitris [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece); Sabharwal, Tarun [NHS Foundation Trust, King's Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospitals (United Kingdom); Siablis, Dimitris [Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Greece)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    IntroductionDrug-eluting stents (DES) have been proposed for the treatment of infrapopliteal arterial disease. We performed a systematic review to provide a qualitative analysis and quantitative data synthesis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing infrapopliteal DES.Materials and MethodsPubMed (Medline), EMBASE (Excerpta Medical Database), AMED (Allied and Complementary medicine Database), Scopus, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), online content, and abstract meetings were searched in September 2012 for eligible RCTs according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses selection process. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. Primary endpoint was primary patency defined as absence of {>=}50 % vessel restenosis at 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included patient survival, limb amputations, change of Rutherford-Becker class, target lesion revascularization (TLR) events, complete wound healing, and event-free survival at 1 year. Risk ratio (RRs) were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model, and number-needed-to-treat values are reported.ResultsThree RCTs involving 501 patients with focal infrapopliteal lesions were analyzed (YUKON-BTX, DESTINY, and ACHILLES trials). All three RCTs included relatively short and focal infrapopliteal lesions. At 1 year, there was clear superiority of infrapopliteal DES compared with control treatments in terms of significantly higher primary patency (80.0 vs. 58.5 %; pooled RR = 1.37, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-1.58, p < 0.0001; number-needed-to-treat (NNT) value = 4.8), improvement of Rutherford-Becker class (79.0 vs. 69.6 %; pooled RR = 1.13, 95 % CI = 1.002-1.275, p = 0.045; NNT = 11.1), decreased TLR events (9.9 vs. 22.0 %; pooled RR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.28-0.73, p = 0.001; NNT = 8.3), improved wound healing (76.8 vs. 59.7 %; pooled RR = 1.29, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.62, p = 0.04; NNT = 5.9), and better overall event-free survival (72.2 vs. 57.3 %; pooled RR = 1.26, 95 % CI = 1.10-1.44, p = 0.0006; NNT = 6.7). Conclusion. DES for focal infrapopliteal lesions significantly inhibit vascular restenosis and thereby improve primary patency, decrease repeat procedures, improve wound healing, and prolong overall event-free survival.

  9. ven as the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) announced its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    the health and well being of the planet and quality of life. Challenges range from making solar energy Coast to the West Coast,"says George Cook, associate dean for research and graduate studies. Noting pieces of the solution areas. Environmental Concerns One top challenge is making solar energy affordable."Solar

  10. Fundamental chromatographic equations designed for columns packed with very fine particles and operated at very high pressures applications to the prediction of elution times and the column efficiencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wall temperatures of three Acquity-BEH-C{sub 18}columns (2.1 mm x 50, 100, and 150 mm) and the temperature of the incoming eluent were maintained constant at 289 K, using a circulating water heat exchanger. The retention times and the band broadening of naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene were measured for each column as a function of the flow rate applied. Pure acetonitrile was used as the eluent. The flow rate dependence of neither elution volumes nor bandwidths can be accounted for by classical models of retention and HETP, respectively, since these models assume columns to be isothermal. Because the heat generated by friction of the eluent against the column bed increases with increasing flow rate, the column bed cannot remain isothermal at high flow rates. This heat is evacuated radially and/or longitudinally by convection, conduction, and radiation. Radial and axial temperature gradients are formed, which are maximum and minimum, respectively, when the temperature of the column wall is kept uniform and constant. The retention times that we measured match well with the values predicted based on the temperature distribution along and across the column, which we calculated and on the temperature dependence of the retention for the same column operated isothermally (i.e., at very low flow rate). The rate of band spreading varies along non-isothermal columns, so the HETP can only be defined locally. It is a function of the axial coordinate. A new contribution is needed to account for the radial thermal heterogeneity of the column, hence the radial distribution of the flow velocities, which warps the elution band. A new model, based on the general dispersion theory of Aris, allows a successful prediction of the unusually large bandwidths observed with columns packed with fine particles, operated at high flow rates, hence high inlet pressures.

  11. Switching the Loaded Agent from Epirubicin to Cisplatin: Salvage Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization with Drug-eluting Microspheres for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, Akihiko, E-mail: sekia@igtc.jp; Hori, Shinich, E-mail: horishin@igtc.jp [Gate Tower Institute for Image Guided Therapy, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: There is no consensus on switching anticancer agents loaded onto drug carriers in transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and clinical outcomes of TACE with cisplatin-loaded microspheres (CLM-TACE) in HCC patients refractory to TACE with epirubicin-loaded microspheres (ELM-TACE). Methods: Between February 2008 and June 2010, 85 patients with unresectable HCC refractory to ELM-TACE were enrolled to undergo CLM-TACE. The number of ELM-TACE sessions until judgment of resistance ranged from 1 to 4 (median, 2.1). CLM-TACE was performed using 50-100-{mu}m superabsorbent polymer microspheres loaded with 1 mg cisplatin/1 mg microspheres together with hepatic arterial infusion of 25 mg cisplatin and 500 mg 5-fluorouracil per patient. Tumor responses were evaluated by computed tomography according to the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria. Results: The median number of CLM-TACE treatment sessions was 1.8 (range, 1-5), and the mean total dose of cisplatin per session was 42.8 mg (range, 30.0-59.0). After 6 months, 3 (3.5%) patients achieved complete response, 31 (36.5%) had partial response, 15 (17.6%) had stable disease, and 36 (42.4%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival and time to treatment failure after initial CLM-TACE were 13.3 and 7.2 months, respectively. Overall, 9.4% of patients experienced grade 3/4 adverse events. Conclusions: witching the loaded agent from epirubicin to cisplatin is a safe, well-tolerated, and efficacious treatment strategy for salvage TACE with drug-eluting microspheres in HCC patients refractory to ELM-TACE.

  12. NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    developing and deploying renewable energy technologies . . . to producing conventional fossil fuels more cleanly . . . to increasing our energy efficiency - our basic research...

  13. NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan - Technology ProjectEnergyNAICS Codes

  14. Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublic

  15. NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico |MyriantSafetyLater:

  16. Current Research at BBISS John C. Crittenden, Ph.D., N.A.E., P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    ://sustainable.gatech.edu/ #12;E unum pluribus (from one to many) #12;Infrastructure Ecology ­ E pluribus unum (from many ideas Management Problems and Ecology of NASU Peng Chi PhD, CEE Visiting Student, Chinese Academy of Science #12 China University of Mining and Technology Advanced oxidation processes. Ruzhen Xie Visiting Student, Ph

  17. affect antibiotic elution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    volume, sorbate and sorbent concentration and it is independence to temperature. Then the isotherm models were used to explain the sorption process and the outcomes reveal that...

  18. automated elution time: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: of a partial automation since they act on the control part of the vehicle. This increasing automationABV- A Low Speed Automation Project to Study the...

  19. DRUG DELIVERY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: AN APPLICATION TO THE ELUTING STENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    [3]. The present work provides a fundamental study of the mass transfer process of a substance across range and it is recognized that the time and quantity of release of the drug is crucial for the therapy models predicting the dynamics of solute concentration and mass flux are of interest for biomedical

  20. Chemoembolization With Doxorubicin-Eluting Beads for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Five-Year Survival Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@otonet.gr [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Pomoni, Mary [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Moschouris, Hippocrates, E-mail: hipmosch@gmail.com [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece); Bouma, Evanthia [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Koskinas, John [Ippokration Hospital, University of Athens, Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Stefaniotou, Aspasia [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Marinis, Athanasios [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Surgery (Greece); Kelekis, Alexios; Alexopoulou, Efthymia [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Chatziioannou, Achilles [University of Athens, First Department of Radiology (Greece); Chatzimichael, Katerina [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Dourakis, Spyridon [Ippokration Hospital, University of Athens, Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Kelekis, Nikolaos [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Rizos, Spyros [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Surgery (Greece); Kelekis, Dimitrios [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report on the 5-year survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEB-DOX) in a scheduled scheme in up to three treatments and thereafter on demand. Materials and Methods: 173 HCC patients not suitable for curable treatments were prospectively enrolled (mean age 70.4 {+-} 7.4 years). Child-Pugh (Child) class was A/B (102/71 [59/41 %]), Okuda stage was 0/1/2 (91/61/19 [53.2/35.7/11.1 %]), and mean lesion diameter was 7.6 {+-} 2.1 cm. Lesion morphology was one dominant {<=}5 cm (22 %), one dominant >5 cm (41.6 %), multifocal {<=}5 (26 %), and multifocal >5 (10.4 %). Results: Overall survival at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years was 93.6, 83.8, 62, 41.04, and 22.5 %, with higher rates achieved in Child class A compared with Child class B patients (95, 88.2, 61.7, 45, and 29.4 % vs. 91.5, 75, 50.7, 35.2, and 12.8 %). Mean overall survival was 43.8 months (range 1.2-64.8). Cumulative survival was better for Child class A compared with Child class B patients (p = 0.029). For patients with dominant lesions {<=}5 cm 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival rates were 100, 95.2, 71.4, 66.6, and 47.6 % for Child class A and 94.1, 88.2, 58.8, 41.2, 29.4, and 23.5 % for Child class B patients. Regarding DEB-DOX treatment, multivariate analysis identified number of lesions (p = 0.033), lesion vascularity (p < 0.0001), initially achieved complete response (p < 0.0001), and objective response (p = 0.046) as significant and independent determinants of 5-year survival. Conclusion: DEB-DOX results, with high rates of 5-year survival for patients, not amenable to curative treatments. Number of lesions, lesion vascularity, and local response were significant independent determinants of 5-year survival.

  1. Radiosensitizer-eluting nanocoatings on gold fiducials for biological in-situ image-guided radio therapy (BIS-IGRT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    of Doxorubicin (Dox), a hydrophilic drug, loaded into a non-degradable polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA in buffer were carried out using fluorescence spectroscopy. In the first case of free Dox release

  2. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization (TACE) of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases by Irinotecan-Eluting Microspheres in a Salvage Patient Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huppert, Peter, E-mail: huppert@klinikum-darmstadt.de [Klinikum Darmstadt GmbH, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Wenzel, Thorsten [Klinikum Darmstadt GmbH, Department of Medical Oncology (Germany); Wietholtz, Hubertus [Klinikum Darmstadt GmbH, Department of Gastroenterology (Germany)

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeThis prospective study evaluated the effectiveness and safety of TACE using irinotecan loaded superabsorbent polymer (SAP) microspheres for treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CCLM) in a salvage setting of patients.MethodsA total of 71 TACE procedures were performed in 29 patients with liver only or liver-dominant CCLM. In all patients, systemic chemotherapy before TACE had failed. Two hundred milligrams of irinotecan were loaded into 50–100 mg of SAP microspheres (HepaSphere™ Microspheres) considering tumor size and vascularization. TACE was performed selectively with respect to tumor distribution. Response was evaluated following RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Median follow-up after last TACE was 8 (range 1–54) months. All patients had died at time of analysis.ResultsAll TACE procedures were performed successfully; 35–400 mg (mean 168.3 mg) of irinotecan loaded in 13–100 mg (mean 48.3 mg) SAP microspheres were injected during individual sessions. No major complications occurred. Three, 6, and 12 months after first TACE complete and partial response was present in 72, 32 %, 0 of patients by EASL criteria and stable disease was seen in 86, 48, and 8 % with no complete and no partial response by RECIST criteria. Median overall survival after first TACE was 8 months, and median time to progression was 5 months. Median overall survival was longer in patients with limited (<25 %) compared with extensive (>50 %) intrahepatic disease (21 vs. 5 months, p < 0.005).ConclusionsTACE using irinotecan loaded SAP microspheres is safe and effective in terms of tumor necrosis. Survival benefit in a salvage setting seems to be limited in patients with advanced intrahepatic tumor load.

  3. Transarterial Chemoembolization of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Drug Eluting Beads: Results of an Open-Label Study of 62 Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@acn.gr; Chatzimichael, Katerina; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Kelekis, Alexios [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Hall, Brenda [Biocompatibles UK, Inc. (United Kingdom); Dourakis, Spyridon [University of Athens, and Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology, Ippokration Hospital University of Athens, Second Clinic of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Delis, Spyridon [Agia Olga Hospital, Department of Surgery (Greece); Gouliamos, Athanasios [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Kelekis, Dimitrios [University of Athens, Evgenidion Hospital, Research Centre of Radiology and Imaging (Greece)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of doxorubicin-loaded beads (DC Beads) delivered by transarterial embolization for the treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This open-label, single-center, single-arm study included 62 cirrhotic patients with documented single unresectable HCC. Mean tumor diameter was 5.6 cm (range, 3-9 cm) classified as Okuda stages 1 (n = 53) and 2 (n = 9). Patients received repeat embolizations with doxorubicin-loaded beads every 3 months (maximum of three). The maximum doxorubicin dose was 150 mg per embolization, loaded in DC Beads of 100-300 or 300-500 {mu}m. Regarding efficacy, overall, an objective response according to the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria was observed in 59.6%, 81.8%, and 70.8% across three treatments. A complete response was observed in 4.8% after the first procedure and 3.6% and 8.3% after the second and third procedures, respectively. At 9 months a complete response was seen in 12.2%, an objective response in 80.7%, progressive disease in 6.8%, and 12.2% showed stable disease. Mean tumor necrosis ranged from 77.4% to 83.9% (range, 28.6%-100%) across three treatments. {alpha}-Fetoprotein levels showed a mean decrease of 1123 ng/ml (95% CI = 846-1399; p = 3 x 10{sup -11}) after the first session and remained stable after the second and third embolizations (42 and 70 ng/ml decrease, respectively). Regarding safety, bilirubin, {gamma}-glutamyl transferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase showed only transient increases during the study period. Severe procedure-related complications were seen in 3.2% (cholecystitis, n 1; liver abscess, n = 1). Postembolization syndrome was observed in all patients. We conclude that hemoembolization using doxorubicin-loaded DC Beads is a safe and effective treatment of HCC as demonstrated by the low complication rate, increased tumor response, and sustained reduction of {alpha}-fetoprotein levels.

  4. The Role of Neutron Activation Analysis in the Pathological Evaluation of Silver-Eluting Biomedical Devices in Biological Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancon, Trevor

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), and INAA methodologies within porcine skin was explored in the feasibility trial. Sections of skin containing control and test articles were investigated using these modalities. The control...

  5. Preparing Women and Minorities for Science and Engineering: Resources for Educators, Parents, and the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    . The companion site Celebration of Women in Engineering http://www.nae.edu/nae/cwe/cwemain.nsf offers resources and pursuit of engineering careers. The inter-linked sites are part of the National Academy of Engineering on Women in Science and Engineering web site http://www4.nationalacademies.org

  6. Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;This project is a collaboration with the authors and NAE. #12;Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education 2012 #12;2 Preface The aim

  7. Annual Energy Outlook 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NAE-AAES Convocation of the Professional Engineering Societies April 28, 2014 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in...

  8. 1.1 0.2 were bound to the column and were eluted by 30 mM and 1 M HCI, respec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    infusion on postabsorp- tive glycemia in non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). V Rigalleau previously reported a hyper- glycemic effect of a lipid infusion in the postabsorptive state in NIDD patients patients. Fifteen received a 180 min lipid infusion (')veiip20%'; 0.0155 mUkg/min) and 15 received saline

  9. Accounting for the mortality benefit of drug-eluting stents in percutaneous coronary intervention: a comparison of methods in a retrospective cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Robert W; Chandra, Malini; McCulloch, Charles E; Go, Alan S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stents in percutaneous coronary intervention: a comparisonstents in percutaneous coronary intervention: a comparisonoutcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with

  10. Apex Peptide Elution Chain Selection: A New Strategy for Selecting Precursors in 2D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF Experiments on Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breitling, Rainer

    profiles that link the precursor ions of the same peptide across SCX fractions. Subsequently, the precursor ion most likely to fragment successfully in a given profile is selected for fragmentation analysis of peptides as a conventional data-dependent acquisition method but with a 35% smaller work load. Consequently

  11. Accounting for the mortality benefit of drug-eluting stents in percutaneous coronary intervention: a comparison of methods in a retrospective cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Robert W; Chandra, Malini; McCulloch, Charles E; Go, Alan S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waksman R: Impact of “off-label” utilization of drug-elutingstents for patients with off- and on-label indications. J Am

  12. College of Engineering Energy Strategic Planning Committee: Interim Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    combustion, solid-state lighting, clean coal technologies, and hybrid electrical vehicles. The engineering), and the recently completed NAE report, America's Energy Future: Technology and Transformation (Shapiro, 2009 fusion, 3) Develop carbon sequestration methods, and 4) Provide access to clean water. The 2008 DOE

  13. Paper ID #6662 A Follow-Up Study of a First-Year Leadership and Service Learning Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    . Her primary interest is in informal learning environments and educational technologies. She currently and Technology Fellow at the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC). His research project at MCC fo- cuses Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy fellow within the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) working

  14. Westover ARB Fuel Hydrant System Upgrade set to begin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    can go to recharge your batteries? Do you know who you will call if you need help getting there? · Do://www.nae.usace.army.mil/news/yankee.htm. ON THE COVER: Congr. Richard Neil speaks at the project announcement at Westover Air Reserve Base. (Photo

  15. Pigeage sexuel de la teigne du poireau, Acrolepiopsis assectella Z. (Lepid. Yponomeutidae — Acrolepiinae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Acrolepii- nae) by means of the synthetic pheromone Z 11 H DAL — Results of 1981. Acrolepiopsis assectella, The synthetic pheromone Z 11 H DAL, which attracts leek moth males, was presented in polyethylene caps, Pheromone, rubber caps and also black fibers. The baits were hung in the standard LN.R.A. sexual trap

  16. Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM |

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    in the nuclear power, aviation, and petrochemical industries. · M. Elisabeth Paté-Cornell, Burt and Deedee McTop Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil Spill by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM | Investigations into the gulf oil disaster are multiplying. The National Academy of Engineering (NAE

  17. Enhanced drug delivery capabilities from stents coated with absorbable polymer and crystalline drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlyle, Wenda C.

    Current drug eluting stent (DES) technology is not optimized with regard to the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery. A novel, absorbable-coating sirolimus-eluting stent (AC-SES) was evaluated for its capacity to deliver drug ...

  18. Introduction The AdenoPACK 100 adenovirus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    with chromatography and cesium chloride density gradients. Moreover, Adenovirus is recovered in non-cytotoxic buffers, contaminating proteins and nucleic acids with washing buffer. D. Elution Elute purified viral particles

  19. NET PRED UTILITY

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility  http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php 

  20. agu joint assembly: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    total chip-eluted DNA. unknown authors 465 READY FOR TODAY. PREPARING FOR TOMORROW. The Joint Operating Environment is intended to inform joint concept Mathematics Websites...

  1. New Approach to a General Nonlinear Multicomponent Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    - ponent fixed-bed adsorption/desorption operations, such as frontal, displacement and elution, have operationsaccurately and efficiently. Model Considera fixed-bed adsorptioncolumnpacked wirb uniform- porous, spherical

  2. Method of degrading trinitrotoluene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN); Vass, Arpad (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of eluting trinitrotoluene (TNT) from soil using a dispersant from bacterial intra-amoebic isolate 1s, ATCC 75229.

  3. Analysis of secreted proteins of Magnaporthe grisea and the search for protein effectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shang, Yue

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .4 by Pichia expresion system. Detected by commasie blue staining. Column was eluted with six 1 ml aliquots of imadazole. A total of 25 ul of each elution was loaded on the gel. E1 is the first elution through which has the most protein detected. 20kDa E6... E5 E4 E3 E2 E1 31 15kDa E7 E6 E5 E4 E3 E2 E1 Figure 10. Hypothetical protein MG 10424.4 purified from P. pastoris. Column was eluted six times and protein started to come out from the first...

  4. associating transmembrane domains: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    here have been developed by combining a few modifications to standard a water: acetonitrile gradient to elute the peptides from a cyano- propyl column at ambient temperature...

  5. Studies on the isolation and properties of the highly unsaturated fatty acids from natural sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Nasr, Ahmed Mostafa

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adrenal Lipids ? ??. 6m Rapid Concentration of Polyunsaturated Methyl and Ethyl Esters of Cod Liver Oil by Urea Complexes . o ? C. CONCENTRATION BY LOW TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION . . . . \\ IV. ISOLATION OF INDIVIDUAL HIGHLY UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS... octadecatetraenoate by elution ? 0 ? . . . Ill b. Methyl arachidonate from beef testes fat by elution............................... . 115 5. Effect of Vacuum Distillation on the Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids ? ? ? ? . ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 117 6...

  6. Cells containing solvated electron lithium negative electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, F.A.; Semkow, K.W.; Sammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Incorporated, Aurora, IL (US))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary work performed on a novel solvated electron lithium negative electrode which may have application in either high energy density secondary or reserve battery systems is discussed. The lithium electrode investigated consisted of lithium initially dissolved in liquid ammonia to give a solvated electron solution. Containment of this liquid negative active material from direct contact with a liquid nonaqueous electrolyte present in the cell positive electrode compartment was addressed via the use of a lithium intercalated electronically conducting ceramic membrane of the general composition Li{sub x}WO{sub 2}(0.1{lt}x{lt} 1.0). Secondary electrochemical cells having the general configuration Li,NH{sub 3}/Li{sub x}WO{sub 2}NAE/TiS{sub 2} using nonaqueous electrolytes (NAE) based upon both propylene carbonate and 2Me-THF. Depending upon initial lithium activity in the negative electrode compartments the cell possessed an initial open-circuit potential (OCP 3.44V). Both cells, which were operated at ambient pressure (low temperature) and ambient temperature (high pressure) showed evidence for electrochemical reversibility.

  7. Commercial Fertilizers in 1936-37.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, T. L. (Thomas Louis); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Asbury, S. E. (Samuel E.)

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Terms ............................................................................................ 5 ................................................ Information on the Fertilizer Bag and Tag 6 How to Calculate the Valuation...-37 ............................................................................ 13 Relation of Valuation Guaranteed to Valuation Delivered .................... 14 Averages Below Guarantee ..................................................................... 15 Non Acid Forming Fertilizers...

  8. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    made of carbon steel. Use of an acid eluant may pose a hazard to the tank integrity (corrosion and associated structural damage) in the event of a spill, leak, etc. A non-acid...

  9. Postpartum serum progesterone and 20 †-hydroxyprogesterone in nonsuckled primiparous Hereford heifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castenson, Paul Edward

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : concentration of unknown Steroid concentration? X dilution factor X recovery 27 CHAPTER IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Validation of Chemical Procedures The non-polar steriod, P, being more soluble in isooctane, was eluted from the column in the first...

  10. New tools for target identification by affinity chromatography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landi, Felicetta

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of the selected biological material in affinity-based separations relies on reversing the biological interaction responsible for the binding. General elution methods which are independent of the bioaffinity ...

  11. CX-011544: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-based Sorbents CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/03/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  12. Drug delivery Sustained Drug Release from Non-eroding Nanoporous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    drug, doxorubicin (Dox), from different non-eroding nanopor- ous coatings. Detailed studies of drug, in the case of small molecules such as Dox, enzymes would not interfere with the drug and hence the elution

  13. Structural and functional studies of the Drosophila melanogaster snRNA activating protein complex (DmSNAPc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Ko-Hsuan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ml of 1x Wash Buffer. Centrifuge resin 30 seconds at 2000 g.ml Elution Buffer. b. Centrifuge at 2000 g for 30 seconds.ml of 1x Wash Buffer. b. Centrifuge resin 30 seconds at 2000

  14. Subunit interactions and protein-DNA interactions of the Drosophila melanogaster small nuclear RNA activating protein complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Mitchell

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precooled 1.5ml tube 3. Centrifuge the resin for 4 minutesof 1x wash buffer b. Centrifuge resin 30 seconds at 2000 x gml "elution buffer". b. Centrifuge at 2000 x g for 30 sec.

  15. Multicomponent affinity radial flow chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    procedure thut uses thejnite element, the orthogonal collocation, (2nd the Gear's stijfrnethods. Kinetic.lrrorntrtogrrrphy-frontal adsorption, wash, und elution-have been .simulated. The ejJects ofthe cwncentrrrtion and the (finit

  16. Septin Self-Assembly: Plasticity and Protein Scaffolding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, III, Galo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    column (HisTrap HP, General Electric Healthcare) at 2 ml/120 ml column volume, General Electric Healthcare) for size-1ml Resource Q column, General Electric Healthcare. To elute

  17. GE Healthcare Data File 11-0036-90 AA GraviTrap column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    and elution (Fig 1). One purification run takes approximately 30 minutes (depending on sample volume phosphate buffer concentrates and highly pure 2 M imidazole stock solutions, thus eliminating time

  18. Luminal flow amplifies stent-based drug deposition in arterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Evan G.

    Background: Treatment of arterial bifurcation lesions using drug-eluting stents (DES) is now common clinical practice and yet the mechanisms governing drug distribution in these complex morphologies are incompletely ...

  19. Specific and general binding in arterial drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Andrew D. (Andrew David), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drug-eluting stents have emerged as the most effective method for treating restenosis following percutaneous coronary interventions. This thesis investigates how drugs with similar physiochemical properties but different ...

  20. Drug deposition and distribution in healthy and atherosclerotic arteries and in models of atherosclerosis following bulk or stent-based drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vukmirovic, Neda

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drug eluting stents have revolutionized the practice of medicine and the landscape of medical devices. Yet, more than four years after introduction clinical trial data and clinical use have still not fully clarified what ...

  1. Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Brinda

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

  2. Stent Thrombogenicity Early in High Risk Interventional Settings is Driven by Stent Design and Deployment, and Protected by Polymer-Drug Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran

    Background—Stent thrombosis is a lethal complication of endovascular intervention. Concern has been raised about the inherent risk associated with specific stent designs and drug-eluting coatings, yet clinical and animal ...

  3. Kava Components Down-Regulate Expression of AR and AR Splice Variants and Reduce Growth in Patient-Derived Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    elution: (A) Water: Acetonitrile: acetic acid (97.8:2:0.2v/v/v), and (B) Acetonitrile: acetic acid 99.8:0.2 (v/v) as

  4. Painting blood vessels and atherosclerotic plaques with an adhesive drug depot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastrup, Christian J.

    The treatment of diseased vasculature remains challenging, in part because of the difficulty in implanting drug-eluting devices without subjecting vessels to damaging mechanical forces. Implanting materials using adhesive ...

  5. THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    group terbium-gadolinium-europium. UCItL~669 Page 27 em y Smterbium-gadolinium-europium, in their elution from a highgadolinium and gadolinium-europium. With regard to the group

  6. A critical analysis of the use of population data in allotting federal-grant funds for research and extension 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adkins, William Gray

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~~~ fO&401 fOI' 'f 1lC, ' tgpQ Oi Shul Qf GBg PWPGGM5 MS@ 'Qf alla@at~ ceil gods ~nC s'ice /he tk:ops ~r6Nae lmsi. bye' Qefiq&. C ' SS'Cl88~ ~AC@. "~S fQl+$, it iP. 'XIQQOM~~ tO, . 'QSC5 ~~t, -;ZO& t&~~ MME ef. ""?th'W;-xeWfja~ 'yag496e, ng Ze... Cdngnsss chan Ne cisssag Rs sc% is Qe Atsgsss~ m9tsricn fm Gebanndn9ng tha c~ eC. %ha s9grwn c9' ~t9ng As federal. Gags nsgs sm93shls nader these sets+ Tho '~C ~se m". ths acts ss ststag thsxa9n ms 4c euthenics eaopvm4srs shsxw bs tha Unitary 8&tan Qa9n...

  7. Some properties of the Goncarov polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldred, Linda Mae

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +1 Replacing t-k-1 by s in the above we obtain aG (z; z , . . . , z ) k ' 0' '''' k-1 i n-k-1 (n-k-1) -s k I s+(k+1) (n-k-1)! ~ ((n-k-1)-a)I s k' '' ' k+s s=0 0' ' k-1 -k-1 k1 '''' -1 The following are some examples of Goncarov polynomials... of the Gonh'arov Polynomials. (May 1972) Linda Nae Eldred, B. A. , SUNY at Fredonia Directed by: Dr. Charles K. Chui In this thesis we collect from the known literature some important properties and applications of the GonKarov polynomials G ( z zp f z I...

  8. The use of solvent extraction in trace metal analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Raymond Douglas

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , reagen4 grade. NamHPOn ~ 7H-. . G T ' Till 68 08 Fe . ?. 0. 0003'Ii. S~ diun; di. hy;!i'cg=n phosphate, J. T. Baker, rcag?nt grade. F. W. 138. 00. Sodium tartrate, J. T. Baker, reagent grade. Nae04H40e 2HnO F. W. 250. 08 Fe = 0. 0002/0. d... the sta!&dards ;&ere prepared. The solutions werc pipeti, ed. into a 125&-ml pear-sba d. separatory funnel and. 5 ml of 41 reagen4 sclurion &;as added. '!ne rsixture was shaken for I'ive s&inutes. 'The layers were allowed to separate snd th or- ganic...

  9. The nerve supply to the major organs and tissues of the caprine head

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatum, Michael Edward

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    've, deep brAanehes A ? CAenicuiate I"66npixen 8- . '. tAxi J 0 r pe t re) e a 1 nAe r ve C St. apedxa1 nerve D-Cnerda tyMpan. i nex"ve E- Cauda1 aurieIulax nex've P ? Digastric nexve G- Stylobyoid nexve FXgUX S 1 1 - D3 S jXXbUt XOIX 0 f tI1Q IXPPOg... ? ZggoQlet 1c bo ne 6-Maxilla H-Fncial tubelasi. ty l-N!Isnl bone J leal . Ol"b3. id. l fazed!!Ien K- incisive bane 4- Pills ' 1ne f 3. sen 1'e figure 3 - Sagittal section of the head showing dietri13ntion 0 f the ol factor/ nerve A...

  10. Escherichia coli proteomics and bioinformatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Lili

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ???? ...????????..?????. .?.. 25 2.7 Comparisons of the distributions of molecular weight (A) and pI (B) between heparin-binding proteins and predicted proteins of the whole genome? .? ????????????????? ..? .??.?. ... 26 2.8 Functional... Page 2.12 pI distribution of heparin-binding proteins in elution fractions of the exponential growth sample...?????.? ??...??????.?.. 38 2.13 pI distribution of heparin-binding proteins in elution fractions...

  11. Garg, Sarpong, and Stoltz: Dragmacidin D Synthesis 1 Supplemental materials for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    a Rainin C18, Microsorb MV, 5mm, 300 x 4.6 mm reversed-phased column in 0.1% (wt/v) TFA with acetonitrile as eluent and a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, gradient elution of 1.25% acetonitrile/min. Preparatory reversed with a guard, 0.1% (wt/v) TFA with acetonitrile as eluent, and gradient elution of 0.50% acetonitrile

  12. Method and system for radioisotope generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toth, James J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Fryxell, Glen E.; O'Hara, Matthew J.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and a process for producing selected isotopic daughter products from parent materials characterized by the steps of loading the parent material upon a sorbent having a functional group configured to selectively bind the parent material under designated conditions, generating the selected isotopic daughter products, and eluting said selected isotopic daughter products from the sorbent. In one embodiment, the process also includes the step of passing an eluent formed by the elution step through a second sorbent material that is configured to remove a preselected material from said eluent. In some applications a passage of the material through a third sorbent material after passage through the second sorbent material is also performed.

  13. Carbonate-H2O2 Leaching for Sequestering Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Horng-Bin [University of Idaho, Moscow] [University of Idaho, Moscow; Weisheng, Liao [University of Idaho, Moscow] [University of Idaho, Moscow; Wai, Chien [University of Idaho, Moscow] [University of Idaho, Moscow; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL] [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL] [ORNL; Tian, Guoxin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Rao, Linfeng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium adsorbed on amidoxime-based polyethylene fiber in simulated seawater can be quantitatively eluted at room temperature using 1M Na2CO3 containing 0.1 M H2O2. This efficient elution process is probably due to formation of an extremely stable uranyl-peroxo-carbonato complex in the carbonate solution. After washing with water, the sorbent can be reused with little loss of uranium loading capacity. Possible existence of this stable uranyl species in ocean water is also discussed.

  14. Ion exchange selectivity of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkerson, James Edward

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (TMA-Cl) as Eluent 6 Elution of Viologens with Tetraethyl Ammonium Br {TEA-Br) as Eluent 7 Effect of Concentration of KC1 on Retention Volume of Methyl Viologen on Column N-1 8 Effect. of Organic Modifier on V r 9 Effect of Organic Modifier...-4 with TMA-Br as Eluent 2 39 14 Effect of Nafion Volume on Retention Volume of Pyridinium Bromides. 41 vii LIST OF FIGURES Failure 1 Calibration Curve of Ru(bpy) 3 in Methanol. 2+ 2 Effect of Ionic Strength on Elution of Methyl Viologen 3...

  15. Ion exchange-induced dissolution of calcite in Na-montmorillonite/CaCO?b3?s systems: its effect on hydraulic conductivity, CaCO?b3?s dissolution kinetics, and CaCO?b3?s equilibrium relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Rio Durand, Jose Bruno

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with deionized water 80 4. 2 Values for pH, H2CO3*, Ca concentration and alkalinity of water (a) in equilibrium with calcite at the designated pCO2, and (b) following elution of deionized water equilibrated at this same pCO2 and passed through a sand.../[ALK] as a function of Na desorption for experiment B during elution with deionized water 117 5. 10 Calcite particle partially under the influence of the diffuse double layer (DDL), where dissolution is taking place, and Ca is rapidly adsorbed...

  16. A novel method for the purification of prephenic acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, Tammy Tiner

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the K ? of components eluting av with prephenate from G-10/NH4HC03 column. . III Elemental analysis of barium prephenate. . Page 22 28 30 is P rfi ti of p phe ic acid f ~oos o c essa. . . 35 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Prephenic acid Page... of the degree of cross-linking, type of gel and eluting solvent polarity on the separation of cis and trans-cin- namic acids. They found that the degree of cross-linking influences the degree of adsorption, as defined by K . The K for Sephadex 1 av av G-10...

  17. Comprehensive off-line, two-dimensional liquid chromotography. Application to the separation of peptide digest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Nicola [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of the peptide digests of myoglobin and bovine serum albumin was performed with an off-line combination of two commercial, conventional HPLC columns. The first column was packed with a strong ion exchanger and eluted with a KCl gradient. The second column was packed with particles of C{sub 18}-bonded silica and eluted with an acetonitrile gradient. The conditional peak capacities of the 2D separations achieved exceed 7000 under the experimental conditions investigated. This performance is achieved at the cost of an analysis time of the order of 28 hours. Possible improvements to the separation method described here are discussed.

  18. Controlled release nanoparticle-embedded coatings reduce the tissue reaction to neuroprostheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Controlled release nanoparticle-embedded coatings reduce the tissue reaction to neuroprostheses online 4 May 2010 Keywords: Microfabrication Nanoparticles Neuroprosthesis Controlled release coatings in the brain. The coatings consist of poly(propylene sulfide) drug-eluting nanoparticles embedded in a poly

  19. B American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2012 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-012-0404-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komives, Elizabeth A.

    pI, mobile phase pH) [12], ion suppression of co-eluting analytes [13], and mobile phase flow rateB American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2012 DOI: 10.1007/s13361-012-0404-0 J. Am. Soc. Mass Improves Peptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry Jesse G. Meyer, Elizabeth A. Komives Department

  20. W W W . Q I A G E N . C O M QproteomeTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Product Use Limitations 4 Quality Control 4 Product Warranty and Satisfaction Guarantee 5 Technical in the handling of many of the materials described in this text. Quality Control In accordance with QIAGEN's ISO-certified Total Quality Management System, each lot of QIAamp MinElute Media Kit is tested against predetermined

  1. W W W . Q I A G E N . C O M QproteomeTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Contents 4 Storage 4 Quality Control 4 Safety Information 5 Product Warranty and Satisfaction Guarantee 6. Elution Buffer should be stored at ­20°C after reconstitution. Quality Control In accordance with QIAGEN's ISO-certified Total Quality Management System, Qproteome Kits are tested against predetermined

  2. Southern Blotting Assemble the LKB Vacugene vacuum blotting unit on a leveling table. Place the white plastic backing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    the plastic mask. Ensure that there are no air bubbles or dirt under the membrane. After electrophoresis photograph the gel on the UV transilluminator. Note: For a southern blot to detect mtDNA deletions UVL tube. This fraction contains the purified probe. Pipet 4µL (1 /100 of the elution volume

  3. Supplemental Material for Jiang et al, Tumor Imaging via Proteolytic Activation of Cell Penetrating Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    and vigorously stirred in air for 3 hr. The crude cyclic peptide was purified on HPLC (C18 reverse phase column purified on HPLC (C18 reverse phase column, eluted with 10-40% acetonitrile in water with 0.1% CF3COOH, and the concentration of each peptide stock solution was verified by UV- vis absorbance. Peptide disulfide bond

  4. Supporting Information for Cribrostatin 6 induces death in cancer cells through a reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hergenrother, Paul J.

    Procedures All reactions were conducted in oven-dried glassware when appropriate and air- or water- sensitive were visualized by UV light (254 or 365 nm). 1 H NMR spectra and 13 C NMR spectra were recorded. The crude material was purified via silica gel column chromatography eluting with 1:1 ethyl acetate

  5. Journal of Clinical Investigation Vol. 42, No. 12, 1963

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alper, Chester A.

    Journal of Clinical Investigation Vol. 42, No. 12, 1963 THE METABOLISM OF GAMMA GLOBULINS- ent study was undertaken to delineate and com- pare simultaneously the metabolism of normal gamma on diethylaminoethyl cellulose (DEAE) with gradient elution (11) from 0.005 M Tris-phosphate, pH 8.0, to 0.3 M Tris

  6. GLUTAMATE DEHYDROGENASE IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF SHEEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    was divided into two frac- tions. The first fraction (peak I) flowed from the column at a low NaCl gradient. The second fraction (peak II) was eluted by a simi- lar NaCl gradient as the enzymic fraction puri- fied Metabolism in Rumen Bacteria and Mucosa froc Sheep Fed Soya Protein or Urea. J. Nutr., 100, 161-169. FRIEDEN

  7. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 letters to nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    was excised (Fig. 2c), and RNA was eluted in 300 mM NaCl, 20 mM DTT, then precipitated with ethanol. After; RNAwas then twice precipitated with ethanol to remove excess biotin. About 75% of material end- mide gel and precipitated with ethanol. Uracil counts associated with the RNA were determined

  8. 10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC- purified mixture was desalted on the same column (methanol was removed on a rotary evaporator, and the sample loaded in H2O and eluted with 90% methanol) and lyophilized, yielding the purified Nvoc

  9. LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Genewiz Sample prep protocol.docx revised 9/27/13 by JW Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    and eluted in water, or by enzymatic treatment. Please use gel extraction if you have more than one product extraction (if extra bands are present) or by using ExoSAP-IT. Gel extraction: use kit, usually Omega Bio for Genewiz Sequencing" below. Genewiz says: PCR products should be purified by either gel extraction

  10. n engl j med 367;25 nejm.org december 20, 2012 2375 The new england

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for patients with diabetes, coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) has had a better outcome than percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We sought to discover whether aggres- sive medical therapy and the use of drug-eluting stents could alter the revascular- ization approach for patients with diabetes and multivessel coronary

  11. Basic Science Effects of Curcumin for Preventing Restenosis in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    in percutaneous coronary interven- tions (PCIs). Unfortunately, in-stent restenosis triggered by metal-eluting stent; restenosis INTRODUCTION Coronary artery narrowing caused by atherosclerosis is treated routinely by percutaneous transluminal coro- nary angioplasty (PTCA); however, restenosis, a seri- ous complication

  12. MATHEMATICAL BIOSCIENCES doi:10.3934/mbe.2009.6.493 AND ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontrelli, Giuseppe

    . Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty has been used in the past to treat coronary occlusion (stenosis) due. Olufsen) Abstract. Implantation of drug eluting stents following percutaneous trans- luminal angioplasty observed after intervention [2] indicated the requirement of alternative approaches. The use of bare

  13. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

    1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

  14. AquaTRAIN MCRTN Geogenic Chemicals in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    , leaching ­ Fossil fuel (mainly coal), ores (mainly copper ores) · Burning, roasting Also (was) very Elution ­ with hot boiling solution of HNO3 for totals, ­ with hot boiling water for speciation, ­ During-UV-AFS or ICP-MS for totals, ­ with HPLC-ICP-MS for speciation. Boiling HNO3 or Boiling H2O #12;Experiments

  15. Supplementary Information for: Individual dimers of the mitotic kinesin motor Eg5 step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Steven

    processively and support substantial loads in vitro M. T. Valentine1,* , Polly M. Fordyce2,* , Troy C. Krzysiak profiles for Eg5 motors purified from E. coli. (a) Elution profiles monitoring intrinsic fluorescence vs Group #12;3 Figure S3 Run lengths are relatively insensitive to the applied load or to the ATP

  16. Tailored drug release from biodegradable stent coatings based on hybrid polyurethanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Tailored drug release from biodegradable stent coatings based on hybrid polyurethanes Qiongyu Guo a 2009 Keywords: POSS Biodegradable polymer Drug delivery Drug-eluting stents Highly adjustable and precisely controllable drug release from a biodegradable stent coating was achieved using a unique family

  17. Purification and characterization of a 50 kDa glycoprotein in cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jianling

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -mannose and some hybrid type glycoproteins can be differentially eluted with 500 mM methyl a-D-mannoside (Beeley 1985; Baenziger and Fiete 1979; Krusius et al. 1976). Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin from the defatted wheat germ (Triticum vuigare...

  18. Supplementary Information Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    µm column, linear gradient of acetonitrile in water (0­ 100% acetonitrile over 20 min at a flow rate) in a linear gradient of acetonitrile in water (80 ­ 100% acetonitrile over 20 min at a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min). Both solvents contained 0.05% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). HPLC elution: 9.0 min. UV/Vis (acetonitrile

  19. Supplemental Experimental Procedures Cell Culture and Induction of Apoptosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cravatt, Benjamin

    and acetonitrile. The pooled supernatant was dried and resuspended in 10 µl buffer A (95% H2O, 5% acetonitrile, 0 eluted from the column using a 2-hour gradient of 5-100% Buffer B (Buffer B: 20% H2O, 80% acetonitrile, 0

  20. STAGE (STop And Go Extraction) TIPS Clean up Procedure: Detergent and Salt Removal "MCX-like method"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    pH 3 b) Ensure that organic (acetonitrile, methanol) concentration is at or below 5 ­ 10% c) Adjust Conditioning solvent A: acetonitrile Conditioning solvent B: ultrapure water Wash solvent A: 95:5:0.2%, water : acetonitrile : formic acid (FA) Wash solvent B: acetonitrile Elution solvent: 60:35:5%, acetonitrile : water

  1. Cell Stem Cell, Volume 5 Supplemental Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1% formic acid. Peptides were eluted with 40 l 80% acetonitrile, 0.1% formic acid. The eluate was dried completely and subsequently reconstituted in 10 l 20% acetonitrile, 0.05% formic acid. #12;Strong Cation, Japan). After injection, the first 5 min were ran isocratic at 100% solvent A (20% acetonitrile, 0

  2. Quasi-linear gradients for capillary liquid chromatography with mass and tandem mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Gradient elution, capillary liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was performed with linear, static the use of additional valves, mixers, pumps or software. It took less than 10 minutes to form a gradient-line as static gradients.12­14 The technique of forming static gradients was first proposed by Ishii and co

  3. Random solutions of random problems...are not just random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achlioptas, Dimitris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let I(n,m) denote a uniformly random instance of some constraint satisfaction problem CSP with n variables and m constraints. Assume that the density r=m/n is small enough so that with high probability I(n,m) has a solution, and consider the experiment of first choosing an instance I=I(n,m) at random, and then sampling a random solution sigma of I (if one exists). For many CSPs (e.g., k-SAT, k-NAE, or k-coloring), this experiment appears difficult both to implement and to analyze; in fact, for a large range of r, no efficient algorithm is known to even compute a single solution of I. In the present paper we show that for many CSPs the above experiment is essentially equivalent to first choosing a random assignment sigma to the n variables, and then drawing a random instance satisfied by sigma uniformly. In general, this second experiment is very easy to implement and amenable to a rigorous analysis. In fact, using this equivalence, we can analyze the solution space of random CSPs. Thus, we can achieve the lon...

  4. Biological in situ Dose Painting for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Drug-Loaded Implantable Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sridhar, Srinivas [Electronics Materials Research Institute, Northeastern University, and Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Suh, W. Warren; D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Makrigiorgos, G. Mike, E-mail: mmakrigiorgos@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Implantable devices routinely used for increasing spatial accuracy in modern image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT), such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, encompass the potential for in situ release of biologically active drugs, providing an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio. We model this new approach for two types of treatment. Methods and Materials: Radiopaque fiducials used in IGRT, or prostate brachytherapy spacers ('eluters'), were assumed to be loaded with radiosensitizer for in situ drug slow release. An analytic function describing the concentration of radiosensitizer versus distance from eluters, depending on diffusion-elimination properties of the drug in tissue, was developed. Tumor coverage by the drug was modeled for tumors typical of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy treatments for various eluter dimensions and drug properties. Six prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy cases were analyzed by assuming implantation of drug-loaded spacers. Radiosensitizer-induced subvolume boost was simulated from which biologically effective doses for typical radiosensitizers were calculated in one example. Results: Drug distributions from three-dimensional arrangements of drug eluters versus eluter size and drug properties were tabulated. Four radiosensitizer-loaded fiducials provide adequate radiosensitization for {approx}4-cm-diameter lung tumors, thus potentially boosting biologically equivalent doses in centrally located stereotactic body treated lesions. Similarly, multiple drug-loaded spacers provide prostate brachytherapy with flexible shaping of 'biologically equivalent doses' to fit requirements difficult to meet by using radiation alone, e.g., boosting a high-risk region juxtaposed to the urethra while respecting normal tissue tolerance of both the urethra and the rectum. Conclusions: Drug loading of implantable devices routinely used in IGRT provides new opportunities for therapy modulation via biological in situ dose painting.

  5. Nitrification in Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a high nitrificati is the balmcing of these extremes which redlices the average le between acid ancl non-acid soils. C03TPOSITION OF SOILS TVITFI LOW AND HIGH NITRIFIC-4TION. Table 11 contains the chemical composition of soils having low nitl... are subsoils. Subsoils thus possess nnu~nally high and unusually low nitrification. Table 11.-Chemical composition of soils with nitrification below 10 . I Average .............................. Nitri- fication 7164 7090 4596' 5710 4645 3976 3657 3...

  6. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrographic study of Fe in bitumens derived from tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (US))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on bitumens extracted from tar sands from various locations (Utah, California, Kentucky, and Alberta) that were examined by size exclusion chromatography with on-line element-specific detection to study the Fe concentration as a function of size. In most cases, the resulting profiles exhibit unimodal distributions at relatively large molecular size with very similar times for maximum elution. specifically, Sunnyside (Utah) and McKittrick (California) tar-sand bitumens exhibited very intense maxima consistent with extremely high bulk Fe contents. Arroyo Grande (California) exhibited an additional maximum at very large molecular size. This size behavior of the Fe appears to correlate with the large molecular size Ni and V components eluted under the same conditions.

  7. Radiopharmaceutical composition containing tantalum-178 and process therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neirinckx, Rudi D. (Medfield, MA); Holman, B. Leonard (Chestnut Hill, MA); Davis, Michael A. (Westwood, MA); Harris, Gale I. (East Lansing, MI)

    1989-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A physiologically acceptable solution of tantalum-178 having an activity of 0.1 to 200 millicuries per milliliter of tantalum-178 solution is provided. The solution is obtained from tungsten-178 bound to a column of an anion exchange resin which forms tantalum-178 in situ by eluting the column with a hydrochloric acid solution containing hydrogen peroxide to form an acidic solution of tantalum-178. The acidic solution of tantalum-178 then is neutralized.

  8. Elisabethamine: a new diterpene alkaloid from Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Russell G.

    chromatography using silica gel as adsorbent and hexane±ethyl acetate (0±100%) and ethyl acetate±methanol (0±100%) as eluents. The fraction obtained on elution with 80% ethyl acetate/20% hexane was subjected to reverse phase groups, respectively. Two three-proton singlets at 1.66 and 1.80 were assigned to the allylic C-16 and C

  9. High Throughput Identification, Purification and Structural Characterization of Water Soluble Protein Complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong,, Ming; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Liu, Hui-Hai; Malik, J.; Geller, Jil; Yang, Li; Choi, M.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Arbelaez, Pablo; Sterling, H. J.; Typke, Dieter; Shatsky, Max; Brenner, Steve; Fisher, Susan; Williams, Evan; Szakal, Evelin; Allen, S.; Hall, S. C.; Hazen, Terry; Witkowska, H. E.; Jin, Jiming; Glaeser, Robert; Biggin, Mark

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Our scheme for the tagless purification of water soluble complexes. 10 g of protein from a crude bacterial extract is first fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and then by a series of chromatographic steps: anion exchange (IEX), hydrophobic interaction (HIC), and finally size exclusion (Gel Filtration). Fractions from the last chromatography step are trypsin digested and peptides labeled with iTRAQ reagents to allow multiplexing and quantitation during mass spectrometric analysis. Elution profiles of identified proteins are then subjected to clustering analysis.

  10. Transcatheter Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Doxorubicin-loaded DC Bead (DEBDOX): Technical Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lencioni, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.lencioni@med.unipi.it [Pisa University Hospital, University of Pisa, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention (Italy); Baere, Thierry de [Institut Gustav-Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Burrel, Marta [Barcelona Clinic for Liver Cancer, Hospital Clinic, Department of Radiology (Spain); Caridi, James G. [University of Florida, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Lammer, Johannes [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Interventional Radiology (Austria); Malagari, Katerina [University of Athens, Department of Radiology (Greece); Martin, Robert C. G. [University of Louisville, Division of Surgical Oncology (United States); O'Grady, Elizabeth [University Hospital Aintree, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Real, Maria Isabel [Barcelona Clinic for Liver Cancer, Hospital Clinic, Department of Radiology (Spain); Vogl, Thomas J. [University of Frankfurt, Department of Radiology (Germany); Watkinson, Anthony [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Geschwind, Jean-Francois H. [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tranarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has been established by a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials as the standard of care for nonsurgical patients with large or multinodular noninvasive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) isolated to the liver and with preserved liver function. Although conventional TACE with administration of an anticancer-in-oil emulsion followed by embolic agents has been the most popular technique, the introduction of embolic drug-eluting beads has provided an alternative to lipiodol-based regimens. Experimental studies have shown that TACE with drug-eluting beads has a safe pharmacokinetic profile and results in effective tumor killing in animal models. Early clinical experiences have confirmed that drug-eluting beads provide a combined ischemic and cytotoxic effect locally with low systemic toxic exposure. Recently, the clinical value of a TACE protocol performed by using the embolic microsphere DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEBDOX; drug-eluting bead doxorubicin) has been shown by randomized controlled trials. An important limitation of conventional TACE has been the inconsistency in the technique and the treatment schedules. This limitation has hampered the acceptance of TACE as a standard oncology treatment. Doxorubicin-loaded DC Bead provides levels of consistency and repeatability not available with conventional TACE and offers the opportunity to implement a standardized approach to HCC treatment. With this in mind, a panel of physicians took part in a consensus meeting held during the European Conference on Interventional Oncology in Florence, Italy, to develop a set of technical recommendations for the use of DEBDOX in HCC treatment. The conclusions of the expert panel are summarized.

  11. www.activemotif.comwww.activemotif.com Protein Purification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Storage Resuspension Buffer 45 ml 175 ml Room Temp. Buffer A 33 ml 125 ml Room Temp. Elution Buffer 11 ml. Resuspension Buffer 50 mM Tris, pH 8.0, 300 mM NaCl, and 10 mM Imidazole, 0.2% Triton X-100 2. Lysozyme 100 mg concentration of 0.2% to the Resuspension Buffer. This will help the ly

  12. Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

  13. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  14. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Tucson, AZ)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting.

  15. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  16. Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

  17. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  18. Garg, Caspi, and Stoltz: Dragmacidin F Supporting Information S1 Supporting Information for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    .6 mm reversed-phased column in 0.1% (w/v) TFA with acetonitrile as eluent and a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, gradient elution of 1.25% acetonitrile/min. Preparatory reversed-phase HPLC was performed on a Beckman HPLC with a Waters DeltaPak 25 x 100 mm, 100 µm C18 column equipped with a guard, 0.1% (w/v) TFA with acetonitrile

  19. Development of sorbers for the recovery of uranium from seawater. Part 2. The accumulation of uranium from seawater by resins containing amidoxime and imidoxime functional groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astheimer, L.; Schenk, H.J.; Witte, E.G.; Schwochau, K.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxylamine derivatives of cross-linked poly(acrylonitriles), so-called poly(acrylamidoxime) resins, are suitable for the accumulation of uranium from natural seawater of pH = 8.1 to 8.3. Depending on the method of manufacture, these sorbers yield excellent uranium loadings up to some thousand ppM which roughly equals the average uranium content of actually explored uranium ores. The rate of uranium uptake, which is 5 to 30 ppM/d at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature of seawater. Uranium can be eluted by 1 M HCl with an elution efficiency of more than 90%. Owing to a certain instability of the uranium binding groups in acid eluants, the uranium uptake decreases with increasing number of sorption-elution cycles. Hydroxylamine derivatives of poly(acrylonitrile) are shown to contain simultaneously at least two kinds of functional groups: open-chain amidoxime groups which are stable and cyclic imidoxime groups which are unstable in 1 M HCl. Experimental evidence is presented that the uptake of uranium from natural seawater is closely related to the presence of cyclic imidoxime configurations in the polyacrylic lattice. Polystyrene and poly(glycidylmethacrylate)-based amidoxime and imide dioxime resins are less effective in extracting uranium from natural seawater. 10 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Observation of time dependent dispersion in laboratory scale experiments with intact tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Triay, I.R.; Ott, M.A.; Mitchell, A.J.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration of radionuclides through intact tuff was studied using tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The tuff samples were both highly zeolitized ash-fall tuff from the Calico Hills and densely welded devitrified tuff from the Topopah Springs member of the Paintbrush tuff. Tritiated water and pertechnetate were used as conservative tracers. The sorbing tracers {sup 85}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 133}Ba were used with the devitrified tuff only. Greater tailing in the elution curves of the densely welded tuff samples was observed that could be fit by adjusting the dispersion coefficient in the conventional Advection Dispersion Equation, ADE. The curves could be fit using time dependent dispersion as was previously observed for sediments and alluvium by Dieulin, Matheron, and de Marsily. The peak of strontium concentration was expected to arrive after 1.5 years based on the conventional ADE and assuming a linear K{sub d} of 26 ml/g. The observed elution had significant strontium in the first sample taken at 2 weeks after injection. The peak in the strontium elution occurred at 5 weeks. The correct arrival time for the strontium peak was achieved using a one dimensional analytic solution with time dependent dispersion. The dispersion coefficient as a function of time used to fit the conservative tracers was found to predict the peak arrival of the sorbing tracers. The K{sub d} used was the K{sub d} determined by the batch method on crushed tuff. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Characterization and Application of Superlig 620 Solid Phase Extraction Resin for Automated Process Monitoring of 90Sr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devol, Timothy A.; Clements, John P.; Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Egorov, Oleg; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of SuperLig® 620 solid phase extraction resin was performed in order to develop an automated on-line process monitor for 90Sr. The main focus was on strontium separation from barium, with the goal of developing an automated separation process for 90Sr in high-level wastes. High-level waste contains significant 137Cs activity, of which 137mBa is of great concern as an interference to the quantification of strontium. In addition barium, yttrium and plutonium were studied as potential interferences to strontium uptake and detection. A number of complexants were studied in a series of batch Kd experiments, as SuperLig® 620 was not previously known to elute strontium in typical mineral acids. The optimal separation was found using a 2M nitric acid load solution with a strontium elution step of ~0.49M ammonium citrate and a barium elution step of ~1.8M ammonium citrate. 90Sr quantification of Hanford high-level tank waste was performed on a sequential injection analysis microfluidics system coupled to a flow-cell detector. The results of the on-line procedure are compared to standard radiochemical techniques in this paper.

  2. Influence of the pressure on the properties of chromatographic columns I. Measurement of the compressibility of methanol-water mixtures on a mesoporous silica adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compressibilities of aqueous solutions of methanol or acetonitrile containing 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) organic solvent were measured with a dynamic chromatographic method. The elution volumes of thiourea samples (2 {micro} L) in these solutions were measured at different average column pressures, adjusted by placing suitable capillary restrictors on-line, after the detector. The reproducibility of the measurements was better than 0.2%. In the range of average pressures studied (10-350 bar), the maximum change in elution volume of thiourea is 1.3% (in pure water) and 4.0% (in pure methanol). This difference is due to the different compressibilities of these pure solvents. For mixtures, the plots of the elution volume of thiourea versus the pressure are convex downward, which is inconsistent with the opposite curvature predicted by the classical Tait model of liquid compressibility. This difference is explained by the variation of the amount of thiourea adsorbed with the pressure. The deconvolution of the two effects, adsorption of thiourea and solvent compressibility, allows a fair and consistent determination of the compressibilities of the methanol-water mixtures. A column packed with non-porous silica particles was also used to determine the compressibility of methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixtures. A negative deviation by respect to ideal behavior was observed.

  3. Influence of the pressure on the properties of chromatographic columns I. Measurement of the compressibility of methanol-water mixtures on a mesoporous silica adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compressibilities of aqueous solutions of methanol or acetonitrile containing 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% (v/v) organic solvent were measured with a dynamic chromatographic method. The elution volumes of thiourea samples (2 {micro} L) in these solutions were measured at different average column pressures, adjusted by placing suitable capillary restrictors on-line, after the detector. The reproducibility of the measurements was better than 0.2%. In the range of average pressures studied (10-350 bar), the maximum change in elution volume of thiourea is 1.3% (in pure water) and 4.0% (in pure methanol). This difference is due to the different compressibilities of these pure solvents. For mixtures, the plots of the elution volume of thiourea versus the pressure are convex downward, which is inconsistent with the opposite curvature predicted by the classical Tait model of liquid compressibility. This difference is explained by the variation of the amount of thiourea adsorbed with the pressure. The deconvolution of the two effects, adsorption of thiourea and solvent compressibility, allows a fair and consistent determination of the compressibilities of the methanol-water mixtures. A column packed with non-porous silica particles was also used to determine the compressibility of methanol-water and acetonitrile-water mixtures. A negative deviation by respect to ideal behavior was observed.

  4. Reforming process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, W.C.

    1987-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reforming process is described comprising: (a) contacting a hydrocarbon feed with a first reforming catalyst at conditions which favor reforming to form a product stream. The first reforming catalyst is bifunctional and comprises a metallic oxide support which contains acidic sites having disposed therein a Group VIII metal; and (b) contacting the product stream with a second reforming catalyst at conditions which favor reforming. The second reforming catalyst is a monofunctional, non-acidic catalyst comprising a large-pore zeolite containing at least one Group VIII metal.

  5. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  6. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

    1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

  7. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hancher, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hackett, Gail D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a flocculating agent, separating precipitate-containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions.

  8. Synthesis and properties of ethylphosphotriesters of oligothymidylates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, Carolyn Jane

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reaction UV spectra of TosC1 and the products of the phosphate activation Electrophoretic pattern of the hexathymidylic acid triester products Elution pattern from Sephadex G-25-40 of hexathymidylic acid reaction mixture ORD spectra of Et T p.... 1 M Tris HC1, pH 7. 0 ( ? ? ? ) 17 19 20 22 23 25 27 29 31 PIGURE PAGE 12 Recooling curve for poly A hexa T triester complex. 13 UV spectrum of the heat denatured poly A hexa T triester complex. 37 INTRODUCTION Since nucleic acids...

  9. Statistical Methods for the Analysis of Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . This research is supported by the. This work was sponsored by a subcontract from PNNL and by the NIH R25-CA-90301 training grant at TAMU. Additional support was provided by KAUST-IAMCS Innovation grant, by NIH grant DK070146 and by the National Institute...-MS Liquid chromatographyCMass spectrometry M/Z Mass over charge ratio NET Normalized elution time NMC Number of missed cleavage sites NTE Number of tryptic ends PEP Posterior error probability PM Potential matches PMF Probability mass function PNNL...

  10. Proteomic profile of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails upon infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tesana, Smarn; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Gallego, Javier Sotillo

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    minutes. Peptides were then eluted onto the PepMap C18 analytical column (15 cm 75 µm 200 i.d.; LC Packings) at a flow rate of 300 nl/min and separated using a linear gradient of 4-80% 201 solvent B over 120 min. The mobile phase consisted of solvent A... “molecular function” (Figure 2a) and “single-organism cellular process” 271 (9.3% and 8%), “regulation of biological process” (8.7% and 8%), “primary metabolic 272 process” (8.1% and 9.3%) and “organic substance metabolic process” (8.1% and 9.3%) 273...

  11. Metabolism of vitamin K in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terryl Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Identification of the product of vitamin K metabolism in Swiss 3T3 mouse fibroblasts was done by comparison of its HPLC gradient elution profile (A) to that of a mixture of authentic vitamin K epoxide standard... METABOLISM OF VITAMIN K IN SWISS 3T3 Mouse FIBROBLASTS A Thesis by TERRyL MARIE JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985...

  12. A water soluble antigen unique to Brucella abortus Strain 19: isolation, immunological characterization and use in an enzyme immunoassay for differential diagnosis of vaccinated and Brucella abortus infected cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smithwick, Charles Ripley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :7;20:25) for 10 min and allowed to air dry. The gel bed was then divided into separate equal fractions with a metal d fractionating grid and each fraction scooped out and resuspended in 10-12 ml distilled water. The pH of each fraction was measured... and proteins as visualized eluted from appropriate gel fractions with distilled water and stored at -20 C. Ca rine immune sera. Caprine antisera were prepared against a crude water soluble extract of B. abortus Strain 19. Crude extract was lyophilized...

  13. Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lisic, Edward C. (Cookeville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Callahan, Alvin P. (Harriman, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

  14. Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lisic, Edward C. (Cookeville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Callahan, Alvin P. (Harriman, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

  15. Turbercidin metabolism in Neurospora crassa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyda, Timothy Stuart

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 14C incorporated into the acid-soluble nucleotide pools of germinated pvr-l, tub conidia incubated with 10 nM [8- 4C] adenosine, 2 pCi/uMol for 20 min 22 g d l g N d~p md' ppl mented with tubercidin (to 100 uM) Anion-exchange elution profile... f ~N d' ppl d with tubercidin (to 100 nial) . Top row (left to right) Ryr-l, tubR ungerminated conidia, conidia germinated 60 min, conidia germinated 4 h. Bottom row (left to right) wild type ungerminated conidia, conidia germinated 60 min...

  16. Planning study, resin and debris removal system. Three Mile Island nuclear station unit 2 make-up and purification demineralizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renkey, E.J.; Jenkins, W.W.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various methods were evaluated to remove the resin and debris from the makeup and purification demineralizers. There are two preferred concepts. The existing waste disposal system should be utilized if some contamination of currently clean lines is acceptable. A skid mounted, temporary, upflow/downflow system should be utilized if the demineralizers and associated piping are to be cleaned to the maximum extent practicable with minimum contamination of the existing system. Both methods provide for removal of complex organic compounds from the effluent and elution of cesium from the resin. The resin and debris will be diluted with concrete to be disposed of in accordance with 10CFR61 burial limits.

  17. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  18. Characterization and purification of juvenile hormone acid methyltransferase 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, Kenneth Elden

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Column . 30 8. Effect of S-adenosylhomocysteine on JHANT Activity 9. Elution Profile from a Sephadex G-100 Column 10. Chromatography of JHAMT on a DEAE-NPR HPLC Ion Exchange 31 36 Column 39 11. Chromatography of JHAMT on a DE-52 DEAE Cellulose Ion...: 1. DEAE-NPR HPLC column. Small aliquots of active fractions from the G-100 column were injected onto a 4. 4x20 mm TSK gel DEAE NPR ion-exchange column (Hewlett Packard, Avondale, Penn) with a Beckman HPLC system (Berkeley, CA) at 0. 5 ml...

  19. Methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for detection of an active enzymatic agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of the present invention provide methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for the detection of an active target agent in a fluid sample. A substrate molecule is used that contains a sequence which may cleave in the presence of an active target agent. A SNAP25 sequence is described, for example, that may be cleaved in the presence of Botulinum Neurotoxin. The substrate molecule includes a reporter moiety. The substrate molecule is exposed to the sample, and resulting reaction products separated using electrophoretic separation. The elution time of the reporter moiety may be utilized to identify the presence or absence of the active target agent.

  20. Potential Modulated Intercalation of Alkali Cations into Metal Hexacyanoferrate Coated Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel T. Schwartz; Bekki Liu; Marlina Lukman; Kavita M. Jeerage; William A. Steen; Haixia Dai; Qiuming Yu; J. Antonio Medina

    2002-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel hexacyanoferrate is a polynuclear inorganic ion intercalation material that loads (intercalates) and elutes (deintercalates) alkali cations from its structure when electrochemically reduced and oxidized, respectively. Nickel hexacyanoferrrate (NiHCF) is known to preferentially intercalate cesium over all other alkali cations, thus providing a basis for a separation scheme that can tackle DOE's radiocesium contamination problem. This program studied fundamental issues in alkalization intercalation and deintercalation in nickel hexacyanoferrate compounds, with the goal of (1) quantifying the ion exchange selectivity properties from cation mixtures, (2) enhancing ion exchange capacities, and (3) and understanding the electrochemically-switched ion exchange process (ESIX).

  1. Synthesis of ethyl N-carbobenzoxy-L-valyl-L-valyl-4-amino-3-hydroxyoctanoate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesky, Elizabeth Gourley

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with 5X citric acid to pH 5. The aqueous layer was then extracted several times with ethyl acetate. The com- bined organic layer was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and the solvent was removed by evaporation in vacuo. The product was a clear.../ sodium bicarbonate, dried with 29 anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by evaporation in vacuo. The product was a pale yellow oil weighing 0. 6 gm (81K yield). The material was passed through a short column of silica gel, eluting with 2...

  2. Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

  3. Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A generator system has been invented for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form. 1 figure.

  4. Expression patterns of FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 map to bacterial entry sites in plant shoots and roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Martina; Wyrsch, Ines; Strutt, James; Wimalasekera, Rinukshi; Webb, Alex; Boller, Thomas; Robatzek, Silke

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    /v) bromophenol blue], proteins retained on the beads were eluted by SDS–PAGE sample loading buffer and separated by 7% SDS–PAGE. FLS2 was detected by immunoblot analyses with anti-FLS2 antibodies (Chinchilla et al., 2006). MAPK activation in roots Isolated... 107, 14502–14507. Bulgarelli D, Schlaeppi K, Spaepen S, Ver Loren van Themaat E, Schulze-Lefert P. 2013. Structure and functions of the bacterial microbiota of plants. Annual Review of Plant Biology 64, 807–838. Chinchilla D, Bauer Z, Regenass M...

  5. Extraction chromatographic separation of promethium from high active waste solutions of Purex origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanujam, A.; Achuthan, P.V.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Kannan, R.; Mathur, J.N. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extraction chromatographic procedure for the separation of {sup 147}Pm from High Active Waste solutions of Purex process has been developed. Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide(CMPO) and 2-ethylhexyl-2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (KSM-17), both sorbed separately on an inert support(chromosorb-102) have been sequentially employed for this purpose. In the CMPO column, the rare earths and the trivalent actinides are sorbed together with uranium, plutonium and traces of few other fission products. The elution of this column with 0.04 M HNO{sub 3} gives an eluate containing trivalent actinides and lanthanides. This solution, after adjusting the pH to 2.0, is used as feed for the second extraction chromatographic column based on KSM-17. All the trivalent metal ions are sorbed on the column leaving the trace impurities in the effluent. Fractional elution of the metal ions from this column is carried out with nitric acid of varying concentrations. At 0.09 M HNO{sub 3}, the pure beta emitting fraction of {sup 147}Pm has been obtained. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

  7. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rand, T., E-mail: thomas.rand@wienkav.at [General Hospital Hietzing, Department of Radiology (Austria); Uberoi, R. [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  8. Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing a new fuel cell membrane for vehicles that relies on cheaper and more abundant materials than those used in current fuel cells. Conventional fuel cells are very acidic, so they require acid-resistant metals like platinum to generate electricity. The University of Delaware is developing an alkaline fuel cell membrane that can operate in a non-acidic environment where cheaper materials like nickel and silver, instead of platinum, can be used. In addition to enabling the use of cheaper metals, the University of Delaware’s membrane is 500 times less expensive than other polymer membranes used in conventional fuel cells.

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

  10. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  11. A rapid method for determination of beta-emitting radionuclides in aqueous samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.H.; Fjeld, R.A. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ion chromatography and a flow-through scintillation detector was investigated for determination of {sup 14}C, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 60}Co, {sup 63}Ni, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 147}Pm. Experiments were conducted with prepackaged elution programs and samples prepared from calibrated standards. The technique produced effective separation of the radionuclides in approximately one hour. Response of the flow-through detector was linear over the full range of activities, from 2 to 1000 Bq (50 to 30,000 pCi). Detection efficiencies ranged from 9% for {sup 63}Ni to 140% for {sup 90}Y. Lower limits of detection ranged from 5 Bq (140 pCi) for {sup 90}Y to 34 Bq (910 pCi) for {sup 63}Ni.

  12. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  13. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste with sRF resin and the tests clearly demonstrated cesium decontamination for actual waste. The results of the column tests were similar for both the simulated and the actual waste and demonstrated Cs removal with sRF from both wastes. For a flowrate of 1.4 bed volumes (BV)/hour at 25 C those results with sRF resin were: (1) Simulant and actual waste results are equivalent; (2) Cs breakthrough began between 200 and 250 BV; (3) Cs breakthrough reached 100% at around 400 BV; (4) Cs breakthrough curve from 5% to 100% is approximately linear; (5) Cs elution with 0.5 M HNO3 starts at 2 BV and ends at 6BV; (6) Most, if not all, of Cs adsorbed during treatment is released during elution; (7) At 100% breakthrough of Cs the resin bed adsorbs approximately 85% of full capacity before detection in the effluent; the remaining 15% is adsorbed at saturation; (8) Approximately 90% of resin bed changes (color and volume) are complete by 6 BV; and (9) During elution the resin shrinks to about 80% of its fully working (sodium form) BV.

  14. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  15. New Treatments for Infrapopliteal Disease: Devices, Techniques, and Outcomes So Far

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Ondina; Chalmers, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.chalmers@cmft.nhs.uk [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of endovascular treatment of infrapopliteal disease has increased in popularity in recent years. An improvement in technical success rates due to the availability of newer devices has fuelled an increased interest in the subject. The pathogenesis, indications for treatment, and outcome measures of infrapopliteal disease differ from larger vessel intervention. Diabetes and renal failure are prevalent. Neuropathy and venous disease contribute to the etiology of ulceration. Most interventions are undertaken for critical limb ischemia rather than claudication. Therefore, a range of conservative, pharmacological, and invasive therapies are provided. Conventional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) using modern low-profile systems is associated with high technical success rates. However, initial data from recent randomized, controlled trials suggest that drug-eluting stents are consistently achieving improved patency over PTA alone or over bare metal stents. This review summarizes recent advances in the treatment of infrapopliteal disease.

  16. Recovery of uranium from seawater. 7; Concentration and separation of uranium in acidic eluate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egawa, H.; Nonaka, T. (Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kumamoto Univ., Kurokami 2-39-1, Kumamoto 860 (JP)); Nakayama, M. (Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto Univ., Oe-Honmachi 5-1, Kumamoto 862 (JP))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on macroporous chelating resins (RSP, RSPO, RCSP, and RCSPO) containing dihydroxphosphino and/or -phosphono groups were examined for the concentration and separation of uranium from acidic eluates of macroporous chelating resin containing amidoxime groups. RSP and RSPO had a high adsorption capacity for uranium even in 0.25-0.50 mol {center dot} dm{sup {minus}3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Uranium adsorbed on the resins was eluted easily as a uranyl carbonate complex by use of 0.25 mol {center dot} dm{sup {minus}3} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. In this effluent, other metal ions were hardly present. The use of RSP and RSPO was very effective in concentrating uranium from seawater and separating it from most other elements.

  17. Porous amidoxime-group-containing membrane for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, K.; Hori, T.; Furusaki, S.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A porous, amidoxime-group-containing membrane was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto porous polyethylene film followed by chemical conversion of the produced cyano group to an amidoxime group. The amidoxime groups were uniformly distributed in the chelating membrane, and the amount of the amidoxime group was 1.8 molkg of the HCl-adsorbed membrane. The membrane was found to adsorb uranyl ion from natural seawater with sufficiently high rate, i.e., 0.85 gkg of adsorbent in 50 days. The concentration factor for uranium was more than 10/sup 5/, and those for magnesium and calcium were less than 10. This adsorbent was stable to the repeated adsorption-elution cycles.

  18. Peripheral plasma levels of progesterone, 5?-pregnane-3,20-dione, and two monohydroxy-5?-pregnanes during late gestation in the mare 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Miriam Kathleen

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decrease in P levels. Sap increased at around 80 to 50 hr prepartum in most mares to a mean high value of 133. 72 ng/ml at -80 hr and appeared to decrease at least 8 hr before the onset of parturition in all mares to a postpartum mean low value of 9. 20... 14 15 15 16 16 16 16 17 17 18 19 19 19 21 21 22 23 23 23 25 28 52 62 74 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE Elution pattern of pregnant mare's serum compared to sH-Sap, sH-P, and H-OH5oP , 27 10 12 13 15 16 17 P and SaP serum...

  19. Biomedical silver-109m isotope generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanek, P.M.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Moody, D.C.

    1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, composition of matter, and apparatus for producing substantially pure Ag-109m for use in biomedical imaging techniques. Cd-109, which decays with a half-life of 453 days to Ag-109m, is loaded onto an ion exchange column consisting of particulate tin phosphate. After secular equilibrium is reached in about ten minutes, Ag-109m may be selectively eluted from the column by means of a physiologically acceptable aqueous buffered eluent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and either ascorbic acid or dextrose. The breakthrough of toxic Cd-109 is on the order of 1 x 10-7, which is sufficiently low to permit administration of the Ag-109m-containing eluate, with but a minor pH adjustment, directly to a human patient within a matter of seconds. 1 fig.

  20. Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

  1. FINAL SUMMARIZING REPORT on Grant DE-SC0001014 "Separation of Highly Complex Mixtures by Two-dimension Liquid Chromatography"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiochon, Georges

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of our research was a fundamental investigation of methods available for the coupling of two separate chromatographic separations that would considerably enhance the individual separation power of each of these two separations. This gain arises from the combination of two independent retention mechanisms, one of them separating the components that coelute on the other column, making possible the separation of many more compounds in a given time. The two separation mechanisms used must be very different. This is possible because many retention mechanisms are available, using different kinds of molecular interactions, hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions, polar interactions, hydrogen bonding, complex formation, ionic interactions, steric exclusion. Two methods can be used, allowing separations to be performed in space (spreading the bands of sample components on a plate covered with stationary phase layer) or in time (eluting the sample components through a column and detecting the bands leaving the column). Both offer a wide variety of possible combinations and were studied.

  2. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

  3. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenmann, E.T.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

  4. Method for determining asphaltene stability of a hydrocarbon-containing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining asphaltene stability in a hydrocarbon-containing material having solvated asphaltenes therein is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, it involves the steps of: (a) precipitating an amount of the asphaltenes from a liquid sample of the hydrocarbon-containing material with an alkane mobile phase solvent in a column; (b) dissolving a first amount and a second amount of the precipitated asphaltenes by changing the alkane mobile phase solvent to a final mobile phase solvent having a solubility parameter that is higher than the alkane mobile phase solvent; (c) monitoring the concentration of eluted fractions from the column; (d) creating a solubility profile of the dissolved asphaltenes in the hydrocarbon-containing material; and (e) determining one or more asphaltene stability parameters of the hydrocarbon-containing material.

  5. Method for the chemical separation of GE-68 from its daughter Ga-68

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan M.; Atcher, Robert W.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a generator apparatus for separating a daughter gallium-68 radioisotope substantially free of impurities from a parent gernanium-68 radioisotope, including a first resin-containing column containing parent gernanium-68 radioisotope and daughter gallium-68 radioisotope, a source of first eluent connected to said first resin-containing column for separating daughter gallium-68 radioisotope from the first resin-containing column, said first eluent including citrate whereby the separated gallium is in the form of gallium citrate, a mixing space connected to said first resin-containing column for admixing a source of hydrochloric acid with said separated gallium citrate whereby gallium citrate is converted to gallium tetrachloride, a second resin-containing column for retention of gallium-68 tetrachloride, and, a source of second eluent connected to said second resin-containing column for eluting the daughter gallium-68 radioisotope from said second resin-containing column.

  6. Features of the adsoprtion of naproxen on the chiral stationary phase (S,S)-Whelk-O1 under reversed-phase conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asnin, Leonid [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland; Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using elution chromatography, we studied the adsorption mechanism of the Naproxen enantiomers on the chiral stationary phase (S,S)-Whelk-O1, from buffered methanol-water solutions. We propose an adsorption mechanism that assumes monolayer adsorption of the more retained enantiomer and the associative adsorption of the less retained one. The effects of the mobile phase composition on the adsorption of Naproxen are discussed. The combination of an elevated column temperature and of the use of an acidic mobile phase led to the degradation of the column and caused a major loss of its separation ability. The use of a moderately acidic mobile phase at temperature slightly above ambient did not produce rapid severe damages but, nevertheless, hampered the experiments and caused a slow gradual deterioration of the column.

  7. Simple procedures for enrichment of chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk for subsequent analysis by high-resolution methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egestad, B.; Curstedt, T.; Sjoevall, J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Procedures for enrichment of non-volatile chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk are described. /sup 14/C-DDT was used as a model compound in recovery experiments. A several thousand-fold enrichment of DDT added to butter was achieved by two consecutive straight-phase chromatographies on Lipidex 5000. Trace amounts of DDT in liter volumes of water could be quantitatively extracted by rapid filtration through 2 ml beds of Lipidex 1000. A batch extraction procedure permitted enrichment of DDT from milk after addition of n-pentylamine, methanol and water. DDT could then be eluted from the gel with retention of more than 90% of the lipids. A reversed-phase system with Lipidex 5000 could be used for separation of TCDD from DDT and PCBs. The liquid-gel chromatographic procedures are simple and suitable for clean-up of samples prior to application of high-resolution methods. 5 tables.

  8. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  9. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  10. Method for digesting spent ion exchange resins and recovering actinides therefrom using microwave radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, III, Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC); Nichols, Sheldon T. (Augusta, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods for digesting diphosphonic acid substituted cation exchange resins that have become loaded with actinides, rare earth metals, or heavy metals, in a way that allows for downstream chromatographic analysis of the adsorbed species without damage to or inadequate elution from the downstream chromatographic resins. The methods of the present invention involve contacting the loaded diphosphonic acid resin with concentrated oxidizing acid in a closed vessel, and irradiating this mixture with microwave radiation. This efficiently increases the temperature of the mixture to a level suitable for digestion of the resin without the use of dehydrating acids that can damage downstream analytical resins. In order to ensure more complete digestion, the irradiated mixture can be mixed with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidant, and reirradiated with microwave radiation.

  11. Use of Chelex-100 for selectively removing Y-90 from its parent Sr-90

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huntley, Mark W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selectively removing yttrium-90 from its parent strontium-90 contained in an environmental sample includes loading the sample onto a column containing a chelating ion-exchange resin capable of retaining yttrium-90; washing the column with a solution capable of removing strontium, calcium, and other contaminants from the yttrium-90 fraction retained on the column; removing excess acetate salts from the column; eluting yttrium-90 solution from the column and adjusting the pH of this solution to about 2.7; filtering the yttrium-90 solution and weighing this solution for gravimetric yield; and, counting the yttrium-90 containing solution with a radiological counter for a time sufficient to achieve the statistical accuracy desired. It is preferred that the chelating ion-exchange resin is a bidente ligand having the chemical name iminodiacetic acid mounted on a divinyl benzene substrate, converted from sodium form to ammonia form.

  12. Use of Chelex-100 for selectively removing Y-90 from its parent Sr-90

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huntley, M.W.

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selectively removing yttrium-90 from its parent strontium-90 contained in an environmental sample includes loading the sample onto a column containing a chelating ion-exchange resin capable of retaining yttrium-90; washing the column with a solution capable of removing strontium, calcium, and other contaminants from the yttrium-90 fraction retained on the column; removing excess acetate salts from the column; eluting yttrium-90 solution from the column and adjusting the pH of this solution to about 2.7; filtering the yttrium-90 solution and weighing this solution for gravimetric yield; and, counting the yttrium-90 containing solution with a radiological counter for a time sufficient to achieve the statistical accuracy desired. It is preferred that the chelating ion-exchange resin is a ligand having the chemical name iminodiacetic acid mounted on a divinyl benzene substrate, converted from sodium form to ammonia form.

  13. Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, John Frederick

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

  14. Balloon Coating with Rapamycin Using an On-site Coating Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmehl, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.schmehl@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Ruhr, Juergen von der [Institute of Anatomy, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Dobratz, Markus; Kehlbach, Rainer [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Braun, Isabelle [Translumina GmbH (Germany); Greiner, Tim-Oliver [Clinic of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Behnisch, Boris [Translumina GmbH (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. The efficacy of drug-eluting balloons has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The drug predominantly used is paclitaxel because of its lipophilic properties and the rapid onset of action. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an alternative balloon coating with rapamycin that can be applied on site.MethodsThe balloon coating (3.0/18 and 3.0/12 mm, Cathy No. 4, Translumina GmbH) with rapamycin was conducted with a coating machine (Translumina GmbH). Concentrations were 2, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2, 3, and 4 %. Measurements regarding the amount of substance released to the vessel wall were carried out on explanted porcine coronaries by means of ultraviolet and visible-light spectroscopy. Inflation time varied between 30 and 120 s. The biological effect of the coating was evaluated in a porcine peripheral overstretch and stent implantation model. Results. The amount of rapamycin on the balloon surface ranged from 558 {+-} 108 {mu}g for the 2 % solution to 1,441 {+-} 228 {mu}g in the 4 % solution. An amount of 95 {+-} 63-193 {+-} 113 {mu}g was released into the vessel wall. The quantitative measurements of the angiographic examinations 4 weeks after treatment revealed a reduction of diameter stenosis from 20.6 {+-} 17.4 % in the control group to 11.6 {+-} 5.5 % in the drug-eluting balloon group. Conclusion. A balloon coating with rapamycin omitting an excipient is possible with a dose-adjustable coating machine. However, the biological effects are moderate, which make further optimization of the coating process and evaluation of appropriate excipients necessary.

  15. Rhenium-188: Availability from the W-188/Re-188 Generator and Status of Current Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillai, M R A [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India; Dash, A [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India; Knapp Jr, Russ F [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhenium-188 is one of the most readily available generator derived and useful radionuclides for therapy emitting - particles (2.12 MeV, 71.1% and 1.965 MeV, 25.6%) and imageable gammas (155 KeV, 15.1%). The 188W/188Re generator is an ideal source for the long term (4-6 months) continuous availability of no carrier added (nca) 188Re suitable for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for radionuclide therapy. The challenges associated with the double neutron capture route of production of the parent 188W radionuclide have been a major impediment in the progress of application of 188Re. Tungsten-188 of adequate specific activity can be prepared only in 2-3 of the high flux reactors operating in the World. Several useful technologies have been developed for the preparation of clinical grade 188W/188Re generator. Since the specific activity of 188W used in the generator is relatively low (<5 Ci/g), the eluted 188ReO4- can have low radioactive concentration often insufficient for radiopharmaceutical preparation. However, several efficient post elution concentration techniques have been developed that yield clinically useful 188ReO4-. Rhenium-188 has been used for the preparation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for the management of diseases such as bone metastasis, rheumatoid arthritis and primary cancers. Several early phase clinical studies using radiopharmaceuticals based on 188Re-labeled phosphonates, antibodies, peptides, lipiodol and particulates have been reported. This article reviews the availability, and use of188Re including a discussion of why broader use of 188Re has not progressed as ecpected as a popular radionuclide for therapy.

  16. Modeling of thermal processes in very high pressure liquid chromatography for column immersed in a water bath: Application of the selected models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, chromatographic analyses are carried out by operating columns packed with sub-2 {micro}m particles under very high pressure gradients, up to 1200 bar for 5 cm long columns. This provides the high flow rates that are necessary for the achievement of high column efficiencies and short analysis times. However, operating columns at high flow rates under such high pressure gradients generate a large amount of heat due to the viscous friction of the mobile phase stream that percolates through a low permeability bed. The evacuation of this heat causes the formation of significant or even large axial and radial gradients of all the physico-chemical parameters characterizing the packing material and the mobile phase, eventually resulting in a loss of column efficiency. We previously developed and successfully applied a model combining the heat and the mass balances of a chromatographic column operated under very high pressure gradients (VHPLC). The use of this model requires accurate estimates of the dispersion coefficients at each applied mobile phase velocity. This work reports on a modification of the mass balance model such that only one measurement is now necessary to accurately predict elution peak profiles in a wide range of mobile phase velocities. The conditions under which the simple equilibrium-dispersive (ED) and transport-dispersive (TD) models are applicable in VHPLC are also discussed. This work proves that the new combination of the heat transfer and the ED model discussed in this work enables the calculation of accurate profiles for peaks eluted under extreme conditions, like when the column is thermostated in a water bath.

  17. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  18. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Hepasphere 30–60 ?m. Safety and Efficacy Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@otenet.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Pomoni, Maria, E-mail: mpomoni@mail.gr [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Moschouris, Hippokratis, E-mail: hipmosch@gmail.com [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece); Kelekis, Alexios, E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Charokopakis, Angelos, E-mail: axarok@gmail.com; Bouma, Evanthia, E-mail: boumaevanthia@gmail.com; Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Chatziioannou, Achilles, E-mail: ahatzi@cc.uoa.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Sotirchos, Vlasios, E-mail: sotirchos@hotmail.com [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Karampelas, Theodoros, E-mail: ctamvakop@bioacademy.gr; Tamvakopoulos, Constantin, E-mail: ctamvakop@bioacademy.gr [Research Academy of University of Athens (Greece); Filippiadis, Dimitrios, E-mail: dfilippiadis@yahoo.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece); Karagiannis, Enangelos, E-mail: kmalag@otenet.gr [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Marinis, Athanasios, E-mail: drmarinis@gmail.com [Tzanion Hospital, 1st Department of Surgery (Greece); Koskinas, John, E-mail: koskinas@ath.forthnet.gr [University of Athens, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Kelekis, Dimitrios A., E-mail: dkelekis@med.uoa.gr [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, 2nd Department of Radiology (Greece)

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a newly developed size of a superabsorbent polymer drug-eluting embolic material.MethodsForty-five patients with documented HCC (Child–Pugh score A/B: 55.5 %/44.5 %) were embolized with HepaSphere microspheres 30–60 ?m with escalation of lesion, dose, and frequency of re-embolization. Local response was evaluated with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Plasma levels of doxorubicin were measured in 24 patients at baseline and at 5, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min, at 6, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days, respectively, to determine doxorubicin in plasma (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC). Measurements of three patients who underwent lipiodol-based conventional chemoembolization (c-TACE) were also performed.ResultsTACE with HepaSphere was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile and no 30-day mortality. Response rates were calculated on intention-to-treat basis with complete response (CR) in 17.8 % reaching 22.2 % for the target lesion. Overall partial response (PR) was seen in 51.1 %, stable disease in 20 %, and progressive disease in 11.1 % of patients. Overall objective response (CR + PR), including patients treated at all dosages of doxorubicin, was seen in 68.9 % of cases. After a median follow-up of 15.6 months, 1-year survival is 100 %. Doxorubicin AUC was significantly lower in patients with HepaSphere 30–60 ?m (35,195 ± 27,873 ng × min/ml) than in patients with conventional TACE (103,960 ± 16,652 ng × min/ml; p = 0.009). Cmax was also significantly lower with HepaSphere 30–60 ?m (83.9 ± 32.1 ng/ml) compared with c-TACE (761.3 ± 58.8 ng/ml; p = 0.002).ConclusionHepaSphere 30–60 ?m is an effective drug-eluting embolic material with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile.

  19. Non-carrier-added 186, 188Re labeled 17a-ethynylestradiol : a potential breast cancer imaging and therapy agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, M. E. (Michael E.); Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J. (Eugene J.); Ott, K. C. (Kevin C.); Arterburn, J. B. (Jeffrey B.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals constitute potential agents for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Breast cancer is the most prevalent form of diagnosed cancer in women in the United States, and it accounts for the second highest number of cases of cancer fatalities (1). In Approximately two-thirds of the breast tumors, estrogen and progesterone steroid hormone receptors can be found. Such tumors can often be treated successfully with anti-estrogen hormone therapy (2). Hence, the ability to determine the estrogen receptor (ER) contend of the breast tumor is essential for making the most appropriate choice of treatment for the patient. Along with this diagnostic aspect, steroid-based radiopharmaceuticals with high specific activity offer an encouraging prospect for therapeutic applications: {sup 186,188}Re labeled steroids binding to receptors expressed by cancer cells appear to be potential agents for the irradiation of small to medium-sized tumors. {sup 186}Re has been regarded as an ideal radionuclide for radiotherapy due to its appropriate half-live of 90 h and {beta}-energy of 1.07 MeV. Moreover, the {gamma}-emission of 137 keV that allows in vivo imaging while in therapy is an additional bonus. {sup 188}Re is obtained from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re radionuclide generator system, representing an advantage for availability at radiopharmacy laboratory by daily elution. In addition, {sup 188}Re emits high energy beta particles with an average energy of 769 keV, and the emission of the 155 keV allows simultaneous imaging for biodistribution evaluation in vivo. In order to avoid competitive saturation of the binding sites of the ligand receptor, Re labeled steroids with high specific activity are required, and the removal of all excess unlabeled ligands is mandatory. {sup 188}Re is eluted from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator produced and provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (3). This paper outlines the solid phase-supported preparation of an n.c.a. [{sup 188}Re]Re-imido estradiol compound. The characteristic feature of the presented route is the simultaneous formation of the steroid-radioisotope linkage and release of the labeled steroid product into solution (4,5). The unlabeled ligand can then be separated by simple filtration.

  20. Site Selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladden, J.B.; Rueter, K.J.; Morin, J.P.

    2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A site selection study was conducted to identify a suitable location for the construction and operation of a new Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The facility to be sited is a single processing facility and support buildings that could house either of three technology alternatives being developed by the High Level Waste Systems Engineering Team: Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation, Crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange or Caustic Side Solvent Extraction. A fourth alternative, Direct Disposal in grout, is not part of the site selection study because a location has been identified that is unique to this technology (i.e., Z-Area). Facility site selection at SRS is a formal, documented process that seeks to optimize siting of new facilities with respect to facility-specific engineering requirements, sensitive environmental resources, and applicable regulatory requirements. In this manner, the prime objectives of cost minimization, environmental protection, and regulatory compliance are achieved. The results from this geotechnical characterization indicated that continued consideration be given to Site B for the proposed SDF. Suitable topography, the lack of surface hydrology and floodplain issues, no significant groundwater contamination, the presence of minor soft zones along the northeast portion of footprint, and no apparent geological structure in the Gordon Aquitard support this recommendation.

  1. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

  2. Photosensitization of human leukemic cells by anthracenedione antitumor agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L.; Reszka, K.; Lown, J.W. (University College and Middlesex School of Medicine, London (England))

    1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1,4-Diamino-substituted anthraquinone antitumor agents (mitoxantrone and ametantrone) and structurally related 1,5- and 1,8-diamino-substituted compounds (AM1 and AM2) were tested for their ability to photosensitize human leukemic cells in culture. Viability was measured using the 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and DNA and membrane damage were assessed. Following a 1-h exposure to AM2, a dose of drug required to give 50% loss of cell viability (53 microM) was obtained in the dark, which was reduced to approximately 2.4 microM following illumination for 2 min (lambda greater than 475 nm), a dose of light that was completely nontoxic to the cells in the absence of drug. A shift in the cell viability curve was also observed for AM1 but, under identical conditions, the dose modification was only 8.9. In contrast, neither ametantrone nor mitoxantrone gave a decreased viability upon illumination. DNA single-strand breaks as measured by alkaline elution correlated with cell viability. Frank DNA single-strand breaks were produced by AM2 and light, suggesting the production of free radicals. The strand breaks produced by AM2 in the dark and by mitoxantrone (with or without illumination) were protein concealed. No evidence of photo-induced membrane damage, as determined by transport of the model amino acid cycloleucine, could be observed even at supralethal doses.

  3. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wisted, Eric E. (Apple Valley, MN); Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  4. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  5. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring ofmore »clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.« less

  6. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500/sup 0/C to yield a purified PuO/sub 2/ product.

  7. Literature Review of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde for Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Garrett N.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The current report summarizes work performed throughout the scientific community and DOE complex as reported in the open literature and DOE-sponsored reports to evaluate the Cs+ ion exchange (CIX) characteristics of SRF resin. King (2007) completed a similar literature review in support of material selection for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project. Josephson et al. (2010) and Sams et al. (2009) provided a similar brief review of SRF CIX for the near-tank Cs+ removal (NTCR) project. Thorson (2008a) documented the basis for recommending SRF over SuperLigTM 644 as the primary CIX resin in the WTP. The current review expands on previous work, summarizes additional work completed to date, and provides a broad view of the literature without focusing on a specific column system. Although the focus of the current review is the SRF resin, many cited references include multiple materials such as the non-spherical GGRF and SuperLigTM 644 organic resins and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IONSIVTM IE-911, a non-elutable inorganic material. This report summarizes relevant information provided in the literature.

  8. Four methods for determining the composition of trace radioactive surface contamination of low-radioactivity metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. O'Keeffe; T. H. Burritt; B. T. Cleveland; G. Doucas; N. Gagnon; N. A. Jelley; C. Kraus; I. T. Lawson; S. Majerus; S. R. McGee; A. W. Myers; A. W. P. Poon; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; R. C. Rosten; L. C. Stonehill; B. A. VanDevender; T. D. Van Wechel

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Four methods for determining the composition of low-level uranium- and thorium-chain surface contamination are presented. One method is the observation of Cherenkov light production in water. In two additional methods a position-sensitive proportional counter surrounding the surface is used to make both a measurement of the energy spectrum of alpha particle emissions and also coincidence measurements to derive the thorium-chain content based on the presence of short-lived isotopes in that decay chain. The fourth method is a radiochemical technique in which the surface is eluted with a weak acid, the eluate is concentrated, added to liquid scintillator and assayed by recording beta-alpha coincidences. These methods were used to characterize two `hotspots' on the outer surface of one of the He-3 proportional counters in the Neutral Current Detection array of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment. The methods have similar sensitivities, of order tens of ng, to both thorium- and uranium-chain contamination.

  9. Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

  10. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature survey has been conducted to collect information on the International R&D activities in the extraction of uranium from seawater for the period from the 1960s till the year of 2010. The reported activities, on both the laboratory scale bench experiments and the large scale marine experiments, were summarized by country/region in this report. Among all countries where such activities have been reported, Japan has carried out the most advanced large scale marine experiments with the amidoxime-based system, and achieved the collection efficiency (1.5 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 30 days soaking in the ocean) that could justify the development of industrial scale marine systems to produce uranium from seawater at the price competitive with those from conventional uranium resources. R&D opportunities are discussed for improving the system performance (selectivity for uranium, loading capacity, chemical stability and mechanical durability in the sorption-elution cycle, and sorption kinetics) and making the collection of uranium from seawater more economically competitive.

  11. Preconcentration of uranium in seawater with heterocyclic azo dyes supported on silica gel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, K.; Koshino, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chelating adsorbents, heterocyclic azo dyes supported on silica gel, were prepared and their adsorption behaviors of metal ions were investigated. The 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol(PAN)-SG and 2-(2-thiazolylazo)-p-cresol(TAC)-SG show greater affinity for UO/sub 2/(II) and ZrO(II), compared with the other metal ions like Cu, Cd, Fe and alkaline earths. Trace uranyl can be quantitatively retained on the column of the gels at neutral pH region and flowrate 3-4 ml/min. The uranyl retained is easily eluted from the column bed with a mixture of acetone and nitric acid (9:1 v/v) and determined by spectrophotometry using Arsenazo-III. Matrix components in seawater do not interfere and the spiked recovery of uranyl in artificial seawater was found to be average 98.6%, with the relative standard deviation of 1.08%. Both gels were applied to the determination of uranium in seawater with satisfactory results. 16 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Prospects for the recovery of uranium from seawater. Final report. [URPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, F.R.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program entitled URPE (Uranium Recovery Performance and Economics) has been developed for analysis of a plant recovering uranium from seawater. The conceptual system design consists of a floating oil-rig type platform, using seawater forced through hydrous titanium oxide. Uranium is recovered from the seawater by adsorption and eluted later. The equilibrium isotherm and the diffusion constant for the uranyl-HTO system, which are needed for bed performance calculations, have been calculated. The URPE program has been benchmarked against previous studies by ORNL and Exxon, and found to make comparable performance and economic estimates. The URPE code was then used to identify optimum bed operating conditions. Thin beds of small, thinly-coated particles are the preferred bed configuration, and actively pumped systems outperform current driven units. Based on URPE, the minimum expected costs of uranium recovered from seawater would be no lower than approx. 316 (1979$)/lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ for state-of-the-art adsorber material (capacity equal to 210 mg U/kg Ti), but might be reduced to the level of breakeven attractiveness of approx. 150 (1979$)/lb U/sub 3/U/sub 8/ if at least a four-fold increase in adsorption capacity could be achieved.

  13. Prospects for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, F.R.; Driscoll, M.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program entitled URPE (Uranium Recovery Performance and Economics) has been developed to simulate the engineering performance and provide an economic analysis of a plant recovering uranium from seawater. The conceptual system design used as the focal point for the more general analysis consists of a floating oil-rig type of platform single-point moored in an open ocean current, using either high-volume-low-head axial pumps or the velocity head of the ambient ocean current to force seawater through a mass transfer medium (hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) coated onto particle beds or stacked tubes). Uranium is recovered from the seawater by an adsorption process, and later eluted from the adsober by an ammonium carbonate solution. A multiproduct cogenerating plant on board the platform burns coal to raise steam for electricity generation, desalination, and process heat requirements. Scrubbed stack gas from the plant is processed to recover carbon dioxide for chemical make-up needs. The equilibrium isotherm and the diffusion constant for the uranyl-HTO system, which are needed for bed performance calculations, have been calculated based on the data reported in the literature. In addition, a technique for calculating the rate constant of a fixed-bed adsoorbing system has been developed for use with Thomas' solution for predicting fixed-bed performance.

  14. Analysis of interaction partners of H4 histone by a new proteomics approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evelyne Saade; Undine Mechold; Arman Kulyyassov; Damien Vertut; Marc Lipinski; Vasily Ogryzko

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a modification of the TAP method for purification and analysis of multiprotein complexes, termed here DEF-TAP (for Differential Elution Fractionation after Tandem Affinity Purification). Its essential new feature is the use for last purification step of 6XHis-Ni++ interaction, which is resistant to a variety of harsh washing conditions, including high ionic strength and presence of organic solvents. This allows us to use various fractionation schemes before the protease digestion, which is expected to improve the coverage of the analysed protein mixture and also to provide an additional insight into the structure of the purified macromolecular complex and the nature of protein-protein interactions involved. We illustrate our new approach by analysis of soluble nuclear complexes containing histone H4 purified from HeLa cells. In particular, we observed different fractionation patterns of HAT1 and RbAp46 proteins as compared to RbAp48 protein, all identified as interaction partners of H4 histone. In addition, we report all components of the licensing MCM2-7 complex and the apoptosis-related DAXX protein among the interaction partners of the soluble H4. Finally, we show that HAT1 requires N-terminal tail of H4 for its stable association with this histone.

  15. The Role of Interventional Radiology in the Diagnosis and Management of Male Impotence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros [Patras University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece)] [Patras University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece); Shaida, Nadeem [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Addenbrooke's University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)] [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Addenbrooke's University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos [Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)] [Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Krokidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.com [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Addenbrooke's University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)] [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Addenbrooke's University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to reach or maintain penile rigidity enough for sexual satisfaction. Nearly 30% of the men between ages 40 and 70 years are affected by ED. A variety of pathologies, including neurological, psychological, or endocrine disorders and drug side effects, may incite ED. A commonly identified cause of ED is vascular disease. Initial diagnostic workup includes a detailed physical examination and laboratory tests. Whilst duplex ultrasound is considered the first-line diagnostic modality, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography is still considered the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of arteriogenic impotence. Percutaneous endovascular treatment may be offered in patients with vasculogenic ED that has failed to respond to oral medical therapy as an alternative to penile prosthesis or open surgical repair. In arteriogenic ED balloon angioplasty of the aorto-iliac axis, and in veno-occlusive ED, percutaneous venous ablation using various embolization materials has been reported to be safe and to improve sexual performance. Recently, the ZEN study investigated the safety and feasibility of drug-eluting stents for the treatment of arteriogenic ED attributed to internal pudendal artery stenosis with promising preliminary results. This manuscript highlights the role of interventional radiology in the diagnosis and minimally invasive treatment of male impotence.

  16. Cesium Ion Exchange Using Tank 241-AN-104 Supernate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The River Protection Project is to design and build a high level nuclear waste treatment facility. The waste treatment plant is to process millions of gallons of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The high level nuclear waste treatment process includes various unit operations, such as ultrafiltration, precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, and vitrification. Ion exchange is identified as the optimal treatment method for removal of cesium-137 and Tc-99 from the waste. Extensive ion exchange testing was performed using small-scale columns with actual waste samples. The objectives of this study were to: demonstrate SuperLig 644 ion exchange performance and process steps for the removal of cesium from actual AN-104 tank waste; pretreat actual AN-104 tank waste to reduce the concentration of cesium-137 in the waste below LAW vitrification limit; produce and characterize cesium eluate solutions for use in eluate evaporation tests. The experiments consisted of batch contact and small-scale column tests. The batch contact tests measured sorption partition coefficients Kds. The Kds were used to predict the effective resin capacity. The small-scale column tests, which closely mimic plant conditions, generated loading and elution profile data used to determine whether removal targets and design requirements were met.

  17. Continuous countercurrent chromatographic separator for the purification of sugars from biomass hydrolyzate. Final project report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooley, R.J.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of pure sugars is required to enable production of fuels and chemicals from biomass feedstocks. Hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose (principal constituents of biomass) produces sugars that can be utilized in various fermentation process to produce valuable chemicals. Unfortunately, the hydrolysis process also liberates chemicals from the biomass that can be toxic to the fermenting organisms. The two primary toxic components of biomass hydrolyzate are sulfuric acid (catalyst used in the hydrolysis) and acetic acid (a component of the feed biomass). In the standard batch chromatographic separation of these three components, sugar elutes in the middle. Batch chromatographic separations are not practical on a commercial scale, because of excess dilution and high capital costs. Because sugar is the {open_quotes}center product,{close_quotes} a continuous separation would require two costly binary separators. However, a single, slightly larger separator, configured to produce three products, would be more economical. This FIRST project develops a cost-effective method for purifying biomass hydrolyzate into fermentable sugars using a single continuous countercurrent separator to separate this ternary mixture.

  18. Two histidine-rich HRGPS from Zea mays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieliszewski, M.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used intact cell elution to isolate two maize HRGPs that co-chromatographed, but resolved after HF-deglycosylation, into two bands (M{sub r} 68 70 kD) on SDS PAGE. They were rich in His, thus designated HHRGPs, and contained 65% carbohydrate occurring as O-arabinosylated Hyp (63 mole%) and Gal (37%) possibly occurring as polygalactose on Thr or Ser. HHRGP did not react with Yariv artificial antigen, or agglutinate rabbit reticulocytes, implying that they are not arabinogalactan proteins or lectins. Furthermore, they were not in a polyproline-II conformation, judging by CD spectra, although TEM showed tham as extended rods. Quantitative ELISAs showed that antibodies raised against deglycosylated HHRGP crossreacted with deglycosylated tomato extensins P1 P2, suggesting possible homology between HHRGP and tomato extensin. Chymotryptic digestion of deglycosylated HHRGP gave a peptide map with 12 peptides rich in His, Ala and Hyp and confirming that both protein bands resolving on SDS-PAGE were HHRGPs.

  19. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring of clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.

  20. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  1. Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethal Island, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  2. Method for detection of extremely low concentration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethal Island, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and CO.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  3. In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic Peptides in Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jong Seo; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partially tryptic peptides are often identified in shotgun proteomics using trypsin as the proteolytic enzyme; however, it has been controversial regarding the sources of such partially tryptic peptides. Herein we investigate the impact of in-source fragmentation on shotgun proteomics using three biological samples, including a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and a mouse plasma sample. Since the in-source fragments of a peptide retain the same elution time with its parent fully tryptic peptide, the partially tryptic peptides from in-source fragmentation can be distinguished from the other partially tryptic peptides by plotting the observed retention times against the computationally predicted retention times. Most partially tryptic in-source fragmentation artifacts were misaligned from the linear distribution of fully tryptic peptides. The impact of in-source fragmentation on peptide identifications was clearly significant in a less complex sample such as a standard protein digest, where ~60 % of unique peptides were observed as partially tryptic peptides from in-source fragmentation. In mouse brain or mouse plasma samples, in-source fragmentation contributed to 1-3 % of all identified peptides. The other major source of partially tryptic peptides in complex biological samples is presumably proteolytic processing by endogenous proteases in the samples. By filtering out the in-source fragmentation artifacts from the identified partially tryptic or non-tryptic peptides, it is possible to directly survey in-vivo proteolytic processing in biological samples such as blood plasma. ?

  4. Effect of force-induced mechanical stress at the coronary artery bifurcation stenting: Relation to in-stent restenosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Cheng-Hung [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Jhong, Guan-Heng [Graduate Institute of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Yi; Wang, Chao-Jan [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Jung, E-mail: shihjung@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Hung, Kuo-Chun [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of metallic stents during percutaneous coronary intervention has become common in the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions. However, restenosis occurs mostly at the bifurcation area even in present era of drug-eluting stents. To achieve adequate deployment, physicians may unintentionally apply force to the strut of the stents through balloon, guiding catheters, or other devices. This force may deform the struts and impose excessive mechanical stresses on the arterial vessels, resulting in detrimental outcomes. This study investigated the relationship between the distribution of stress in a stent and bifurcation angle using finite element analysis. The unintentionally applied force following stent implantation was measured using a force sensor that was made in the laboratory. Geometrical information on the coronary arteries of 11 subjects was extracted from contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan data. The numerical results reveal that the application of force by physicians generated significantly higher mechanical stresses in the arterial bifurcation than in the proximal and distal parts of the stent (post hoc P?

  5. Method and apparatus for selective filtering of ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Jason S. (Kennewick, WA); Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An adjustable, low mass-to-charge (m/z) filter is disclosed employing electrospray ionization to block ions associated with unwanted low m/z species from entering the mass spectrometer and contributing their space charge to down-stream ion accumulation steps. The low-mass filter is made by using an adjustable potential energy barrier from the conductance limiting terminal electrode of an electrodynamic ion funnel, which prohibits species with higher ion mobilities from being transmitted. The filter provides a linear voltage adjustment of low-mass filtering from m/z values from about 50 to about 500. Mass filtering above m/z 500 can also be performed; however, higher m/z species are attenuated. The mass filter was evaluated with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of an albumin tryptic digest and resulted in the ability to block low-mass, "background" ions which account for 40-70% of the total ion current from the ESI source during peak elution.

  6. Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

  7. Aromatic measurements of diesel fuel - A CRC round-robin study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seizinger, D.E.; Hoekman, S.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A round robin study to measure the aromatic levels in diesel fuels was conducted by the Chemical Characterization Panel of the Coordinating Research Council Air Pollution Research Advisory Committee (CRC-APRAC) In-house Program Group, CAPI-1-64. The fuels for this study consisted of a jet fuel, a No. 2 diesel reference fuel, and three fuels used in a CRC-sponsored diesel emission project (CAPE-32). These fuels had 90% distillation temperatures which ranged from 472/sup 0/ to 642/sup 0/ F and aromaticity levels from approximately 18 to 55% by volume. All participants used the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D1319 or modified D1319 methods to measure the aromatic levels in the selected fuels. Some participants concurrently analyzed the same fuels using other methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and elution chromatography (ASTM D2549). One non-participating laboratory analyzed the fuels using supercritical fluid chromatography. The results of nine participants using the D1319 methodology and other methods showed good agreement for fuels with 90% distillation temperatures less than 600/sup 0/ F. However, this round robin study showed that: 1) there is no standard method to measure aromatic levels in full boiling range diesel fuels, and 2) there are inadequacies when using the D1319 and modified D1319 methods for fuels outside of the specified property ranges.

  8. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  9. Molecular Size and Weight of Asphaltene and Asphaltene Solubility Fractions from Coals, Crude Oils and Bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badre,S.; Goncalves, C.; Norinaga, K.; Gustavson, G.; Mullins, O.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular weight of asphaltenes has been a controversy for several decades. In recent years, several techniques have converged on the size of the fused ring system; indicating that chromophores in virgin crude oil asphaltenes typically have 4-10 fused rings. Consequently, the molecular weight debate is equivalent to determining whether asphaltenes are monomeric (one fused-ring system per molecule) or whether they are polymeric. Time-resolved fluorescence depolarization (FD) is employed here to interrogate the absolute size of asphaltene molecules and to determine the relation of the size of the fused ring system to that of the corresponding molecule. Coal, petroleum and bitumen asphaltenes are compared. Molecular size of coal asphaltenes obtained here by FD-determined rotational diffusion match closely with Taylor-dispersion-derived translational diffusion measurements with UV absorption. Coal asphaltenes are smaller than petroleum asphaltenes. N-methyl pyrrolidinone (NMP) soluble and insoluble fractions are examined. NMP soluble and insoluble fractions of asphaltenes are monomeric. It is suggested that the 'giant' asphaltene molecules reported from SEC studies using NMP as the eluting solvent may actually be the expected flocs of asphaltene which are not soluble in NMP. Data is presented that intramolecular electronic relaxation in asphaltenes does not perturb FD results.

  10. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  11. Kinetics of coal conversion to soluble products. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.W.

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work are (1) to measure the kinetics of the conversion of coals to soluble products under model liquefaction conditions using GPS techniques to count the number of bonds broken; (2) to analyze these data using kinetic schemes based on the behavior of crosslinked macromolecular networks. The product was Soxhlet extracted with pyridine until the pyridine solution was clear. A gel permeation chromatogram of the pyridine soluble is shown in Figure 2A. The improved mass sensitive detector system requires only about 500 ng to acquire a chromatogram having fairly good S/N ratio. Apparently, no disturbance is caused by the remaining tetralin and naphthalene formed by dehydrogenation of tetralin. These seriously affect the lower molecular weight region when IR or UV detectors are used. It is a notable advantage of the mass sensitive detector that suitable adjustment of the nebulizer and of the evaporator completely suppressed the contribution of solvent to the chromatogram. The molecular weight distribution of liquefaction product appears to be almost unimodal if the small shoulder at the lower elution volume side is neglected.

  12. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography of radiolabeled peptides using a C18 guard-PAK precolumn system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carriere, P.D.; Bennett, H.P. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to avoid radioactive contamination of high-performance liquid chromatography columns and injectors, we have investigated the use of a Guard-PAK precolumn system for the chromatography of ({sup 125}I) labeled peptides. Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs: (1) (D-Ala6-des-Gly10)-GnRH (GnRH-(Ala6)) and (2) (D-Ser(TBu)6-des-Gly10)-GnRH (GnRH-(Ser6)) and rat prolactin (r-PRL) were radiolabeled with {sup 125}I and subjected to reversed-phase liquid chromatography using a C18 Guard-PAK precolumn system. Major peak fractions of purified ({sup 125}I)GnRH-(Ala6), ({sup 125}I)GnRH-(Ser6), and ({sup 125}I)r-PRL eluted at 24%, 28%, and 55% acetonitrile, respectively. Purified ({sup 125}I)GnRH analogs showed specific high affinity binding to rat anterior pituitary gland membranes (specific activity: 1500-1700 Ci/mmol). Purified ({sup 125}I)r-PRL showed high affinity binding to r-PRL antibody by RIA (specific activity: 70-75 microCi/micrograms). This rapid and efficient chromatographic method should be useful in the separation of a wide range of radiolabeled protein and peptide molecules.

  13. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  14. Isolation and quantitation of DNA-bound benzo(a)pyrene metabolites: comparison of hydroxyapatite and precipitation procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adriaenssens, P.I. (Exeter Univ., England); Bixler, C.J.; Anderson, M.W.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydroxyapatite and precipitation procedures are two commonly used methods for isolating DNA, and both have been employed in studies on chemical carcinogenesis. A comparison was made of the specific activity (pmol/mg DNA) of benzo(a)pyrene metabolite-DNA adducts in DNA isolated by the two procedures from the lung, liver, and forestomach of A/HeJ mice given oral benzo(a)pyrene. Total DNA-associated radioactivity per milligram DNA was higher with the precipitation procedure than with the hydroxyapatite method. This was partly due to large amounts of early eluting peaks in the high-pressure liquid chromatrography analyses of digests of DNA isolated by the precipitation procedure. However, the specific activities obtained for binding of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide isomers to DNA isolated by the two methods were in close agreement. The hydroxyapatite procedure resulted in the isolation of purer DNA and required less time and sample handling than the precipitation method. For isolation of DNA from whole tissue for carcinogen-DNA adduct analysis, these properties make the hydroxyapatite procedure superior to the precipitation method. Our findings have important implications when comparing the results of DNA-binding studies which employ different DNA isolation procedures.

  15. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  16. Immobilization of fission products in low-temperature ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Tlustochowicz, M.; Mandalika, V.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing room-temperature-setting chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs) for use in solidifying and stabilizing low-level mixed wastes. The focus of this work is development of CBPCs for use with fission-product wastes generated from high-level waste (HLW) tank cleaning or other decontamination and decommissioning activities. The volatile fission products such as Tc, Cs, and Sr removed from HLW need to be disposed of in a low-temperature immobilization system. Specifically, this paper reports on the solidification and stabilization of separated {sup 99}Tc from Los Alamos National Laboratory`s complexation-elution process. Using rhenium as a surrogate form technetium, we fabricated CBPC waste forms by acid-base reactions. Dense and hard ceramic waste forms are produced in this process. The principal advantage of this technology is that the contaminants are immobilized by both chemical stabilization and subsequent microencapsulation of the reaction products. This paper reports the results of durability studies conducted on waste forms made with 35 wt.% waste loading. Standard leaching tests such as ANS 16.1 and PCT were conducted on the final waste forms. In addition, stability of the waste forms in aqueous environments was evaluated by long-term water-immersion tests.

  17. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  18. Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Takashi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)] [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Shin-ichi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)] [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

  19. Monitoring/Verification using DMS: TATP Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan Weeks; Kevin Kyle

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-rugged and field-programmable differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) networks provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. CBE sensor motes used in conjunction with automated fast gas chromatography with DMS detection (GC/DMS) verification instrumentation integrated into situational operations management systems can be readily deployed and optimized for changing application scenarios. The feasibility of developing selective DMS motes for a 'smart dust' sampling approach with guided, highly selective, fast GC/DMS verification analysis is a compelling approach to minimize or prevent the use of explosives or chemical and biological weapons in terrorist activities. Two peroxide-based liquid explosives, triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), are synthesized from common chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide, acetone, sulfuric acid, ammonia, and citric acid (Figure 1). Recipes can be readily found on the Internet by anyone seeking to generate sufficient quantities of these highly explosive chemicals to cause considerable collateral damage. Detection of TATP and HMTD by advanced sensing systems can provide the early warning necessary to prevent terror plots from coming to fruition. DMS is currently one of the foremost emerging technologies for the separation and detection of gas-phase chemical species. This is due to trace-level detection limits, high selectivity, and small size. DMS separates and identifies ions at ambient pressures by utilizing the non-linear dependence of an ion's mobility on the radio frequency (rf) electric field strength. GC is widely considered to be one of the leading analytical methods for the separation of chemical species in complex mixtures. Advances in the technique have led to the development of low-thermal-mass fast GC columns. These columns are capable of completing runs in less than 3 minutes. Fast GC columns are also more compact than their traditional counterparts. An earlier collaborative effort involving these authors optimized a handheld, fast GC/DMS, equipped with a non-rad ionization source, for the detection of TATP (Figure 2). The unit combines the separation capabilities of GC with the selectivity of DMS. Analytes are identified both by their elution time from the column and by the characteristic response in the DMS spectrum. Analysis times required to obtain results for these analytes are approximately 80 seconds for TATP and 160 seconds for HMTD (Figure 3). The limit of detection for both TATP and HMTD is approximately 1 ng/{micro}L. Substances that could interfere with the detection of peroxide-based explosives have been studied. Both the GC elution time and the DMS spectral peak locations were unique and do not hinder the detection of either TATP or HMTD.

  20. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [{sup 18}F] fluoride and [{sup 13}N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [{sup 18}O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Shea, C.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target, and reducing the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3}. The [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O, and sequential elution of [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target. 2 figs.

  1. Restenosis of the CYPHER-Select, TAXUS-Express, and Polyzene-F Nanocoated Cobalt-Chromium Stents in the Minipig Coronary Artery Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: Boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Thierjung, Heidi; Stampfl, Ulrike; Stampfl, Sibylle; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben; Sommer, Christof [University Heidelberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Berger, Irina [University Heidelberg, Department of Pathology (Germany); Richter, Goetz M. [University Heidelberg, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeTo date no direct experimental comparison between the CYPHER-Select and TAXUS-Express stents is available. Therefore, we investigated late in-stent stenosis, thrombogenicity, and inflammation, comparing the CYPHER-Select, TAXUS-Express, and custom-made cobalt chromium Polyzene-F nanocoated stents (CCPS) in the minipig coronary artery model.MethodsThe three stent types were implanted in the right coronary artery of 30 minipigs. The primary endpoint was in-stent stenosis assessed by quantitative angiography and microscopy. Secondary endpoints were inflammation and thrombogenicity evaluated by scores for inflammation and immunoreactivity (C-reactive protein and transforming growth factor beta). Follow-up was at 4 and 12 weeks.ResultsStent placement was successful in all animals; no thrombus deposition occurred. Quantitative angiography did not depict statistically significant differences between the three stent types after 4 and 12 weeks. Quantitative microscopy at 4 weeks showed a statistically significant thicker neointima (p = 0.0431) for the CYPHER (105.034 {+-} 62.52 {mu}m) versus the TAXUS (74.864 {+-} 66.03 {mu}m) and versus the CCPS (63.542 {+-} 39.57 {mu}m). At 12 weeks there were no statistically significant differences. Inflammation scores at 4 weeks were significantly lower for the CCPS and CYPHER compared with the TAXUS stent (p = 0.0431). After 12 weeks statistical significance was only found for the CYPHER versus the TAXUS stent (p = 0.0431). The semiquantitative immunoreactivity scores for C-reactive protein and transforming growth factor beta showed no statistically significant differences between the three stent types after 4 and 12 weeks.ConclusionsThe CCPS provided effective control of late in-stent stenosis and thrombogenicity in this porcine model compared with the two drug-eluting stents. Its low inflammation score underscores its noninflammatory potential and might explain its equivalence to the two DES.

  2. The TGA codons are present in the open reading frame of selenoprotein P cDNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K.E.; Lloyd, R.S.; Read, R.; Burk, R.F. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States))

    1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The TGA codon in DNA has been shown to direct incorporation of selenocysteine into protein. Several proteins from bacteria and animals contain selenocysteine in their primary structures. Each of the cDNA clones of these selenoproteins contains one TGA codon in the open reading frame which corresponds to the selenocysteine in the protein. A cDNA clone for selenoprotein P (SeP), obtained from a {gamma}ZAP rat liver library, was sequenced by the dideoxy termination method. The correct reading frame was determined by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the amino acid sequence of several peptides from SeP. Using SeP labelled with {sup 75}Se in vivo, the selenocysteine content of the peptides was verified by the collection of carboxymethylated {sup 77}Se-selenocysteine as it eluted from the amino acid analyzer and determination of the radioactivity contained in the collected samples. Ten TGA codons are present in the open reading frame of the cDNA. Peptide fragmentation studies and the deduced sequence indicate that selenium-rich regions are located close to the carboxy terminus. Nine of the 10 selenocysteines are located in the terminal 26% of the sequence with four in the terminal 15 amino acids. The deduced sequence codes for a protein of 385 amino acids. Cleavage of the signal peptide gives the mature protein with 366 amino acids and a calculated mol wt of 41,052 Da. Searches of PIR and SWISSPROT protein databases revealed no similarity with glutathione peroxidase or other selenoproteins.

  3. Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcelin, G.

    1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 7 summarizes the carbon selectivities observed towards the main products. During Period IV, the main products observed were the heavy hydrocarbons, with selectivity for MTBE being less than 3--5%. The only time that high MTBE selectivity was noted was during period III, when the i-butylene feed was shut-off. The large amounts of heavy products and the low selectivity to MTBE were surprising in view of our previous experiments in the gas phase and the high methanol-to-i-butylene ratio used in these runs. In the gas-phase and with methanol/i-butylene = 0.5, over 95% selectivity to MTBE was observed with this catalyst at this temperature. The higher level of methanol used here would be expected to further improve the MTBE selectivity. Perhaps one reason for the poor MTBE selectivity relates to the relative solubilities of the reactants in the Synfluid changing the effective methanol/i-butylene ratio. Figure 8 shows the relative molar concentration of i-butylene during Period III. At 180 minutes, the gas supply of that reactant was shut-off, yet the analyses show that i-butylene continued to elute from the reactor for at least an additional 2 hours. It seems reasonable that the i-butylene is highly soluble in the Synfluid since they are both nonpolar hydrocarbons. Likewise, one would expect the methanol to not be quite as soluble and thus the methanol/i-butylene ratio in the liquid medium may be very low, favoring the oligomerization of i-butylene. Indeed, the only time that MTBE selectivity was high was after the i-butylene supply was shut-off. We intend to quantify these solubilities in future experiments.

  4. Inorganic ion exchange evaluation and design: Silicotitanate ion exchange waste conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balmer, M.L.; Bunker, B.C.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange materials are being evaluated for removing Cs, SR from tank waste. Thermal conversion of a variety of compositions within the Cs{sub 2}O-TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} phase diagram yielded both glass and crystalline materials, some of which show low leach rates and negligible Cs losses during heat treatment. A new material, CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}, with a structure isomorphous to pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}) has been identified. This material represents a new class of crystalline zeolite materials which contain large amounts of titanium. Direct conversion of Cs loaded silicotitanate ion exchangers to CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is an excellent alternative to dissolving the Cs-loaded or Cs-eluted exchangers in borosilicate glass because: CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed using a simple, one step heat treatment. The unique crystalline pollucite-like structure of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} traps Cs, and exhibits extremely low Cs leach rates. CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is converted to solid waste at a low processing temperature of 700 to 800 C (nominal melter operating temperatures are 1150 C). CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6} concentrates the waste, thus generating lower volumes of expensive HLW. Cs losses due to volatilization during processing of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} are extremely low.

  5. Routine production of copper-64 using 11.7MeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, C. M.; Smith, S. V.; Asad, A. H.; Chan, S.; Price, R. I. [Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Centre for Forensic Science, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia) and ARC Centre of Excellence in A (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence in Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) and Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence in Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) and Imaging and Applied (Australia); Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia) and School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia)

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable production of copper-64 ({sup 64}Cu) was achieved by irradiating enriched nickel-64 ({sup 64}Ni, >94.8%) in an IBA 18/9 cyclotron. Nickel-64 (19.1 {+-} 3.0 mg) was electroplated onto an Au disc (125{mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15mm). Targets were irradiated with 11.7 MeV protons for 2 hours at 40{mu}A. Copper isotopes ({sup 60,61,62,64}Cu) were separated from target nickel and cobalt isotopes ({sup 55,57,61}Co) using a single ion exchange column, eluted with varying concentration of low HCl alcohol solutions. The {sup 64}Ni target material was recovered and reused. The {sup 64}Cu production rate was 1.46{+-}0.3MBq/{mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni(n = 10) (with a maximum of 2.6GBq of {sup 64}Cu isolated after 2hr irradiation at 40uA. Radionuclidic purity of the {sup 64}Cu was 98.7 {+-} 1.6 % at end of separation. Cu content was < 6mg/L (n = 21). The specific activity of {sup 64}Cu was determined by ICP-MS and by titration with Diamsar to be 28.9{+-}13.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.70{+-}0.35Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n = 10) and 13.1{+-}12.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.35{+-}0.32Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n 9), respectively; which are in agreement, however, further work is required.

  6. Energy balance for uranium recovery from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.; Lindner, H. [The University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy return on investment (EROI) of an energy resource is the ratio of the energy it ultimately produces to the energy used to recover it. EROI is a key viability measure for a new recovery technology, particularly in its early stages of development when financial cost assessment would be premature or highly uncertain. This paper estimates the EROI of uranium recovery from seawater via a braid adsorbent technology. In this paper, the energy cost of obtaining uranium from seawater is assessed by breaking the production chain into three processes: adsorbent production, adsorbent deployment and mooring, and uranium elution and purification. Both direct and embodied energy inputs are considered. Direct energy is the energy used by the processes themselves, while embodied energy is used to fabricate their material, equipment or chemical inputs. If the uranium is used in a once-through fuel cycle, the braid adsorbent technology EROI ranges from 12 to 27, depending on still-uncertain performance and system design parameters. It is highly sensitive to the adsorbent capacity in grams of U captured per kg of adsorbent as well as to potential economies in chemical use. This compares to an EROI of ca. 300 for contemporary terrestrial mining. It is important to note that these figures only consider the mineral extraction step in the fuel cycle. At a reference performance level of 2.76 g U recovered per kg adsorbent immersed, the largest energy consumers are the chemicals used in adsorbent production (63%), anchor chain mooring system fabrication and operations (17%), and unit processes in the adsorbent production step (12%). (authors)

  7. Removal of Pu238 from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KYSER, EDWARD

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new anion flowsheet for use in HB-Line was tested in the lab with Reillex{trademark} HPQ for removal of Pu{sup 238} contamination from Np. Significant rejection of Pu{sup 238} was observed by washing with 6 to 12 bed volumes (BV) of reductive wash containing reduced nitric acid concentration along with both ferrous sulfamate (FS) and hydrazine. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 1500 to 2200 g Np were observed with modest losses for up-flow washing. Down-flow washing was observed to have high losses. The following are recommended conditions for removing Pu{sup 238} from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: Up-flow 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: Up-flow 6-12 BV of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS, 0.05 M hydrazine. 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: Up-flow 1-2 BV of 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (4) Elution conditions: Down-flow 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

  8. Metal, mutagenicity, and biochemical studies on bivalve molluscs from Spanish coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Ariza, A.; Abril, N.; Navas, J.I.; Dorado, G.; Lopez-Barea, J.; Pueyo, C. (Departmento de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cordoba, (Spain))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three species of marine bivalve molluscs (Chamelea gallina, Ruditapes decussatus, and Crassostrea gigas) have been studied in order to evaluate the levels of pollution on the South Atlantic Spanish littoral. Several transition metals (Cu, As, Cd, Sn, Hg, Pb) were determined as a general index of total contamination. Animals from putative contaminated areas exhibited higher metal contents than those from cleaner waters. C. gigas showed 5-20-fold higher total metal content than the other two species. The mutagenicity of ethanolic extracts was assayed by using both the His reversion and the Ara forward mutation tests. Mollusc tissues from the three species did not contain genotoxins active on TA98 (frameshift mutations) or TA100 (mainly G:C base-pair substitutions), but did contain direct-acting genotoxins of a polar nature and oxidative type. This was based on the following observations: (1) mammalian metabolic activation was not required for mutagenicity, (2) mutagens were eluted with the polar fraction from XAD-2 columns, and (3) mutagenic responses were observed with Salmonella typhimurium TA102 (base-pair substitutions; sensitive to oxidative damages) and Escherichia coli catalase-deficient (AraR forward mutations) strains. No relevant differences were found in the mutagenicity of mollusc extracts from areas with different pollution levels. Otherwise, our data suggest that, in general, animals living in contaminated environments had fewer genotoxins of oxidative type than those from less polluted areas. Such a result might be explained by the observation of increased levels of a number of detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase.

  9. Chemical and nuclear properties of lawrencium (element 103) and hahnium (element 105)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.A.

    1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical and nuclear properties of Lr and Ha have been studied, using 3-minute {sup 260}Lr and 35-second {sup 262}Ha. The crystal ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} was determined by comparing its elution position from a cation-exchange resin column with those of lanthanide elements having known ionic radii. Comparisons are made to the ionic radii of the heavy actinides, Am{sup 3+} through Es{sup 3+}, obtained by x-ray diffraction methods, and to Md{sup 3+} and Fm{sup 3+} which were determined in the same manner as Lr{sup 3+}. The hydration enthalpy of {minus}3622 kJ/mol was calculated from the crystal ionic radius using an empirical form of the Born equation. Comparisons to the spacings between the ionic radii of the heaviest members of the lanthanide series show that the 2Z spacing between Lr{sup 3+} and Md{sup 3+} is anomalously small, as the ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} of 0.0886 nm is significantly smaller than had been expected. The chemical properties of Ha were determined relative to the lighter homologs in group 5, Nb and Ta. Group 4 and group 5 tracer activities, as well as Ha, were absorbed onto glass surfaces as a first step toward the determination of the chemical properties of Ha. Ha was found to adsorb on surfaces, a chemical property unique to the group 5 elements, and as such demonstrates that Ha has the chemical properties of a group 5 element. A solvent extraction procedure was adapted for use as a micro-scale chemical procedure to examine whether or not Ha displays eka-Ta-like chemical under conditions where Ta will be extracted into the organic phase and Nb will not. Under the conditions of this experiment Ha did not extract, and does not show eka-Ta-like chemical properties.

  10. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera: I. clinical features, hematology, histology, and immunopathology in long-term chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clinical features, pathology, and immunopathology of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developing in the long-term rat radiation chimera are described. At 6 to 12 months post-transplant, the previously stable ACI/LEW chimeras developed patchy to diffuse severe hair loss and thickened skin folds, and had microscopic features resembling scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis. Skin histology showed dermal inflammation and acanthosis with atrophy of the appendages, with progression to dermal sclerosis. The liver revealed chronic hepatitis with bile duct injury and proliferation and periportal piecemeal necrosis. The tongue had considerable submucosal inflammation, muscular necrosis, and atrophy and arteritis. The serous salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and bronchi had lymphocytic inflammation and injury to duct, acinar, and mucosal columnar epithelium. The thymus had lymphocyte depletion of the medulla with prominent epithelium. The spleen and lymph nodes had poorly developed germinal centers but increased numbers of plasma cells. IgM was observed along the basement membrane and around the basal cells of the skin and tongue and along the basement membrane of the bile ducts. IgM was present also in the arteries of the tongue. Immunoglobulins eluted from the skin, cross-reacted with the bile duct epithelium and usually with both ACI and Lewis skin. Increased titers of speckled antinuclear antibodies were present in the serum of rats with chronic (GVHD). Chronic GVHD in the long-term rat radiation chimera is very similar to human chronic GVHD and is a potentially excellent model for autoimmune disorders including scleroderma, Sjorgren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis.

  11. Below-the-ankle Angioplasty and Stenting for Limb Salvage: Anatomical Considerations and Long-term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris [School of Medicine, Patras University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Greece)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeTo report the long-term angiographic and clinical results in a series of below-the-ankle (BTA) angioplasty procedures and to present some biomechanical issues related to the unique anatomical geometry of the ankle.MethodsWe performed a retrospective analysis of BTA angioplasty procedures. Clinical end points included technical success, patient mortality, salvage of the treated foot, and repeat target lesion revascularization. Imaging end points included primary patency, binary restenosis of the target lesion at the 50 % threshold, and stent integrity (stent fracture, deformation, or collapse). Univariate subgroup analysis was performed.ResultsIn total, 40 limbs in 37 patients (age 73.5 {+-} 8.2 years) with critical limb ischemia were included and 42 inframalleolar lesions (4.2 {+-} 1.4 cm) were analyzed. Technical success was achieved in 95.2 % (40 of 42). Provisional stent placement was performed in 45.2 % (19 of 42). Two patients died, and two major amputations occurred up to 3 years. At 1 year, overall primary vessel patency was 50.4 {+-} 9.1 %, lesion binary restenosis rate was 64.1 {+-} 8.3 %, and repeat intervention-free survival was 93.6 {+-} 4.3 % according to life table analysis of all treated lesions. Pairwise subgroup analysis showed that BTA self-expanding stents were associated with significantly higher restenosis and poorer primary patency compared to plain balloon angioplasty or sirolimus-eluting balloon-expandable stents. Significant deformation and/or fracture of balloon-expandable stents placed BTA were identified in five of 11. Dynamic imaging showed that the dorsalis pedis artery is kinked during foot dorsiflexion, whereas the distal posterior tibial artery is kinked during plantar flexion of the foot.ConclusionBTA angioplasty for critical limb ischemia treatment is safe and feasible with satisfactory long-term results. BTA stent placement must be reserved for bailout indications.

  12. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in < 6 hours. The method uses a rapid calcium carbonate precipitation enhanced with a small amount of phosphate added to enhance chemical yields (typically >90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

  13. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  14. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

  15. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Synthesis by Inverse Suspension Polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Robert J.; Scrivens, Walter A.; Nash, Charles

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Base catalyzed sol-gel polycondensation of resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) with formaldehyde by inverse suspension polymerization leads to the formation of uniform, highly cross-linked, translucent, spherical gels, which have increased selectivity and capacity for cesium ion removal from high alkaline solutions. Because of its high selectivity for cesium ion, resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resins are being considered for process scale column radioactive cesium removal by ion-exchange at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), which is now under construction at the Hanford site. Other specialty resins such as Superlig{reg_sign} 644 have been ground and sieved and column tested for process scale radioactive cesium removal but show high pressure drops across the resin bed during transition from column regeneration to loading and elution. Furthermore, van Deemter considerations indicate better displacement column chromatography by the use of spherical particle beads rather than irregularly shaped ground or granular particles. In our studies batch contact equilibrium experiments using a high alkaline simulant show a definite increase in cesium loading onto spherical R-F resin. Distribution coefficient (Kd) values ranged from 777 to 429 mL/g in the presence of 0.1M and 0.7M potassium ions, respectively. Though other techniques for making R-F resins have been employed, to our knowledge no one has made spherical R-F resins by inverse suspension polymerization. Moreover, in this study we discuss the data comparisons to known algebraic isotherms used to evaluate ion-exchange resins for WTP plant scale cesium removal operations.

  16. Separation of peptides from myoglobin enzymatic digests by RPLC. Influence of the mobile-phase composition and the pressure on the retention and separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Nicola [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the mobile-phase composition and the pressure on the chromatographic separation of the peptides from the enzymatic digest of myoglobin was studied under linear conditions. The retention behavior of these tryptic peptides was measured under isocratic conditions with different mobile-phase compositions, ranging from 9 to 28% (v/v) acetonitrile in 0.1% (v/v) aqueous trifluoroacetic acid. The effect of the pressure was studied by analyzing the separation of the tryptic peptides under different average column pressures between 14 and 220 bar, at 13, 20, and 26% (v/v) acetonitrile. The differences between the partial molar volumes of these peptides in the stationary and mobile phases were derived from these results. All the measurements were performed on a 10-cm-long C{sub 18}-bonded, end-capped monolithic column. The results obtained illustrate the highly complicated behavior of the complex peptide mixtures afforded by tryptic digestion. The capacity factors of the analyzed peptides do not depend linearly on the acetonitrile concentration but follow exactly a quadratic relationship. The adsorption changes of partial molar volumes are in good agreement with other literature data. The consequences of the influence of the average column pressure (hence of the flow rate) on the column phase ratio and on the retention factors of the peptides are discussed. The retention pattern of the complex mixture is affected by both the mobile-phase composition and the pressure, and the resolution of certain peptide pairs is so much affected by the pressure that inversions in the elution order of some pairs are observed.

  17. Evaluation of kinetic phosphorescence analysis for the determination of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croatto, P.V.; Frank, I.W.; Johnson, K.D.; Mason, P.B.; Smith, M.M.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has used a fluorometric method for the determination of sub-microgram quantities of uranium. In its continuing effort to upgrade and improve measurement technology, NBL has evaluated the commercially-available KPA-11 kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (Chemchek, Richland, WA). The Chemchek KPA-11 is a bench-top instrument which performs single-measurement, quench-corrected analyses for trace uranium. It incorporates patented kinetic phosphorimetry techniques to measure and analyze sample phosphorescence as a function of time. With laser excitation and time-corrected photon counting, the KPA-11 has a lower detection limit than conventional fluorometric methods. Operated with a personal computer, the state-of-the-art KPA-11 offers extensive time resolution and phosphorescence lifetime capabilities for additional specificity. Interferences are thereby avoided while obtaining precise measurements. Routine analyses can be easily and effectively accomplished, with the accuracy and precision equivalent to the pulsed-laser fluorometric method presently performed at NBL, without the need for internal standards. Applications of kinetic phosphorimetry at NBL include the measurement of trace level uranium in retention tank, waste samples, and low-level samples. It has also been used to support other experimental activities at NBL by the measuring of nanogram amounts of uranium contamination (in blanks) in isotopic sample preparations, and the determining of elution curves of different ion exchange resins used for uranium purification. In many cases, no pretreatment of samples was necessary except to fume them with nitric acid, and then to redissolve and dilute them to an appropriate concentration with 1 M HNO{sub 3} before measurement. Concentrations were determined on a mass basis ({micro}g U/g of solution), but no density corrections were needed since all the samples (including the samples used for calibration) were in the same density matrix (1 M HNO{sub 3}). A statistical evaluation of the determination of uranium using kinetic phosphorimetry is described in this report, along with a discussion of the method, and an evaluation of the use of plastic versus quartz cuvettes. Measurement with a precision of {+-} 3--4% relative standard deviation (RSD) and an accuracy of better than {+-} 2% relative difference (RD) are obtained in the 0.0006 to 5 {micro}g U/g-solution range. The instrument detection limit is 0.04 ppb (4 x 10{sup {minus}5} {micro}g U/g solution) using quartz cells, and 0.11 ppb (11 x 10{sup {minus}5} {micro}g U/g solution) using disposable methacrylate cuvettes.

  18. RAPID DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES IN URINE BY INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY: A HYBRID APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid separation method that allows separation and preconcentration of actinides in urine samples was developed for the measurement of longer lived actinides by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration, if required, is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation. Similar technology has been applied to separate actinides prior to measurement by alpha spectrometry, but this new method has been developed with elution reagents now compatible with ICP-MS as well. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long- and short-lived actinide isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 24 samples (including QC samples) in less than 3 h. Simultaneous sample preparation can offer significant time savings over sequential sample preparation. For example, sequential sample preparation of 24 samples taking just 15 min each requires 6 h to complete. The simplicity and speed of this new method makes it attractive for radiological emergency response. If preconcentration is applied, the method is applicable to larger sample aliquots for occupational exposures as well. The chemical recoveries are typically greater than 90%, in contrast to other reported methods using flow injection separation techniques for urine samples where plutonium yields were 70-80%. This method allows measurement of both long-lived and short-lived actinide isotopes. 239Pu, 242Pu, 237Np, 243Am, 234U, 235U and 238U were measured by ICP-MS, while 236Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm were measured by alpha spectrometry. The method can also be adapted so that the separation of uranium isotopes for assay is not required, if uranium assay by direct dilution of the urine sample is preferred instead. Multiple vacuum box locations may be set-up to supply several ICP-MS units with purified sample fractions such that a high sample throughput may be achieved, while still allowing for rapid measurement of short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry.

  19. Estimation of Sorption Behavior of Europium(III) Using Biotite Flakes - 13272

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Go; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kirishima, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of biotite and Eu(III) (europium (III)) was examined by using secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometer (SIMS), fluorescence emission spectrum and decay behavior of fluorescence emission spectrum in addition to the time-changes of Eu(III) and potassium ions concentrations in a solution, using the flake form samples. The results of SIMS showed that the intensity of Eu was gradually decreasing with depth, while the intensity of Eu in the case shaken for 30 days exceeded that in the case for 1 day. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of Eu(III) and potassium ions in the flake of biotite suggested that Eu ions diffuse mainly from the edges of biotite flake, while Eu ions can slightly diffuse through some small cracks existing on the flake surface far from the edges. Besides, the elution amount of potassium from the biotite flakes into a solution was proportional to the sorption amount of Eu(III). The changes nearly revealed ion exchange between these ions, while muscovite flake sample did not show such ion exchange reaction. In addition, from the time-change of Eu(III) concentration, an apparent diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 8.0x10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s, by using two-dimensional diffusion model coupled with a film between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Furthermore, the fluorescent intensity decreased with the shaking (contacting) time. This means that Eu(III) gradually diffuses into the inside of biotite edges of the biotite flakes, after the sorption of Eu(III) in the edges. This tendency was observed also in the powder samples. The observed fluorescence decay (at 592 nm in wave length) showed almost similar curve in any samples, indicating a certain sorption form of Eu(III) onto the edges of the biotite flakes. These results mentioned above suggest that the diffusion processes through internal layer in biotite mainly control the sorption behavior of multivalent ions. Such diffusion processes affect the retardation-effects on fracture surfaces in the rock matrix, depending on the fluid flow velocity of groundwater. That is, a more reliable model considering the mass transfer in the internal layer of biotite may be required to estimate the sorption behavior of RNs with biotite which controls the whole sorption behavior of granite. (authors)

  20. Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DE Kurath; JR Bontha; DL Blanchard; SK Fiskum; BM Rapko

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] {approximately} 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K{sub d} {approximately} 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the loss of barium be correlated with the resin's ability to selectively complex sulfate, then maintaining even the current limited resin characteristics for sulfate complexation over multiple cycles becomes questionable.

  1. Effect of Fe2+ Oxidation on the Removal of 238Pu from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KYSER, EDWARD

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of ferrous sulfamate (FS) oxidation and variation in nitric acid concentration on the removal of {sup 238}Pu contamination from Np by the HB-Line anion exchange flowsheet has been tested. Significant rejection of {sup 238}Pu was observed by washing with a reductive wash solution containing 6.0 to 6.8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) with as little as 30% of the Fe{sup 2+} from the FS remaining in its reduced form. To achieve the desired 30% removal of {sup 238}Pu from the process, conditions should be controlled to maintain the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratio in the reductive wash to be greater than 60%/40% (or 1.5). Since Fe{sup 2+} oxidation is strongly affected by temperature and nitric acid concentration, these parameters (as well as time after FS addition) need to be controlled to ensure predictable results. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 2000 g Np were observed with modest losses for ''up-flow'' washing. The following are recommended conditions for removing {sup 238}Pu from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), 0.05 M excess FS. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6 Bed volumes (BV) of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS (minimum 0.03M Fe{sup 2+} during wash cycle), 0.05 M hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 1-2 BV of 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (4) Elution conditions: ''Down-flow'' 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

  2. Development Of Ion Chromatography Methods To Support Testing Of The Glycolic Acid Reductant Flowsheet In The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedenman, B. J.; White, T. L.; Mahannah, R. N.; Best, D. R.; Stone, M. E.; Click, D. R.; Lambert, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Chromatography (IC) is the principal analytical method used to support studies of Sludge Reciept and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) chemistry at DWPF. A series of prior analytical ''Round Robin'' (RR) studies included both supernate and sludge samples from SRAT simulant, previously reported as memos, are tabulated in this report.2,3 From these studies it was determined to standardize IC column size to 4 mm diameter, eliminating the capillary column from use. As a follow on test, the DWPF laboratory, the PSAL laboratory, and the AD laboratory participated in the current analytical RR to determine a suite of anions in SRAT simulant by IC, results also are tabulated in this report. The particular goal was to confirm the laboratories ability to measure and quantitate glycolate ion. The target was + or - 20% inter-lab agreement of the analyte averages for the RR. Each of the three laboratories analyzed a batch of 12 samples. For each laboratory, the percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) of the averages on nitrate, glycolate, and oxalate, was 10% or less. The three laboratories all met the goal of 20% relative agreement for nitrate and glycolate. For oxalate, the PSAL laboratory reported an average value that was 20% higher than the average values reported by the DWPF laboratory and the AD laboratory. Because of this wider window of agreement, it was concluded to continue the practice of an additional acid digestion for total oxalate measurement. It should also be noted that large amounts of glycolate in the SRAT samples will have an impact on detection limits of near eluting peaks, namely Fluoride and Formate. A suite of scoping experiments are presented in the report to identify and isolate other potential interlaboratory disceprancies. Specific ion chromatography inter-laboratory method conditions and differences are tabulated. Most differences were minor but there are some temperature control equipment differences that are significant leading to a recommendation of a heated jacket for analytical columns that are remoted for use in radiohoods. A suggested method improvement would be to implement column temperture control at a temperature slightly above ambient to avoid peak shifting due to temperature fluctuations. Temperature control in this manner would improve short and longer term peak retention time stability. An unknown peak was observed during the analysis of glycolic acid and SRAT simulant. The unknown peak was determined to best match diglycolic acid. The development of a method for acetate is summaraized, and no significant amount of acetate was observed in the SRAT products tested. In addition, an alternative Gas Chromatograph (GC) method for glycolate is summarized.

  3. 230Th-234U Age-Dating Uranium by Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R W; Gaffney, A M

    2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the standard operating procedure used by the Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Group of the Chemical Sciences Division at LLNL for the preparation of a sample of uranium oxide or uranium metal for {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U age-dating. The method described here includes the dissolution of a sample of uranium oxide or uranium metal, preparation of a secondary dilution, spiking of separate aliquots for uranium and thorium isotope dilution measurements, and purification of uranium and thorium aliquots for mass spectrometry. This SOP may be applied to uranium samples of unknown purity as in a nuclear forensic investigation, and also to well-characterized samples such as, for example, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U-metal certified reference materials. The sample of uranium is transferred to a quartz or PFA vial, concentrated nitric acid is added and the sample is heated on a hotplate at approximately 100 C for several hours until it dissolves. The sample solution is diluted with water to make the solution approximately 4 M HNO{sub 3} and hydrofluoric acid is added to make it 0.05 M HF. A secondary dilution of the primary uranium solution is prepared. Separate aliquots for uranium and thorium isotope dilution measurements are taken and spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 229}Th, respectively. The spiked aliquot for uranium isotope dilution analysis is purified using EiChrom UTEVA resin. The spiked aliquot for thorium isotope dilution analysis is purified by, first, a 1.8 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 9 M HCl on which U adsorbs and Th passes through; second, adsorbing Th on a 1 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 8 M HNO{sub 3} and then eluting it with 9 M HCl followed by 0.1 M HCl + 0.005 M HF; and third, by passing the Th through a final 1.0 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 9 M HCl. The mass spectrometry is performed using the procedure 'Th and U Mass Spectrometry for {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U Age Dating'.

  4. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

  5. LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although a Supplemental LAW feed simulant has previously been prepared, this feed composition differs from that simulant because those tests examined only the fully soluble aqueous solution at room temperature, not the composition formed after evaporation, including the insoluble solids that precipitate after it cools. The conceptual flow sheet for Supplemental LAW immobilization has an option for removal of {sup 99}Tc from the feed stream, if needed. Elutable ion exchange has been selected for that process. If implemented, the stream would need filtration to remove the insoluble solids prior to processing in an ion exchange column. The characteristics, chemical speciation, physical properties, and filterability of the solids are important to judge the feasibility of the concept, and to estimate the size and cost of a facility. The insoluble solids formed during these tests were primarily natrophosphate, natroxalate, and a sodium aluminosilicate compound. At the elevated temperature and 8 M [Na+], appreciable insoluble solids (1.39 wt%) were present. Cooling to room temperature and dilution of the slurry from 8 M to 5 M [Na+] resulted in a slurry containing 0.8 wt% insoluble solids. The solids (natrophosphate, natroxalate, sodium aluminum silicate, and a hydrated sodium phosphate) were relatively stable and settled quickly. Filtration rates were in the range of those observed with iron-based simulated Hanford tank sludge simulants, e.g., 6 M [Na+] Hanford tank 241-AN-102, even though their chemical speciation is considerably different. Chemical cleaning of the crossflow filter was readily accomplished with acid. As this simulant formulation was based on an average composition of a wide range of feeds using an integrated computer model, this exact composition may never be observed. But the test conditions were selected to enable comparison to the model to enable improving its chemical prediction capability.

  6. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University /Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  7. Elemental Fluorine-18 Gas: Enhanced Production and Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanBrocklin, Henry F. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an efficient, reproducible and reliable process for the preparation of fluorine-18 labeled fluorine gas ([¹?F]F?) from readily available cyclotron-produced [¹?F]fluoride ion. The two step process entailed the production of [¹?F]fluoromethane with subsequent conversion to [¹?F]F? by electric discharge of [¹?F]fluoromethane in the presence of carrier nonradioactive F? gas. The specific goals of this project were i) to optimize the preparation of [¹?F]fluoromethane from [¹?F]fluoride ion; ii) to develop a prototype automated system for the production of [¹?F]F? from [¹?F]fluoride ion and iii) develop a compact user friendly automated system for the preparation of [¹?F]F? with initial synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled radiotracers. Over the last decade there has been an increased interest in the production of "non-standard" positron-emitting isotopes for the preparation of new radiotracers for a variety of applications including medical imaging and therapy. The increased availability of these isotopes from small biomedical cyclotrons has prompted their use in labeling radiotracers. In much the same way the production of [¹?F]F? gas has been known for several decades. However, access to [¹?F]F? gas has been limited to those laboratories with the means (e.g. F? targetry for the cyclotron) and the project-based need to work with [¹?F]F? gas. Relatively few laboratories, compared to those that produce [¹?F]fluoride ion on a daily basis, possess the capability to produce and use [¹?F]F? gas. A simplified, reliable system employing [¹?F]fluoride ion from cyclotron targetry systems that are already in place coupled with on-demand production of the [¹?F]F? gas would greatly enhance its availability. This would improve the availability of [¹?F]F? gas and promote further work with a valuable precursor. The major goals of the project were accomplished over the funding period. The preparation of ¹?F]fluoromethane has been automated with reproducible yields greater than 90% conversion from [¹?F]fluoride ion. A trap and release system was established for the [¹?F]fluoride ion concentration and direct elution of the [¹?F]fluoride ion into the reaction vial with the appropriate base and precursor in DMSO. Other solvents were also investigated. The production time for [¹?F]fluoromethane is less than 10 minutes. An automated system for the [¹?F]F? gas production from the [18F]fluoromethane has been developed. The unit coupled to the [¹?F]fluoromethane system permits the on demand production of [¹?F]F? gas. In less than 30 minutes, mCi quantities of [¹?F]F? gas were produced. Several variables for the [¹?F]F? gas production were investigated and a set of parameters for reproducible operation were determined. These parameters included discharge chamber size, carrier gas (He, Ne, Ar), discharge time, discharge current, mass of F? gas added to the chamber. FDOPA and EF5 were used to test the reactivity of the [¹?F]F? gas. Both products were produced in low to modest yield. The ready availability of [¹?F]F? gas has potential impact to advance both DOE mission-driven initiatives and nuclear medicine initiatives through other federally funded agencies such as NIH and DoD. New reactions involving the use of [¹?F]F? gas will lead to direct labeling of new radiotracers and intermediates as well as new fluorine-18 labeled synthons that may be further reacted with other reagents to provide useful fluorine-18 labeled compounds. New tracers to understand and follow plant and microbial metabolism as well as new tracers for nuclear medicine applications, that have been either difficult to obtain or never produced due to the limited availability of [¹?F]F? gas, may be prepared using the techniques developed .

  8. Developing Fieldable Systems for Chemical Sensing Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Kyle, Stephan Weeks, R. Trainham

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, there is an urgent need for field-rugged and field-programmable sensor systems that provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. These devices must be portable, low cost, robust, and provide accurate measurements to avoid both false positive and negative results. Furthermore, the information provided by the devices must be received in a timely manner so that informed decisions can be immediately made and the appropriate actions taken. Two technologies that are unparalleled in their sensitivity, selectivity, and trace-level detection capabilities are field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry. Here, we will show progress that has been made toward developing fieldable FAIMS systems and mass spectrometers. Working in collaboration with Sionex Corporation, the microDMx detector was equipped with a continuous air sampling system to develop selective methods for the analysis of compounds of interest. A microdiaphragm pump (KNF Neuberger, Inc.) is used to pull in gas-phase analytes directly from the air for separation and detection with the FAIMS system. The FAIMS evaluation platform (SVAC) unit currently measures 9.8-inch x 4.6-inch x 3.2-inch, weighs 3.1 lb, and utilizes a {sup 63}Ni source to ionize incoming compounds. Analytes entering the unit are separated and identified by their characteristic response to the compensation voltage (V{sub c}) at a given rf field strength (V{sub rf}). This response has been observed to be unique for a wide range of substances studied. If additional verification were required or a targeted analyte present in a complex chemical matrix, a FAIMS unit equipped with a fast gas chromatography column has been evaluated. The unit combines the separation capabilities of gas chromatography with the selectivity of FAIMS. It measures 9.5-inch x 5.25-inch x 3.5-inch, weighs 3.8 lb, and uses a 10.6 eV photoionization source. Analytes are identified both by their elution time from the column and by the characteristic response in the FAIMS spectrum. Analysis times required to obtain results for most analytes examined are less than three minutes. A fieldable mass spectrometer system is also being developed that includes sampling, ionization, mass selection and detection, vacuum technology, and analytical methodology with remote data transmission. Multiple methods for mass selection are being explored, including both Penning and Paul type ion traps as well as a quadrupole system to determine which is best suited for a portable mass spectrometer. Several ionization sources and ion counting methods will also be evaluated to establish their effectiveness with each system. The intended result of this project is a handheld mass spectrometer system capable of field deployment for the detection and identification of a wide range of gas-phase CBE species.

  9. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

  10. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.