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1

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Elution electrophoresis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Colloids and macromolecules are separated by simultaneously carrying out elution and electrophoretic separation processes.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" April 29, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Tom for that kind introduction. And I want to commend you, Norm Augustine and Chuck Vest for your continued leadership on these issues. You are powerful voices for urgent and sustained action to preserve this nation's technological preeminence - and our economic competitiveness. It's a pleasure to be here with you all, and with my good friends Margaret and Carlos. It strikes me that we are in the fortunate position of

4

Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moody to participate in "Frontiers of Engineering" Moody to participate in "Frontiers of Engineering" Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of Engineering" symposium Engineers between 30 to 45 who are performing exceptional engineering research and technical work in a variety of disciplines attend the 2-1/2 day event. August 22, 2012 Nathan Moody Nathan Moody Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email Nathan Moody, specialist in electromagnetic radiation, honored LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, August 22, 2012-Nathan Moody of Los Alamos National Laboratory is among 78 of the nation's brightest young engineers selected for the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) 18th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium. Engineers between 30 to 45 who are

5

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina NOTE: EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS REVISION 0 EXCEPT THE END DATE IS EXTENDED. Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol- Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently.

6

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina NOTE: EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS REVISION 0 EXCEPT THE END DATE IS EXTENDED. Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol- Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently.

7

ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom Jump to: navigation, search Name ELUTIONS Inc (formerly TeCom) Place Tampa, Florida Zip 33605 Sector Efficiency Product Tampa-based wireless enterprise automation solutions firm. Elutions provides an Active Energy Management service allowing users to increase efficiency by monitoring, forecasting and analyzing utility resource consumption. Coordinates 27.94653°, -82.459269° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.94653,"lon":-82.459269,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate measurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time measurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Small-Column Cesium Ion Exchange Elution Testing of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed to evaluate multiple, cesium loading, and elution cycles for small columns containing SRF resin using a simple, high-level waste (HLW) simulant. Cesium ion exchange loading and elution curves were generated for a nominal 5 M Na, 2.4E-05 M Cs, 0.115 M Al loading solution traced with 134Cs followed by elution with variable HNO3 (0.02, 0.07, 0.15, 0.23, and 0.28 M) containing variable CsNO3 (5.0E-09, 5.0E-08, and 5.0E-07 M) and traced with 137Cs. The ion exchange system consisted of a pump, tubing, process solutions, and a single, small ({approx}15.7 mL) bed of SRF resin with a water-jacketed column for temperature-control. The columns were loaded with approximately 250 bed volumes (BVs) of feed solution at 45 C and at 1.5 to 12 BV per hour (0.15 to 1.2 cm/min). The columns were then eluted with 29+ BVs of HNO3 processed at 25 C and at 1.4 BV/h. The two independent tracers allowed analysis of the on-column cesium interaction between the loading and elution solutions. The objective of these tests was to improve the correlation between the spent resin cesium content and cesium leached out of the resin in subsequent loading cycles (cesium leakage) to help establish acid strength and purity requirements.

Brown, Garrett N.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

500: Categorical Exclusion Determination 500: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cesium (Cs)-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with

11

Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report  

SciTech Connect

Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

Sakamoto, Susumu, E-mail: susumu1029@gmail.com; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Shibuya, Kazutoshi [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Japan); Homma, Sakae [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Numerical modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained solutes in supercritical fluid chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), the significant expansion of the mobile phase along the column causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase density, its viscosity, its velocity, its diffusion coefficients, etc. are not constant throughout the column. This results in a nonuniform flow velocity distribution, itself causing a loss of column efficiency in certain cases, even at low flow rates, as they do in HPLC. At high flow rates, an important deformation of the elution profiles of the sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the retention of an unsorbed solute in SFC is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained compounds. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides the temperature and the pressure profiles inside the column and values of the retention time and the band profiles of retained compounds that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data for large value of mobile phase reduced density. At low reduced densities, the band profiles can strongly depend on the column axial distribution of porosity.

Kaczmarski, Krzysztof [University of Tennessee and Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland; Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71: Categorical Exclusion Determination 71: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office NOTE: EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS REVISION 0 EXCEPT THE END DATE IS EXTENDED. Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high

14

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 27, 2012 March 27, 2012 CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 27, 2012 CX-008370: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operation of Tube Furnace for Synthesis of Hydrogen Storage Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 23, 2012 CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 22, 2012 CX-008374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

15

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 6490 of 28,905 results. 81 - 6490 of 28,905 results. Download CX-001367: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy Water Disposition Offsite, K-Area CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 03/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001367-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005497: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operations in Laboratory 773-A, B135/139 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005497-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

16

Reduction of Solvent Effect in Reverse Phase Gradient Elution LC-ICP-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quantification in liquid chromatography (LC) is becoming very important as more researchers are using LC, not as an analytical tool itself, but as a sample introduction system for other analytical instruments. The ability of LC instrumentation to quickly separate a wide variety of compounds makes it ideal for analysis of complex mixtures. For elemental speciation, LC is joined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to separate and detect metal-containing, organic compounds in complex mixtures, such as biological samples. Often, the solvent gradients required to perform complex separations will cause matrix effects within the plasma. This limits the sensitivity of the ICP-MS and the quantification methods available for use in such analyses. Traditionally, isotope dilution has been the method of choice for LC-ICP-MS quantification. The use of naturally abundant isotopes of a single element in quantification corrects for most of the effects that LC solvent gradients produce within the plasma. However, not all elements of interest in speciation studies have multiple naturally occurring isotopes; and polyatomic interferences for a given isotope can develop within the plasma, depending on the solvent matrix. This is the case for reverse phase LC separations, where increasing amounts of organic solvent are required. For such separations, an alternative to isotope dilution for quantification would be is needed. To this end, a new method was developed using the Apex-Q desolvation system (ESI, Omaha, NE) to couple LC instrumentation with an ICP-MS device. The desolvation power of the system allowed greater concentrations of methanol to be introduced to the plasma prior to destabilization than with direct methanol injection into the plasma. Studies were performed, using simulated and actual linear methanol gradients, to find analyte-internal standard (AIS) pairs whose ratio remains consistent (deviations {+-} 10%) over methanol concentration ranges of 5%-35% (simulated) and 8%-32% (actual). Quadrupole (low resolution) and sector field (high resolution) ICP-MS instrumentation were utilized in these studies. Once an AIS pair is determined, quantification studies can be performed. First, an analysis is performed by adding both elements of the AIS pair post-column while performing the gradient elution without sample injection. A comparison of the ratio of the measured intensities to the atomic ratio of the two standards is used to determine a correction factor that can be used to account for the matrix effects caused by the mobile phase. Then, organic and/or biological molecules containing one of the two elements in the AIS pair are injected into the LC column. A gradient method is used to vary the methanol-water mixture in the mobile phase and to separate out the compounds in a given sample. A standard solution of the second ion in the AIS pair is added continuously post-column. By comparing the ratio of the measured intensities to the atomic ratio of the eluting compound and internal standard, the concentration of the injected compound can be determined.

Patrick Allen Sullivan

2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

Irinotecan Loaded in Eluting Beads: Preclinical Assessment in a Rabbit VX2 Liver Tumor Model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to study the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan injected intravenously, intra-arterially, or loaded onto a delivery platform. Material and Methods: Fifty-four New Zealand White rabbits with VX2 liver tumor, divided in 3 groups of 17 rabbits, each received irinotecan either by intravenous (IV) route, intra-arterial hepatic (IA) route, or loaded on drug-eluting beads (DEBIRI). Animals were killed at 1, 6, and 24 h. Irinotecan and SN-38 concentrations were measured at different time points in serum, tumor, and normal liver.ResultsTwelve milligrams of irinotecan were injected IV and IA, whereas 6-16.5 mg were injected loaded onto DEBIRI. Normalized serum irinotecan reached a peak of 333 ng/ml (range 198.8-502.5) for IV, 327.1 ng/ml (range 277.1-495.6) for IA, and 189.7 ng/ml (range 111.1-261.9) for DEBIRI (P < 0.001) delivery. The area-under-the-curve value from 10 to 60 min of serum irinotecan concentration was significantly lower for DEBIRI (P = 0.0009). Tumor irinotecan levels for IV, IA, and DEBIRI (in ng/200 mg of tissue followed by ranges in parentheses) were, respectively, 23.6 (0.3-24.9), 36.5 (7.7-1914.1), and 20.2 (2.9-319) at 1 h; 4.2 (1-27.9), 99.3 (46.6-159.5), and 42.1 (11.3-189) at 6 h; and 2.7 (2.5-6.9), 18.3 (1.5-369.1), and 174.4 (3.4-5147.3) at 24 h (P = 0.02). At 24 h, tumor necrosis was 25% (10-30), 60% (40-91.25), and 95% (76.25-95) for IV, IA, and DEBIRI, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Compared with IV or IA, DEBIRI induces lower early serum levels of irinotecan, a high and prolonged intratumoral level of irinotecan, and a greater rate of tumor necrosis at 24 h. Further evaluation of the clinical benefit of DEBIRI is warranted.

Rao, Pramod P.; Pascale, Florentina [Institute Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Seck, Atman [Institute Gustave Roussy, UPRES EA 3535, Pharmacologie et Nouveaux Traitements du Cancer (France); Auperin, Anne [Institute Gustave Roussy, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (France); Drouard-Troalen, Laurence [Institute Gustave Roussy, Department of Biology and Pathology (France); Deschamps, Frederic; Teriitheau, Christophe [Institute Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Paci, Angelo [Institute Gustave Roussy, UPRES EA 3535, Pharmacologie et Nouveaux Traitements du Cancer (France); Denys, Alban; Bize, Pierre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Baere, Thierry de, E-mail: debaere@igr.fr [Institute Gustave Roussy, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

ven as the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) announced its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

updated version of the answer keys . With respect to the latter, there were more updates made to TST4 than of updating existin g answer key templates and documentation. The compromise reached for MUC-4 wa . These veteran groups are BBN Systems and Technologies (Cambridge, MA), General Electric (Schenectady, NY), Hughe

Simaan, Nabil

19

NAS/NAE Committee on the Prospects for IFE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Polar-Drive Ignition on the NIF J. D. Zuegel University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics 0 0 be tested on the NIF with a few modest modifications to the facility · Beam-smoothingimprovements: ­ Multi modifications to the NIF facility ­ Beamsmoothingisonlyrequiredatthebeginningofthelaserpulse, which minimizes

20

Prospective Randomized Comparison of Chemoembolization with Doxorubicin-Eluting Beads and Bland Embolization with BeadBlock for Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the added role of a chemotherapeutic in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The issue is of major importance since, as suggested by recent evidence, hypoxia or incomplete devascularization of the tumor is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and there are not many papers supplying level one evidence confirming the value of a chemotherapeutic. The hypothesis was that since drug-eluting bead (DEB)-TACE is standardized and reproducible, a comparison with bland TACE can readily reveal the potential value of the chemotherapeutic. Two groups were randomized in this prospective study: group A (n = 41) was treated with doxorubicin DEB-TACE, and group B (n = 43) with bland embolization. Patients were randomized for tumor diameter. Patients were embolized at set time intervals (2 months), with a maximum of three embolizations. Tumor response was evaluated using the EASL criteria and {alpha}-fetoprotein levels. At 6 months a complete response was seen in 11 patients (26.8%) in the DEB-TACE group and in 6 patients (14%) in the bland embolization group; a partial response was achieved in 19 patients (46.3%) and 18 (41.9%) patients in the DEB-TACE and bland embolization groups, respectively. Recurrences at 9 and 12 months were higher for bland embolization (78.3% vs. 45.7%) at 12 months. Time to progression (TTP) was longer for the DEB-TACE group (42.4 {+-} 9.5 and 36.2 {+-} 9.0 weeks), at a statistically significant level (p = 0.008). In conclusion, DEB-TACE presents a better local response, fewer recurrences, and a longer TTP than bland embolization with BeadBlock. However, survival benefit and bland embolization with smaller particles must be addressed in future papers to better assess the clinical value.

Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@otenet.g [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, Second Department of Radiology, Evgenidion Hospital (Greece); Pomoni, Mary [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, Evgenidion Hospital (Greece); Kelekis, Alexis [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, Second Department of Radiology, Evgenidion Hospital (Greece); Pomoni, Anastasia; Dourakis, Spyros [University of Athens, Department of Internal Medicine (Greece); Spyridopoulos, Themis [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Moschouris, Hippokratis [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, Evgenidion Hospital (Greece); Emmanouil, Emmanouil [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Rizos, Spyros [Tzanion Hospital (Greece); Kelekis, Dimitrios [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit, Evgenidion Hospital (Greece)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GRADIENT ELUTION MOVING BOUNDARY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LA Lewis and JJ Opplt. CRC Handbook of Electrophoresis: Lipoproteins: Basic Principles and Concepts, Boca Raton:CRC Press, 1979. Page 12. ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

22

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiative, which included dramatic increases in federal funding for basic research, particularly in the physical sciences. As you know, among other things, the...

23

Alternative Non-Acid Eluants for Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde  

3 M Sodium Hydroxide 456 6.09 26.2 11,778 1,938 4.03 1 M Tetrabutylphosphonium Hydroxide 376 12.7 26.1 9,499 758 14.1 1 M ...

24

Process Development for the Serra Verde Weathered Crust Elution ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current Korean R&D and Investment Strategies in Response to REE Demand & Supply Concerns Development of a High Recovery Process Flowsheet for...

25

Depth Profiling of Drug Eluting Stent Coatings with Cluster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the advent of polyatomic primary ion sources (C60+, Bi3+ ... Spectrometry (SIMS) employing an SF5+ polyatomic primary ion source for sputtering ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Engine Design for LIFE Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 2 #12;The LIFE "chamber" is an unsealed, segmented array sitting within a low pressure gas environment Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 4 #12;Once moved to the engine bay, cooling

27

Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation H sub 2 -D sub 2 exchange in non-acidic and acidic supports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient nitrogen removal from heterocyclic aromatics in liquid fuels calls for the development of catalysts with better HDN activity than is available with the traditional HDS catalysts, such as CoMo/gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiMo/gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.These catalysts, the first step is the partial or total hydrogenation of the heterocyclic ring -- at equilibrium at normal operating conditions -- and the rate-limiting step is the scission of the C-N-C bonds. Therefore an increase in the rate of C-N-C scission should produce an overall increase in the HDN yield. In this project it is proposed that the selectivity of the HDN reaction can be affected by an alteration of the catalyst acidity since it is possible that an acidic Hofmann-like diminution pathway is operative in parallel with the hydrogenolysis of saturated C--N--C bonds. Such was the conclusion from the study done of the denitrogenation of piperidine, where it was demonstrated that Bronsted acid sites are active for the denitrogenation of N-heterocycles, whereas Lewis sites are not. The exchange of deuterium with surface OH in silica, alumina and silica-alumina, has been studied under 400{degree}C, and using D{sub 2}0 and D{sub 2} as deuterium sources. Substantial degree of exchange is achieved in all cases, resulting in the production of surfaces suitable for the study of the interaction of heterocyclic amines with surface OH.

Miranda, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Recovery Plan for the Non-Elutable Ion Exchange Salt Alternative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations during experiments with UOP IONSIV(TM) IE-911 during the past year and information obtained during technical discussions with UOP, LLC, personnel in June 8, 1999, generated technical questions concerning the application of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Savannah River Site (SRS) soluble waste decontamination.

Walker, D.D.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chemoembolization With Doxorubicin-Eluting Beads for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Five-Year Survival Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report on the 5-year survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with DC Bead loaded with doxorubicin (DEB-DOX) in a scheduled scheme in up to three treatments and thereafter on demand. Materials and Methods: 173 HCC patients not suitable for curable treatments were prospectively enrolled (mean age 70.4 {+-} 7.4 years). Child-Pugh (Child) class was A/B (102/71 [59/41 %]), Okuda stage was 0/1/2 (91/61/19 [53.2/35.7/11.1 %]), and mean lesion diameter was 7.6 {+-} 2.1 cm. Lesion morphology was one dominant {5 cm (41.6 %), multifocal {5 (10.4 %). Results: Overall survival at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years was 93.6, 83.8, 62, 41.04, and 22.5 %, with higher rates achieved in Child class A compared with Child class B patients (95, 88.2, 61.7, 45, and 29.4 % vs. 91.5, 75, 50.7, 35.2, and 12.8 %). Mean overall survival was 43.8 months (range 1.2-64.8). Cumulative survival was better for Child class A compared with Child class B patients (p = 0.029). For patients with dominant lesions {<=}5 cm 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival rates were 100, 95.2, 71.4, 66.6, and 47.6 % for Child class A and 94.1, 88.2, 58.8, 41.2, 29.4, and 23.5 % for Child class B patients. Regarding DEB-DOX treatment, multivariate analysis identified number of lesions (p = 0.033), lesion vascularity (p < 0.0001), initially achieved complete response (p < 0.0001), and objective response (p = 0.046) as significant and independent determinants of 5-year survival. Conclusion: DEB-DOX results, with high rates of 5-year survival for patients, not amenable to curative treatments. Number of lesions, lesion vascularity, and local response were significant independent determinants of 5-year survival.

Malagari, Katerina, E-mail: kmalag@otonet.gr [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Pomoni, Mary [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Moschouris, Hippocrates, E-mail: hipmosch@gmail.com [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Radiology (Greece); Bouma, Evanthia [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Koskinas, John [Ippokration Hospital, University of Athens, Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Stefaniotou, Aspasia [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece); Marinis, Athanasios [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Surgery (Greece); Kelekis, Alexios; Alexopoulou, Efthymia [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Chatziioannou, Achilles [University of Athens, First Department of Radiology (Greece); Chatzimichael, Katerina [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Dourakis, Spyridon [Ippokration Hospital, University of Athens, Department of Internal Medicine and Hepatology (Greece); Kelekis, Nikolaos [University of Athens, Second Department of Radiology (Greece); Rizos, Spyros [Tzanion Hospital, Department of Surgery (Greece); Kelekis, Dimitrios [University of Athens, Imaging and Research Unit (Greece)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Mechanism of hydrodenitrogenation H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange in non-acidic and acidic supports. Eighth quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficient nitrogen removal from heterocyclic aromatics in liquid fuels calls for the development of catalysts with better HDN activity than is available with the traditional HDS catalysts, such as CoMo/gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiMo/gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.These catalysts, the first step is the partial or total hydrogenation of the heterocyclic ring -- at equilibrium at normal operating conditions -- and the rate-limiting step is the scission of the C-N-C bonds. Therefore an increase in the rate of C-N-C scission should produce an overall increase in the HDN yield. In this project it is proposed that the selectivity of the HDN reaction can be affected by an alteration of the catalyst acidity since it is possible that an acidic Hofmann-like diminution pathway is operative in parallel with the hydrogenolysis of saturated C--N--C bonds. Such was the conclusion from the study done of the denitrogenation of piperidine, where it was demonstrated that Bronsted acid sites are active for the denitrogenation of N-heterocycles, whereas Lewis sites are not. The exchange of deuterium with surface OH in silica, alumina and silica-alumina, has been studied under 400{degree}C, and using D{sub 2}0 and D{sub 2} as deuterium sources. Substantial degree of exchange is achieved in all cases, resulting in the production of surfaces suitable for the study of the interaction of heterocyclic amines with surface OH.

Miranda, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Investigation on Formation Mechanism of Non-Anode Effect Related ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NAE-PFC will emit when there is not enough alumina under some or other anode's ... PFC and CO2 Emissions from an Australian Aluminium Smelter Using ...

32

Operational Assimilation of GPS Zenith Total Delay Observations into the Met Office Numerical Weather Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zenith total delay (ZTD) observations derived from ground-based GPS receivers have been assimilated operationally into the Met Office North Atlantic and European (NAE) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model since 2007. Assimilation trials were ...

Gemma V. Bennitt; Adrian Jupp

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

LIFE Economics and Delivery Pathway Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29, 2011 2NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt #12;A minimum electrical gain of 3 to 4 gain may outweigh benefits LIFE Point Design Anklam--NAS/NAE, January 29, 2011NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt 3, 2011NIF-0111-20828s2.ppt 4 #12;Improvements to gain need to be weighed against cost impacts on affected

34

Removal of boron from wastewater of geothermal power plant by selective ion-exchange resins. 1: Batch sorption-elution studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron removal was studied using N-glucamine-type resins Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108. The resin Diaion CRB 02 exhibited a higher sorption capacity for boron removal from 0.01 M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} solution than did Purolite S 108. The presence of calcium, sodium, and chloride ions did not make a large interference on boron removal by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. The sorption behavior of these two chelating resins obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model. Kinetic tests were performed to find the mass transfer mechanism of the sorption process of boron by Diaion CRB 02 resin. Five kinetic models were applied to fit the kinetic data obtained by using glucamine type-resin Diaion CRB 02. The results showed that the rate-determining step is particle diffusion for boron removal by Diaion CRB 02. The quantitative stripping of boron from both chelating resins was obtained with either 0.05 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 0.1 M HCl solutions. Boron in wastewater of the Kizildere geothermal field was effectively removed by both Diaion CRB 02 and Purolite S 108 resins. Preliminary column tests showed that Diaion CRB 02 is a potential resin for column removal of boron from wastewater of a geothermal power plant.

Badruk, M. [MTA, Izmir (Turkey)] [MTA, Izmir (Turkey); Kabay, N.; Demircioglu, M. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering] [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering; Mordogan, H.; Ipekoglu, U. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering] [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Mineral Engineering

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

"1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130 "2. Indian River Operations","Coal","Indian River Operations Inc",795 "3. Edge Moor","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",723 "5. McKee Run","Gas","NAES Corporation",136 "6. NRG Energy Center Dover","Coal","NRG Energy Center Dover LLC",100 "7. Warren F Sam Beasley Generation Station","Gas","Delaware Municipal Electric Corp",48 "8. Christiana","Petroleum","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",45 "9. Van Sant Station","Gas","NAES Corporation",39

36

F I S C A L Y E A R 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O R T Agricultural Technology Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Intelligent Deboning System Pilgrim's Pride Corporation Tyson Foods, Inc. Wayne Farms LLC Intelligent Cooking Pilgrim's Pride Corporation Sanderson Farms Tip Top Poultry, Inc. Foreign Object Detection Technology Farms Inc. Michael Crump Pilgrim's Pride Corporation Ken Long Pilgrim's Pride Corporation John Naes

Löffler, Frank E.

37

The Engineer of 2020: Global Visions of Engineering Practice and Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40% more electrical capacity, 40% more gasoline, and 20% more natural gas than in 2000. · 50, less-technical engineering work (e.g., management, finance, marketing, policy) · The shift- technical and operational context #12;6 Results from a Survey of NAE Frontiers of Engineering Alumni

Agogino, Alice M.

38

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM |  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top Engineers to Investigate Cause of Oil Spill by Lauren Schenkman on July 13, 2010 6:02 PM | Investigations into the gulf oil disaster are multiplying. The National Academy of Engineering (NAE and industry engineers to take a technical look into the causes of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion and oil

Southern California, University of

39

Resolution of National Academy of Sciences technical issues at N Reactor; Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (Westinghouse Hanford) response documenting the scope required to address the 14 issues identified in the NAS/NAE technical recommendations that affect the N Reactor. The closure of the issues related to the N Reactor will provide the appropriate documentation to the DOE for certification of compliance.

Rainey, T.E.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently. Tanks containing highly alkaline radioactive waste are made of carbon steel. Use of an acid eluant may pose a hazard to the tank integrity (corrosion and associated structural damage) in the event of a spill, leak, etc. A non-acid eluant may be a viable alternative. It will eliminate the need for special acid handling requirements within the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently. Tanks containing highly alkaline radioactive waste are made of carbon steel. Use of an acid eluant may pose a hazard to the tank integrity (corrosion and associated structural damage) in the event of a spill, leak, etc. A non-acid eluant may be a viable alternative. It will eliminate the need for special acid handling requirements within the

42

TUV SUD America Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... non-acid electrolytes - Secondary lithium cells and batteries for portable ... Program Requirements Product Specification for Battery Charging Systems ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. 11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. Download Newsletter (May 2011) SHR.pub http://energy.gov/management/downloads/newsletter-may-2011-shrpub Article NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman http://energy.gov/articles/nas-nae-national-convocation-rising-above-gathering-storm-two-years-later-accelerating Download Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc.- EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

44

Image  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment, Assessment, 404(b) (1) Evaluation, and Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Permit Application #NAE 2008-410 Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 4 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................. 4 1.2 Overview of Proposed Action and Alternatives ...................................................... 6 1.3 Affected Environment/Function and Value of Resources Impacted ....................... 8 1.4 Environmental Consequences/Public Interest Impacts ............................................ 9 2. Purpose and Need for Action ........................................................................................................ 11

45

The Chemical Nature of Scaritoxin YONG-GOE JOH and PAUL J. SCHEUER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elution. The chloroform/methanol fraction (9:1) was further purified on a DEAE celulose column (Cellex D

46

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

47

Concentration of perrhenate and pertechnetate solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of preparing a concentrated solution of a carrier-free radioisotope which includes the steps of: a. providing a generator column loaded with a composition containing a parent radioisotope; b. eluting the generator column with an eluent solution which includes a salt of a weak acid to elute a target daughter radioisotope from the generator column in a first eluate. c. eluting a cation-exchange column with the first eluate to exchange cations of the salt for hydrogen ions and to elute the target daughter radioisotope and a weak acid in a second eluate; d. eluting an anion-exchange column with the second eluate to trap and concentrate the target daughter radioisotope and to elute the weak acid solution therefrom; and e. eluting the concentrated target daughter radioisotope from the anion-exchange column with a saline solution.

Knapp, Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beets, Arnold L. (Clinton, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Guhlke, Stefan (Bonn, DE)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: D, h&Z *_ --------------__ SITE NA,,E: -------- CITY: -%+&6!? -------------------------- STATE: CT cr: 13 ------ WNERL_S, Past: -------_____-----_-_____ current: -----------------------~-- Owner contacted q yes q no; if yes, date contacted / TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- J& Research & Development i \ 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis m Production e9 Facility Type p Manufacturing rJ University $ Research Organizat 0 Government Sponsor 0 Other I ------------ ,-, I I TFaLility Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, Contract/Purchase ~~~~---~~~_---~~~~---------- I OWNERSHiP: AEC/MED AECbED GOVT GOUT I CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR

49

Method of degrading trinitrotoluene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of eluting trinitrotoluene (TNT) from soil using a dispersant from bacterial intra-amoebic isolate 1s, ATCC 75229.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN); Vass, Arpad (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Technetium-99m generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generator system includes a sorbent column loaded with a composition containing {sup 99}Mo. The sorbent column has an effluent end in fluid communication with an anion-exchange column for concentrating {sup 99m}Tc eluted from the sorbent column. A method of preparing a concentrated solution of {sup 99m}Tc includes the general steps of: (a) providing a sorbent column loaded with a composition containing {sup 99}Mo, the sorbent column having an effluent end in fluid communication with an anion-exchange column; (b) eluting the sorbent column with a salt solution to elute {sup 99m}Tc from the sorbent and to trap and concentrate the eluted {sup 99m}Tc on the ion-exchange column; and (c) eluting the concentrated {sup 99m}Tc from the ion-exchange column with a solution comprising a reductive complexing agent. 1 fig.

Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Collins, E.D.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ruthton Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ruthton Wind Farm Ruthton Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ruthton Wind Farm Facility Ruthton Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lincoln County MN Coordinates 44.4039°, -96.2646° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4039,"lon":-96.2646,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-.. -.. 37qg: MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE =b-- FROM: ---L- _------__ u . SUBJECT: SITE ACl= ALTERNATE NAME: -_______-~-----------------NA~E:__( CITY:--~---------_-STATE:-~~ (2 OWNE!sI_SL f Past- L&cl= w ------------------- ----- Current- w buL.r - ------------ ownq cm-ltacted 0 yes @ "no; if yes, data cnntacte TYPE OF OPERATION -------------_~-~ q Research & Development 0 Production %.cale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production i2 Disposal/Storage 0 Facility T 0 Hanufac 0 Univerrj 0 .R esearc 0 Governm 14 Other 1 I lil IrJ y,/3 Prime 0 Other infcrkion Subcwkractbr (i.e., ?bst + fixed fee! &nit price, Cl Purchase Order time & mate

54

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

55

Framing the Energy Technology Menu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Future of Coal and Future of Coal and Nuclear Power Ernest J. Moniz Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems Director, MIT Energy Initiative EIA April 2008 2 NAE Engineering Achievement of the Twentieth Century l Electrification l Reflects both the technological challenge of this continent- scale system and the ubiquitous contribution to quality of life 3 Annual Per Capita Electricity Use (kWh) 4 MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change H. Jacoby and R. Prinn, co-directors 5 A NEW WHEEL with lower odds of EXTREMES What would we buy with STABILIZATION of CO 2 at 550 ppm? Compared with NO POLICY HOW CAN WE EXPRESS THE VALUE OF A CLIMATE POLICY UNDER UNCERTAINTY? http://web.mit.edu/globalchange/ 6 ATMOSPHERE 750 VEGETATION & SOILS 2,190 OCEAN 40,000 60.0 61.3

56

North Shaokatan Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Shaokatan Wind Farm North Shaokatan Wind Farm Facility North Shaokatan Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lincoln County MN Coordinates 44.393089°, -96.425042° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.393089,"lon":-96.425042,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Reviews News and Reviews Pulsed Power in the News Nuclear fusion simulation shows high-gain energy output (March 2012) Rapid-fire pulse brings Sandia Z method closer to goal of high-yield fusion reactor (April 2007) Ice created in nanoseconds by Sandia's Z machine (March 2007) Z-Machine Shockwaves Melt Diamond (November 2006) Phase diagram of water revised by Sandia researchers (October 2006) Z fires objects faster than Earth moves through space (June 6, 2005) Sandia imagists view imploding wire arrays on Z (November 10, 2004) Z's $61.7 million refurbishment to advance capabilities (October 21, 2004) Z produces fusion neutrons (April 7, 2003) Former shock physics manager (Asay) elected to NAE (February 20, 2003) Z-Beamlet image shows Z evenly compresses pellet (August 30, 2001)

58

EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

801: Final Environmental Impact 801: Final Environmental Impact EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire Granite Reliable Power, LLC, a subsidiary of Noble Environmental Power, has applied for a permit from the Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers for authorization to discharge dredged or fill materials into jurisdictional waters of the United States in connection with the proposed construction of a wind-driven electrical power generating facility in Coos County, New Hampshire. Environmental Assessment,404(b) (1) Evaluation, and Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Permit Application #NAE 2008-410, DOE/EA-1801 (2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1782: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0317-S1: Environmental Impact Statement, Appendices

59

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

60

ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Drug deposition and distribution in healthy and atherosclerotic arteries and in models of atherosclerosis following bulk or stent-based drug delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drug eluting stents have revolutionized the practice of medicine and the landscape of medical devices. Yet, more than four years after introduction clinical trial data and clinical use have still not fully clarified what ...

Vukmirovic, Neda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Plan for Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... QIAGEN MiniElute reduces salt levels in ... has a big effect (A 1-2 degree shift in temperature of the heat plate can ... Vial caps will transfer low levels ...

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

63

Troubleshooting: Strategies and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... QIAGEN MiniElute reduces salt levels in ... has a big effect (A 1-2 degree shift in temperature of the heat plate can ... Vial caps will transfer low levels ...

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advanced Topics in Forensic DNA Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... QIAGEN MiniElute reduces salt levels in ... has a big effect (A 1-2 degree shift in temperature of the heat plate can ... Vial caps will transfer low levels ...

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

Stent Thrombogenicity Early in High Risk Interventional Settings is Driven by Stent Design and Deployment, and Protected by Polymer-Drug Coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BackgroundStent thrombosis is a lethal complication of endovascular intervention. Concern has been raised about the inherent risk associated with specific stent designs and drug-eluting coatings, yet clinical and animal ...

Kolandaivelu, Kumaran

66

Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

Balakrishnan, Brinda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Luminal flow amplifies stent-based drug deposition in arterial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Treatment of arterial bifurcation lesions using drug-eluting stents (DES) is now common clinical practice and yet the mechanisms governing drug distribution in these complex morphologies are incompletely ...

Levine, Evan G.

68

A support vector machine model for the prediction of proteotypic peptides for accurate mass and time proteomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: The standard approach to identifying peptides based on accurate mass and elution time (AMT) compares profiles obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometer to a database of peptides previously identified from tandem mass spectrometry ...

Bobbie-Jo M. Webb-Robertson; William R. Cannon; Christopher S. Oehmen; Anuj R. Shah; Vidhya Gurumoorthi; Mary S. Lipton; Katrina M. Waters

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A support vector machine model for the prediction of proteotypic peptides for accurate mass and time proteomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: The standard approach to identifying peptides based on accurate mass and elution time (AMT) compares profiles obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometer to a database of peptides previously identified from tandem mass spectrometry ...

Bobbie-Jo M. Webb-Robertson; William R. Cannon; Christopher S. Oehmen; Anuj R. Shah; Vidhya Gurumoorthi; Mary S. Lipton; Katrina M. Waters

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Florida's 9th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom EarthFirst Technologies Inc Ecowind Freedom Wind Energy LLC Fuel Cells Technology Transit Idea One Inc Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS)...

71

Florida's 11th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida. Registered Energy Companies in Florida's 11th congressional district All Solar Power, Inc. ECO2 Asset Solutions ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom EarthFirst Technologies Inc...

72

Cette hypothse a t confirme par une srie d'essais. Des effets analogues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With a cooling centrifuge the wax matrix can be separated from the active ingre- #12;dients at -12°C. Further purification with florisil follows. After elution with acetone, separation takes place via gas chromatog- raphy

Recanati, Catherine

73

ADSORPTION PROCEDURE IN PREPARING U$sup 23$$sup 3$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for the separation of protoactinium and thorium from an aqueous nitric acid solution containing these metals. It comprises contacting the solution with a cation exchange phenol-formaldehyde resin containing sulfonic acid groups, and eluting the adsorbed thorium from the resin by means of aqueous nitric acid. Thereafter the adsorbed protoactinium is eluted from the resin by means of an aqueous solution of ammonium fluoride.

Stoughton, R.W.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Salt Processing Through Ion Exchange at the Savannah River Site Selection of Exchange Media and Column Configuration - 9198  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed, modeled, and tested several different ion exchange media and column designs for cesium removal. One elutable resin and one non-elutable resin were considered for this salt processing application. Deployment of non-elutable Crystalline Silicotitanate and elutable Resorcinol Formaldehyde in several different column configurations were assessed in a formal Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE). Salt solutions were selected that would allow a grouping of non-compliant tanks to be closed. Tests were run with the elutable resin to determine compatibility with the resin configuration required for an in-tank ion exchange system. Models were run to estimate the ion exchange cycles required with the two resins in several column configurations. Material balance calculations were performed to estimate the impact on the High Level Waste (HLW) system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Conceptual process diagrams were used to support the hazard analysis. Data from the hazard analysis was used to determine the relative impact on safety. This report will discuss the technical inputs, SEE methods, results and path forward to complete the technical maturation of ion exchange.

Spires, Renee; Punch, Timothy; McCabe, Daniel

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

75

Air quality implications associated with the selection of power plants in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

This assessment models emission inventories and pollutant emission rates for fossil fuel power plants. Ground-level air concentration of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and TSP are predicted. Pollutant deposition, non-acidic deposition, acidic deposition, ozone impacts, and visibility attenuation are considered. Human health effects, wildlife effects, effects on plants and crops, and residual environmental impacts are estimated from predicted emissions.

Baechler, M.C.; Glantz, C.S.; Edelmen, P.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

EIS-0214 - North Regional Power Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT FACT S~ET NEPA DOWENT This environment impact statement (EW) is issued under Section 102 (2) (C) of the National Environrnenti Poficy Act @EpA) at 42 U.S-C. 4321 Q a. s~ce ~anges to the Draft EE were rektively minor, BPA decided to pubtish the changes, comments, and responses as the Find EB rather than rewrite and cirtite the Draft EIS. NA~E AND LOCAHON OF H PROPOSAL '~ ALTERNAmS The original proponents and developers of the Northwest Regional Power Fa~ty were WA Resources, Inc. WA) and Central and South West Energy, hc. (CSWE). Recentiy the development agreement was amended to include ~T Power hc. The proponents have created a Limited Liabfity Company, WA Power LLC. WA Power LLC is composed of WA Resources he., and ~T Power hc. ~T Power kc., is a who~y-owned subsidiary of ~T kc., which is a who~y owned subsidiary of Wsas City Power and Light Company. References to WA and ~WE throughout this EIS

77

Metro Wind LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Wind Farm LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wind LLC Wind Farm Facility Metro Wind LLC Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Elk River - Sherbourne County MN Coordinates 45.379527°, -93.634011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.379527,"lon":-93.634011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Agassiz Beach Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Agassiz Beach Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Agassiz Beach Wind Farm Facility Agassiz Beach Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Clay County MN Coordinates 46.8844°, -96.5042° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.8844,"lon":-96.5042,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

What is believed about cold fusion?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1989, Fleischmann and Pons[1-5] claimed to initiate a fusion reaction between deuterons in palladium that resulted in an unusual amount of heat. This claim was rejected because insufficient supporting experimental information was provided, the claim was very difficult to replicate, and no plausible explanation could be proposed. During the 20 years since then, studies in at least 8 countries has provided a rich collection of information, improved reproducibility, and encouraged many explanations. This work has been reviewed by Storms[6] in 2007 based on over 1000 citations and will not be repeated here. This paper provides a brief and focused summary of what is believed to be true about the effect at the present time. Energy production in the form of heat is the most often investigated indication of a novel effect. The reported power ranges from a few milliwatts to over 100 watts with most studies reporting values at the low end of this range. The large range in values is caused by accidental creation of the necessary physical structures that are required to initiate the heat producing reactions, called the nuclear active environment (NAE). This environment requires a very large concentration of deuterons and involves structures having nano-sized dimensions. Although focus has been applied mostly to palladium, other elements are apparently involved.

Edmund Storms

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Spatial Imaging And Speciation of Lead in the Accumulator Plant Sedum Alfredii By Microscopically Focused Synchrotron X-Ray Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae), a species native to China, has been characterized as a Zn/Cd cohyperaccumulator and Pb accumulator though the mechanisms of metal tolerance and accumulation are largely unknown. Here, the spatial distribution and speciation of Pb in tissues of the accumulator plant was investigated using synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence and powder Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Lead was predominantly restricted to the vascular bundles of both leaf and stem of the accumulator. Micro-XRF analysis revealed that Pb distributed predominantly within the areas of vascular bundles, and a positive correlation between the distribution patterns of S and Pb was observed. The dominant chemical form of Pb (>60%) in tissues of both accumulating (AE) and nonaccumulating ecotype (NAE) S. alfredii was similar to prepared Pb-cell wall compounds. However, the percentage of the Pb-cell wall complex is lower in the stem and leaf of AE, and a small amount of Pb appeared to be associated with SH-compounds. These results suggested a very low mobility of Pb out of vascular bundles, and that the metal is largely retained in the cell walls during transportation in plants of S. alfredii.

Tian, S.; Lu, L.; Yang, X.; Webb, S.M.; Du, Y.; Brown, P.H.; /SLAC

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

MASIC: a software program for fast quantitation and flexible visualization of chromatographic profiles from detected LC-MS(/MS) features  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative analysis of liquid chromatography (LC)- mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data is essential to many proteomics studies. We have developed MASIC to accurately measure peptide abundances and LC elution times in low-resolution LC-MS/MS analyses. This software program uses an efficient processing algorithm to quickly generate mass specific selected ion chromatograms from a dataset and provides an interactive browser that allows users to examine individual chromatograms in a variety of fashions. The improved elution time estimates afforded by MASIC increase the utility of LC-MS/MS data in the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach to proteomics.

Monroe, Matthew E.; Shaw, Jason L.; Daly, Don S.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder: Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING THORIUM VALUES FROM URANIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved ion exchange method is described for recovery of uranium and thorium values as separate functions from an aqueous acidic solution containing less than 10/sup -3/ M thorium ions and between 0.1 and 1 M uranyl ions. The solution is passed through a bed of cation exchange resin in the acid form to adsorb all the thorium ions and a portion of the uranyl ions. The uranium is eluted by means of aqueous 0.1 to 0.4 M sulfuric acid. The thorium may then be stripped from the resin by elution with aqueous 0.5 M oxalic acid.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Schubert, J.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

PRODUCTION OF METALS AND THEIR COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Zirconium nitrate can be separated from hafnium nitrate by mixing the nitrates with ethyl cellulose pulp, eluting the mass with diethyl ether containing nitric acid, and passing the eluent through a column of cellulose pulp the outflow of which is substantially free of hafnium.

Arden, T.V.; Burstall, F.H.; Davies, G.R.; Linstead, R.P.; Wells, R.A.

1958-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

86

Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Testing for Cesium Removal from Hanford Tank Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

A new spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin was tested for efficacy of cesium removal from Hanford tank waste. Two spherical RF formulations, prepared by varying curing temperature, were tested. Both resins had a tight particle size distribution and a high degree of sphericity. Small-scale column testing (on {approx}20-mL resin beds) was conducted evaluating the cesium load profile with AZ-102 simulated tank waste and the cesium elution profile using 0.5 M HNO3 eluant. The load and elution profiles were compared in side-by-side testing with ground-gel RF resin and SuperLig? 644, the Waste Treatment Plant baseline ion exchanger. Although capacity was not as high at the other resins tested, the spherical RF resin met plant cesium loading requirements with the AZ-102 simulant matrix. Excellent reproducibility of cesium load and elution was demonstrated over three process cycles with no evidence of degraded performance. Residual cesium on the resin beds after elution was nearly a factor of 10 lower than that of the ground-gel RF and SuperLig? 644.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Blanchard, David L.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Thorson, Murray R.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Process for preparing radiopharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals is disclosed. The process comprises initially isolating technetium-99m pertechnetate by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing in a chromatographic column. The technetium-99m is then eluted from the packing with a biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical.

Barak, Morton (Walnut Creek, CA); Winchell, Harry S. (Lafayette, CA)

1977-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Butler, Thomas A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brihaye, Claude (Liege, BE)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

Weston, Ken

90

Development of an Automatic Method for Americium and Plutonium Separation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrochloric acid, and then plutonium is separated via on-column Pu- (IV) reduction to Pu(III) with titanium, and Elution of Pu. Plutonium in nitric medium presents a distribution relationship much higher thanDevelopment of an Automatic Method for Americium and Plutonium Separation and Preconcentration

Sánchez, David

91

Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

ADSORPTION-BISMUTH PHOSPHATE METHOD FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products. Plutonium and uranium are adsorbed by a cation exchange resin, plutonium is eluted from the adsorbent, and then, after oxidation to the hexavalent state, the plutonium is contacted with a bismuth phosphate carrier precipitate.

Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.W.; Boyd, G.E.

1960-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Supplemental Material Improved Sensitivity Mass Spectrometric Detection of Eicosanoids by Charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CN followed by centrifugation to remove precipitated protein (no solid phase extraction). 3) Elution Source Temp (o C) 130 130 Desolvation Temp (o C) 500 500 Desolvation Gas (L/Hr) 1100 1100 Cone Gas (L Gas (L/Hr) 900 900 Cone Gas (L/Hr) 0 0 Collision Cell Entrance (V) -5 -5 Collision Cell Exit (V) 0 0

Gelb, Michael

94

National Waste Processing Conference Proceedings ASME 1994 THERMOSELECT: ENERGY AND RAW MATERIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the form of an inert and non-toxic vitreous material that meets TCLP elution test standards (Tables II As Sulfide TCLP TCLP 0.07 mgtl 100.0 Cadmium, TCLP .01 mgtl 1.0 Chromium, TCLP 0.04 mgtl 5.0 Copper, TCLP 0.11 mgtl 100.0 Lead, TCLP

Columbia University

95

A-<  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

< < Enclosure 2 ..- Page 1 of 2 RECORDS DlSPOSrrlON AUTHORITY (k IrrEtnx;tmr wl ma^) DATE RECEIVED 1. FROM (AgbncyoreaWWmmt NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY DepamncntofErmyy . 1 4.. NA?$E OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5. TELEPHONE I 6 . A G t N C Y CtK l ItlCATION I ~ E a r t i f y t M I m ~ b 3 ~ f D T ~ . o 1 c 1 c y m ~ p b c . t r i n b . g t o t h e ~ o f ~ r s c o r e b u d t f r t t t h a r s c o r d r ~ f o r ~ m t h s d b e h d p r g s ( s ) w s n o t m n r c b d f o r t h a k a i n s r r o f t h b . g c n c y ~ w i l l n o t b s m d s d r r R t r t h s ~ p c w i o d r r p e c i f i e d ; P d m ~ a n c u r r s n o e f r a t h e ~ ~ D f f i a , w h p r w k a n s o f R t h 8 o f t h t GAO ktuunl for Guidance d Fsddnl Apsndro, Core Contract Records See attached description 115.109 NSN STANDARD FORM 115 (REV. 3.91) PREVIOUS EDITION NOT USABLE P-bul by NARA 36 CFR 1228 Enclosure 2 Page 2 of 2 (1) Unit - PNR Contracts and Security ~ivision (2) Description - Contracts for procurement of reactor cores,

96

Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX Candace Kairies, Carol Cardone, and Karl Schroeder U.S. Dept. of Energy, NETL, PO Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 KEYWORDS: extraction, mercury, fly ash, fluidized bed combustion, flue gas desulfurization Abstract Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. The fixed-bed column offers the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the

97

Detection system for a gas chromatograph. [. cap alpha. -methylnaphthalene,. beta. -methylnapthalene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam. 3 figures, 2 tables.

Hayes, J.M.; Small, G.J.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

Size-exclusion chromatography system for macromolecular interaction analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low pressure, microcomputer controlled system employing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) allows for precise analysis of the interaction of two reversibly associating macromolecules such as proteins. Since a macromolecular complex migrates faster than its components during size-exclusion chromatography, the difference between the elution profile of a mixture of two macromolecules and the summation of the elution profiles of the two components provides a quantifiable indication of the degree of molecular interaction. This delta profile is used to qualitatively reveal the presence or absence of significant interaction or to rank the relative degree of interaction in comparing samples and, in combination with a computer simulation, is further used to quantify the magnitude of the interaction in an arrangement wherein a microcomputer is coupled to analytical instrumentation in a novel manner.

Stevens, Fred J. (Downers Grove, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Detection system for a gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

Hayes, John M. (Ames, IA); Small, Gerald J. (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrographic study of Fe in bitumens derived from tar sands  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on bitumens extracted from tar sands from various locations (Utah, California, Kentucky, and Alberta) that were examined by size exclusion chromatography with on-line element-specific detection to study the Fe concentration as a function of size. In most cases, the resulting profiles exhibit unimodal distributions at relatively large molecular size with very similar times for maximum elution. specifically, Sunnyside (Utah) and McKittrick (California) tar-sand bitumens exhibited very intense maxima consistent with extremely high bulk Fe contents. Arroyo Grande (California) exhibited an additional maximum at very large molecular size. This size behavior of the Fe appears to correlate with the large molecular size Ni and V components eluted under the same conditions.

Reynolds, J.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Increasing Confidence of LC-MS Identifications by Utilizing Ion Mobility Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Ion mobility spectrometry in conjunction with liquid chromatography separations and mass spectrometry offers a range of new possibilities for analyzing complex biological samples. To fully utilize the information obtained from these three measurement dimensions, informatics tools based on the accurate mass and time tag methodology were modified to incorporate ion mobility spectrometry drift times for peptides observed in human serum. A reference human serum database was created using 12,139 peptides, tracking the monoisotopic mass, liquid chromatography normalized elution time, and ion mobility spectrometry drift time(s) for each peptide. We demonstrate that the use of three dimensions for peak matching during the peptide identification process resulted in increased numbers of identifications and lower false discovery rates relative to the use of only the mass and normalized elution time dimensions.

Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Payne, Samuel H.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Danielson, William F.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Method for dissolving plutonium oxide with HI and separating plutonium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

PuO.sub.2 -containing solids, particularly residues from incomplete HNO.sub.3 dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels, are dissolved in aqueous HI. The resulting solution is evaporated to dryness and the solids are dissolved in HNO.sub.3 for further chemical reprocessing. Alternatively, the HI solution containing dissolved Pu values, can be contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the Pu values to load the resin. The Pu values are selectively eluted from the resin with more concentrated HI.

Vondra, Benedict L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

The impact of vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected human endothelial cells on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,a Zhenggong Li, MD,b Yang Shen, PhD,a James C.-M. Lee, PhD,c and Qingsong Yu, PhD,c Chongqing, China-stent restenosis (ISR). A growing body of evidence suggests that drugs loaded on drug-eluting stents could impair (ECs).4 Moreover, drugs may also impair the circulation of endo- thelial progenitor cells for re

Lee, James

105

Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting. 3 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Method for detecting and diagnosing disease caused by pathological protein aggregation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for detecting pathological macromolecules in a patient, comprising obtaining body fluid from the patient, pretreating the body fluid, subjecting the pretreated body fluid to size-exclusion chromatography to create an excluded fluid, and analyzing the excluded fluid to detect macromolecules having a predetermined molecular weight. The method also allows for comparing elution spectra with reference spectra of suspect pathologic proteins.

Stevens, F.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Successful Coronary Stent Retrieval From a Pedal Artery  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to report complications from a coronary drug-eluting stent lost in the peripheral circulation. We report the case of successful retrieval of a sirolimus coronary stent from a pedal artery in a young patient who underwent coronary angiography for previous anterior myocardial infarction. Recognition of stent embolization requires adequate removal of the device to avoid unwelcome clinical sequelae.

Mariano, Enrica, E-mail: enrica_mariano@hotmail.com; Versaci, Francesco [Tor Vergata University, Department of Cardiology (Italy); Gandini, Roberto; Simonetti, Giovanni; Di Vito, Livio [Tor Vergata University, Department of Radiology (Italy); Romeo, Francesco [Tor Vergata University, Department of Cardiology (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ion exchange separation and mass spectrometric analysis of uranium for solutions containing plutonium  

SciTech Connect

An ion exchange technique separates plutonium from uranium using Dowex-1 resin and a methanol--HCl plutonium elutriant. The method is applicable to both trace uranium determination and uranium isotopic distribution analysis by mass spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for plutonium, and elution curves for uranium and plutonium are shown. For uranium analysis the percent relative standard deviation is 0.8 at 120-2400 micrograms uranium per gram plutonium and 5.0 at 5 micrograms uranium per gram plutonium. (auth)

McBride, K.C.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F (Oak Ridge, TN); Boll, Rose A (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

Beaton, R.H.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

1962-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of .sup.10 B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions.

Pollock, Charles W. (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Method for the concentration and separation of actinides from biological and environmental samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the quantitative recover of actinide values from biological and environmental sample by passing appropriately prepared samples in a mineral acid solution through a separation column of a dialkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate on an inert substrate which selectively extracts the actinide values. The actinide values can be eluted either as a group or individually and their presence quantitatively detected by alpha counting.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Tucson, AZ)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mid-year status report for TTP {number_sign}SR-1320-02 UST: Cs extraction testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to perform several tasks to provide transfer of technology to PNL concerning optimization of a cesium-specific ion exchange resin, developed at WSRC. The tasks support the development of a Compact Processing Unit (CPU) for Cs-removal from a variety of waste streams at Westinghouse Hanford (WH). In a series of experiments, WSRC has studied the behavior of a small column of the resin at various, increasingly greater flow rates with the HW simulant solution to determine an optimum column loading rate. Elution studies of the resin after saturation with Cs+ will generate an elution profile from which an optimum elution medium, flow rate, and volume can be determined. Small column tests at temperatures ranging from 40{degrees}C 80{degrees}C are planned but have not yet begun. Further, WSRC has begun a study in which the resin is subjected to ionizing radiation in a Co-60 source. This study will determine if any flammable or hazardous compounds, that might require special process controls, are formed as a result of irradiation. it will also define the ability of the resin to maintain its selectivity and capacity in a radiation field. During this period, a literature survey of the effects of radiation on this type of resin and similar compounds was initiated. For this survey, the extensive database established by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center at the University of Notre Dame is being used.

Bibler, J.P.

1993-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

Extraction and purification of fullerenes: A comprehensive review  

SciTech Connect

This review summarizes the advances of the last four years in the field of fullerenes purification. Purification involves extraction from soots, which may be considered as a prepurification step, and separation by liquid chromatography, where the different stationary phases tested are listed. The authors also describe other purification techniques, like elution on molecular sieves or activated charcoal, gel permeation, and supercritical fluids purification. The authors purpose is to show the reader the general trends for obtaining pure C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}.

Theobald, J.; Perrut, M. [Separex Chimie Fine, Champigneulles (France); Weber, J.V. [Universite De Metz (France)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effects of garlic on cellular doubling time and DNA strand breaks caused by UV light and BPL, enhanced with catechol and TPA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3T3 cell cultures were exposed to UV light and Beta-Propiolactone. Neoplastic cell transformation (TF) was demonstrated after concurrent addition of catechol, or repeated addition of TPA. Addition of garlic to all fluences/concentrations of the carcinogen/cocarcinogen/promoter groups reduced the number of transformed foci/dish by at least 40%. Since the cell cycle is prolonged following exposure to carcinogens, it is likely the cell requires a longer time to repair this damage. The doubling time (DT) was extended from 12 to 36 hrs. when cells were exposed to BPL and from 12 o 28 hrs. when cells were exposed to 3.0J/M2/sec. If an anticarcinogenic compound is also added, it is reasonable to assume that the cell cycle may be further elongated. The cell cycle, denoted by DT was lengthened from 12 to 47 hrs and from 12 to 86 hrs for BPL and UVC, respectively. The extensions occurred in a dope dependent manner. The concentrations of the cocarcinogen and promoter remained constant throughout the experiment. When strand breaks were determined at the same dose sequences, by alkaline elution, more repair was seen with garlic where the lowest and middle doses of BPL were used and almost no decrease in % DNA eluted was seen with UVC exposed cells. With catechol, there was a two-fold decrease in % DNA eluted at the lowest and middle fluences. When TPA was added, all three fluences of UVC showed more than a threefold decrease in % DNA eluted. BPS with both TPA and catechol, again showed a reduction in strand breaks only low and middle doses. Both a direct-acting alkylating agent, BPL, and a physical carcinogen, UVC, were homogeneously affected, in terms of doubling time, but not when strand break repair was examined. A separate mechanism may be responsible for repair, and the mechanism associated with combinations of physical carcinogen enhancing agents combined with some non-carcinogens may be more profoundly affected by some natural products.

Baturay, N.Z.; Gayle, F.; Liu, S.; Kreidinger, C.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lisic, Edward C. (Cookeville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Callahan, Alvin P. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lisic, Edward C. (Cookeville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Callahan, Alvin P. (Harriman, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Prsente pour obtenir le grade de DOCTEUR DE L'ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FeSO4 H2O, 0.1 g CoSO4, 0.1 g CaCl2, 0.1 g ZnSO4 7H2O, 0.01 g CuSO4, 0.01 g AlK(SO4)2 12H2O, 0.01 g H by direct addition of solid trichloroacetic acid (TCA) to 10% (wt/vol). Following overnight storage at 20°C solvent delivered from an isocratic pump. Gradient elution was per- formed at 200 nL/min and by increasing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

125

Recovery of transplutonium elements from nuclear reactor waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating actinide values from nitric acid waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels comprises oxalate precipitation of the major portion of actinide and lanthanide values to provide a trivalent fraction suitable for subsequent actinide/lanthanide partition, exchange of actinide and lanthanide values in the supernate onto a suitable cation exchange resin to provide an intermediate-lived raffinate waste stream substantially free of actinides, and elution of the actinide values from the exchange resin. The eluate is then used to dissolve the trivalent oxalate fraction prior to actinide/lanthanide partition or may be combined with the reprocessing waste stream and recycled.

Campbell, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Buxton, Samuel R. (Wartburg, TN)

1977-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

825 THE TECHNIQUE OF BLADDER IMPLANTATION: FURTHER RESULTS AND AN ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JuLL (1951) suggested that the surgical introduction of a pellet containing a test chemical into the lumen of the mouse bladder might be useful for routine testing for carcinogenic activity. The method, it was thought, would possess the following advantages: (i) the chemical would be slowly eluted from the pellet and would therefore remain in contact with the bladder epithelium for a prolonged period; (ii) the metabolic processes of the liver, etc., would be by-passed, and (iii) the bladder would function under approximately normal conditions. Bladder implantation has been used successfully in Leeds (Bonser, Clayson

D. B. Clayson; J. A. S. Pringle; G. M. Bonser; M. Wood

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff  

SciTech Connect

The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

MODELING ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL  

SciTech Connect

The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig? 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig? 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for highpotassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowestpotassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ?cesium bleed? is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual postelution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

Hang, T.; Nash, C.; Aleman, S.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Agonist-activated angiotensin II receptor is associated with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in bovine adrenal cortex  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have shown that high affinity binding of the agonist Angiotensin II (Ang II) to adrenal cortex receptors was modulated by guanine nucleotides. In contrast, the antagonist (/sup 1/SAR,/sup 8/Ile) Ang II (SARILE) did not display any sensitivity toward guanine nucleotides. The authors have observed already after solubilization in octyl-glucoside and size-exclusion HPLC that agonist (/sup 131/I) (/sup 1/SAR) Ang II (SARANG)-stabilized receptor complex behaved as a larger protein than the antagonist (/sup 125/I)SARILE-stabilized receptor. Their purpose was to assay the direct association of a guanine nucleotide binding protein to the agonist-occupied Ang II receptor using (/sup 35/S) guanosine-thio-triphosphate (GTP-..gamma..-s) as a probe of the regulation protein. Adrenal cortical membrane receptors were activated with 10/sup -6/ M SARANG, solubilized and fraction marked on DEAE-agarose, then on size-exclusion HPLC. Fractionated samples were assayed with (/sup 35/S)-GTP-..gamma..-s. They found that a (/sup 35/S)GTP-..gamma..-s binding protein peak coeluted with the agonist-occupied receptor peak, while it disappeared in absence of agonist and eluted presumably free in a higher elution volume. Their results demonstrated directly the coupling of a guanine-nucleotide binding protein to the agonist-activated Ang II receptor.

Berardi, M.; Ong, H.; De Lean, A.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

Tompkins, E.R.

1959-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Chemistry and structure of coal-derived asphaltenes, Phase II. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1977. [15 refs  

SciTech Connect

Separations of Synthoil liquefied coal by solvent fractionation and high pressure liquid chromatography have been compared. Solvent fractionation is believed to give more distinctive fractions. The asphaltene fraction obtained by use of hplc was found to be a mixture of resin, asphaltene, carbene, and carboid. Solvent elution chromatrogrphy of asphaltenes on silica gel has been scaled up, and recoveries of 98-99 wt. % are generally obtained. VPO molecular weight studies of coal asphaltenes, as a function of concentration, in the solvents benzene and THF indicate that association of asphaltenes takes place in both solvents, but is more significant in benzene. Structural parameters obtained from modified Brown-Ladner treatment of proton NMR data suggest that solvent fractions: oil, resin, asphaltene, and carboid have structural characteristics which are sequentially related. X-ray diffraction patterns for asphaltene, carbene, and carboid fractions reveal progressively sharpened (002) and (11) bands indicative of increasing carbonization in this series. Methyl iodide addition to a basic fraction of Synthoil asphaltene (diethyl ether-eluted from silica gel) suggests, in conjunction with infrared results, that essentially all of the nitrogen in this fraction is present in basic pyridine-like compounds.

Yen, T. F.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Chemical Properties of Elements 99 and 100 [Einsteinium and Fermium  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A description of some of the chemical properties and of the methods used in the separations of elements 99 [Einsteinium] and 100 [Fermium] are given. The new elements exhibit the properties expected for the tenth and eleventh actinide elements. Attempts to produce an oxidation state greater than III of element 99 have been unsuccessful. In normal aqueous media only the III state of element 100 appears to exist. The relative spacings of the elution peaks of the new elements in some separations with ion exchange resin columns are the same as the relative spacings of the homologous lanthanide elements. The results of experiments involving cation exchange resins with very concentrated hydrochloric acid eluant show that the new elements, like the earlier actinides, are more strongly complexed than the lanthanides. The new elements also exist partially as anions in concentrated hydrochloric acid, as do earlier actinide elements, and they may be partially separated from each other by means of ion exchange resins. With some eluants interesting reversals of elution positions are observed in the region Bk-Cf-99-100, indicating complex ion formation involving unusual factors.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Harvey, B. G.; Choppin, G. R.

1954-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination  

SciTech Connect

Principal conclusions are: CsI(Tl) provides sufficient pulse shape discrimination for use in the flow-cell detector. However, an improved method of coating is needed to extend the useful life of a detection cell. Of the activation/fission products investigated, only the co-elution of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 63}Ni produced a radiological interference. Tritium (and presumably other non-ionic radioisotopes) can be separated during the loading of the solution onto the pre- concentration column. Natural U (and/or decay products) produced a radiological interference with {sup 90}Sr. This is a potential problem. No potential radiological interferences were observed with {sup 223}Th. Chemical interferences were observed to some degree for all the chemicals tested except for the chloride solutions, NaCl and KCl, and the sulfate solution, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The specific interference effects were decreased detection efficiencies and changes in peak elution times. The NEL`s (non-observable effects loadings) are tentative targets for development of sample processing protocols, which is the next phase of the work.

DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.; Roane, J.E. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Systems Engineering; Leyba, J.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Branton, S.D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

LARGE SCALE METHOD FOR THE PRODUCTION AND PURIFICATION OF CURIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large-scale process for production and purification of Cm/sup 242/ is described. Aluminum slugs containing Am are irradiated and declad in a NaOH-- NaHO/sub 3/ solution at 85 to 100 deg C. The resulting slurry filtered and washed with NaOH, NH/sub 4/OH, and H/sub 2/O. Recovery of Cm from filtrate and washings is effected by an Fe(OH)/sub 3/ precipitation. The precipitates are then combined and dissolved ln HCl and refractory oxides centrifuged out. These oxides are then fused with Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and dissolved in HCl. The solution is evaporated and LiCl solution added. The Cm, rare earths, and anionic impurities are adsorbed on a strong-base anfon exchange resin. Impurities are eluted with LiCl--HCl solution, rare earths and Cm are eluted by HCl. Other ion exchange steps further purify the Cm. The Cm is then precipitated as fluoride and used in this form or further purified and processed. (T.R.H.)

Higgins, G.H.; Crane, W.W.T.

1959-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

137

Unfolding mechanism and the free energy landscape of a single stranded DNA i-motif  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present Molecular Dynamics simulations of a single stranded unprotonated DNA i-motif in explicit solvent. Our results indicate that the native structure in non-acidic solution at 300 K is unstable and completely vanishes on a time scale up to 10 ns. Two unfolding mechanisms with decreasing connectivity between the initially interacting nucleobases can be identified where one pathway is characterized as entropically more favorable. The entropic preference can be mainly explained by strong water ordering effects due to hydrogen bonds for several occurring structures along the pathways. Finally we are able to indicate via free energy calculations the most stable configurations belonging to distinct hairpin structures in good agreement to experimental results.

Smiatek, Jens; Liu, Dongsheng; Heuer, Andreas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing a new fuel cell membrane for vehicles that relies on cheaper and more abundant materials than those used in current fuel cells. Conventional fuel cells are very acidic, so they require acid-resistant metals like platinum to generate electricity. The University of Delaware is developing an alkaline fuel cell membrane that can operate in a non-acidic environment where cheaper materials like nickel and silver, instead of platinum, can be used. In addition to enabling the use of cheaper metals, the University of Delawares membrane is 500 times less expensive than other polymer membranes used in conventional fuel cells.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Chemistry and stoichiometry of wood liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approximate stoichiometry of liquefaction, from data of two PDU runs and a laboratory run is Wood (100 g) + CO (0.1 - 0.4 Mol) ..-->.. CO/sub 2/ (0.5 - 1.0 Mol) + H/sub 2/O (0.4 - 0.8 Mol) + Product (55 - 64 g). Product includes wood oil, water soluble organics and residues. Water is formed by decomposition, carbon dioxide by decomposition and reduction of wood oxygen by CO. Aqueous products include many carboxylic acids plus a roughly equal percentage of non-acids. The wood oil is divided into a neutral fraction and three phenolic fractions of varying molecular weight. Some specific compounds found in water and oil phases are listed.

Davis, H.G.; Kloden, D.J.; Schaleger, L.L.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

JGI - Why Sequence Hyperthermophilic Archaea?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyperthermophilic Archaea? Hyperthermophilic Archaea? The hyperthermophile genus Pyrobaculum represents a unique clade among the archaea because its cultured members respire toxic metals such as arsenic and selenium, sulfur compounds, ferric (Fe(III)) iron, nitrate, and oxygen. Pyrobaculum species are also capable of chemolithotrophic and organotrophic growth. In contrast to the emerging crenarchaeal model Sulfolobus, which is an acidophilic obligate aerobe, Pyrobaculum provides an alternative archaeal system to investigate biological processes in non-acidic, aerobic/anaerobic, high-temperature environments. This project involves sequencing multiple Pyrobaculum genomes, which will significantly advance the genus's establishment as a model system. Unfortunately, the first member of this genus to be sequenced, P. aerophilum, is not easily

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CHARACTERIZATION OF CYCLED SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents characterization data for two spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin beds that had processed cesium in non-radioactive and radioactive cycles. All column cycle operations for the resin beds including loading, displacements, elution, regeneration, breakthroughs, and solution analyses are reported in Nash and Duignan, 2009a. That report covered four ion exchange (IX) campaigns using the two {approx}11 mL beds in columns in a lead-lag arrangement. The first two campaigns used Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 2F nonradioactive simulant while the latter two were fed with actual dissolved salt in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. Both radioactive cycles ran to cesium breakthrough of the lead column. The resin beds saw in excess of 400 bed volumes of feed in each cycle. Resin disposal plans in tank farm processing depend on characterizations of resin used with actual tank feed. Following a final 30 bed volume (BV) elution with nitric acid, the resin beds were found to contain detectable chromium, barium, boron, aluminum, iron, sodium, sulfur, plutonium, cesium, and mercury. Resin affinity for plutonium is important in criticality safety considerations. Cesium-137 was found to be less than 10E+7 dpm/g of resin, similar to past work with sRF resin. Sulfur levels are reasonably consistent with other work and are expected to represent sulfur chemistry used in the resin manufacture. There were low but detectable levels of technetium, americium, and curium. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) work on the used (eluted) resin samples showed significant contents of mercury, barium, and chromium. One resin sample exceeded the TCLP level for mercury while the other metals were below TCLP levels. TCLP organics measurements indicated measurable benzene in one case, though the source was unknown. Results of this work were compared with other work on similar sRF resin characterizations in this report. This is the first work to quantify mercury on sRF resin. Resin mercury content is important in plans for the disposition of used sRF resin. Mercury speciation in high level waste (HLW) is unknown. It may be partly organic, one example being methyl mercury cation. Further study of the resin's affinity for mercury is recommended.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusions (CX)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEPA NEPA National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations CX Posting No. Project Title Posted DOE-ID-13-085 Organic Speciation and Interactions in ALSEP - One Step Partitioning Process of Minor Actinides, Lanthanides, and Fission Products - Oregon State University - 15 Kb 12/12/13 DOE-ID-13-084 Enhancement of the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater - University of Maryland - 13 Kb 12/11/13 DOE-ID-13-082 Long-Term Prediction of Emissivity of Structural Material for High Temperature Reactor Systems - University of Missouri - 13 Kb 12/10/13 DOE-ID-13-081 Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoximebased Sorbents - University of Idaho - 14 Kb 12/06/13 DOE-ID-13-080 Glass Composition and Solution Effects on Stage III Dissolution - Pennsylvania State University - 12 Kb 12/06/13

143

FE Press Releases and Techlines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 14, 2012 November 14, 2012 Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease Washington, DC - A new stent that incorporates an innovative metal alloy developed by scientists at Boston Scientific Corporation and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received European approval for use in the treatment of certain peripheral arterial diseases. Initially developed for use as a coronary stent, the new PROMUS ELEMENT™ PLUS BTK drug-eluting stent system is designed for treatment of critical limb ischemia, a severe obstruction of arteries within the extremities which reduces blood flow and can damage tissues. November 9, 2012 Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery

144

Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease November 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new stent that incorporates an innovative metal alloy developed by scientists at Boston Scientific Corporation and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received European approval for use in the treatment of certain peripheral arterial diseases. Initially developed for use as a coronary stent, the new PROMUS ELEMENT™ PLUS BTK drug-eluting stent system is designed for treatment of critical limb ischemia, a severe obstruction of arteries within the extremities which reduces blood flow and can damage tissues. Restoring and maintaining peripheral blood flow in

145

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-052 Chicago EC B3-6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 SECTION A. Project Title: Development of Novel Porous Sorbents for Extraction of Uranium from Seawater - The University of Chicago SECTION B. Project Description The University of Chicago proposes to develop highly porous sorbents for the extraction of uranium from seawater. This will be accomplished through design and investigation of new multifunctional uranyl chelators and engineering on nanoporous supports that facilitate cooperative sorbent interactions. Once candidate materials have been synthesized, they will be evaluated for uranium binding capacities, selectivity, uptake and elution kinetics, durability, and reusability. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact Radioactive Material Use - It is expected that 2 grams of depleted uranium will be used each year. The depleted uranium is

146

Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-call scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination: Topical report, September 15, 1996--October 3, 1996, Tasks 1.11, 1.12 and 1.13  

SciTech Connect

Several flow-cell radiation detector systems are commercially available for quantification of aqueous radioactive solutions. These systems do not use the technique of pulse shape discrimination to identify the incident radiation and therefore are limited in environmental characterization application when coupled to an ion chromatography system. The advantages of the pulse shape discriminating flow-cell detector over the commercially available systems include: (1) lower minimum detectable activity for alpha radiation, (2) reduced radiological interferences that may exist between co-eluted alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides, and (3) possible isotopic information from the ion chromatography system. For Tasks 1.1.1 and 1.1.2 of this project, several scintillation materials were investigated for pulse shape (alpha and beta) discrimination capabilities and the best candidate material was optimized. In addition, the following detector properties were also optimized: scintillator particle size, flow-cell tubing type, and electromagnetic as well as optical crosstalk between the photomultiplier tubes.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide in the guinea pig spleen  

SciTech Connect

The presence of immunoreative ANP precursor-like material in the guinea pig spleen is suggested. This is based on the following experimental evidence: An acidic extract of guinea pig spleen analyzed by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration contained 4.6 pmol/g wet tissue immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (IR-ANP), IR-ANP coeluting with 15 kDa synthetic ANP (2-126). Gel filtrated IR-ANP material was further submitted to reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and monitored by radioimmunoassay employing two antisera. One antiserum recognizes the C-terminal of ANP (1-126), the second is directed against the N-terminal sequence. Both antisera revealed material eluting with synthetic ANP (2-126). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis suggests this ANP-like material to be localized mainly at the periphery of the white pulp of the spleen. These findings link ANP with the immune system.

Vollmar, A.M.; Friedrich, A.; Schulz, R. (Univ. of Munich (Germany, F.R.))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comparison of methods for leaching heavy metals from composts  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the determination of total iron, copper, zinc, chromium, nickel, lead, cadmium and mercury contents in the compost obtained from sorted municipal organic solid waste applying the following methods of sample mineralization: 40% hydrofluoric acid with preliminary incineration of a sample, a mixture of concentrated nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids with preliminary incineration of organic matter and a mixture of nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids without sample incineration. The speciation analysis of Tessier was used to estimate the bioavailability of the metals. Elution degrees of the mobile forms of the metals from the compost with 10% nitric(V) acid and 1 mol/dm{sup 3} hydrochloric acid were compared. The contents of the elements in the eluates were determined applying atomic absorption spectrometry.

Ciba, Jerzy; Zolotajkin, Maria; Kluczka, Joanna; Loska, Krzysztof; Cebula, Jan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Assessment report on the kinetics of radionuclide adsorption on Yucca Mountain tuff  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of sorption was measured by observing the uptake of radionuclides by tuff wafers and crushed tuff as a function of time. In addition, the broadening of breakthrough curves for cations eluted through crushed-tuff columns was interpreted in terms of adsorption kinetics. The results of these measurements are consistent with a diffusion-limited adsorption mechanism for simple cations, such as strontium, cesium, and barium. The adsorption kinetics for these simple cations is sufficiently fast so that equilibrium can be assumed for the retardation of these chemical species in the groundwater velocities that would be reasonable for most release scenarios. The actinides, in particular plutonium, exhibited a slow time dependence for adsorption. 23 refs., 61 figs., 12 tabs.

Rundberg, R.S.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

URANIUM RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCTION OF HIGH PURITY URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described wherein an anionic exchange technique is employed to separate uramium from a large variety of impurities. Very efficient and economical purification of contamimated uranium can be achieved by treatment of the contaminated uranium to produce a solution containing a high concentration of chloride. Under these conditions the uranium exists as an aniomic chloride complex. Then the uranium chloride complex is adsorbed from the solution on an aniomic exchange resin, whereby a portion of the impurities remain in the solution and others are retained with the uramium by the resin. The adsorbed impurities are then removed by washing the resin with pure concentrated hydrochloric acid, after which operation the uranium is eluted with pure water yielding an acidic uranyl chloride solution of high purity.

Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Grinstead, R.R.

1957-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

154

METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

Poirier, R.H.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Use of Chelex-100 for selectively removing Y-90 from its parent Sr-90  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively removing yttrium-90 from its parent strontium-90 contained in an environmental sample includes loading the sample onto a column containing a chelating ion-exchange resin capable of retaining yttrium-90; washing the column with a solution capable of removing strontium, calcium, and other contaminants from the yttrium-90 fraction retained on the column; removing excess acetate salts from the column; eluting yttrium-90 solution from the column and adjusting the pH of this solution to about 2.7; filtering the yttrium-90 solution and weighing this solution for gravimetric yield; and, counting the yttrium-90 containing solution with a radiological counter for a time sufficient to achieve the statistical accuracy desired. It is preferred that the chelating ion-exchange resin is a bidente ligand having the chemical name iminodiacetic acid mounted on a divinyl benzene substrate, converted from sodium form to ammonia form.

Huntley, Mark W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

DePaoli, David W. (Knoxville, TN); Hu, Michael Z. (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Clavier, John W. (Elizabethton, TN)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Use of Chelex-100 for selectively removing Y-90 from its parent Sr-90  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively removing yttrium-90 from its parent strontium-90 contained in an environmental sample includes loading the sample onto a column containing a chelating ion-exchange resin capable of retaining yttrium-90; washing the column with a solution capable of removing strontium, calcium, and other contaminants from the yttrium-90 fraction retained on the column; removing excess acetate salts from the column; eluting yttrium-90 solution from the column and adjusting the pH of this solution to about 2.7; filtering the yttrium-90 solution and weighing this solution for gravimetric yield; and, counting the yttrium-90 containing solution with a radiological counter for a time sufficient to achieve the statistical accuracy desired. It is preferred that the chelating ion-exchange resin is a ligand having the chemical name iminodiacetic acid mounted on a divinyl benzene substrate, converted from sodium form to ammonia form.

Huntley, M.W.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for the separation of protactinium values from an aqueous solution containing Pa and Th values comprising establishing in the solution a HCl concentration of from 4 to 11 molar, contacting the resulting solution with an anion-exchange adsorbent, such as a polystyrene divinyl benzene polymer with quatenary amines as the active exchange group, to effect the adsorption of Pa values upon the adsorbent while leaving Th values in the solution, and then washlng the separated Pa bearing adsorbent with an aqueous solution of HCl of less than 4M to exclusively elute Pa values from the adsorbent. If hexavalent U values are contained in the original solution thcy are adsorbed on the resin together with Pa. A separation is offected chromatographically by percolating the resin with aqueous HCl.

Kraus, K.A.; Moore, G.E.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electronically programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity. 6 figs.

Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

1988-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effects of Resin Particle Size and Solution Temperature on SuperLig(R) 644 Resin Performance with AN-105 Simulate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the SuperLig(R) 644 resin loading and elution was evaluated at 25, 35, and 45 degree C using a single-column containing 2.25 g of oven-dry, hydrogen form of SuperLig(R) 664 resin. A simulated Envelope A solution was used to mimic the composition of low-activity waste solution from Tank 241-AN-105 supernate in the Hanford Site waste tank. The simulant was spiked with small quantities of trace metals (cadmium, chromium, iron, and lead) to evaluate the effects of these metals on cesium sorption. The results from column tests performed at 25, 35, and 45 degree C showed that more than 100 BVs of simulated Envelope A solution could be processed at each temperature before 50 percent breakthrough of the cesium occurred.

Nash, C.A.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to miniaturize the height of a distillation tower for the detritiation of waste water from fusion reactors, two experiments were conducted: (1) liquid frontal chromatography of tritium water eluting through an adsorption column and (2) water distillation using a column packed with adsorbent particles. The height of the distillation tower depends on the height equivalent to a theoretical plate, HETP, and the equilibrium isotope separation factor, {alpha}{sub H-T}{sup equi}. The adsorption action improved not only HETP but also {alpha}{sub H-T}{sup equi}. Since the adsorption-distillation method proposed here can shorten the tower height with keeping advantages of the distillation, it may bring an excellent way for miniaturizing the distillation tower to detritiate a large amount of waste water from fusion reactors.

Fukada, Satoshi [Kyushu University (Japan)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of CHELEX-100{reg_sign} for radionuclide purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively removing yttrium-90 from its parent strontium-90 contained in an environmental sample includes loading the sample onto a column containing a chelating ion-exchange resin capable of retaining yttrium-90; washing the column with a solution capable of removing strontium, calcium and other contaminants from the yttrium-90 fraction retained on the column; removing excess acetate salts from the column; eluting yttrium-90 solution from the column and adjusting the pH of this solution to about 2.7; filtering the yttrium-90 solution and weighting this solution for gravimetric yield; and, counting the yttrium-90 containing solution with a radiological counter for a time sufficient to achieve the statistical accuracy desired. It is preferred that the chelating ion-exchange resin is a bidente ligand having the chemical name iminodiacetic acid mounted on a divinyl benzene substrate, converted from sodium form to ammonia form. Its name is Chelex-100{reg_sign}.

Huntley, M.W.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

CX-002884: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002884: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low pH Resin Batch Contact Work CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde organic resin (MSDS # 36589) will be contacted with various chemical solutions so that adsorption and desorption of cesium, potassium, mercury, and other metal ions can be measured. Solutions are Savannah River National Laboratory (on site) generated simulants of Savannah River Site tank salt wastes or are elution reagents. This work does not involve any radioactive material. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002884.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination

167

Report on Qiagen Columns with Precipitation versus Packed Bed Technology for Trace Amounts of DNA  

SciTech Connect

The assured limit of detection (LOD), where 100% of the PCR assays are successful, for the Qiagen spin column is dramatically improved when combined with an ethanol precipitation step of the eluted sample. A detailed SOP for the ethanol precipitation was delivered as a separate report. A key finding in the precipitation work was to incubate the ethanol precipitation at -20{sup o}C overnight when concentrating low copy number samples. Combining this modified ethanol precipitation with the Qiagen spin columns, the limit of assured detection was improved by 1-2 orders of magnitude, for the aliquot and assay variables used. The lower limit of detection (defined as when at least 1 assay of 1 aliquot was positive) was only improved by approximately 1 order of magnitude. The packed bed process has the potential of a 20-fold improvement in the limit of detection compared to Qiagen plus precipitation, based on a mass balance analysis for the entire DNA concentration and purification processes. Figure ES1 shows a mass balance for all the DNA processing steps. The packed bed process minimizes losses from elution, precipitation, and pipetting (aliquoting and transferring). Figure ES1 assumes that 100 copies of DNA serve as the input sample. Efficiencies for each step have been estimated based on our experiences or a worst case scenario (for example, a 50% loss was assumed for pipetting). Table ES1 summarizes the number of copies that are the input template for PCR assuming 100 copies of DNA are processed through the three options detailed in Figure ES1.Theoretically a 20-fold increase in the number of starting copies in the PCR reaction is gained when the DNA is concentrated, purified and then amplified directly on the surface of the beads in the packed bed.

Wheeler, E K; Erler, A M; Seiler, A

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Analytical Methods for Malachite Green : Completion Report : Malachite Green Analysis in Water.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Malachite green is a known teratogen and therefore its use is limited to nonfood fish under an Investigational New Animal Drug permit (INAD), number 2573. Although a charcoal adsorption column was developed to remove malachite green from hatchery water, INAD compliance requires that the malachite green residue concentrations in any effluent from hatcheries using the chemical be quantified. Therefore, we developed a method for the analysis of malachite green residues in water. Enrichment of the residues of malachite green in water on a diol column followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) analysis gives a minimum sensitivity of less than 10 ppb for the chemical. When combined with post-column oxidation using a lead oxide post-column reactor, the procedure can be used for the simultaneous analysis of malachite green in its leuco form, a decomposition product of the dye, as well as its chromatic form. Recovery of the leuco form is pH dependent and water samples should be adjusted to pH 6 to optimize recovery of this form. Water samples spiked with malachite green were concentrated on a diol column followed by elution with 0.05 M p-toluene sulfonic acid in methanol. The methanol elutes were analyzed by HPLC. Pond water samples spiked with malachite green and leuco malachite green yielded average recoveries of 95.4% for malachite green and 57.3% for leuco malachite green. Tap water samples spiked with the carbinol form of malachite green gave average recoveries of 98.6%. The method is very sensitive and is capable of detecting malachite green residues in water at less than 10 ppb. Fish culturists, who cannot find an effective replacement for malachite green, can utilize the method to ensure that their effluents comply with INAD regulations. 13 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Allen, John L.; Gofus, Jane E.; Meinertz, Jeffery R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pilot-Scale Fermentation and Laboratory Nutrient Studies on Mixed-Acid Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Via mixed-culture fermentation, the MixAlcoTM produces carboxylic acids, which are chemically converted into industrial chemicals and hydrocarbon fuels. Using pilot fermentation data, The Continuum Particle Distribution Model (CPDM) overestimated acid concentration (3090% error) but more closely estimated conversion (50%. To analyze fermentation data with semi-continuous streams, the Slope method calculates the average flowrate of material from the slope of the moving cumulative sum with respect to time. Although the Slope method does not significantly improve accuracy, it dramatically reduces error compared to traditional techniques (>40% vs. <2%). Nutrients are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. For a four-bottle fermentation train, five nutrient contacting patterns (single-point nutrient addition to Fermentors F1, F2, F3, F4, and multi-point parallel addition) were investigated. Compared to the traditional nutrient contacting method (all nutrients fed to F1), the near-optimal feeding strategies improved exit yield, culture yield, process yield, exit acetate-equivalent yield, conversion, and total acid productivity by approximately 31%, 39%, 46%, 31%, 100%, and 19%, respectively. To estimate nitrogen concentration profiles, a segregated-nitrogen model uses separate mass balances for solid- and liquid-phase nitrogen; the nitrogen reaction flux between phases is assumed to be zero. Using five fermentation trains, each with a different nutrient contacting pattern, the model predictions capture basic behavior; therefore, it is a reasonable tool for estimating and controlling nitrogen profiles. To determine the optimal scenario for mixed-acid fermentations, an array of batch fermentations was performed that independently varied the C/N ratio and the blend of carbohydrate (office paper) and nutrient (wet chicken manure (CM)). Reactant was defined as non-acid volatile solids (NAVS). C/N ratios were based on non-acid carbon (CNA). A blend of 93% paper and 7% wet CM (dry basis) with a C/N ratio of 37 g CNA/g N had the highest culture yield (0.21 g acidproduced/g NAVSinitial), total acid productivity (0.84 g acidproduced/(Lliqd)), and conversion (0.43 g NAVSconsumed/g NAVSinitial).

Smith, Aaron Douglas

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Genome sequence of the ocean sediment bacterium Saccharomonospora marina type strain (XMU15T)  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomonospora marina Liu et al. 2010 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Organisms belonging to the genus are usually Gram-positive staining, non-acid fast, and classify among the actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis and S. azurea, S. marina is the third member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced (permanent draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,965,593 bp long chromosome with its 5,727 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Potter, Gabriele [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Li, Wen-Jun [Yunnan University, Kunming, China; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Electroactive Materials for Anion Separation - Technetium from Nitrate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) exist as anions. These include the high priority pollutants chromate, pertechnetate, and nitrate ions. In addition, there are also industrial and urban applications where the separation of anionic species from aqueous streams is critical. Examples include industrial water recycle and waste water treatment (e.g., chloride ion removal for the pulp and paper industry, borate ion in the chemical and nuclear industries) and drinking water and agricultural waste treatment (e.g., nitrate removal). In the proposed research, technetium is chosen as the target pollutant. Because of its half-life of 213,000 years, technetium (99Tc) presents a long-term hazard for waste disposal. Much of the 99Tc in the tank wastes is present as pertechnetate (TcO4-), accounting for its high solubility and mobility in aqueous systems. Several sorbents are available for removing TcO4- from alkaline waste brines, but each has important drawbacks. The use of commercial ion exchange (IX) resins to extract TcO4-, e.g., Reillex{trademark}-HPQ (Reilly Industries) and ABEC 5000 (Eichrom Industries), generates significant secondary waste. The elution of TcO4- from Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins requires either concentrated nitric acid or a concentrated caustic solution of ethylene-diamine containing a small amount of tin chloride. This eluant has a short shelf life requiring frequent preparation, and the 99Tc is delivered in a complexed, reduced form. While TcO4- can be eluted from ABEC 5000 resins using de-ionized water, the much-reduced capacity of ABEC 5000 resins in comparison to the Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins leads to a low column capacity. In general, unwanted secondary wastes are generated because (1) the only effective eluant happens to be hazardous and/or (2) the IX material has a low capacity or selectivity for the target ion, resulting in more frequent elution and column replacements. Alternative IX materials that have high capacities, can be regenerated easily, and are highly selective for TcO4- would avoid these problems. Electrochemically active IX media meet these criteria. Such an IX system uses electrically induced changes in the media to expel sorbed ions through a charge imbalance rather than requiring chemical eluants to ''strip'' them. Therefore, this medium eliminates the need to prepare, store, and dispose of many of the process chemicals normally required for IX operations. The focus of the project is to develop a fundamental understanding of how the physical and chemical properties of electroactive ion exchange (EaIX) materials control their efficiency when used as mass separation agents. Specifically, the desirable characteristics of EaIX materials for separation applications are (1) high reversibility, (2) high selectivity, (3) acceptable physical and chemical stability, (4) rapid intercalation and de-intercalation rates, and (5) high capacity. Because of these requirements, EaIX materials share many properties in common with conventional ion exchangers and electroactive polymers. For example, EaIX materials require the selectivity typically found in ion exchangers; they also require the redox reversibility of electroactive polymers. The results of this work will allow the rational design of new materials and processes tailored for the separation of specific anions.

Sukamto, Johanes H.; Smyrl, William H.; McBreen, James; Hubler, Timothy L.; Lilga, Michael A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 10:47:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country" "Sourcekey","MTTNTUS2","MTTNTUSPG2","MTTNT_NUS-ME0_2","MTTNTUSAG2","MTTNTUSAO2","MTTNTUSEC2","MTTNTUSIR2","MTTNT_NUS-NIZ_2","MTTNTUSKU2","MTTNT_NUS-NLY_2","MTTNTUSNI2","MTTNTUSQA2","MTTNTUSSA2","MTTNTUSTC2","MTTNTUSVE2","MTTNTUSVV2","MTTNT_NUS-NAF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAC_2","MTTNTUSAR2","MTTNT_NUS-NAE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAA_2","MTTNTUSAS2","MTTNT_NUS-NAU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAJ_2","MTTNTUSBF2","MTTNT_NUS-NBA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBO_2","MTTNTUSBE2","MTTNT_NUS-NBH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBK_2","MTTNTUSBR2","MTTNTUSBX2","MTTNT_NUS-NBU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCB_2","MTTNTUSCM2","MTTNTUSCA2","MTTNT_NUS-NCJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCI_2","MTTNTUSCH2","MTTNTUSCO2","MTTNTUSCF2","MTTNTUSCG2","MTTNT_NUS-NCW_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDR_2","MTTNTUSEG2","MTTNT_NUS-NES_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NET_2","MTTNT_NUS-NER_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFI_2","MTTNTUSFR2","MTTNT_NUS-NFP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFG_2","MTTNTUSGB2","MTTNT_NUS-NGG_2","MTTNTUSBZ2","MTTNT_NUS-NGH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGI_2","MTTNTUSGR2","MTTNT_NUS-NGL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGJ_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NGP_2","MTTNTUSGT2","MTTNT_NUS-NGV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIC_2","MTTNTUSIN2","MTTNTUSID2","MTTNT_NUS-NEI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIS_2","MTTNTUSIT2","MTTNT_NUS-NIV_2","MTTNTUSJM2","MTTNTUSJA2","MTTNT_NUS-NJO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKE_2","MTTNTUSKS2","MTTNT_NUS-NKT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMA_2","MTTNTUSMY2","MTTNT_NUS-NMV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NML_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NRM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMP_2","MTTNTUSMX2","MTTNT_NUS-NFM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMQ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMG_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NMJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNP_2","MTTNTUSNL2","MTTNTUSNA2","MTTNT_NUS-NNC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNE_2","MTTNTUSNO2","MTTNTUSMU2","MTTNT_NUS-NPK_2","MTTNTUSPM2","MTTNT_NUS-NPP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPA_2","MTTNTUSPE2","MTTNT_NUS-NRP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPO_2","MTTNTUSRQ2","MTTNTUSRO2","MTTNT_NUS-NRS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NST_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NYI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSF_2","MTTNTUSSP2","MTTNT_NUS-NPG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWZ_2","MTTNTUSSW2","MTTNT_NUS-NSZ_2","MTTNTUSSY2","MTTNTUSTW2","MTTNT_NUS-NTZ_2","MTTNTUSTH2","MTTNT_NUS-NTO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTN_2","MTTNTUSTD2","MTTNT_NUS-NTS_2","MTTNTUSTU2","MTTNT_NUS-NTX_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUR_2","MTTNTUSUK2","MTTNT_NUS-NUY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVI_2","MTTNTUSVQ2","MTTNTUSYE2","MTTNT_NUS-NYO_2","MTTNTUSWW2"

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Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:29:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAC_1","MTTEXAR1","MTTEX_NUS-NAE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAA_1","MTTEXAS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAJ_1","MTTEXBF1","MTTEXBA1","MTTEX_NUS-NBB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBO_1","MTTEXBE1","MTTEX_NUS-NBH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBK_1","MTTEXBR1","MTTEX_NUS-NBX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCM_1","MTTEXCA1","MTTEX_NUS-NCJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCD_1","MTTEXCI1","MTTEXCH1","MTTEXCO1","MTTEX_NUS-NCF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCG_1","MTTEXCS1","MTTEX_NUS-NHR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCZ_1","MTTEXDA1","MTTEX_NUS-NDJ_1","MTTEXDO1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NDR_1","MTTEXEC1","MTTEXEG1","MTTEXES1","MTTEX_NUS-NEK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NER_1","MTTEX_NUS-NEN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NET_1","MTTEX_NUS-NFJ_1","MTTEXFI1","MTTEXFR1","MTTEX_NUS-NFG_1","MTTEXFP1","MTTEX_NUS-NGB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGG_1","MTTEXBZ1","MTTEXGH1","MTTEX_NUS-NGI_1","MTTEXGR1","MTTEX_NUS-NGL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGJ_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NGP_1","MTTEXGT1","MTTEX_NUS-NGV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NHA_1","MTTEXHO1","MTTEXHK1","MTTEX_NUS-NHU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIC_1","MTTEXIN1","MTTEXID1","MTTEX_NUS-NIR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIZ_1","MTTEXEI1","MTTEXIS1","MTTEXIT1","MTTEX_NUS-NIV_1","MTTEXJM1","MTTEXJA1","MTTEX_NUS-NJO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKE_1","MTTEXKS1","MTTEX_NUS-NKN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMA_1","MTTEXMY1","MTTEX_NUS-NMV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NML_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMP_1","MTTEXMX1","MTTEX_NUS-NFM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMQ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMG_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NMJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNP_1","MTTEXNL1","MTTEXNA1","MTTEX_NUS-NNC_1","MTTEXNZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NNU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNG_1","MTTEXNI1","MTTEX_NUS-NNE_1","MTTEXNO1","MTTEX_NUS-NMU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPK_1","MTTEXPM1","MTTEX_NUS-NPP_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPA_1","MTTEXPE1","MTTEXRP1","MTTEXPL1","MTTEXPO1","MTTEXRQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NQA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NST_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSM_1","MTTEXSA1","MTTEX_NUS-NSG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NYI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSL_1","MTTEXSN1","MTTEX_NUS-NSK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBP_1","MTTEXSF1","MTTEXSP1","MTTEX_NUS-NPG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSU_1","MTTEXNS1","MTTEX_NUS-NWZ_1","MTTEXSW1","MTTEXSZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NSY_1","MTTEXTW1","MTTEX_NUS-NTZ_1","MTTEXTH1","MTTEX_NUS-NTN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTO_1","MTTEXTD1","MTTEX_NUS-NTS_1","MTTEXTU1","MTTEX_NUS-NTX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUR_1","MTTEXTC1","MTTEXUK1","MTTEXUY1","MTTEX_NUS-NUZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNH_1","MTTEXVE1","MTTEX_NUS-NVM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVI_1","MTTEXVQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NYE_1","MTTEXYO1","MTTEX_NUS-NZA_1"

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Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:28:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAC_1","MTTEXAR1","MTTEX_NUS-NAE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAA_1","MTTEXAS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAJ_1","MTTEXBF1","MTTEXBA1","MTTEX_NUS-NBB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBO_1","MTTEXBE1","MTTEX_NUS-NBH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBK_1","MTTEXBR1","MTTEX_NUS-NBX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCM_1","MTTEXCA1","MTTEX_NUS-NCJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCD_1","MTTEXCI1","MTTEXCH1","MTTEXCO1","MTTEX_NUS-NCF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCG_1","MTTEXCS1","MTTEX_NUS-NHR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCZ_1","MTTEXDA1","MTTEX_NUS-NDJ_1","MTTEXDO1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NDR_1","MTTEXEC1","MTTEXEG1","MTTEXES1","MTTEX_NUS-NEK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NER_1","MTTEX_NUS-NEN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NET_1","MTTEX_NUS-NFJ_1","MTTEXFI1","MTTEXFR1","MTTEX_NUS-NFG_1","MTTEXFP1","MTTEX_NUS-NGB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGG_1","MTTEXBZ1","MTTEXGH1","MTTEX_NUS-NGI_1","MTTEXGR1","MTTEX_NUS-NGL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGJ_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NGP_1","MTTEXGT1","MTTEX_NUS-NGV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NHA_1","MTTEXHO1","MTTEXHK1","MTTEX_NUS-NHU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIC_1","MTTEXIN1","MTTEXID1","MTTEX_NUS-NIZ_1","MTTEXEI1","MTTEXIS1","MTTEXIT1","MTTEX_NUS-NIV_1","MTTEXJM1","MTTEXJA1","MTTEX_NUS-NJO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKE_1","MTTEXKS1","MTTEX_NUS-NKN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMA_1","MTTEXMY1","MTTEX_NUS-NMV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NML_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMP_1","MTTEXMX1","MTTEX_NUS-NFM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMQ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMG_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NMJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNP_1","MTTEXNL1","MTTEXNA1","MTTEX_NUS-NNC_1","MTTEXNZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NNU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNG_1","MTTEXNI1","MTTEX_NUS-NNE_1","MTTEXNO1","MTTEX_NUS-NMU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPK_1","MTTEXPM1","MTTEX_NUS-NPP_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPA_1","MTTEXPE1","MTTEXRP1","MTTEXPL1","MTTEXPO1","MTTEXRQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NQA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NST_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSM_1","MTTEXSA1","MTTEX_NUS-NSG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NYI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSL_1","MTTEXSN1","MTTEX_NUS-NSK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBP_1","MTTEXSF1","MTTEXSP1","MTTEX_NUS-NPG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSU_1","MTTEXNS1","MTTEX_NUS-NWZ_1","MTTEXSW1","MTTEXSZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NSY_1","MTTEXTW1","MTTEX_NUS-NTZ_1","MTTEXTH1","MTTEX_NUS-NTN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTO_1","MTTEXTD1","MTTEX_NUS-NTS_1","MTTEXTU1","MTTEX_NUS-NTX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUR_1","MTTEXTC1","MTTEXUK1","MTTEXUY1","MTTEX_NUS-NUZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNH_1","MTTEXVE1","MTTEX_NUS-NVM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVI_1","MTTEXVQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NYE_1","MTTEXYO1","MTTEX_NUS-NZA_1"

176

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 10:46:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country" "Sourcekey","MTTNTUS2","MTTNTUSPG2","MTTNT_NUS-ME0_2","MTTNTUSAG2","MTTNTUSAO2","MTTNTUSEC2","MTTNTUSIR2","MTTNT_NUS-NIZ_2","MTTNTUSKU2","MTTNT_NUS-NLY_2","MTTNTUSNI2","MTTNTUSQA2","MTTNTUSSA2","MTTNTUSTC2","MTTNTUSVE2","MTTNTUSVV2","MTTNT_NUS-NAF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAC_2","MTTNTUSAR2","MTTNT_NUS-NAE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAA_2","MTTNTUSAS2","MTTNT_NUS-NAU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAJ_2","MTTNTUSBF2","MTTNT_NUS-NBA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBO_2","MTTNTUSBE2","MTTNT_NUS-NBH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBK_2","MTTNTUSBR2","MTTNTUSBX2","MTTNT_NUS-NBU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCB_2","MTTNTUSCM2","MTTNTUSCA2","MTTNT_NUS-NCJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCI_2","MTTNTUSCH2","MTTNTUSCO2","MTTNTUSCF2","MTTNTUSCG2","MTTNT_NUS-NCW_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDR_2","MTTNTUSEG2","MTTNT_NUS-NES_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NET_2","MTTNT_NUS-NER_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFI_2","MTTNTUSFR2","MTTNT_NUS-NFP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFG_2","MTTNTUSGB2","MTTNT_NUS-NGG_2","MTTNTUSBZ2","MTTNT_NUS-NGH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGI_2","MTTNTUSGR2","MTTNT_NUS-NGL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGJ_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NGP_2","MTTNTUSGT2","MTTNT_NUS-NGV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIC_2","MTTNTUSIN2","MTTNTUSID2","MTTNT_NUS-NEI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIS_2","MTTNTUSIT2","MTTNT_NUS-NIV_2","MTTNTUSJM2","MTTNTUSJA2","MTTNT_NUS-NJO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKE_2","MTTNTUSKS2","MTTNT_NUS-NKT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMA_2","MTTNTUSMY2","MTTNT_NUS-NMV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NML_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NRM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMP_2","MTTNTUSMX2","MTTNT_NUS-NFM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMQ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMG_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NMJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNP_2","MTTNTUSNL2","MTTNTUSNA2","MTTNT_NUS-NNC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNE_2","MTTNTUSNO2","MTTNTUSMU2","MTTNT_NUS-NPK_2","MTTNTUSPM2","MTTNT_NUS-NPP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPA_2","MTTNTUSPE2","MTTNT_NUS-NRP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPO_2","MTTNTUSRQ2","MTTNTUSRO2","MTTNT_NUS-NRS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NST_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NYI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSF_2","MTTNTUSSP2","MTTNT_NUS-NPG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWZ_2","MTTNTUSSW2","MTTNT_NUS-NSZ_2","MTTNTUSSY2","MTTNTUSTW2","MTTNT_NUS-NTZ_2","MTTNTUSTH2","MTTNT_NUS-NTO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTN_2","MTTNTUSTD2","MTTNT_NUS-NTS_2","MTTNTUSTU2","MTTNT_NUS-NTX_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUR_2","MTTNTUSUK2","MTTNT_NUS-NUY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVI_2","MTTNTUSVQ2","MTTNTUSYE2","MTTNT_NUS-NYO_2","MTTNTUSWW2"

177

Antimicrobial activities of saponin-rich guar meal extract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three saponin-rich extracts (20, 60, 100% methanol), four 100% methanol subfractions and seven independently acquired fractions (A-G) from guar meal, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. (syn. C. psoraloides), were evaluated for antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. These activities were compared against quillaja bark (Quillaja saponaria), yucca (Yucca schidigera), and soybean (Glycine max) saponins in 96-well plates using eight concentrations (0.01 to 1.0 and 0.1 to 12.5 mg extract/mL). Initial guar meal butanol extract was 4.8 0.6% of the weight of original material dry matter (DM). Butanol extract was purified by preparative reverse-phase C-18 chromatography. Two fractions eluted with 20, and one each with 60, and 100% methanol with average yields of 1.72 0.47, 0.88 0.16, 0.91 0.16 and 1.55 0.15% of DM, respectively. Further purification of the 100% methanol fraction using normal-phase silica gel preparatory high pressure liquid chromatography eluted 4 peaks at 16, 39, 44 and 46 min. Only the 100% methanol fraction, its 16 min peak, F and G fractions, and quillaja saponin, exhibited both hemolytic and antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli, but 20 and 60% methanol fractions stimulated Lactobacillus spp. growth. Guar meal (0 or 5%) was added to diets fed to chicks from 1 to 21 days of age. Chicks fed both diets were unchallenged or challenged with 5 x 103 Eimeria tenella sporulated oocysts at 10 days. Guar meal diets reduced oocysts shed per gram of feces, body weight, and feed efficiency. Adding 2.5% guar meal, 1% guar gum, or 0.125% saponin-rich guar meal extract to diets fed to chicks to 21 days of age showed that guar meal increased the cfu concentrations of digesta more than controls following a challenge with 107 cfu of Clostridium perfringens at 14 days. Body weights of chicks fed guar meal and saponin-rich extract were significantly lower than control body weights at 21 days of age, whereas the weekly feed to gain ratio of chicks fed saponin-rich extract was higher than controls. Guar meal reduced severity of Eimeria tenella infection and guar saponin-rich extract exhibited antimicrobial activity against several common poultry pathogens.

Hassan, Sherif Mohamed

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method for detection of extremely low concentration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and CO.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethal Island, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethal Island, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C; zirconium, 500 to 600/sup 0/C; LaNi/sub 5/, -78 to +30/sup 0/C; Mg/sub 2/Ni, 300 to 375/sup 0/C; palladium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%.

Wiswall, R; Reilly, J; Bloch, F; Wirsing, E

1977-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will use cesium ion exchange to remove Cs-137 from Low Activity Waste (LAW) down to a maximum activity of 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW (ILAW) product. The WTP Project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig(R) 644 (SL-644) resin (registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT) or a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. The WTP Project is conducting a three-stage process for selecting and qualifying an alternative ion exchange resin. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) is being pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644, to provide a backup resin supply. Resin cost relative to SL-644 is a primary driver. Phase I of the testing plan examined the viability of RF resin and recommended that a spherical form of RF resin be examined further. Phases II and III, now underway, include batch testing to determine the isotherm of this resin, kinetics to address the impacts of bead diameter and high sodium feed levels on processing Hanford waste with the resin, and multicycle column testing to determine how temperature and chemical cycling affects waste processing. Phases II and III also examine resin performance against simulated WTP feeds, radiolytic and thermal stability, and scale-up to pilot scale performance. We will discuss early results obtained from Phase II testing here.

CHARLES, NASH

2005-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay for the measurement of urodilatin and. alpha. -hANP in the urine of healthy males  

SciTech Connect

Urodilatin (ANP-(95-126)), a natriuretic peptide in urine, and {alpha}-hANP (ANP-(99-126)) are crossreactive in the radioimmunoassay of {alpha}-hANP (ANP-RIA). The authors therefore developed a method to separate physiological amounts of urodilatin and {alpha}-hANP in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography followed by ANP-RIA of the separated fractions. They studied urine samples of 10 healthy adult males with a plasma {alpha}-hANP level of 41 {plus minus} 21 pg/ml (mean {plus minus} SD) and a total urinary ANP-RIA reactivity of 40 {plus minus} 21 pg/ml. In all urine samples they found three peaks of ANP-RIA reactivity, the first one coeluting with synthetic urodilatin, the second one with the retention time of {alpha}-hANP and a late eluting ANP-RIA-reactive peak, possibly containing degradation products. The ratio of urodilatin/{alpha}-hANP was 0.77 {plus minus} 0.17.

Solc, J.; Bauer, K.; Timnik, A.; Doehlemann, C.; Strom, T.M.; Weil, J. (Univ. of Munich, Muenchen (West Germany)); Solcova, A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High-pressure/high-temperature gas-solubility study in hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems using static and chromatographic techniques  

SciTech Connect

The design and discovery of sources for alternative energy such as coal liquefaction has become of major importance over the past two decades. One of the major problems in such design in the lack of available data, particularly, for gas solubility in polycyclic aromatics at high temperature and pressure. Static and gas-liquid partition chromatographic methods were used for the study of hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems. The static data for these two binaries were taken along 398.2, 423.2, 448.2, and 473.2 K isotherms up to 25.23 MPa. Gas-liquid partition chromatography was used to study the infinite dilution behavior of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the hydrogen-phenanthrene system as well as hydrogen, ethane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the methane-phenanthrene binary. The principle objective was to examine the role of the elution gas. Temperatures were along the same isotherms as the static data and up to 20.77 MPa. With the exception of carbon dioxide, Henry's constants were calculated for all systems. Expressions for the heat of solution as a function of pressure were derived for both binary and chromatographic data. Estimates of delta H/sub i/sup sol/ at high pressure were presented.

Malone, P.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

185

Utilization of the noble gases in studies of underground nuclear detonations  

SciTech Connect

From symposium on noble gases; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (24 Sep 1973). The Livermore Gas Diagnostics Program employs a number of rare gas isotopes, both stable and radioactive, in its investigations of the phenomenology of underground nuclear detonations. Radioactive gases in a sample are radiochemically purified by elution chromatography, and the separated gases are radioassayed by gamma-ray spectrometry and by internal or thin-window beta proportional counting. Concentrations of the stable gases are determined by mass-spectrometry, following chemical removal of the reactive gases in the sample. The most general application of the noble gases is as device fraction indicators to provide a basis for estimating totals of chimney-gas components. All of the stable rare gases except argon have been used as tracers, as have /sup 127/Xe and /sup 85/Kr. /sup 37/Ar and /sup 85/Kr have proven to be of particular value in the absence of a good tracer material as reference species for studies of chimney-gas chemistry. The rate of mixing of chimney gases and the degree to which the sampled gas truly represents the underground gas mixture can be studied with the aid of the fission- product gases. /sup 222/Ra and He are released to the cavity from the surrounding rock and are therefore useful in studies of the interaction of the detonation with the surrounding medium. (auth)

Smith, C.F.

1973-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Nanomaterials-Enhanced Electrically Switched Ion Exchange Process for Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our work is to develop an electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) system based on conducting polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites as a new and cost-effective approach for removal of radioactive cesium, chromate, and perchlorate from contaminated groundwater. The ESIX technology combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for the removal of target species from wastewater. In this technique, an electroactive ion exchange layer is deposited on a conducting substrate, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulation of the potential of the layer. ESIX offers the advantages of highly-efficient use of electrical energy combined with no secondary waste generation. Recently, we have improved upon the ESIX process by modifying the conducting substrate with carbon nanotubes prior to the deposition of the electroactive ion exchanger. The nanomaterial-based electroactive ion exchange technology will remove cesium-137, chromate, and perchlorate rapidly from wastewater. The high porosity and high surface area of the electroactive ion exchange nanocomposites results in high loading capacity and minimize interferences for non-target species. Since the ion adsorption/desorption is controlled electrically without generating a secondary waste, this electrically active ion exchange process is a green process technology that will greatly reduce operating costs.

Lin, Yuehe; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Jun; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater  

SciTech Connect

A literature survey has been conducted to collect information on the International R&D activities in the extraction of uranium from seawater for the period from the 1960s till the year of 2010. The reported activities, on both the laboratory scale bench experiments and the large scale marine experiments, were summarized by country/region in this report. Among all countries where such activities have been reported, Japan has carried out the most advanced large scale marine experiments with the amidoxime-based system, and achieved the collection efficiency (1.5 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 30 days soaking in the ocean) that could justify the development of industrial scale marine systems to produce uranium from seawater at the price competitive with those from conventional uranium resources. R&D opportunities are discussed for improving the system performance (selectivity for uranium, loading capacity, chemical stability and mechanical durability in the sorption-elution cycle, and sorption kinetics) and making the collection of uranium from seawater more economically competitive.

Rao, Linfeng

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)] [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.  

SciTech Connect

The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Continuous countercurrent chromatographic separator for the purification of sugars from biomass hydrolyzate. Final project report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of pure sugars is required to enable production of fuels and chemicals from biomass feedstocks. Hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose (principal constituents of biomass) produces sugars that can be utilized in various fermentation process to produce valuable chemicals. Unfortunately, the hydrolysis process also liberates chemicals from the biomass that can be toxic to the fermenting organisms. The two primary toxic components of biomass hydrolyzate are sulfuric acid (catalyst used in the hydrolysis) and acetic acid (a component of the feed biomass). In the standard batch chromatographic separation of these three components, sugar elutes in the middle. Batch chromatographic separations are not practical on a commercial scale, because of excess dilution and high capital costs. Because sugar is the {open_quotes}center product,{close_quotes} a continuous separation would require two costly binary separators. However, a single, slightly larger separator, configured to produce three products, would be more economical. This FIRST project develops a cost-effective method for purifying biomass hydrolyzate into fermentable sugars using a single continuous countercurrent separator to separate this ternary mixture.

Wooley, R.J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fabrication and In Vitro Deployment of a Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Vascular Stent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of {approx}8 W. We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

Baer, G M; Small IV, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W J; Matthews, D L; Hartman, J; Maitland, D J

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Planar Analyzers at Elevated Dispersion Fields  

SciTech Connect

Analyses of complex or isomeric mixtures increasingly involve ion mobility spectrometry/ mass spectrometry (IMS/MS). The IMS methods are grouped into conventional, based on the absolute ion mobility, and differential or field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS), based on the mobility difference in strong and weak electric fields. The key attraction of FAIMS is substantial orthogonality to MS, and several FAIMS/MS platforms have been commercialized. However, the utility of FAIMS had been constrained by limited resolving power, typically R ~ 10 - 20. Recently, the use of helium/nitrogen mixtures comprising up to 75% He has enabled R > 100, with broad resolution gains allowing separation of previously co-eluting isomers. These performance metrics open major new FAIMS applications in proteomic and other biological analyses. Here, we show that raising the separation field by ~35% over the previous 21 kV/cm provides similar or better resolution at 50% He, while avoiding problems due to elevated gas pressure in the MS manifold upon excessive He intake. In particular, a resolving power of >200 has been achieved for multiply-charged peptides. The field heating of ions under these conditions appears to exceed that at higher He content but weaker separation field, inducing greater izomerization of fragile species.

Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Prior, David C.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, UNIT OPERATIONS SECTION MONTHLY PROGRESS REPORT, JULY 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thoria denitrator products from 0.04 to 0.066 N/Th ratio were dispersed into sols at N/Th radios of 0.11 to 0.19 and processed by the sol-gel technique to produce final compacted thoria products with little significant variation. Experimental results of H/sub 2/-CuO reaction in the helium purification work further substantiated the mathematical model. The elutions of uranyl sulfate loaded Dowex 2lK with chloride apparently involved the diffusion of both the sulfate ions and the uranyl ions. The dejacketing of the NaK bonded SRE Core I fuel elements is proceeding satisfactorily with an average rate that has increased to 7 to 8 kg U/hr. The uranium slugs exhibited various degrees of camber and pitting. The disintegration-leaching of 3% U-graphite fuel by flowing 90% HNO/sub 3/ at 60 deg C is apparently superior to a batch-leach method. Attempts to use air bubblers to control the interface level at the bottom of a 2- in.-dia glass pulse column showed considerable loss of pulse amplitude, particularly in taller columns. An air operated diaphragm pump was designed, fabricated, and tested for use as a TrU facility process pump. A successful duplicate test was made calcining TBP-25 waste using the close coupled evaporator- calciner system. (auth)

Whatley, M.E.; Haas, P.A.; Horton, R.W.; Ryon, A.D.; Suddath, J.C.; Watson, C.D.

1962-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Serendipitous, Long-Term Infiltration Experiment: Water and Tritium Circulation Beneath the CAMBRIC Ditch at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site introduced numerous radionuclides that may be used to characterize subsurface hydrologic transport processes in arid climates. A sixteen year pumping experiment designed to examine radionuclide migration away from the CAMBRIC nuclear test, conducted in groundwater beneath Frenchman Flat in 1965, gave rise to an unintended second experiment involving radionuclide infiltration through the vadose zone, as induced by seepage of pumping effluents beneath an unlined discharge trench. The combined experiments have been reanalyzed using a detailed, three-dimensional numerical model of transient, variably saturated flow and mass transport, tailored specifically for large scale and efficient calculations. Simulations have been used to estimate radionuclide travel and residence times in various parts of the system for comparison with observations in wells. Model predictions of mass transport were able to clearly demonstrate radionuclide recycling behavior between the ditch and pumping well previously suggested by isotopic age dating information; match travel time estimates for radionuclides moving between the ditch, the water table, and monitoring wells; and provide more realistic ways in which to interpret the pumping well elution curves. Collectively, the results illustrate the utility of integrating detailed numerical modeling with diverse observational data in developing accurate interpretations and forecasts of contaminant migration processes.

Maxwell, R M; Tompson, A B; Kollet, S J

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500/sup 0/C to yield a purified PuO/sub 2/ product.

Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

Mike L. Laue

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Integrated Investigation on the Production and Fate of Organo-Cr(III) Complexes from Microbial Reduction of Chromate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our objective is to investigate the complexity of chromium biogeocycling. Our results clearly support more complexity. In short, the chromium cycle is not as simple as the conversion between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in inorganic forms. We have obtained more evidence to prove the formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes from microbial reduction of Cr(VI). The complexes are relatively stable due to the slow ligand exchange of Cr(III). However, some microorganisms can consume the organic ligands and release Cr(III), which then precipitates. Efforts are being made to characterize the organo-Cr(III) complexes and investigate their behavior in soil. Progress and efforts are summarized for each task. Task 1. Production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by selected microorganisms A total of eight organisms were screened for production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by culturing in both growth and non growth media containing 4 mg/L of Cr(VI); three were Gram positive and five were Gram negative. The Gram-positive bacteria were Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Rhodococcus sp., and Leafsonia sp., while Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, Pseudomonas putida MK 1 and Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1 were Gram negative. Purifications of the soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes produced by Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1, Rhodococcus sp., and D. vulgaris Hildenborough were carried out. The culture supernatants were lyophilized and extracted first with methanol followed by water. The extracts were then analyzed for soluble Cr. The majority of the Cr(III) was present in the water-soluble fraction for all of the bacteria tested (data not shown), revealing a general phenomenon of soluble Cr(III) production. Cellulomonas sp. ES6 produced the highest amount of soluble Cr(III) (364 ppm) and D. vulgaris Hildenborough produced the least (143 ppm). Seventy eight percent of the soluble Cr(III) produced by Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1 was water soluble, while 45% was water soluble for the Cellulomonas sp. ES6. The water-soluble fractions were further purified by anion exchange chromatography. All soluble Cr(III) was bound to the anion exchange column. The bound organo-Cr(III) was eluted by gradient elution, (0.25M-2M) using ammonium acetate. Preliminary characterization confirmed the nature of organo-Cr(III) complexes. Further characterization of these species by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is in progress. Task 2. Demonstrate that chromate reduction produces organo-Cr(III) complexes with microbial cellular components. In the past year, further research on the formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes has been completed. Formation of soluble complexes with cell free extracts as the organic portion has resulted in the formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes, approximately 27% Cr(III) remained soluble after 14 days. In addition, complexes formed between individual organic components and Cr(III) have been tested for changes in solubility due to changes in pH.

Xun, Luying

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Novel Simulated moving bed technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose and hemicellulose from plants and other biomass can be hydrolyzed to produce sugars (i.e. glucose and xylose). Once these sugars are separated from other impurities, they can serve as feedstock in fermentation to produce ethanol (as fuels), lactic acid, or other valuable chemicals. The need for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass has become abundantly clear over the last decade. However, the cost of producing fermentable sugars from biomass hydrolyzate using existing technology is relatively high and has been a major obstacle. The objective of this project is to develop an efficient and economical simulated moving bed (SMB) process to recover fermentable sugars from biomass hydrolyzate. Sulfuric acid can hydrolyze the cellulose and hemicellulose in biomass to sugars, but this process can generate byproducts such as acetic acid, and can lead to further degradation of the xylose to furfural and glucose to hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Also, lignin and other compounds in the biomass will degrade to various phenolic compounds. If the concentrations of these compounds exceed certain threshold levels, they will be toxic to the downstream fermentation, and will severely limit the usefulness of the derived sugars. Standard post-hydrolysis processing involves neutralization of sulfuric acid, usually with lime (calcium hydroxide). A study by Wooley et al.showed that the limed hydrolyzate gave a low ethanol yield in fermentation test (20% of theoretical yield compared to 77% of theoretical yield from fermentation of pure sugars). They showed that instead of adding lime, an ion exclusion chromatography process could be used to remove acids, as well as to isolate the sugars from the biomass hydrolyzate. In this project, we investigated the feasibility of developing an economical SMB process based on (1) a polymeric adsorbent, Dowex99, which was used by Wooley et al., (2) a second polymeric adsorbent, poly-4-vinyl pyridine (or PVP in short, Reilly Industries Inc., Indianapolis, IN), which has been used for organic acid separations, and (3) an activated carbon adsorbent. The adsorption isotherms and mass transfer parameters of the two polymeric adsorbents were estimated using single-component pulse tests and frontal tests. The parameters were then validated using batch elution chromatography test of a corn-stover hydrolyzate, which was provided gratis by NREL. The sugars recovered in batch chromatography were then fermented using yeast developed at Dr. Ho's LORRE laboratory. A standard mixture of pure sugars and an overlimed corn-stover hydrolyzate were fermented using the same procedure simultaneously. The fermentability of the overlimed hydrolyzate was the worst, and that of the sugars recovered using the PVP column was similar to that of the pure sugar mixture. The sugars recovered using the Dowex99 column had an intermediate fermentability. Since the sugars were the ''center cut'' in the Dowex99 column, a tandem SMB (two SMB's in series) design was needed to obtain sugars of high purity. By contrast, sugars were the fast-moving components in the PVP column, and only a single SMB was needed to recover sugars from the hydrolyzate. The impurities, such as sulfuric acid, acetic acid, HMF, and furfural, had higher affinities for PVP. Caustic regeneration was needed to efficiently remove these impurities from PVP. Therefore, a five-zone SMB, which includes a regeneration zone and a reequilibration zone, was developed. The isotherms and mass transfer parameters estimated from batch chromatography experiments were used in the design of SMB processes. A Standing Wave Design method was developed for the five-zone SMB and the tandem SMB. Cost analysis was carried out based on the resulting operating conditions. The analysis showed that the PVP five-zone SMB process was more economical than the Dowex99 tandem SMB process. The cost analysis also showed that elution and equipment costs are dominant for the Dowex99 SMB and the regeneration cost is dominant (60%) for the PVPSMB. Both the cost analysis and the fermentatio

Purdue University

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease  

SciTech Connect

Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cim{sup a} and cim{sup b}, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cim{sup a} B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets significantly less well than cim{sup a/a} or cim{sup a/b} targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cim{sup a/a} targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cim{sup b} and three cim{sup a} RT1 haplotypes showed that the cim{sup b} peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cim{sup a/b} or cim{sup b/b}. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Simmons, W.A.; Satumtira, Nimman; Taurog, J.D. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Chemical and nuclear properties of lawrencium (element 103) and hahnium (element 105)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical and nuclear properties of Lr and Ha have been studied, using 3-minute {sup 260}Lr and 35-second {sup 262}Ha. The crystal ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} was determined by comparing its elution position from a cation-exchange resin column with those of lanthanide elements having known ionic radii. Comparisons are made to the ionic radii of the heavy actinides, Am{sup 3+} through Es{sup 3+}, obtained by x-ray diffraction methods, and to Md{sup 3+} and Fm{sup 3+} which were determined in the same manner as Lr{sup 3+}. The hydration enthalpy of {minus}3622 kJ/mol was calculated from the crystal ionic radius using an empirical form of the Born equation. Comparisons to the spacings between the ionic radii of the heaviest members of the lanthanide series show that the 2Z spacing between Lr{sup 3+} and Md{sup 3+} is anomalously small, as the ionic radius of Lr{sup 3+} of 0.0886 nm is significantly smaller than had been expected. The chemical properties of Ha were determined relative to the lighter homologs in group 5, Nb and Ta. Group 4 and group 5 tracer activities, as well as Ha, were absorbed onto glass surfaces as a first step toward the determination of the chemical properties of Ha. Ha was found to adsorb on surfaces, a chemical property unique to the group 5 elements, and as such demonstrates that Ha has the chemical properties of a group 5 element. A solvent extraction procedure was adapted for use as a micro-scale chemical procedure to examine whether or not Ha displays eka-Ta-like chemical under conditions where Ta will be extracted into the organic phase and Nb will not. Under the conditions of this experiment Ha did not extract, and does not show eka-Ta-like chemical properties.

Henderson, R.A.

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Synthesis by Inverse Suspension Polymerization  

SciTech Connect

Base catalyzed sol-gel polycondensation of resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) with formaldehyde by inverse suspension polymerization leads to the formation of uniform, highly cross-linked, translucent, spherical gels, which have increased selectivity and capacity for cesium ion removal from high alkaline solutions. Because of its high selectivity for cesium ion, resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resins are being considered for process scale column radioactive cesium removal by ion-exchange at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), which is now under construction at the Hanford site. Other specialty resins such as Superlig{reg_sign} 644 have been ground and sieved and column tested for process scale radioactive cesium removal but show high pressure drops across the resin bed during transition from column regeneration to loading and elution. Furthermore, van Deemter considerations indicate better displacement column chromatography by the use of spherical particle beads rather than irregularly shaped ground or granular particles. In our studies batch contact equilibrium experiments using a high alkaline simulant show a definite increase in cesium loading onto spherical R-F resin. Distribution coefficient (Kd) values ranged from 777 to 429 mL/g in the presence of 0.1M and 0.7M potassium ions, respectively. Though other techniques for making R-F resins have been employed, to our knowledge no one has made spherical R-F resins by inverse suspension polymerization. Moreover, in this study we discuss the data comparisons to known algebraic isotherms used to evaluate ion-exchange resins for WTP plant scale cesium removal operations.

Ray, Robert J.; Scrivens, Walter A.; Nash, Charles

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Storage and Aging Effects on Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Ion Exchange Performance  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is evaluating the alternate Cs ion exchanger, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), for use in the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP).( ) Previous test activities with spherical RF indicate that it has adequate capacity, selectivity, and kinetics to perform in the plant according to the flowsheet needs. It appears to have better elution and hydraulic properties than the existing alternatives: ground-gel RF and SuperLig 644 (SL 644).( ) To date, the spherical RF performance testing has been conducted on freshly manufactured resin (within ~2 months of manufacture). The ion exchange resins will be manufactured and shipped to the WTP up to 1 year before being used in the plant. Changes in the resin properties during storage could reduce the capacity of the resin to remove Cs from low-activity waste solutions. Active sites on organic SL-644 resin have been shown to degrade during storage (Arm et al. 2004). Additional testing was needed to study the effects of storage conditions and aging on spherical RF ion exchange performance. Variables that could have a significant impact on ion exchange resins during storage include storage temperature, medium, and time. BattellePacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted to test the effects of various storage conditions on spherical RF resin. Data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to provide direction for suitable storage conditions and manage the spherical RF resin stock. Storage test conditions included wet and dry resin configurations under nitrogen at three temperatures. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004 satisfying the needs defined in Appendix C of the Research and Technology Plan( ) TSS A-219 to evaluate the impact of storage conditions on RF resin performance. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thomas, Kathie K.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Characterization of solubilized atrial natriuretic peptide receptors from rat olfactory bulb and A10 cultured smooth muscle cells  

SciTech Connect

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from A10 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for 125I-ANP(99-126) was 12.7 pM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 pM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 125I-ANP(99-126) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) much greater than ANP(103-123). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) = ANP(103-123). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose column, a portion of the olfactory ANP receptor was retained on the column and could be eluted with 5 mM GTP, while the VSMC ANP receptor did not adsorb to the column. Since the olfactory bulb ANP receptor has been shown to contain a binding component of 116 kDa, while the VSMC ANP receptor binding component is 66 kDa, these receptors appear to be similar to the 2 receptor classes described recently in which the 120 kDa receptor that binds GTP is postulated to be coupled to guanylate cyclase, while the 60 kDa receptor does not bind GTP, is not coupled to guanylate cyclase, and may possess a hormone clearance function. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclic GMP appears to be a second messenger for ANP in the brain.

Gibson, T.R.; Zyskind, A.D.; Glembotski, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in 90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

Maxwell, S.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in < 6 hours. The method uses a rapid calcium carbonate precipitation enhanced with a small amount of phosphate added to enhance chemical yields (typically >90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

Maxwell, S.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

211

LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY  

SciTech Connect

A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

Nash, C.

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Extraction of erythropoietin from normal kidneys. [Rats, dogs  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of active erythropoietin were extracted from the kidneys of normal rats, cattle, dogs, and rabbits by homogenization of the organs in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. The mean erythropoietin activities of the extracts, as determined by the starved-rat assay, were 0.26 U/g beef kidney, 0.41 U/g dog kidney, and 0.11 U/g rat kidney. The dog kidney extracts had a mean activity of 0.35 U/g, as measured by stimulation of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured bone marrow cells (in vitro assay) and produced a dose-dependent stimulation of /sup 59/Fe incorporation into circulating red cells when assayed in polycythemic mice. Extracts of rabbit kidney cortices had a mean activity of 2.12 U/g, as measured by stimulation of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured bone marrow cells. When the dog kidney homogenate was fractionated on DEAE-cellulose, all of the erythropoietin activity was adsorbed to the exchanger in the presence of 0.01 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5, and was completely eluted by 0.1 M Na/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/-0.5 M NaCl, pH 8. An antibody made aganist human urinary erythropoietin completely inactivated the erythropoietic factor in the dog kidney extract. Serum from a donor dog had no erythropoietin activity when assayed in the starved rat, suggesting that the factor in the extracts is intracellular erythropoietin rather than that contained in plasma trapped in the renal vasculature. The complete inactivation of the erythropoietic factor in these kidney homogenates by antierythropoietin and its behavior on DEAE-cellulose indicate that this factor is structurally similar to native plasma erythropoietin. The extracts are completely active without being incubated in the presence of serum.

Sherwood, J.B.; Goldwasser, E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

APPLICATION OF FORMOHYDROXAMIC ACID IN NUCLEAR PROCESSING: SYNTHESIS AND COMPLEXATION WITH TECHNETIUM-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) is an organic ligand planned for use in the Uranium Extraction (UREX) process. It reduces neptunium and plutonium, and the resultant hydrophilic complexes are separated from uranium by extraction with tributyl phosphate (TBP) in a hydrocarbon diluent. AHA undergoes hydrolysis to acetic acid which will impede the recycling of nitric acid. During recent discussions of the UREX process, it has been proposed to replace AHA by formohydroxamic acid (FHA). FHA will undergo hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. The reported reduction potentials of AHA and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) indicated that it may be possible for AHA to reduce technetium, altering its fate in the fuel cycle. At UNLV, it has been demonstrated that TcO{sub 4}{sup -} undergoes reductive nitrosylation by AHA under a variety of conditions. The resulting divalent technetium is complexed by AHA to form the pseudo-octahedral trans-aquonitrosyl (diacetohydroxamic)-technetium(II) complex ([Tc{sup II}(NO)(AHA){sub 2}H{sub 2}O]{sup +}). In this paper, we are reporting the synthesis of FHA and its complex formation with technetium along with the characterization of FHA crystals achieved by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the complexation of FHA with Tc and the results were compared with previous data on AHA. The first experiment involved the elution of Tc from a Reillex HP anion exchange resin, and the second one monitored the complexation of technetium with FHA by UV-visible spectrophotometry.

Amber Wright; Edward Mausolf; Keri Campbell; Frederic Poineau; P. Paviet-Hartmann

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

3-Dimensional Flow Modeling of a Proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Ion-Exchange Column Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, it has been assumed that the inlet and outlet low activity waste plenums would be designed such that a nearly uniform velocity profile would be maintained at every axial cross-section (i.e., providing nearly 100 percent use of the resin bed). With this proposed design, we see a LAW outlet distributor that results in significant non-axial velocity gradients in the bottom regions of the bed with the potential to reduce the effectiveness'' of the overall resin bed. The magnitude of this efficiency reduction depends upon how far up-gradient of the LAW outlet these non-axial velocities persist and to what extent a ''dead-zone'' is established beneath the LAW outlet. This can impact loading and elution performance of the ion-exchange facility. Currently, no experimental studies are planned. The primary objective of this work was, through modeling, to assess the fluid dynamic impact on ''effective'' resin volume of the full-scale column based on its normal operation using a recently proposed LAW outlet distributor. The analysis effort was limited to 3-D flow only analyses (i.e., no follow on transport analyses) with 3-D particle tracking to approximate the impact that a nonaxial velocity profile would have on bed ''effectiveness''. Additional analyses were performed to estimate under nominal operating conditions the thermal temperature rise across a loaded resin bed and within its particles. Hydrogen bubble formation is not considered in the heat transfer analysis or in the determination of minimum flowrate. All modeling objectives were met.

ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Collection Rule and an Integrated Cell Culture-Nested PCR Procedure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluated the use of an integrated cell culture-reverse transcription-PCR (ICC-RT-PCR) procedure coupled with nested PCR to detect human astroviruses, enteroviruses, and adenovirus types 40 and 41 in surface water samples that were collected and evaluated by using the Information Collection Rule (ICR) method. The results obtained with the ICC-RT-PCRnested PCR method were compared to the results obtained with the total culturable virus assaymost-probable-number (TCVA-MPN) method, the method recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for monitoring viruses in surface and finished waters. Twenty-nine ICR surface water samples were analyzed. Viruses were concentrated by using filter adsorption-beef extract elution and organic flocculation techniques, and then the preparations were evaluated for viruses by visualizing cytopathic effects in the Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cell line. In the ICC-RT-PCRnested PCR technique we used Caco-2 cells to propagate astroviruses and enteroviruses (ICC step), and we used BGMK cells to propagate adenovirus types 40 and 41, as well as enteroviruses. Fifteen of the 29 samples (51.7%) were positive for astrovirus as determined by the ICC-RT-PCRnested PCR method, and eight of these samples (27.5%) contained infectious astrovirus. Seventeen of the 29 samples (58.6%) were positive for enteroviruses when the BGMK cell line was used, and six (27.6%) of these samples were determined to be infectious. Fourteen of the 29 samples (48.3%) were positive for adenovirus types 40 and 41, and 11

Christopher D. Chapron; Nicola A. Ballester; Justin H. Fontaine; Christine N. Frades; Aaron; B. Margolin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime pretreatment (OLP). In the first study, the constant-selectivity assumption used in the continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) was determined to be invalid. During a 32-day batch fermentation, selectivity increased from 0.10 to 0.40 g acid/g non-acid volatile solid (NAVS) digested. Future revisions to CPDM should incorporate a non-constant selectivity term. In the second study, a revised procedure was developed to provide a more accurate determination of moisture content. Conventional drying at 105 degrees C allowed product acids to vaporize with water, which introduced errors. Using the revised procedure, calcium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide was added to samples at a concentration of 0.01 g base/g sample, which retained acids in the sample. The mass of additional retained material closely matched that of the additional retained acid. Three related studies involving biomass pretreatment were performed. In the first, recommended parameters for pretreating sugarcane bagasse with OLP and STP were determined. Recommended OLP parameters were 130 degrees C, 6.9-bar O2, and 2-h duration. The effects of solids concentration, liquid fill volume, particle size, type of shotgun shell, number of shocks, and pretreatment order were investigated. Liquid fill volume, particle size, type of shotgun shell, and pretreatment order were significant variables, whereas solids concentration and number of shocks were not. Recommended OLP parameters were used as a basis for an additional experiment. To simulate industrial-scale pile fermentation, fixed-bed batch fermentation of OLP + STP sugarcane bagasse was performed in 1-L PVC fermentors. Rubber mulch was used as a structural support material to prevent filter plugging, which had been reported in previous work. After 42 d, acid concentration reached 8 g/L with yield approximately 0.1 g acid/g NAVS fed. Poor fermentation performance was caused by short solid-liquid contact time and poor pH control. A third biomass pretreatment experiment investigated the potential of pretreated corn stover as a potential ruminant feed. Five samples (raw, OLP, STP, OLP + STP, and STP + OLP) were analyzed for composition and in vitro digestibility. STP followed by OLP increased neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility from 49.3 to 79.0 g NDF digested/100 g NDF fed. On an organic matter basis, STP + OLP corn stover plus water-soluble extractives had a total digestible nutrients (TDN) of 74.9, nearly reaching corn grain at 88.1.

Meysing, Daniel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

230Th-234U Age-Dating Uranium by Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the standard operating procedure used by the Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Group of the Chemical Sciences Division at LLNL for the preparation of a sample of uranium oxide or uranium metal for {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U age-dating. The method described here includes the dissolution of a sample of uranium oxide or uranium metal, preparation of a secondary dilution, spiking of separate aliquots for uranium and thorium isotope dilution measurements, and purification of uranium and thorium aliquots for mass spectrometry. This SOP may be applied to uranium samples of unknown purity as in a nuclear forensic investigation, and also to well-characterized samples such as, for example, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and U-metal certified reference materials. The sample of uranium is transferred to a quartz or PFA vial, concentrated nitric acid is added and the sample is heated on a hotplate at approximately 100 C for several hours until it dissolves. The sample solution is diluted with water to make the solution approximately 4 M HNO{sub 3} and hydrofluoric acid is added to make it 0.05 M HF. A secondary dilution of the primary uranium solution is prepared. Separate aliquots for uranium and thorium isotope dilution measurements are taken and spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 229}Th, respectively. The spiked aliquot for uranium isotope dilution analysis is purified using EiChrom UTEVA resin. The spiked aliquot for thorium isotope dilution analysis is purified by, first, a 1.8 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 9 M HCl on which U adsorbs and Th passes through; second, adsorbing Th on a 1 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 8 M HNO{sub 3} and then eluting it with 9 M HCl followed by 0.1 M HCl + 0.005 M HF; and third, by passing the Th through a final 1.0 mL AG1x8 resin bed in 9 M HCl. The mass spectrometry is performed using the procedure 'Th and U Mass Spectrometry for {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U Age Dating'.

Williams, R W; Gaffney, A M

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Preliminary design and analysis of a process for the extraction of lithium from seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. demand for lithium by the industrial sector and by a fusion power economy in the future is discussed. For a one million MW(e) CTR (D-T fuel cycle) economy, growing into the beginning of the next century (the years 2000 to 2030), the cumulative demand for lithium is estimated to range from (0.55 to 4.7) x 10/sup 7/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ kg. Present estimates of the available U.S. supply are 6.9 x 10/sup 8/ kg of lithium from mineral resources and 4.0 x 10/sup 9/ kg of lithium from concentrated natural brines. There is, however, a vast supply of lithium in seawater: 2.5 x 10/sup 14/ kg. A preliminary process design for the extraction of lithium from seawater is presented: seawater is first evaporated by solar energy to increase the concentration of lithium and to decrease the concentration of other cations in the bittern which then passes into a Dowex-50 ion exchange bed for cation adsorption. Lithium ions are then eluted with dilute hydrochloric acid forming an aqueous lithium chloride which is subsequently concentrated and electrolyzed. The energy requirement for lithium extraction varies between 0.08 and 2.46 kWh(e)/gm for a range of production rates varying between 10/sup 4/ and 10/sup 8/ kg/y; this is small compared to the energy produced from the use of lithium in a CTR having a value of 3400 kWh(e)/g Li. Production cost of the process is estimated to be in the range of 2.2 to 3.2 cents/g Li. As a basis for the process design, it is recommended that a phase equilibria study of the solid--liquid crystallization processes of seawater be conducted. Uncertainties exist in the operation of large solar ponds for concentrating large quantities of seawater. A search for a highly selective adsorbent or extractant for Li from low concentration aqueous solutions should be made. Other physical separation processes such as using membranes should be investigated. 9 tables. (DLC)

Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

DEVELOPMENT OF ION CHROMATOGRAPHY METHODS TO SUPPORT TESTING OF THE GLYCOLIC ACID REDUCTANT FLOWSHEET IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Ion Chromatography (IC) is the principal analytical method used to support studies of Sludge Reciept and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) chemistry at DWPF. A series of prior analytical ?Round Robin? (RR) studies included both supernate and sludge samples from SRAT simulant, previously reported as memos, are tabulated in this report.2,3 From these studies it was determined to standardize IC column size to 4 mm diameter, eliminating the capillary column from use. As a follow on test, the DWPF laboratory, the PSAL laboratory, and the AD laboratory participated in the current analytical RR to determine a suite of anions in SRAT simulant by IC, results also are tabulated in this report. The particular goal was to confirm the laboratories ability to measure and quantitate glycolate ion. The target was + or ? 20% inter-lab agreement of the analyte averages for the RR. Each of the three laboratories analyzed a batch of 12 samples. For each laboratory, the percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) of the averages on nitrate, glycolate, and oxalate, was 10% or less. The three laboratories all met the goal of 20% relative agreement for nitrate and glycolate. For oxalate, the PSAL laboratory reported an average value that was 20% higher than the average values reported by the DWPF laboratory and the AD laboratory. Because of this wider window of agreement, it was concluded to continue the practice of an additional acid digestion for total oxalate measurement. It should also be noted that large amounts of glycolate in the SRAT samples will have an impact on detection limits of near eluting peaks, namely Fluoride and Formate. A suite of scoping experiments are presented in the report to identify and isolate other potential interlaboratory disceprancies. Specific ion chromatography inter-laboratory method conditions and differences are tabulated. Most differences were minor but there are some temperature control equipment differences that are significant leading to a recommendation of a heated jacket for analytical columns that are remoted for use in radiohoods. A suggested method improvement would be to implement column temperture control at a temperature slightly above ambient to avoid peak shifting due to temperature fluctuations. Temperature control in this manner would improve short and longer term peak retention time stability. An unknown peak was observed during the analysis of glycolic acid and SRAT simulant. The unknown peak was determined to best match diglycolic acid. The development of a method for acetate is summaraized, and no significant amount of acetate was observed in the SRAT products tested. In addition, an alternative Gas Chromatograph (GC) method for glycolate is summarized.

Wiedenman, B.; White, T.; Mahannah, R.; Best, D.; Stone, M.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Coleman, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

The development and evaluation of a sensitive minicolumn assay for the detection of aflatoxin M1 in milk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aflatoxins comprise a subgroup of mycotoxins usually produced by Aspergillus parasiticus or Aspergillus flavus. Dairy cattle which ingest aflatoxin-contaminated feed will excrete aflatoxin M1 into the milk. The presence of this metabolite in milk is a concern for humans. At the present time, the best method to prevent ingestion of contaminated milk is by detection and diversion from our food supply. A field-practical method for the chemiselective immobilization and detection of aflatoxin M1 (CSID-M1) in milk has been developed in our laboratory. In this new method, aflatoxin M1 (AfM1) is selectively adsorbed in a small glass minicolumn at the interface of a layer of packed neutral sand and a narrow band of magnesium silicate (or Florisil). AfM1, at a level of 0.5 ppb or greater in contaminated milk, can be easily detected as a band of bright blue fluorescence with this assay. Briefly, whole milk- is diluted with water and passed through a C18 Sep-Pak cartridge. AfM1 is then partitioned by polarity and eluted from the cartridge with 2.5% acetone in methylene chloride. The eluate (containing AfM1) is added to the minicolumn detector. The tube is then washed with 2% methanol in methylene chloride and viewed under longwave UV light for AfM1. The limit o detection for CSID-M1 assay was determined to be 0.2 ppb compared with 0.3 ppb AfM1 using an immunoaffinity column extraction. The CSID-M1 assay was found to accurate, exhibiting no false positives or false negatives under the experimental condition imposed in this study. Also, the CSID-M1 detectors were shown to be chemically stable requiring no refrigeration for storage up to 20 weeks. In summary, the CSID-M1 assay was shown to be rapid, practical, easy to perform, and stable, thus facilitating its use in the prescreening of milk.

Cathey, Carol Grmela

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chemical and biological methods for the analysis and remediation of environmental contaminants frequently identified at Superfund sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial environmental contamination has occurred from coal tar creosote and pentachlorophenol (C5P) in wood preserving solutions. The present studies focused on the characterization and remediation of these contaminants. The first objective was to delineate a sequence of biological changes caused by chlorinated phenol (CP) exposure. In Clone 9 cells, short-term exposure to 10 ?M C5P decreased pH, GJIC, and GSH, and increased ROS generation. Long-term exposure caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization (25 ?M), increased intracellular Ca2+ (50 ?M), and plasma membrane depolarization (100 ?M). Cells were affected similarly by C5P or 2,3,4,5-C4P, and similarly by 2,3,5-C3P or 3,5-C2P. Endpoints were affected by dose, time, and the number of chlorine substituents on specific congeners. Thus, this information may be used to identify and quantify unknown CPs in a mixture to be remediated. Due to the toxic effects observed due to CP exposure in vitro, the objective of the second study was to develop multi-functional sorbents to remediate CPs and other components of wood preserving waste from groundwater. Cetylpyridinium-exchanged low pH montmorillonite clay (CP-LPHM) was bonded to either sand (CP-LPHM/sand) or granular activated carbon (CP-LPHM/GAC). Laboratory studies utilizing aqueous solution derived from wood preserving waste indicated that 3:2 CP-LPHM/GAC and CP-LPHM/sand were the most effective formulations. In situ elution of oil-water separator effluent indicated that both organoclay-containing composites have a high capacity for contaminants identified in wood preserving waste, in particular high molecular weight and carcinogenic PAHs. Further, GAC did not add substantial sorptive capacity to the composite formulation. Following water remediation, the final aim of this work was to explore the safety of the parent clay minerals as potential enterosorbents for contaminants ingested in water and food. Calcium montmorillonite and sodium montmorillonite clays were added to the balanced diet of Sprague-Dawley rats throughout pregnancy. Based on evaluations of toxicity and neutron activation analysis of tissues, no significant differences were observed between animals receiving clay supplements and control animals, with the exception of slightly decreased brain Rb in animals ingesting clay. Overall, the results suggest that neither clay mineral, at relatively high dietary concentrations, influences mineral uptake or utilization in the pregnant rat.

Wiles, Melinda Christine

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Developing Fieldable Systems for Chemical Sensing Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there is an urgent need for field-rugged and field-programmable sensor systems that provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. These devices must be portable, low cost, robust, and provide accurate measurements to avoid both false positive and negative results. Furthermore, the information provided by the devices must be received in a timely manner so that informed decisions can be immediately made and the appropriate actions taken. Two technologies that are unparalleled in their sensitivity, selectivity, and trace-level detection capabilities are field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry. Here, we will show progress that has been made toward developing fieldable FAIMS systems and mass spectrometers. Working in collaboration with Sionex Corporation, the microDMx detector was equipped with a continuous air sampling system to develop selective methods for the analysis of compounds of interest. A microdiaphragm pump (KNF Neuberger, Inc.) is used to pull in gas-phase analytes directly from the air for separation and detection with the FAIMS system. The FAIMS evaluation platform (SVAC) unit currently measures 9.8-inch x 4.6-inch x 3.2-inch, weighs 3.1 lb, and utilizes a {sup 63}Ni source to ionize incoming compounds. Analytes entering the unit are separated and identified by their characteristic response to the compensation voltage (V{sub c}) at a given rf field strength (V{sub rf}). This response has been observed to be unique for a wide range of substances studied. If additional verification were required or a targeted analyte present in a complex chemical matrix, a FAIMS unit equipped with a fast gas chromatography column has been evaluated. The unit combines the separation capabilities of gas chromatography with the selectivity of FAIMS. It measures 9.5-inch x 5.25-inch x 3.5-inch, weighs 3.8 lb, and uses a 10.6 eV photoionization source. Analytes are identified both by their elution time from the column and by the characteristic response in the FAIMS spectrum. Analysis times required to obtain results for most analytes examined are less than three minutes. A fieldable mass spectrometer system is also being developed that includes sampling, ionization, mass selection and detection, vacuum technology, and analytical methodology with remote data transmission. Multiple methods for mass selection are being explored, including both Penning and Paul type ion traps as well as a quadrupole system to determine which is best suited for a portable mass spectrometer. Several ionization sources and ion counting methods will also be evaluated to establish their effectiveness with each system. The intended result of this project is a handheld mass spectrometer system capable of field deployment for the detection and identification of a wide range of gas-phase CBE species.

Kevin Kyle, Stephan Weeks, R. Trainham

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University /Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

225

Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure Characterization - We extended our previous work on studying the time evolution of patterns associated with phase separation in conserved concentration fields. (6) Probabilistic Homology Validation - work on microstructure characterization is based on numerically studying the homology of certain sublevel sets of a function, whose evolution is described by deterministic or stochastic evolution equations. (7) Computational Homology and Dynamics - Topological methods can be used to rigorously describe the dynamics of nonlinear systems. We are approaching this problem from several perspectives and through a variety of systems. (8) Stress Networks in Polycrystals - we have characterized stress networks in polycrystals. This part of the project is aimed at developing homological metrics which can aid in distinguishing not only microstructures, but also derived mechanical response fields. (9) Microstructure-Controlled Drug Release - This part of the project is concerned with the development of topological metrics in the context of controlled drug delivery systems, such as drug-eluting stents. We are particularly interested in developing metrics which can be used to link the processing stage to the resulting microstructure, and ultimately to the achieved system response in terms of drug release profiles. (10) Microstructure of Fuel Cells - we have been using our computational homology software to analyze the topological structure of the void, metal and ceramic components of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z