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1

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion concerns, calcium acetate and magnesium acetate will be tested instead of calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively. Nitric acid is for benchmarking since it is the baseline sRF eluant. The information at hand indicates ammonium hydroxide, while a weak base, may hold promise as an effective eluant. Hence, its inclusion among the eluants to be studied despite the fact that it was not tested as a stand-alone eluant earlier.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moody to participate in "Frontiers of Engineering" Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of Engineering" symposium Engineers between 30 to 45 who are...

4

Improved Approximations for Max Set Splitting and Max NAE SAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved Approximations for Max Set Splitting and Max NAE SAT #3; Jiawei Zhang and Yinyu Ye y Nanjing, 210093, P.R.China August 16, 2000, Revised January 22, 2001. #3; This research was supported Fudan University, Shanghai, R.R.China. z This work was done while the author was visiting Computational

Ye, Yinyu

5

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" April 29, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Tom for that kind introduction. And I want to commend you, Norm Augustine and Chuck Vest for your continued leadership on these issues. You are powerful voices for urgent and sustained action to preserve this nation's technological preeminence - and our economic competitiveness. It's a pleasure to be here with you all, and with my good friends Margaret and Carlos. It strikes me that we are in the fortunate position of

6

Sequential elution process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

Kingsley, I.S.

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

7

Alternative Non-Acid Eluants for Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde  

SciTech Connect

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in or near high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE Complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange (IX) resin under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step IX process is typically done with nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A non-acid eluant may be a viable alternative. It will eliminate the need for special acid handling requirements within the tank farms.

Adu-Wusu, Kofi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moody to participate in "Frontiers of Engineering" Moody to participate in "Frontiers of Engineering" Los Alamos engineer selected to participate in NAE's 2012 "Frontiers of Engineering" symposium Engineers between 30 to 45 who are performing exceptional engineering research and technical work in a variety of disciplines attend the 2-1/2 day event. August 22, 2012 Nathan Moody Nathan Moody Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email Nathan Moody, specialist in electromagnetic radiation, honored LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, August 22, 2012-Nathan Moody of Los Alamos National Laboratory is among 78 of the nation's brightest young engineers selected for the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) 18th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium. Engineers between 30 to 45 who are

9

Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater  

SciTech Connect

Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina NOTE: EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS REVISION 0 EXCEPT THE END DATE IS EXTENDED. Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol- Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently.

11

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina NOTE: EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS REVISION 0 EXCEPT THE END DATE IS EXTENDED. Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol- Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently.

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated elution time Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

locateyprep Summary: to a chromatographic column packed with immobilized polyethylene glycol 20,000 (PEG 20 K) followed by pulse elution... elution with 8 M urea was...

13

ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom ELUTIONS Inc formerly TeCom Jump to: navigation, search Name ELUTIONS Inc (formerly TeCom) Place Tampa, Florida Zip 33605 Sector Efficiency Product Tampa-based wireless enterprise automation solutions firm. Elutions provides an Active Energy Management service allowing users to increase efficiency by monitoring, forecasting and analyzing utility resource consumption. Coordinates 27.94653°, -82.459269° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.94653,"lon":-82.459269,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Alternate Methods For Eluting Cesium From Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect

A Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removing cesium from the supernate and dissolved salt solutions in the high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX system could use either crystalline silicotitanate (CST) an inorganic, non-regenerable sorbent or spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), a new regenerable resin, to remove cesium from the waste solutions. The standard method for eluting the cesium from the RF resin uses 15-20 bed volumes (BV) of 0.5 M nitric acid (HNO3). The nitric acid eluate, containing the radioactive cesium, would be combined with the sludge from the waste tanks, and would be converted into glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS. The amount of nitric acid generated by the standard elution method exceeds the capacity of DWPF to destroy the nitrate ions and maintain the required chemical reducing conditions in the glass melt. Alternate methods for eluting the resin have been tested, including using lower concentrations of nitric acid, other acids, and changing the flow regimes. About 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M nitric acid are required to remove the sodium (titrate the resin) and most of the cesium from the resin, so the bulk of the acid used for the standard elution method removes a very small quantity of cesium from the resin. The resin was loaded with 9.5 g Cs/L of resin prior to elution, which is the maximum expected loading for RF resin treating the actual dissolved salt waste at SRS. For the baseline elution method, 465 g of nitrate is used per liter of resin, and >99.9999% of the cesium is removed from the resin. An alternative method that used 4 bed volumes of 0.5 M HNO3 followed by 11 bed volumes of 0.05 M HNO3, used 158 g of nitrate per liter of resin (66% less nitrate than used for the standard elution) and removed >99.998% of the cesium. A staccato flow mode using 0.5 M HNO3 (1 hr on at 1 BV/hr, followed by 3 hrs off) after the resin had been titrated using a continuous flow of acid at 1 BV/hr removed 99.9998% of the cesium while using 12 BV of acid (20% less than the baseline). Formic acid was slightly less efficient than nitric acid for eluting the resin, but 20 BV of 0.5 M HCOOH removed 99.98% of the cesium from the resin.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Johnson, Heather Lauren [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Solute Band Broadening Effects in Gas-Adsorption Elution Chromatography in Packed Columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plate height for linear gas adsorption elution chro- matography may be written as (13) H=(A+ u PX +CuXPx ) Y1(p) + C2u Eq. 12 where the coefficients are interpreted as follows (13, 14) A=2Xdp , Eq. 13 B = 2yD 1 Eq. 14 (1-- '/E + k......

P. C. van Berge; V. Pretorius

1964-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

500: Categorical Exclusion Determination 500: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/24/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cesium (Cs)-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with

17

NAE National Meeting Thursday February 7, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" "" """ "" """ "Our Times" Yannis C. Yortsos University of Southern California #12;"This is the most #12;» Make Solar Energy Economical " » Provide Energy from Fusion" » Develop Carbon Sequestration environmental stresses, but also with the capacity to generate new challenges

Zhou, Chongwu

18

Twelve or 30 Months of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy after Drug-Eluting Stents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...noncardiovascular causes of death. Statistical Analysis. The primary efficacy analysis was a superiority analysis performed with the use of the log-rank test, with stratification according to geographic region (North America, Europe, or Australia and New Zealand), thienopyridine drug received at the time... Patients who had received a drug-eluting stent and then dual antiplatelet therapy for 12 months were randomly assigned to 18 more months of therapy or aspirin alone. Continued therapy resulted in lower rates of stent thrombosis and major adverse cardiovascular events but more bleeding.

Mauri L.; Kereiakes D.J.; Yeh R.W.

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71: Categorical Exclusion Determination 71: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office NOTE: EVERYTHING IS THE SAME AS REVISION 0 EXCEPT THE END DATE IS EXTENDED. Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high

20

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 6490 of 28,905 results. 81 - 6490 of 28,905 results. Download CX-001367: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heavy Water Disposition Offsite, K-Area CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 03/16/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001367-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005497: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operations in Laboratory 773-A, B135/139 CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005497-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 27, 2012 March 27, 2012 CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 27, 2012 CX-008370: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operation of Tube Furnace for Synthesis of Hydrogen Storage Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 23, 2012 CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 22, 2012 CX-008374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

22

Column Experiments for Radionuclide Adsorption Studies of the Culebra Dolomite: Retardation Parameter Estimation for Non-Eluted Actinide Species  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Performance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long-term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanism, migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of Th, U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quanti~ parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of mathematical analyses related to the retardation of %J%, 24%, and 24'Am in two of these cores (B-Core - VPX26-11A and C-Core - VPX28-6C). All B-Core transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AIS). Most experiments with C-Core were done with AIS brine with some admixture of a brine composition (ERDA-6) that simulated deeper formation brines. No significant changes in transport behavior were observed for changes in brine. Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for the cores were obtained via experiments using conservative tracer `Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers `*U and %Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of these species. Elution experiments with tracers `%, 24'Pu, and 24'Ani were performed, but no elution of any of these species was observed in any flow experiment to date, including experiments of up to two years duration. However, B-Core was subjected to tomographic analysis from which a retardation factor can be inferred for%. Moreover, the fact of non- elution for 24*Pu and 24'Am after more than two years brine flow through C-Core can be coupled with the minimum detectable activity for each of these species to compute minimum retardation factors in C-Core. The retardation factors for all three species can then be coupled with the apparent hydraulic characteristics to estimate an apparent minimum solutionhock distribution coefficient, &, for each actinide. The specific radionuclide isotopes used in these experiments were chosen to facilitate analysis. Even though these isotopes are not necessarily the same as those that are most important to WIPP performance, they are isotopes of the same elements, and . their chemical and transport properties are therefore identical to those of isotopes in the WIPP inventory. The retardation factors and & values deduced from experimental results strongly support the contention that sorption in the Culebra provides an effective barrier to release of Th, Pu, and Am during the regulatory period.

Brown, G.O.; Lucero, D.A.; Perkins, W.G.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Sex-related Impact on Clinical Outcome of Everolimus-eluting Versus Bare-metal Stents in ST-segment Myocardial Infarction. Insights From the EXAMINATION Trial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction and objectives The use of second-generation drug-eluting stents compared with bare-metal stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reduces the rate of major adverse cardiac events. We aimed to evaluate the impact of sex on the performance of everolimus-eluting stents vs bare-metal stents in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction at 2-year follow-up. Methods This is a sub-study of the EXAMINATION trial that randomized 1498 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to everolimus-eluting or bare-metal stents. Primary end point was combined all-cause death, any recurrent myocardial infarction, and any revascularization. All end points were analyzed according to sex at 2-year follow-up. Results Of 1498 patients included in the trial, 254 (17.0%) were women. Women were older and had higher prevalence of hypertension and lower prevalence of smoking compared with men. In contrast with men, stent diameter was smaller in women. After multivariate analysis, the primary end point was similar between women and men (hazard ratio=0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.37), and among women, between those treated with bare-metal vs everolimus-eluting stents (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-6.46). Women showed a lower rate of repeat revascularization than men (hazard ratio=0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.95) despite worse baseline characteristics. This difference was driven by better performance of the everolimus-eluting stent in women. Conclusions Despite poorer baseline clinical characteristics, women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention showed outcomes similar to men. The use of everolimus-eluting stents may represent an added value in women as it showed a reduced rate of repeated revascularization compared to men.

Ander Regueiro; Diego Fernndez-Rodrguez; Salvatore Brugaletta; Victoria Martn-Yuste; Monica Masotti; Xavier Freixa; ngel Cequier; Andrs iguez; Patrick W. Serruys; Manel Sabat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Introduction In the year 2000 the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) issued the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of homes and businesses, clean water, refrigeration and air conditioning), as well as advances Institute of Technology (IIT) and Chicago Council on Science and Technology (C2ST), along with our academic of the 14 Grand Challenges: clean water; carbon, energy and climate; urban sustainability; and global

Heller, Barbara

25

USCViterbi//Engineer USC'S NEW PRESIDENT // NAE GRAND CHALLENGES SUMMIT // HEALTH CARE VIA MOBILE PHONE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsed Power Group is experimenting with plasma ignition to develop cleaner, more efficient diesel.0 PARTICLES 4 Diesel Emissions 5 Power Cell Phones 20

Zhou, Chongwu

26

NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

fortunate position of "preaching to the choir" today. After all, there are few things we care more passionately about than the need to strengthen America's position in the world...

27

Identification of Eluted Components in Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... at some intermediate stage could be subjected to in-line reaction using micro-reactors or pyrolysis units. A fascinating example of this type of application was described in which the ... that support activity could be measured in this manner and indicated that a commercially available silane-treated product was the least adsorptive of those investigated. It was also considered that ...

C. G. SCOTT

1966-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Current Research at BBISS John C. Crittenden, Ph.D., N.A.E., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Analysis Sergiy Smetana PhD, CEE Fulbright Scholar Visiting Student, Institute of NatureD, CEE Sichuan University Electrochemical degradation of organic pollutants. Yuheng Feng Visiting Student, PhD, CEE Zhejian University Catalytic degradation of dioxin using computational chemistry. Xia Yang

Das, Suman

29

Curriculum Vitae for John C. Crittenden, Ph.D., P.E., N.A.E. (Revised: 6/11/2014)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Director, Center for Clean Industrial and Treatment Technology, an EPA Funded Research Center of Excellence Technologies School of Civil and Environmental Engineering 828 West Peachtree, Suite 320B Atlanta Systems, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology (January 1

Jacobs, Laurence J.

30

Engine Design for LIFE Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 2 #12;The LIFE "chamber" is an unsealed, segmented array sitting within a low pressure gas environment Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF Latkowski -- NAS/NAE, January 2011NIF-0111-20839s2.ppt 4 #12;Once moved to the engine bay, cooling

31

Solute Band Broadening Effects in Gas-Adsorption Elution Chromatography in Packed Columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......column. Gas pressures at the inlet and outlet were measured on mercury-in- glass manometers. Measurements of the carrier gas velocity...cient in gas phase at one at- mosphere, cm2 sec-' atm. Dla - apparent gas diffusion coeffi- cient of a solute in the pores......

P. C. van Berge; V. Pretorius

1964-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Modeling Elution Histories of Copper and Lead from Contaminated Soil Treated by Poly,,amidoamine... Dendrimers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedures; Heavy metals; Soil pollution; Soil treatment. In recent years, extraction of heavy metals from transport models do not simulate the dynamic leaching process of heavy metals desorbed by the water soluble soil treated by poly amidoamine dendrimers. In the model, the metal sorption sites of the soil were

Clement, Prabhakar

33

The Role of Neutron Activation Analysis in the Pathological Evaluation of Silver-Eluting Biomedical Devices in Biological Matrices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to their presence was not observed. INAA results correlated with these findings; silver was not detected adjacent to the test article, but a concentration of 74 ppm 29% of silver was observed in tissue adjacent to the control article. A complex system of ordinary...

Lancon, Trevor

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

34

Poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) elution from polysulfone dialysis membranes by varying solvent and wall shear stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Packed water was collected from both the dialysate and blood sides of the wet-type dialyzer APS-15SA. The dialysate and blood sides of the moist- and dry-type dialyzers CX-1.6U and FX140, respectively...

Koki Namekawa; Masato Matsuda; Makoto Fukuda; Ami Kaneko

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ethanolamide Oxylipins of Linolenic Acid Can Negatively Regulate Arabidopsis Seedling Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydroxy-octadecatrienoylethanolamides|AOS, allene oxide synthase|AOC, allene oxide cyclase|AEA, arachidonoyl...Arabidopsis AOS and allene oxide cyclase (AOC) metabolized in vivo the ethanolamides...13-NAE-HPOT is also metabolized by AOS and/or AOC to generate the unstable epoxide and NAE-OPDA...

Jantana Keereetaweep; Elison B. Blancaflor; Ellen Hornung; Ivo Feussner; Kent D. Chapman

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

N-Acylethanolamine Metabolism Interacts with Abscisic Acid Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...controls, revealed a shift in the dose-response curve for NAE12:0-induced...analysis of microarrays applied to the ionizing radiation responses. Proc. Natl. Acad...acylamides that are present in a wide range of organisms. In plants, NAEs...

Neal D. Teaster; Christy M. Motes; Yuhong Tang; William C. Wiant; Matthew Q. Cotter; Yuh-Shuh Wang; Aruna Kilaru; Barney J. Venables; Karl H. Hasenstein; Gabriel Gonzalez; Elison B. Blancaflor; Kent D. Chapman

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfven eigenmode induced Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the NAE modes12... the MAE modes15,16 (Mirror-induced Alfven Eigenmodes) and numerous types of HAE modes15-18 ... Source: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Theory Department...

38

Being water-sensi-ve to improve `liveability' Prof David Pannell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollutants ­ keeps them out of waterways & estuaries · Stormwater management · Na;es 2012 Combining water sources · Groundwater · Dams · Desal · Recycling · Rainwater

39

Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAE-AAES Convocation of the Professional Engineering Societies April 28, 2014 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in...

40

Purification of EE-Mot1 Using Antibody-Coupled Beads Perform all steps except quick spins and peptide elution at 4 degrees. Use about 100 mg of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auble Lab Purification of EE-Mot1 Using Antibody-Coupled Beads Perform all steps except quick spins and check purification by western blot. #12;Auble Lab HEG Buffer, 500 ml 20 mM HEPES 4.77 g 1 mM EDTA 2 ml 0. Make stock 0.5 M DTT in water (store at -20) Stock detergents: 10% NP40 in water and 5% octyl glucoside

Auble, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Apex Peptide Elution Chain Selection: A New Strategy for Selecting Precursors in 2D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF Experiments on Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,,§ Bert Poolman, and Hjalmar P. Permentier*, Department of Biochemistry, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG, Groningen, The Netherlands, Groningen Bioinformatics Centre, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, 9751 NN, Haren, The Netherlands, and Faculty of Biomedical and Life Sciences

Breitling, Rainer

42

1.1 0.2 were bound to the column and were eluted by 30 mM and 1 M HCI, respec-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infusion on postabsorp- tive glycemia in non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). V Rigalleau previously reported a hyper- glycemic effect of a lipid infusion in the postabsorptive state in NIDD patients patients. Fifteen received a 180 min lipid infusion (')veiip20%'; 0.0155 mUkg/min) and 15 received saline

Boyer, Edmond

43

"1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130 "2. Indian River Operations","Coal","Indian River Operations Inc",795 "3. Edge Moor","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",723 "5. McKee Run","Gas","NAES Corporation",136 "6. NRG Energy Center Dover","Coal","NRG Energy Center Dover LLC",100 "7. Warren F Sam Beasley Generation Station","Gas","Delaware Municipal Electric Corp",48 "8. Christiana","Petroleum","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",45 "9. Van Sant Station","Gas","NAES Corporation",39

44

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently. Tanks containing highly alkaline radioactive waste are made of carbon steel. Use of an acid eluant may pose a hazard to the tank integrity (corrosion and associated structural damage) in the event of a spill, leak, etc. A non-acid eluant may be a viable alternative. It will eliminate the need for special acid handling requirements within the

45

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt Plans are underway to use small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange (IX) resin, known for its high selectivity for cesium in highly alkaline radioactive wastes, is the baseline material under consideration for the Hanford site. It is a weak acid cation (WAC) exchange resin and as a result has a high affinity for hydrogen ions. Therefore, it is easily eluted with acid solutions. Nitric acid is used most frequently. Tanks containing highly alkaline radioactive waste are made of carbon steel. Use of an acid eluant may pose a hazard to the tank integrity (corrosion and associated structural damage) in the event of a spill, leak, etc. A non-acid eluant may be a viable alternative. It will eliminate the need for special acid handling requirements within the

46

THE VITERBI USCViterbi//Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-engineering the brain and making solar energy economical. For more on the 14 NAE Grand Challenges, visit wwwTHE VITERBI ENERgy TABlEAu USCViterbi//Engineer UsC PResidenT sTeven b. samPle On en a huge obstacle for me to attend classes in person. Fortunately, the online DEN program at USC made

Zhou, Chongwu

47

House Policy Group Reviews Science Academies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...heard in the fall, will be the culmination a 5-year legal battle. The law, which was approved by the Louisiana state legislature...corporate gifts might carry a different kind oftaint. (The NAE is midway in a campaign to raise $30 million from companies for studies...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

48

FYI: July 3, 1974 - December 19, 1974  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)eading, subarranged by titles 2) Identic~ title added entries, by their main e~tries . subarranged alphabetically 3) Nsme with corporate subdivisions, the subdi vis ions interfiled alphabeticall:" with titles, longer corpQrate na~es beginning with the sa~e words...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Welcome to the Columbia Journey Seminar, and to the year-long project that will be the culmination of your First-Year Scholar experience! We invite you to use this Handbook and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to dive in. #12;2010-11 JOURNEY SEMINAR GRAND ENGINEERING CHALLENGES 1. Provide Energy From Fusion 1 2. Engineer the Tools of Scientific Discovery 41 #12;PROVIDE ENERGY FROM FUSION Summary from N.A.E. Grand knowledge of broad subjects like sustainable energy, clean water, or virtual reality, and to hone your

Hone, James

50

MA 161 W/ MA 161E  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 28, 2007 ... S M I T H much! nae? 8. 3. 10. 10. 10. 11. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 10. 11. 12. 13 12 11. 13. 14. 14 13 12 11. 14 13 12. 14 13 12 11. 14 13 12 11.

51

Evaluation of cytotoxicity, biophysics and biomechanics of cells treated with functionalized hybrid nanomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Subbiah 1 2 Subramaniyan Ramasundaram 3 Ping Du 1 2 Kim Hyojin 2 Dongkyung Sung 4 Kwideok...1 2 Nae-Eung Lee 3 Kyusik Yun 5 Kyoung Jin Choi 6 e-mail: ykyusik@gachon.ac...nn900416z ) 35 Ren, J , S Shen, D Wang, Z Xi, L Guo, Z Pang, Y Qian, X Sun, and...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Formation and stability of oxygen-rich bubbles that shape photosynthetic mats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation and stability of oxygen-rich bubbles that shape photosynthetic mats T. BOSAK,1 J. W. M and stability of oxygen-rich bubbles enmeshed by filamentous cyanobacteria. Sub-millimetric and millimetric bubbles can be stable for weeks and even months. During this time, lithifying organic-rich lami- nae

Bush, John W.M.

53

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. 11 - 18920 of 28,560 results. Download Newsletter (May 2011) SHR.pub http://energy.gov/management/downloads/newsletter-may-2011-shrpub Article NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman http://energy.gov/articles/nas-nae-national-convocation-rising-above-gathering-storm-two-years-later-accelerating Download Preliminary Notice of Violation, Isotopes Idaho, Inc.- EA-2000-04 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to International Isotopes Idaho, Inc., related to Work Planning and Control Deficiencies associated with Replacement of Exhaust Ventilation Filters at the Test Reactor Area Hot Cell Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

54

The growth of single-crystals of Pb-K-Niobate and temperature dependence of dielectric property  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) According to the Lorentz relation the total internal field is 1 Et =E+ ? P 3ep (29) Then the polarization can be written as P = NoEz (3O) 23 P=Xo E ?, P (31) Now solving for P or, NaE P=? 1 ?? NU. 3EU (32) Also, P No Na SUU (33) From...) According to the Lorentz relation the total internal field is 1 Et =E+ ? P 3ep (29) Then the polarization can be written as P = NoEz (3O) 23 P=Xo E ?, P (31) Now solving for P or, NaE P=? 1 ?? NU. 3EU (32) Also, P No Na SUU (33) From...

Islam, Faizul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Image  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment, Assessment, 404(b) (1) Evaluation, and Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Permit Application #NAE 2008-410 Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 4 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................. 4 1.2 Overview of Proposed Action and Alternatives ...................................................... 6 1.3 Affected Environment/Function and Value of Resources Impacted ....................... 8 1.4 Environmental Consequences/Public Interest Impacts ............................................ 9 2. Purpose and Need for Action ........................................................................................................ 11

56

A paleoenvironmental study of the Lower Mississippian Caballero Formation and Andrecito member of the Lake Valley Formation in the south-central Sacramento Mountains, Otero County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to very coarse sand wavy upper and lom. r surfscesi rare thin wavy beds very little, associated with thfn wavy beds crinoids, fenestrate bryozoaas burzmwsi rare to high/shallow abundant horizon- tal. rare vertical occasional grain flow... beds with rounded mud rich clastsl rare whole brachlopods and horn coral A2 Mackestones to Plckstones olive gray to olive black fine to coarse sand thin beds wfth wavy upper and lower surfaces Interbedded calcareous shale lami- nae...

George, Peter Gillham

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Bovine Leukemia Virus SU Protein Interacts with Zinc, and Mutations within Two Interacting Regions Differently Affect Viral Fusion and Infectivity In Vivo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...elution solution had the same composition except that EDTA was added at...conditions at the Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Center (Machelen, Belgium...addition of elution buffer (the same composition as load and wash buffer except...

Jean-Stphane Gatot; Isabelle Callebaut; Carine Van Lint; Dominique Demont; Pierre Kerkhofs; Daniel Portetelle; Arsne Burny; Luc Willems; Richard Kettmann

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ureides in active and nitrate-repressed soybean nodules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Flow chart for acid extraction and assays of soybean bacteroids, nodules, and free-living Rhizobium. Elution profile of acid-soluble protein. . . Elution profile of acid-soluble ureides. . . Elution profile of acid-soluble protein... and ureides from soybean nodules 21 22 Elution profile of acid-soluble protein and ureioes from isolated bacteroids 26 10 Schematic drawing of TLC plates of extracts from soybean nodules. 27 Schematic drawing of TLC plates of extr acts from isolated...

Bundy, Timothy K.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Automation of Fluorous Solid-Phase Extraction for Parallel Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automation of Fluorous Solid-Phase Extraction for Parallel Synthesis ... Cartridge conditioning, sample loading, elution, and rinsing are automated. ...

Wei Zhang; Yimin Lu

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monthly Progress Report No. 59 for March 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

europium, samarium, and promethium are eluted well ahead ofcome off ahead of promethium and possibly even ahead of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Monthly Progress Report No. 59 for March 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

europium, samarium, and promethium are eluted well ahead ofcome off ahead of promethium and possibly even ahead of

Various

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: D, h&Z *_ --------------__ SITE NA,,E: -------- CITY: -%+&6!? -------------------------- STATE: CT cr: 13 ------ WNERL_S, Past: -------_____-----_-_____ current: -----------------------~-- Owner contacted q yes q no; if yes, date contacted / TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- J& Research & Development i \ 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis m Production e9 Facility Type p Manufacturing rJ University $ Research Organizat 0 Government Sponsor 0 Other I ------------ ,-, I I TFaLility Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, Contract/Purchase ~~~~---~~~_---~~~~---------- I OWNERSHiP: AEC/MED AECbED GOVT GOUT I CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR

64

Centipedes and Millipedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and are commonly found in soil or leaf litter and under rocks or wood. Description Both centipedes and millipedes have long, segmented bodies connected to heads with a single pair of anten- nae. Centipedes vary from brown to grey to red to green- ish..., protected habitats, for example, under stones, rotted logs, leaves or bark. Although a few species give birth to live young, most centipedes lay eggs in soil during the warm months. The eggs are covered by a sticky substance. Centipedes are predators...

Brown, Wizzie

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

65

Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Major articles/reports in this issue include: An interesting year ahead of us, by Tom Christopher, AREVA NP Inc.; U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Cooperation; Decontamination and recycling of retired components, by Sean P. Brushart, Electric Power Research Institute; and, ANO is 33 and going strong, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The industry innovation article is: Continuous improvement process, by ReNae Kowalewski, Arkansas Nuclear One.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Section C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

established for the ILAW melter system. The Cs removal process shall use an elutable ion exchange resin. Resin selection shall consider technical acceptability and life cycle...

67

Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pavlo. 2005. Do iodine water purification tablets provide an1997. Efficacy of iodine water purification tablets againstwater: 1) concentration and filtration, 2) elution and purification

Wainwright, Katlyn E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

EC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT .:'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

removed from the resin by continuous countercurrent elution either in a column or tanks. Uranium reduction processes employing sodium amalgam and hydrogen were studied in the...

69

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-081 Idaho EC B3-6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use - Simulated seawater containing 10 ppm of natural uranium will be used for sorption and elution experiments using amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. Radioactive Waste...

70

STUDIES IN THE NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY OF PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM, AND CURIUM AND MASSES OF THE HEAVIEST ELEMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMISTRY OF PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM, AND CURIUM AND THE MASSESTO ION EXCHANGE SEPARATIONS OF AMERICIUM AND CURIUM A. B.5. Tartrate elutions of americium and curium from Dowex-50

Glass, Richard Alois

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

El TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FROM Kn= O-AND Kn=1- STATES OF 238Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ratio 1:8x1o-6 Americium and curium were separated fromthen separated from the americium by elution from a cation-

Lederer, C. Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A New Method for the Preparation of Adsorbents for Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE technique of chromatography, as used at present, is limited to a few adsorbents and usually to non-aqueous systems, due to the difficulty of elution of the ... the difficulty of elution of the adsorbate. However, aqueous systems could be used if adsorbents were available which permitted adsorption and desorption to be controlled by pH. adjustment. This ...

D. E. WEISS

1948-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Comparison of the Cellular DNA-bound Products of Benzo(a)pyrene with the Products Formed by the Reaction of Benzo(a)pyrene-4,5-oxide with DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waschromatographedwith a 30 to 100% water:methanol gradient as described...eluted with a similar 30 to 100% water:methanol gradient. The elution...Relation between Carcinogenic Power of Hydrocarbons and Their Binding...Derivatives in Mutagenesis and Car cinogenesis. Cancer Res...

William M. Baird; Ronald G. Harvey; and Peter Brookes

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Technetium-99m generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A .sup.99 Mo/.sup.99m Tc generator system includes a sorbent column loaded with a composition containing .sup.99 Mo. The sorbent column has an effluent end in fluid communication with an anion-exchange column for concentrating .sup.99m Tc eluted from the sorbent column. A method of preparing a concentrated solution of .sup.99m Tc includes the general steps of: a. providing a sorbent column loaded with a composition containing .sup.99 Mo, the sorbent column having an effluent end in fluid communication with an anion-exchange column; b. eluting the sorbent column with a salt solution to elute .sup.99m Tc from the sorbent and to trap and concentrate the eluted .sup.99m Tc on the ion-exchange column; and c. eluting the concentrated .sup.99m Tc from the ion-exchange column with a solution comprising a reductive complexing agent.

Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Emory D. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Technetium-99m generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generator system includes a sorbent column loaded with a composition containing {sup 99}Mo. The sorbent column has an effluent end in fluid communication with an anion-exchange column for concentrating {sup 99m}Tc eluted from the sorbent column. A method of preparing a concentrated solution of {sup 99m}Tc includes the general steps of: (a) providing a sorbent column loaded with a composition containing {sup 99}Mo, the sorbent column having an effluent end in fluid communication with an anion-exchange column; (b) eluting the sorbent column with a salt solution to elute {sup 99m}Tc from the sorbent and to trap and concentrate the eluted {sup 99m}Tc on the ion-exchange column; and (c) eluting the concentrated {sup 99m}Tc from the ion-exchange column with a solution comprising a reductive complexing agent. 1 fig.

Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Collins, E.D.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Ruthton Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ruthton Wind Farm Ruthton Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ruthton Wind Farm Facility Ruthton Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lincoln County MN Coordinates 44.4039°, -96.2646° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4039,"lon":-96.2646,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-.. -.. 37qg: MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE =b-- FROM: ---L- _------__ u . SUBJECT: SITE ACl= ALTERNATE NAME: -_______-~-----------------NA~E:__( CITY:--~---------_-STATE:-~~ (2 OWNE!sI_SL f Past- L&cl= w ------------------- ----- Current- w buL.r - ------------ ownq cm-ltacted 0 yes @ "no; if yes, data cnntacte TYPE OF OPERATION -------------_~-~ q Research & Development 0 Production %.cale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production i2 Disposal/Storage 0 Facility T 0 Hanufac 0 Univerrj 0 .R esearc 0 Governm 14 Other 1 I lil IrJ y,/3 Prime 0 Other infcrkion Subcwkractbr (i.e., ?bst + fixed fee! &nit price, Cl Purchase Order time & mate

78

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

79

Framing the Energy Technology Menu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Future of Coal and Future of Coal and Nuclear Power Ernest J. Moniz Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems Director, MIT Energy Initiative EIA April 2008 2 NAE Engineering Achievement of the Twentieth Century l Electrification l Reflects both the technological challenge of this continent- scale system and the ubiquitous contribution to quality of life 3 Annual Per Capita Electricity Use (kWh) 4 MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change H. Jacoby and R. Prinn, co-directors 5 A NEW WHEEL with lower odds of EXTREMES What would we buy with STABILIZATION of CO 2 at 550 ppm? Compared with NO POLICY HOW CAN WE EXPRESS THE VALUE OF A CLIMATE POLICY UNDER UNCERTAINTY? http://web.mit.edu/globalchange/ 6 ATMOSPHERE 750 VEGETATION & SOILS 2,190 OCEAN 40,000 60.0 61.3

80

North Shaokatan Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Shaokatan Wind Farm North Shaokatan Wind Farm Facility North Shaokatan Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Lincoln County MN Coordinates 44.393089°, -96.425042° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.393089,"lon":-96.425042,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Reviews News and Reviews Pulsed Power in the News Nuclear fusion simulation shows high-gain energy output (March 2012) Rapid-fire pulse brings Sandia Z method closer to goal of high-yield fusion reactor (April 2007) Ice created in nanoseconds by Sandia's Z machine (March 2007) Z-Machine Shockwaves Melt Diamond (November 2006) Phase diagram of water revised by Sandia researchers (October 2006) Z fires objects faster than Earth moves through space (June 6, 2005) Sandia imagists view imploding wire arrays on Z (November 10, 2004) Z's $61.7 million refurbishment to advance capabilities (October 21, 2004) Z produces fusion neutrons (April 7, 2003) Former shock physics manager (Asay) elected to NAE (February 20, 2003) Z-Beamlet image shows Z evenly compresses pellet (August 30, 2001)

82

EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

801: Final Environmental Impact 801: Final Environmental Impact EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire Granite Reliable Power, LLC, a subsidiary of Noble Environmental Power, has applied for a permit from the Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers for authorization to discharge dredged or fill materials into jurisdictional waters of the United States in connection with the proposed construction of a wind-driven electrical power generating facility in Coos County, New Hampshire. Environmental Assessment,404(b) (1) Evaluation, and Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Permit Application #NAE 2008-410, DOE/EA-1801 (2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1782: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0317-S1: Environmental Impact Statement, Appendices

83

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, Orange County, California Proposed Facility Location: Southern California Description: This company has experience building biomass power plants in California and their technology has been demonstrated at the pilot scale. One of its partners is Waste Management Inc., a leading waste-to-energy company. This project will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann Participants: Waste Management, Inc., JGC Corporation; MECS Inc.; NAES; PetroDiamond Production: * 19 million gallons/year in the unit in which DOE will be participating. Technology & Feedstocks: * Concentrated acid processing of 700 tons/day of sorted green waste and wood

84

The role of apolipoprotein VLDL-II in regulating the diameter of VLDLy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SUBJECT HENS. . 60 79 VITA 81 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Composition of experimental diets . 61 2 Average peak elution times of plasma cholesterol in hens . . . 62 3 Population percentiles for diameter (nm) distributions of VLDL isolated as the d... procedure. 70 Representative standard curves calculated for Apo-VLDL-II and Apo-B in hens fed Diet 1. . 71 Cholesterol elution profiles of d & 1. 0224 g/mL plasma lipoproteins. , 72 Elution times of cholesterol Peak I of d & 1. 0224 g/mL plasma...

Wallowitz, Mikhael L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Flame Photometric Detection of Metal Chelates Separated by Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from carbon tetra- chloride. Iron (III) hexafluoroacetyl...necessary for certain other acetylacetonate derivatives by Ross (13...mixture of chromium (III), iron (III) , and rhodium (III...chosen so that the chromium and iron chelates would be eluted to......

R. S. Juvet; R. P. Durbin

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Analysis of Herbicides on a Single C30 Bead via the Platform Combined Microfluidic Device with ESI-Q-TOF-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we developed an analysis platform combined the microfluidic device and ESI-Q- ... for its small dimension. The trace level chemicals eluted from the single C30 bead were...

Dr. Huibin Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Purification and Partial Biochemical Characterization of Polyphenol Oxidase from Mango (Mangifera indica cv. Manila)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The equilibrium buffer was displaced stepwise from 100 to 0% with distilled water, and the bound proteins were eluted. ... At this purification step, PPO was purified 216-fold (Table 1). ...

Gisela Palma-Orozco; Norma A. Marrufo-Hernndez; Jos G. Sampedro; Hugo Njera

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

88

Arabidopsis irregular xylem8 and irregular xylem9: Implications for the Complexity of Glucuronoxylan Biosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...902A transmission electron microscope. Isolation...dialyzed against water. After dialysis, 80% of the material...chromatography-electron-impact mass spectrometry. Enzyme Treatment of Cell Wall Extracts...cm) eluted with water. Because of their...

Maria J. Peña; Ruiqin Zhong; Gong-Ke Zhou; Elizabeth A. Richardson; Malcolm A. O'Neill; Alan G. Darvill; William S. York; Zheng-Hua Ye

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha subunit peptide Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-terminal beta-barrel domain of the alpha and beta subunits in the yeast F1-ATPase. J Bioenerg Biomembr 1999... stained bands (Fig. 1A) were eluted, digested with trypsin, and ......

90

Anti-viral RNAi and its suppression in plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infected with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV). These plants were subjected to column chromatography methods, and fractions contained a virus-specific ribonuclease activity, co-eluting with small interfering RNAs (si...

Ciomperlik, Jessica J.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Disposition and Metabolism of Pentamethylmelamine and Hexamethylmelamine in Rabbits and Humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...eluted from the gas Chromatograph between...minutes I Chart 5. Gas chromatograms of...plasma and urine by nitrogen-phosphorous gas liquid chromatography...xenografts induced by water soluble analogs...with enhanced water solubility. Chem. Biol...

Matthew M. Ames; Garth Powis; John S. Kovach; and Robert T. Eagan

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium oxides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery and Uses of Americium... generator. The generator technology immobilizes the strontium-82 on a metal-oxide support allowing elution... on the basis of titanium(IV) oxide...

93

Nonlinearities in Flame Ionization Detector Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ionization detector (FIO) to various hydrocarbons hat been found to be proportional to powers of the concentration which ex- ceed unity In certain ranges. The sample elution rates at which this effect is observed and operating condi- tions employed correspond......

J.H. Bromly; P. Roga

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Impact of Processing Method on Recovery of Bacteria from Wipes Used in Biological Surface Sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spores from artificially loaded HVAC filters, recovery of the vegetative cells...Yersinia ruckeri was higher when filters were eluted in PBS. In that study...bioterrorism agents from ventilation filters. Clean 36 :601-608. 35. Kirschner...

Autumn S. Downey; Sandra M. Da Silva; Nathan D. Olson; James J. Filliben; Jayne B. Morrow

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Early double stent thrombosis associated with clopidogrel hyporesponsivenesss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 57-year-old male patient without cardiovascular history suffered an acute myocardial infarction and underwent drug-eluting stent implantation in the left anterior descending artery. A few days later, the rig...

L. M. Rademakers; W. Dewilde; D. van de Kerkhof

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

CX-011544: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-based Sorbents CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/03/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

97

Interference Prevention in Size-Exclusion Chromatographic Analysis of Debranched Starch Glucans by Aqueous System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The barium acetate reacts with ammonium sulfate and produces barium sulfate, the latter having very low solubility (0.00115 g/L at 18 C) and can be easily removed by filtration (Figure 9). ... In some cases, a weak anionic water-soluble polymer, dextran (Mw = 2 kg/mol), could be excluded from the pores of silica gel upon elution with water,(39) but a mixture of pullulans was eluted without a good correlation with molecular size when a silica gel packed column was eluted with water (data not show). ... (43, 44) In the present system, the laser detector with a vertically polarized 30 mW gallium-arsenide laser operating at ? = 690 nm gave less noise upon the elution with sodium nitrate (Figure 5). ...

Amy Hui-Mei Lin; Yung-Ho Chang; Wen-Bin Chou; Ting-Jang Lu

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of an Automatic Method for Americium and Plutonium Separation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of an Automatic Method for Americium and Plutonium Separation and Preconcentration and separation in a short time using large sample volumes. Americium is eluted from the column with 4 mol L-1

Sánchez, David

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-spectrometry vliyanie toriya Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by activity determination using combinations of LSC, alpha spectrometry or ICP-MS. Uranium... Extraction with TBP from 8 M HNO3, rinse with 1.2 M HCl and elution with water...

100

An immunofluorescent and histopathologic study of chicken embryos infected with blue-tongue virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and so that un- conjugated globulins would be eluted prior to collection of the labelled fractions. The conjugate was then eluted from the DEAE column with an increasing gradient of sodium chloride (up to 1. 0M)A * Baltimore Biological Laboratories..., Baltimore, Maryland. ** California Biochemicals for Research, Los Angeles, California. *a* Jacketed Laboratory Column, K25/45, Pharmacia Fine Chemicals, Inc. , Piscataway, New Jersey. "*** Carl Schleicher & Schuell Co. , Keene, New Hampshire. 10...

Fairchild, David George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modeling the behavior of Cm and Am during separation by complexing extraction chromatography  

SciTech Connect

Certain heavy rare earths (REE), Cm, and Am are separated by complexing extraction chromatography using solutions of DTPA and DTPA-citric acid as eluents. The separation coefficients of REE from Cm and Am are calculated. Tracers are proposed for the Cm and Am separations. These are Tm for Cm elution using 0.025 M DTPA and Ho for Cm elution using 0.025 M DTPA with 0.025 citric acid. The tracer for Am in both instances is Tb.

Chuveleva, E.A.; Kharitonov, O.V.; Firsova, L.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Partial characterization of the antigen(s) from Listeria monocytogenes responsible for the induction of cellular immunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fractions from Seqhadex G-ZOO gel filtration column . 31 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Elution profile of soluble antigen from DEAE Sephacel ion exchange column . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Calibration curve of Sephadex G-200 column used for molecular... weight determination of soluble antigen 34 Elution profile of soluble antigen from Sephadex G-200 gel filtration column . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Agarose double diffusion with fractions reacted with anti-soluble antibody . 39 10 Agarose double...

Smith, John Stephen

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/315/5810/513/DC1 Supporting Online Material for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5% ethanol and passed through a column packed with approximately 100 mg of CF11 cellulose using a slow speedCl, 50 mM Tris pH 8, 0.5 mM EDTA pH 8, 16.5 % ethanol). The dsRNA was eluted in 4.5 ml of elution buffer) and precipitated at -20°C overnight with 10 ml of ice cold absolute ethanol (100%). After centrifugation, pellets

Bruns, Tom

104

Escherichia coli proteomics and bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???? ...????????..?????. .?.. 25 2.7 Comparisons of the distributions of molecular weight (A) and pI (B) between heparin-binding proteins and predicted proteins of the whole genome? .? ????????????????? ..? .??.?. ... 26 2.8 Functional... Page 2.12 pI distribution of heparin-binding proteins in elution fractions of the exponential growth sample...?????.? ??...??????.?.. 38 2.13 pI distribution of heparin-binding proteins in elution fractions...

Niu, Lili

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Isolation and purification of a bovine milk lipase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISOLATION AND PURIFICATION OF A BOVINE MILK LIPASE A Thesis by EDNA SUSTEK ALFORD Approved to style an cpntent by: / / (Chairman of C mmittee) Head of Depa ment) (Member7) (Member) December 1979 ABSTRACT Isolation and Purification of a.... Elution profile of the sodium taurocholate treated fraction on Sephadex G-50. The arrows denote the fractions collected for additional purification. 17 3. Elution profile of the electrofocused lipolytic fraction ( ? ) superimposed over the pH gradient...

Alford, Edna Sustek

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Relation of Soil Nitrogen, Nitrification and Ammonification to Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................ 6 Relation of the Crops to the Total Nitrogen of the Soil ........... 7 Relation of the Different Crops ................................. 8 Relation of Surface Soil to Subsoil ............................. 13 Acid Soils Compared with Non-Acid... of Production of Nitrates to the Results of the Pot Ex- periments ................................................ 21 Extensive Work ............................................ 24 Relation of Nitric Nitrogen to Nitrogen Removed by First Crop .... 24...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A novel method for the purification of prephenic acid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the K ? of components eluting av with prephenate from G-10/NH4HC03 column. . III Elemental analysis of barium prephenate. . Page 22 28 30 is P rfi ti of p phe ic acid f ~oos o c essa. . . 35 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Prephenic acid Page... of the degree of cross-linking, type of gel and eluting solvent polarity on the separation of cis and trans-cin- namic acids. They found that the degree of cross-linking influences the degree of adsorption, as defined by K . The K for Sephadex 1 av av G-10...

Harding, Tammy Tiner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sequential separation of actinide elements from highly radioactive Hanford waste by ion exchange methods  

SciTech Connect

A simple, rapid method has been developed for the sequential separation of actinide elements from samples with high salt content such as these resulting from efforts to characterize Hanford storage tank waste. Actinide elements in 9M HC1 solution are introduced into an anion exchange column. U(VI), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) are retained on the column while Am(III) passes through. Plutonium is eluted first, reductively; after which neptunium and then uranium are eluted with mixtures of HC1 and HF. The Am(III) is purified by cation exchange in a nitric acid system. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Maiti, T.C.; Kaye, J.H.; Kozelisky, A.E.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Method and system for radioisotope generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and a process for producing selected isotopic daughter products from parent materials characterized by the steps of loading the parent material upon a sorbent having a functional group configured to selectively bind the parent material under designated conditions, generating the selected isotopic daughter products, and eluting said selected isotopic daughter products from the sorbent. In one embodiment, the process also includes the step of passing an eluent formed by the elution step through a second sorbent material that is configured to remove a preselected material from said eluent. In some applications a passage of the material through a third sorbent material after passage through the second sorbent material is also performed.

Toth, James J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Fryxell, Glen E.; O'Hara, Matthew J.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

EIS-0214 - North Regional Power Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACT FACT S~ET NEPA DOWENT This environment impact statement (EW) is issued under Section 102 (2) (C) of the National Environrnenti Poficy Act @EpA) at 42 U.S-C. 4321 Q a. s~ce ~anges to the Draft EE were rektively minor, BPA decided to pubtish the changes, comments, and responses as the Find EB rather than rewrite and cirtite the Draft EIS. NA~E AND LOCAHON OF H PROPOSAL '~ ALTERNAmS The original proponents and developers of the Northwest Regional Power Fa~ty were WA Resources, Inc. WA) and Central and South West Energy, hc. (CSWE). Recentiy the development agreement was amended to include ~T Power hc. The proponents have created a Limited Liabfity Company, WA Power LLC. WA Power LLC is composed of WA Resources he., and ~T Power hc. ~T Power kc., is a who~y-owned subsidiary of ~T kc., which is a who~y owned subsidiary of Wsas City Power and Light Company. References to WA and ~WE throughout this EIS

111

Metro Wind LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Wind Farm LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wind LLC Wind Farm Facility Metro Wind LLC Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Elk River - Sherbourne County MN Coordinates 45.379527°, -93.634011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.379527,"lon":-93.634011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

Agassiz Beach Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Agassiz Beach Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Agassiz Beach Wind Farm Facility Agassiz Beach Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Clay County MN Coordinates 46.8844°, -96.5042° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.8844,"lon":-96.5042,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Low-Temperature, Normal-Phase HPLC for Separation of Thermally Labile Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......tris-1,1,1-trifluoro- acetylacetonate [Co(tfa)3], have not...other hand, the elution of the iron(III) complex has not been...mation of a bond between the iron and the oxygen donor of the...reaction of the ligand with iron wire (31). The reaction......

David E. Henderson; Frank P. Novak

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

FaQR, Required for the Biosynthesis of the Strawberry Flavor Compound 4-Hydroxy-2,5-Dimethyl-3(2H)-Furanone, Encodes an Enone Oxidoreductase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reacting, via the Michael addition mechanism, with important...substrates for FaQR. In addition, we clearly demonstrated...protein extract. After the addition of 2 mL of 1 M phosphate...extract was applied to the ion-exchange resin and eluted with a linear...

Thomas Raab; Juan Antonio López-Ráez; Dorothée Klein; Jose Luis Caballero; Enriqueta Moyano; Wilfried Schwab; Juan Muñoz-Blanco

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

115

A Cytochrome b5-Containing Plastid-Located Fatty Acid Desaturase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...buffer supplied (HF buffer for the cytochrome...linearized with KpnI-HF (New England BioLabs...before the DsRED fusion proteins were eluted...microscopy. Confocal laser scanning microscopy...lines by confocal laser scanning microscopy...Crdelta4FAD-GFP fusion construct was introduced...

Simone Zuner; Wibke Jochum; Tara Bigorowski; Christoph Benning

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Isolation and Identification of Kahweol Palmitate and Cafestol Palmitate as Active Constituents of Green Coffee Beans That Enhance Glutathione S-Transferase Activity in the Mouse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as the eluting solvent. Silver APRIL...Lam et al. Green Coffee Beans PE...Activity of green coffee beans (GCB) and their solvent extracts on the...Palmitates in Green Coffee Beans inducing...Benzene, the second solvent used in the extraction...

Luke K. T. Lam; Velta L. Sparnins; and Lee W. Wattenberg

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Purification and Properties of an Esterase from Human Breast Cyst Fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...samples and describe the purification and properties of the...partitioned between water and hexane. The increase...and then rinsed with water. Preparation of Leukocytes...material for the Table 1 Purification protocol Esterase activity...was eluted with 30 ml water which removed 50% of...

S. Banerjee; J. Katz; M. Levitz; and T. H. Finlay

1991-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

TB189 12/98 Novagen 1 Orders: 800 526-7319  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................4 Use of Ethylene Glycol 4 Water or Low Salt Elution 4 Purifying CBD Fusion Proteins on CBIND Cartridges 4 Batch Purification with CBIND 100 Resin 5 Column Purification with CBIND 200 Resin 5 Multiple are used for rapid affinity purification of CBD fusion proteins such as those produced from Novagen's p

Lebendiker, Mario

119

sigma-aldrich.com DETECTION AND PURIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sigma-aldrich.com 82 DETECTION AND PURIFICATION RecombinantProtein DetectionandPurification Product of Working Dilution: water results in a solution of 0.01 M sodium phosphate · 1:2,000 by Western blotting tagged fusion purification protein per 1 ml of settled resin. Elution: At least 3.5 nmoles of HA

Lebendiker, Mario

120

Artificial Neural Network Analysis for Evaluation of Peptide MS/MS Spectra in Proteomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An artificial neural network, based on multilayer perceptron and comprising 10 artificial neurons in the input layer, 23, 10, and 7 neurons in three consecutive hidden layers, and a single neuron in the output layer, was used. ... Use of artificial neural networks for the accurate prediction of peptide liquid chromatography elution times in proteome analyses ...

Tomasz Ba?czek; Adam Buci?ski; Alexander R. Ivanov; Roman Kaliszan

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Crystal Structures Adopted by Black Phosphorus at High Pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...activities might be obtained by con-trolled treatment with pepsin. 1 -D/AL. 0U *UE-i-I...in.2) within a vessel containing water at pH 4.0. The dialysate was changed...They were eluted from the starch by electrodialysis. Each was examined in a Spinco model...

John C. Jamieson

1963-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Antigenic Determinants in Fragments of Gamma Globulin from Rabbit Serum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...activities might be obtained by con-trolled treatment with pepsin. 1 -D/AL. 0U *UE-i-I...in.2) within a vessel containing water at pH 4.0. The dialysate was changed...They were eluted from the starch by electrodialysis. Each was examined in a Spinco model...

Joel W. Goodman

1963-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Rapid Separation of Petroleum Fuels by Hydrocarbon Type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......below) . A comparison of two turbine fuels is presented in Figure...MIN Figure 3. Comparison of Turbine Fuels. Elution order: satu...constructed. A synthetic sample of turbine fuel was prepared from pure...coefficient characterizing efficiency of the fractionation. In contrast......

Robert Stevenson

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Yields of ?-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, and trihydroxynitrates formed from OH radical-initiated reactions of 2-methyl-1-alkenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...25 C) and atmospheric pressure. The chamber...evaporationcondensation apparatus were added...spiking indicated recovery was 90100...elution by using water and acetonitrile...Arey J ( 2003 ) Atmospheric degradation of volatile...The Mechanisms of Atmospheric Oxidation of the...

Aiko Matsunaga; Paul J. Ziemann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An endogenous capsaicin-like substance with high potency at recombinant and native vanilloid VR1 receptors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...methanol/basified water (50:50)/water and eluted with...tandem MS system. Recovery was calculated...ethyl acetate/water/2,2,4-tri-methylpentane...lipid extract by atmospheric pressure chemical...biosynthesis is the condensation of dopamine with...

Susan M. Huang; Tiziana Bisogno; Marcello Trevisani; Abdulmonem Al-Hayani; Luciano De Petrocellis; Filomena Fezza; Michele Tognetto; Timothy J. Petros; Jocelyn F. Krey; Constance J. Chu; Jeffrey D. Miller; Stephen N. Davies; Pierangelo Geppetti; J. Michael Walker; Vincenzo Di Marzo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Envelope B Hanford Tank 241-AZ-102  

SciTech Connect

The pretreatment process for the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to provide decontaminated Low-Activity Waste and concentrated elute streams for vitrification into low- and high-activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, strontium, transuranics, cesium, and technetium.

King, W.D.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Role of Acidity in Mobilizing Colloidal Particulate Matter From Natural Sand Grain Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of acidity. This study looked at the role of acidity with H? as a chemical agent. Through cyclic elution of a natural sand column with a weak acid and base solution, there was an increase in mobilized clay colloids. It was found that low concentrations...

Hammons, Jessica Lynn

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Supplemental Data Directed Evolution of ATP Binding Proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplemental Data Directed Evolution of ATP Binding Proteins from a Zinc Finger Domain Using m TG 3'). Denaturing Ni-NTA was performed on the ATP-column elution for round 2, and then FLAG with the resin, but instead passed directly over the immobilized ATP. The selection was performed at room

Heller, Eric

129

132nd AAAS ANNUAL MEETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Waring (Oregon State University). Estimating biomass and productivity in fir-spruce-birch...utilizing the t special EMI CsSb box and grid design. Typical gain of 3 x 106 at 1100...Place gel slab on its side in separating grid (shown below) of EC 730 ELUTION CONVECTION...

1965-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Endogenous Siderophore 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid Deficiency Promotes Anemia and Splenic Iron Overload in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oxidation as well as in iron handling. MATERIALS AND METHODS Derivation...55Fe-Tf in the eluted material by spectrometry at A...kinase. (B) Ribbon diagrams of wt and mutant mouse...application as starting material in natural-product...

Zhuoming Liu; Alieta Ciocea; L. Devireddy

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

Weston, Ken

132

AquaTRAIN MCRTN Geogenic Chemicals in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digestion of traps without glass wool (n=8) Elution of traps (n=8) LOD (ng As trapped) Digest and measure all compartments. Digest silica gel from SKC traps with block digester after removal of the glass wool, analysis with UV-HG-AFS and ICP-MS. � Measure digests of traps to solve LOD problem. � Experiments

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

133

Tomato Fruit Antioxidants in Relation to Salinity and Greenhouse Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tomato Fruit Antioxidants in Relation to Salinity and Greenhouse Climate ... Blocks were positioned to account for experimental error due to minor light gradients in the greenhouse. ... Tomato extracts (15 ?L injection) were eluted with a methanol/MTBE gradient over an 80 min run. ...

David L. Ehret; Kevin Usher; Tom Helmer; Glenn Block; Dan Steinke; Brenda Frey; Tallie Kuang; Moussa Diarra

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

Postmortem Tissue Distribution of MDPV Following Lethal Intoxication by "Bath Salts"  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) was added to the tube and mixed by vortexing. Resuspended extracts were poured into ZSXE010 (XCEL 1) columns (UCT) and all effluents were eluted by gravity. The columns were washed with 1 mL of 100 mM sodium acetate buffer......

John F. Wyman; Eric S. Lavins; David Engelhart; Erica J. Armstrong; Kimberly D. Snell; Paul D. Boggs; Shaena M. Taylor; Rindi N. Norris; Frank P. Miller

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Application of organo-nanoclay as a solid sorbent for rhodium complex separation and preconcentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An organo-nanoclay is used as a new, easily accessible ... then the complex was then adsorbed onto the nanoclay. The rhodium ions were eluted from the...?1 and 20.0?gmL?1 in the initial solution, the relative s...

Daryoush Afzali; Ali Mostafavi; Hadis Beitollah

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Heparanase-Induced GEF-H1 Signaling Regulates the Cytoskeletal Dynamics of Brain Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bethesda, MD) and Janet Price (MD Anderson Cancer Center...Laemmli buffer with subsequent heating at 95C for 5 minutes. Eluted...Plan-APOCHROMAT 63 or 100 1.4 oil DIC, software version...31. Minard ME , Kim LS, Price JE, Gallick GE.The role...

Lon D. Ridgway; Michael D. Wetzel; Jason A. Ngo; Anat Erdreich-Epstein; and Dario Marchetti

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PnuC and the Utilization of the Nicotinamide Riboside Analog 3-Aminopyridine in Haemophilus influenzae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...imidazole (250 mM). The eluted fractions were analyzed by SDS-PAGE...with glass beads in a cell shredder (Bio 101, Savant Instruments...below) and monitoring with UV light. 3-AAD was furthermore characterized...with the cytosolic membrane fraction (Fig. 3, lanes 4 and 6...

Elizabeta Sauer; Melisa Merdanovic; Anne Price Mortimer; Gerhard Bringmann; Joachim Reidl

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Identification of the Antimetabolite of l-Alanosine, l-Alanosyl-5-Amino-4-Imidazolecarboxylic Acid Ribonucleotide, in Tumors and Assessment of Its Inhibition of Adenylosuccinate Synthetase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...equilibrated with 0.015 M lithium citrate buffer, pH 2.65...075, 0.15, and 0.225 M lithium citrate buffers (pH 2.72...sulfamate were added to remove excess sodium nitrite. Three min...of the injection material. Lithium citrate, used for eluting...

Anil K. Tyagi and David A. Cooney

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Interspecies Differences in the Major DNA Adducts Formed from Benzo(a)pyrene but not 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in Rat and Human Mammary Cell Cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrolysates were applied to Sep-Pak CIS car tridges (Waters Associates, Milford, MA). Unreacted...column was eluted with metha- nol:water (46:54) for 34 min at a flow...relation between carcinogenic power of hydrocarbons and their binding...

Cynthia J. Moore; Donna Pruess-Schwartz; Robert J. Mauthe; Michael N. Gould; and William M. Baird

1987-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

132nd AAAS ANNUAL MEETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Secondary School Mathematics. James R. Smart (San Jose State College) will preside...utilizing the t special EMI CsSb box and grid design. Typical gain of 3 x 106 at 1100...Place gel slab on its side in separating grid (shown below) of EC 730 ELUTION CONVECTION...

1965-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Identification of Staphylococcus species and subspecies with the MicroScan Pos ID and Rapid Pos ID panel systems.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hybridization. The Pos ID panel uses a battery of 18 tests, and the Rapid Pos ID panel uses a battery of 42 tests for the identification of Staphylococcus...Johnson. 1969. A batch procedure for thermal elution of DNA from hydroxyapatite. Anal...

W E Kloos; C G George

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Citrobacter rodentium, the Causative Agent of Transmissible Murine Colonic Hyperplasia, Exhibits Clonality: Synonymy of C. rodentium and Mouse-PathogenicEscherichia coli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rodentium. Applying the same battery of tests, we found that MPEC...hybridized were incubated at 60 thermal elution profiles were obtained...rodentium isolates using a battery of genetic and biochemical...rodentium. Applying the same battery of tests, we found that MPEC...

Steven A. Luperchio; Joseph V. Newman; Charles A. Dangler; Mark D. Schrenzel; Don J. Brenner; Arnold G. Steigerwalt; David B. Schauer

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Identification of Staphylococcus species with the API STAPH-IDENT system.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The API STAPH-IDENT strip utilizes a battery of 10 miniaturized biochemical tests...by the manufacturer) were added to the battery, 95 to 96% of the profiles generated...John- son. 1969. A batch procedure for thermal elution of DNA from hydroxyapatite. Anal...

W E Kloos; J F Wolfshohl

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Finite Element Stent Design P. Mortier, M. De Beule, B. Verhegghe and P. Verdonck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Drug-Eluting Stents (DES) was an enormous step forward in the treatment of narrowed arteries. Compared distribution. Numerical models (e.g. finite element models) provide a suitable tool to study and to improve stainless steel · Trifolded RAPTORTM balloon (nominal diameter 3 mm; Cordis) · Finite element code: ABAQUS

Gent, Universiteit

145

Plant Drug Analysis by Planar Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......during the time required to obtain a start of the elution process. Upon observing that migration was linear with time, it...Planar chromatography has become a modern technique with the commercialization of a large choice of adsorbents and the arrival of automated......

Nicole Galand; Jacques Pothier; Claude Viel

146

Download Full-text PDF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the key enzyme responsible for the conversion of N2 to ammonia. While the .... the ability to process light limits energy generation (represented by electrons: e2) and .... was eluted from the column with an HCl carrier solution. (0.14 mol L21)...

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Polymeric Columns for Liquid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......with the polymer in the lithium ionic form. Elution...with the polymer in the lithium form. As will be seen...improvements in polymer synthesis techniques coupled with...Determination of glycerol, acetate, and ethanol in the...that this will require synthesis of entirely new polymers......

James R. Benson; Dexter J. Woo

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Deconstruction of Lignocellulose into Soluble Sugars by Native and Designer Cellulosomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...processes. Sugar production rates must therefore be increased...cost-competitive with fossil fuels. MATERIALS AND METHODS...provided by Designer Energy (Rehovot, Israel...min as the elution flow rate). Arabinose, xylose...Pleurotus ostreatus Florida strain F6 (ATCC 58053...

Sarah Moras; Ely Morag; Yoav Barak; Dan Goldman; Yitzhak Hadar; Raphael Lamed; Yuval Shoham; David B. Wilson; Edward A. Bayer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Coupled with Sulfur-Chemiluminescence Detector to Standard Methods for Speciation of Sulfur-Containing Compounds in Middle Distillates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in seconds). The general elution profile was...sulfur-specific analysis of diesel oils. Comparison...different types of diesel oils by XRF and GC...and LCO, light cycle gasoil. Figure 2...components in a light cycle oil of catalytic...compounds in gasoline and diesel range process streams......

Rosario Ruiz-Guerrero; Colombe Vendeuvre; Didier Thibaut; Fabrice Bertoncini; Didier Espinat

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Drug Screening of Whole Blood by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......carbonate from BDH Laboratory Supplies (Poole, U.K.). Buffer 1000 media were purchased from MML Diagnostic Packaging (Troutdale, OR), and ChemElute 1-mL supported liquidliquid extraction columns were from Varian. Polypropylene tubes (5 mL) were......

Elisabeth Leere iestad; Unni Johansen; se Marit Leere iestad; Asbjrg Solberg Christophersen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin  

SciTech Connect

A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste.

Hamm, L.L.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

trends inI?nalytical chemistry, vol. 4, no. 3,X985 75 Analytical applications of ultraviolet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- nique to studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coat liquids and in tissue. UVRR can also be used to speci- ate PAHs eluting from high-pe$ormance liquid chromato- graphy columns. Other, detection and identification of environmental pollu- tants, pesticide research, and coal and petroleum re

Asher, Sanford A.

153

The Effect of Different Amines Added to Eluents as Silanol Masking Agents on the Chromatographic Behavior of Some Diuretics in Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Using C18 Packings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......triethylamine (TEA), and ethyldiisopropylamine (EDIA). H3 PO4 and ammonium sul phate were...AML, TRI, CLP, and TRS, except when EDIA was used (TRI and CLP peaks' elution...PPA 7.5 5 S 37 43 DEA >7.5 4 S 34 39 EDIA 4.5 8 T 30 35 PA >7.5 3 P 28 33 IPA......

A.I. Gasco-Lpez; A. Santos-Montes; R. Izquierdo-Hornillos

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

GE Healthcare Instructions 28-9367-25 AA Affinity media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(II)-tagged proteins. Purification is done under physiological conditions and mild elution preserves the activity...................................................................................8 5. Scale up................................................................................... 11 This robust, high-resolution medium is based on the 34 m Sepharose High Performance matrix. Due to the small

Lebendiker, Mario

156

Determination of Total Biodiesel Fatty Acid Methyl, Ethyl Esters, and Hydrocarbon Types in Diesel Fuels by Supercritical Fluid Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Determination of Total Biodiesel Fatty Acid Methyl...vortex mixer. This process produced solutions ranging...D5186 indicated that the biodiesel esters were not eluted...0%. For further evaluation, the quantitative analysis...determination of the biodiesel ester components by......

John W. Diehl; Frank P. DiSanzo

157

Pilot-Scale Fermentation and Laboratory Nutrient Studies on Mixed-Acid Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in feed CM chicken manure C/N carbon-nitrogen ratio, g CNA/g N CNA non-acid carbon, g COD chemical oxygen demand CPDM continuum particle distribution model D standard deviation EIA Energy Information Agency Fi bulk fermentation mass in Fermentor i... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2011 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering PILOT-SCALE FERMENTATION AND LABORATORY NUTRIENT STUDIES ON MIXED-ACID FERMENTATION A Dissertation by AARON DOUGLAS SMITH...

Smith, Aaron Douglas

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

A-<  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

< < Enclosure 2 ..- Page 1 of 2 RECORDS DlSPOSrrlON AUTHORITY (k IrrEtnx;tmr wl ma^) DATE RECEIVED 1. FROM (AgbncyoreaWWmmt NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY DepamncntofErmyy . 1 4.. NA?$E OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5. TELEPHONE I 6 . A G t N C Y CtK l ItlCATION I ~ E a r t i f y t M I m ~ b 3 ~ f D T ~ . o 1 c 1 c y m ~ p b c . t r i n b . g t o t h e ~ o f ~ r s c o r e b u d t f r t t t h a r s c o r d r ~ f o r ~ m t h s d b e h d p r g s ( s ) w s n o t m n r c b d f o r t h a k a i n s r r o f t h b . g c n c y ~ w i l l n o t b s m d s d r r R t r t h s ~ p c w i o d r r p e c i f i e d ; P d m ~ a n c u r r s n o e f r a t h e ~ ~ D f f i a , w h p r w k a n s o f R t h 8 o f t h t GAO ktuunl for Guidance d Fsddnl Apsndro, Core Contract Records See attached description 115.109 NSN STANDARD FORM 115 (REV. 3.91) PREVIOUS EDITION NOT USABLE P-bul by NARA 36 CFR 1228 Enclosure 2 Page 2 of 2 (1) Unit - PNR Contracts and Security ~ivision (2) Description - Contracts for procurement of reactor cores,

159

Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX Leaching of CUB Using a CSTX Candace Kairies, Carol Cardone, and Karl Schroeder U.S. Dept. of Energy, NETL, PO Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 KEYWORDS: extraction, mercury, fly ash, fluidized bed combustion, flue gas desulfurization Abstract Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. The fixed-bed column offers the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the

160

Size-exclusion chromatography system for macromolecular interaction analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low pressure, microcomputer controlled system employing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) allows for precise analysis of the interaction of two reversibly associating macromolecules such as proteins. Since a macromolecular complex migrates faster than its components during size-exclusion chromatography, the difference between the elution profile of a mixture of two macromolecules and the summation of the elution profiles of the two components provides a quantifiable indication of the degree of molecular interaction. This delta profile is used to qualitatively reveal the presence or absence of significant interaction or to rank the relative degree of interaction in comparing samples and, in combination with a computer simulation, is further used to quantify the magnitude of the interaction in an arrangement wherein a microcomputer is coupled to analytical instrumentation in a novel manner.

Stevens, Fred J. (Downers Grove, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Migration in alluvium of chlorine-36 and tritium from an underground nuclear test  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a field experiment studying the migration in alluvium of radioactive elements away from an underground nuclear explosion at the Nevada Test Site in the United States. Nuclides detected in the pumped water are tritium, chlorine-36, iodine-129, and krypton-85 - all at levels below the maximum permissible concentration for drinking water in controlled areas. The chlorine-36 elution curve precedes that of tritium, and is due to an anion exclusion process. A conventional two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation does not fully describe the elution curves for tritium and chlorine-36; the tailing of the curves is longer than predicted. Successful modeling of this experiment will be important for validating codes and models to be used in the high-level nuclear waste program.

Ogard, A.E.; Thompson, J.L.; Rundberg, R.S.; Wolfsberg, K.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.; Bentley, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Flavor development in peanut protein cheese-like products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of correlation between sensory evaluation and GLC analysis, the effluent was trapped as it eluted from the GLC column. This material did not have the cheese aroma of the distillate vapor that had been injected into the GLC. It was concluded that the packing... of Cheddar cheese flavor compounds was not eliminated. Grated whole cheese (2. 4 kg) was distilled in a cryogenic vacuum distillation apparatus. Sensory evaluation of the cheese distillate as it warmed to room temperature determined that the cheese aroma...

Bath, Sheila Clare

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of Acute and Chronic Lesions in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infarction with 100% stenosis of the RCA. Following stenting there was no measured reflow in the RCA. The patient died moments after catheterization. Present in the RCA was a stent identified by CT scanning as a Boston Scientific Taxus paclitaxel eluting.... The need to analyze autopsy specimens in the most efficient way possible comes from a growing need for human pathology data, especially when discussing off-label use of ____________ This thesis follows the style of The Journal of the American College...

Roberts, Aaron

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Qualitative and quantitative analysis of low molecular weight phenols by high pressure liquid chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A. , Bethany College Chairman of Advisory Comnittee: Dr. Lloyd W. Rooney A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPI C) method was de- veloped for the separation and identification of substituted benzoic and cinnamic acids (phenolic acids...). The 8 commonly occurring phenolic acids chosen as standards were: gallic, protocatechuic, p-hydroxyben- zoic, vanillic, caffeic, p-coumaric, feruli c and ci nnami c acids. Separation was on a nonpolar C18 substituted, silica based column with elution...

Hahn, David Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

www.activemotif.comwww.activemotif.com Protein Purification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage Resuspension Buffer 45 ml 175 ml Room Temp. Buffer A 33 ml 125 ml Room Temp. Elution Buffer 11 ml. Resuspension Buffer 50 mM Tris, pH 8.0, 300 mM NaCl, and 10 mM Imidazole, 0.2% Triton X-100 2. Lysozyme 100 mg concentration of 0.2% to the Resuspension Buffer. This will help the ly

Lebendiker, Mario

167

Effects of Salinity Stress on Carotenoids, Anthocyanins, and Color of Diverse Tomato Genotypes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gradient elution was as follows: 95% A and 5% B for 6 min; 80% A and 5% B until 32 min; 30% A and 5% B until 56 min; and 95% A and 5% B until 62 min. ... On the other hand, the fact that high salinity can lead to a clear enhancement in the antioxidant levels of tomato could be harnessed to exploit saline soils. ...

Eva Borghesi; M. Lourdes Gonzlez-Miret; M. Luisa Escudero-Gilete; Fernando Malorgio; Francisco J. Heredia; Antonio J. Melndez-Martnez

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

High Throughput Identification, Purification and Structural Characterization of Water Soluble Protein Complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris  

SciTech Connect

Our scheme for the tagless purification of water soluble complexes. 10 g of protein from a crude bacterial extract is first fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and then by a series of chromatographic steps: anion exchange (IEX), hydrophobic interaction (HIC), and finally size exclusion (Gel Filtration). Fractions from the last chromatography step are trypsin digested and peptides labeled with iTRAQ reagents to allow multiplexing and quantitation during mass spectrometric analysis. Elution profiles of identified proteins are then subjected to clustering analysis.

Dong,, Ming; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Liu, Hui-Hai; Malik, J.; Geller, Jil; Yang, Li; Choi, M.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Arbelaez, Pablo; Sterling, H. J.; Typke, Dieter; Shatsky, Max; Brenner, Steve; Fisher, Susan; Williams, Evan; Szakal, Evelin; Allen, S.; Hall, S. C.; Hazen, Terry; Witkowska, H. E.; Jin, Jiming; Glaeser, Robert; Biggin, Mark

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Metabolic labeling enables selective photocrosslinking of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins to their binding partners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1606 . 28 Finlay DR Newmeyer DD Price TM Forbes DJ ( 1987 ) Inhibition of...staining the TLC was done by heating with ceric ammonium molybdate...Ac3GlcNDAz-1-P Ac-SATE 2 as a colorless oil (145 mg, 86%).1 H NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3): 1...beads with 2 loading dye by heating at 95 C for 7 min. The eluted...

Seok-Ho Yu; Michael Boyce; Amberlyn M. Wands; Michelle R. Bond; Carolyn R. Bertozzi; Jennifer J. Kohler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiopharmaceutical composition containing tantalum-178 and process therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A physiologically acceptable solution of tantalum-178 having an activity of 0.1 to 200 millicuries per milliliter of tantalum-178 solution is provided. The solution is obtained from tungsten-178 bound to a column of an anion exchange resin which forms tantalum-178 in situ by eluting the column with a hydrochloric acid solution containing hydrogen peroxide to form an acidic solution of tantalum-178. The acidic solution of tantalum-178 then is neutralized.

Neirinckx, Rudi D. (Medfield, MA); Holman, B. Leonard (Chestnut Hill, MA); Davis, Michael A. (Westwood, MA); Harris, Gale I. (East Lansing, MI)

1989-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Size exclusion chromatography for the unambiguous detection of aliphatics in fractions from petroleum vacuum residues, coal liquids, and standard materials, in the presence of aromatics  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in heptane eluent that can detect aliphatics unambiguously without fractionation to remove aromatics. Spherical molecules such as colloidal silicas elute at the exclusion limit, while alkanes up to C{sub 50} elute through the porosity of the column. Detection of aliphatics was defined by use of an evaporative light scattering (ELS) detector with the simultaneous absence of UV absorbance at 300 nm. Alkanes smaller than C{sub 12} were not detected because the conditions of operation of the ELS caused their evaporation. All aromatics eluted after the permeation limit of about 25 min and were not detected until well after 45 min by their UV absorbance. The SEC method was applied to petroleum vacuum residues and coal liquids, and their fractions were soluble in pentane or heptane. High-temperature (HT) GC-MS confirmed the presence of alkanes in the pentane- and heptane-soluble fractions of petroleum vacuum residues, but did not elute any of the aromatics known to be present from SEC. Alkanes were examined in pentane-soluble fractions of a coal digest and a low-temperature coal tar; alkanes up to C{sub 40} were detected in the low-temperature tar and, although present in the digest, were masked by aromatics. No alkanes were detected by either SEC or HT GC-MS in fractions from a coal tar pitch. Aromatics in coal liquids and one petroleum residue were also examined by SEC using NMP as eluent and by UV fluorescence spectroscopy. The SEC method will find application to pentane- and heptane-soluble fractions of petroleum liquids and coal liquids where the alkanes are concentrated relative to the more abundant aromatics. 43 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Eiman M. Al-Muhareb; Fatma Karaca; Trevor J. Morgan; Alan A. Herod; Ian D. Bull; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

Boll, Rose A [Knoxville, TN

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

Understanding the importance of the viscosity contrast between the sample solvent plug and the mobile phase and its potential consequences in two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The effect of solvent viscosity mismatch on elution performance in reversed-phase HPLC was studied using moment analysis. Two conditions were tested: (1) the mobile phase viscosity was less than the injection plug viscosity, and (2) the mobile phase viscosity was greater than the injection plug viscosity. Under the first condition, retention time and elution performance decreased as the viscosity contrast between the mobile phase and injection plug increased. The effect on performance was more marked as the injection volume increased. A decrease in performance of 12% for compounds with retention factors up to 2.8 was apparent even when the viscosity contrast was only 0.165 cP. In the second set of conditions, elution performance was actually observed to increase, by as much as 25% for a 40 {micro}L injection, as the viscosity contrast between the mobile phase and the solute plug increased. No change in the retention factor was observed. This behaviour was attributed to the shape of an injection plug as it enters into the column, whereby a low viscosity plug permeates away from the wall when the column contains a higher viscosity mobile phase, and vice a versa for a high viscosity plug entering a low viscosity mobile phase. At no stage was either a band splitting or shoulders observed with viscosity contrasts up to 1.283 cP, as could have been expected.

Shalliker, R. Andrew [University of Western Sydney, Australia; Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modeling Ion-Exchange Processing With Spherical Resins For Cesium Removal  

SciTech Connect

The spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde and hypothetical spherical SuperLig(r) 644 ion-exchange resins are evaluated for cesium removal from radioactive waste solutions. Modeling results show that spherical SuperLig(r) 644 reduces column cycling by 50% for high-potassium solutions. Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde performs equally well for the lowest-potassium wastes. Less cycling reduces nitric acid usage during resin elution and sodium addition during resin regeneration, therefore, significantly decreasing life-cycle operational costs. A model assessment of the mechanism behind ''cesium bleed'' is also conducted. When a resin bed is eluted, a relatively small amount of cesium remains within resin particles. Cesium can bleed into otherwise decontaminated product in the next loading cycle. The bleed mechanism is shown to be fully isotherm-controlled vs. mass transfer controlled. Knowledge of residual post-elution cesium level and resin isotherm can be utilized to predict rate of cesium bleed in a mostly non-loaded column. Overall, this work demonstrates the versatility of the ion-exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. This evaluation justifies further development of a spherical form of the SL644 resin.

Hang, T.; Nash, C. A.; Aleman, S. E.

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

SELECTION AND PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE REDUCTANTS FOR SRAT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Defense Waste Processing Facility - Engineering (DWPF-E) has requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform scoping evaluations of alternative flowsheets with the primary focus on alternatives to formic acid during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The reductants shown below were selected for testing during the evaluation of alternative reductants for Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing. The reductants fall into two general categories: reducing acids and non-acidic reducing agents. Reducing acids were selected as direct replacements for formic acid to reduce mercury in the SRAT, to acidify the sludge, and to balance the melter REDuction/OXidation potential (REDOX). Non-acidic reductants were selected as melter reductants and would not be able to reduce mercury in the SRAT. Sugar was not tested during this scoping evaluation as previous work has already been conducted on the use of sugar with DWPF feeds. Based on the testing performed, the only viable short-term path to mitigating hydrogen generation in the CPC is replacement of formic acid with a mixture of glycolic and formic acids. An experiment using glycolic acid blended with formic on an 80:20 molar basis was able to reduce mercury, while also targeting a predicted REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) of 0.2 expressed as Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe. Based on this result, SRNL recommends performing a complete CPC demonstration of the glycolic/formic acid flowsheet followed by a design basis development and documentation. Of the options tested recently and in the past, nitric/glycolic/formic blended acids has the potential for near term implementation in the existing CPC equipment providing rapid throughput improvement. Use of a non-acidic reductant is recommended only if the processing constraints to remove mercury and acidify the sludge acidification are eliminated. The non-acidic reductants (e.g. sugar) will not reduce mercury during CPC processing and sludge acidification would require large amounts of nitric acid (and subsequently larger reductant additions) unless a reducing acid is also used.

Stone, M.; Pickenheim, B.; Peeler, D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Analysis of spent ion exchange media: Superlig 639 and Superlig 644  

SciTech Connect

The current BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment of the Hanford High-Level tank wastes includes the use of Superlig{reg_sign} materials for the removal of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 99}Tc from the aqueous fraction of the waste. The cesium-selective Superlig{reg_sign} 644 (SL-644) and the technetium-selective Superlig{reg_sign} 639 (SL-639) have been evaluated in tests with actual waste samples. These materials have a finite processing lifetime in the plant and will need to be disposed of. The composition and level of residual radionuclide contamination is important for assessing various disposal pathways for the Superlig{reg_sign} materials. This report contains the results of analyses of subsamples of the SL-639 and SL 644 materials that have been used in small column testing of actual waste samples at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory. The wastes that have been tested include samples from Tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-107. The analyses of the spent resins include inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for metals, cold vapor atomic absorption (CVAA) spectroscopy for mercury, gamma energy analysis (GEA) for radionuclides and inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for selected metals and radionuclides. While these results provide an indication of the analyte concentrations that may be left on the spent resin, they do not fully represent the concentrations that may be found after extended plant processing with additional load/elute cycles and different waste compositions. BNFL estimates that the SL-644 may last for 100 load/elute cycles with Envelope A and C wastes and 20 cycles with Envelope B wastes. The number of useable load/elute cycles for the SL-639 is not well defined, but is likely on the order of hundreds.

DE Kurath; JJ Wagner

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect

Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 {micro}l injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few {micro}l of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.

Freeze, R.

1997-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Leaching of FGD Byproducts Using a CSTX  

SciTech Connect

Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. Fixed-bed columns offer the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the material itself, such as is seen for fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly ash, or because of precipitate formation, such as can occur when a high-calcium ash is subjected to sulfate-containing leachates. Also, very fine-grained materials, such as gypsum, do not provide sufficient permeability for study in a fixed-bed column. A continuous, stirred-tank extractor (CSTX) is being used as an alternative technique that can provide the elution profile of column leaching but without the low permeability problems. The CSTX has been successfully employed in the leaching of flue gas desulfurization products that would not be sufficiently permeable under traditional column leaching conditions. The results indicate that the leaching behavior depends on a number of factors, including (but not limited to) solubility and neutralization capacity of the mineral phases present, sorption properties of these phases, behavior of the solubilized material in the tank, and the type of species in solution. In addition, leaching to near-exhaustion of a wallboard produced from FGD gypsum has allowed the isolation of a highly adsorptive phase. This phase appears to be present in at least some FGD gypsums and accounts for the immobilization of trace metals such as arsenic, cobalt, lead, and mercury.

Kairies, C.L.; Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Specific uptake, dissociation, and degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled insulin in isolated turtle (Chrysemys dorbigni) thyroid glands  

SciTech Connect

Thyroid glands from turtles (Chrysemys dorbigni) pretreated with potassium iodide were incubated with /sup 125/I-insulin in the presence or absence of unlabeled insulin, in order to study its specific uptake. At 24 degrees, the specific uptake reached a plateau at 180 min of incubation. The dose of bovine insulin that inhibited 50% of the /sup 125/I-insulin uptake was 2 micrograms/ml of incubation medium. Most of the radioactive material (71%) extracted from the gland, after 30 min incubation with /sup 125/I-insulin, eluted in the same position as labeled insulin on Sephadex G-50. Only 24% eluted in the salt position. After 240 min incubation, increased amount of radioactivity appeared in the Na/sup 125/I position. When bovine insulin was added together with the labeled hormone, a substantial reduction of radioactivity was observed in the insulin and Na/sup 125/I elution positions. Dissociation studies were performed at 6 degrees in glands preincubated with /sup 125/I-insulin either at 24 or 6 degrees. The percentage of trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-soluble radioactive material in the dissociation medium increased with incubation time at both temperatures. However, the degradation activity was lower at 6 than at 24 degrees. The addition of bovine insulin to the incubation buffer containing /sup 125/I-insulin reduced the radioactive degradation products in the dissociated medium. Chloroquine or bacitracin inhibited the degradation activity. Incubation of thyroid glands with /sup 125/I-hGH or /sup 125/I-BSA showed values of uptake, dissociation, and degradation similar to those experiments in which an excess of bovine insulin was added together with the labeled hormone. Thus, by multiple criteria, such as specific uptake, dissociation, and degradation, the presence of insulin-binding sites in the turtle thyroid gland may be suggested.

Marques, M.; da Silva, R.S.; Turyn, D.; Dellacha, J.M.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Supporting Information Moissiard et al. 10.1073/pnas.1406611111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supporting Information Moissiard et al. 10.1073/pnas.1406611111 FLAG rbcL B atmorc6-1 - AtM ORC6 -FLAG cm t3 - cmt3/ atmorc1-3 GFP C FLAG Input Flowthrough Elution AtM ORC1 -FLAG wild-type 200 400 600MORC5 atm orc2-1 atm orc1-2 FLAG-AtM ORC2 atm orc1-2/atm orc2-1 atm orc1-2/atm orc2-1 w ild-type atm orc

Jacobsen, Steve

183

Ion exchange purification of scandium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of an in vitro model for migration inhibitory factor utilizing a component of cobra venom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Committee~ Head of Depar me j'7 c Member Membe May 1976 ABSTRACT Development of an In Vitro Model for Migration Inhibitory Factor Utilizing a Component of Cobra Venon. May (1976) Lee James Carmack, B. S. , Texas ASM University; Chairman of Advisory... of fractions eluted from the ion exchange column 2 Effects of whole cobra venom (CV), dialyzed cobra venom (OCV), Arvin, and Venacil on migration of normal mouse peritoneal exudate cells in cell culture 3 Effects on migration of normal mouse peritoneal...

Carmack, Lee James

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gram-scale separation of curium from americium using alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid in high-pressure cation columns  

SciTech Connect

Quantities of heavy element (americium and curium) up to 2.3 g have been successfully separated by chromatographic elution from cation resin using alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate in equipment originally designed for decigram-scale separations of /sup 252/Cf and heavier elements. The high-pressure ion exchange process was reliable and relatively easy to operate. Overall curium recoveries of 80 to 90% were readily achieved with decontamination from americium by factors of 400 to 500. The product and waste streams are both in forms readily coupled to further processing steps.

Bigelow, J.E.; Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Ross, R.G.; Stacy, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Distribution of Tc-99m administered as labeled microspheres for lung imaging  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the distribution of Tc-99m in 36 patients receiving labeled microspheres for routine lung imaging studies. Quantitative organ measurements were made by conjugate counting with an Anger camera at various times for 24 hours. Initial uptake was all in lung as expected. Removal of Tc-99m from lung was principally by elution of activity as TcO/sub 4//sup -/ rather than by breakup of the microspheres. Calculated radiation doses in mrad/mCi were as follows: lung, 229; kidney, 138; stomach, 72; thyroid, 72; and bladder wall, 40. Doses to other tissues were all below 40 mrads/mCi.

Wicks, R.; Rosenspire, K.; Ackerhalt, R.; Langan, M.; Steinbach, J.J.; Blau, M.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for detection of an active enzymatic agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments of the present invention provide methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for the detection of an active target agent in a fluid sample. A substrate molecule is used that contains a sequence which may cleave in the presence of an active target agent. A SNAP25 sequence is described, for example, that may be cleaved in the presence of Botulinum Neurotoxin. The substrate molecule includes a reporter moiety. The substrate molecule is exposed to the sample, and resulting reaction products separated using electrophoretic separation. The elution time of the reporter moiety may be utilized to identify the presence or absence of the active target agent.

Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff  

SciTech Connect

The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

filled by one or more gases. In marine sediments gas hydrates are found in regions where high pressure, low temperature and gas in excess of solubility are present. Low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWH), I. e. methane through butane, carbon dioxide... loop at a helium carrier flow of 12 ml/min with an elution order of methane, ethane, carbon dioxide and propane. Each fraction was trapped in a U- shaped Porpak-Q filled glass tube immersed in LN2. Butanes and heartier weight gases were trapped...

Cox, Henry Benjamin

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system has been invented for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form. 1 figure.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Studies on immunoglobulins and complement binding to the surface of Schistosoma mansoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Walter Michael Kemp (Ph. D. ) An indirect assay was used to detect binding of Fc associated specific anti-schistosome antibody (homospec1fic antibody) to adult male schistosomes. Binding... of this homospecific antibody could be demonstrated by utilizing freeze thaw antigen, anti-schistosome ~ ntihody a d iiuoresceinated ~Sta h iococcus au eus tnBI which h d to the Fc reg1on of the second antibody. Control experiments w1th reconstitution of eluted...

Rasmussen, Kathleen Ruth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

The parabiotic relationship between Phymatotrichum omnivorum and Gossypium spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, washing the column with at least two column volumes of double distilled water, and eluting the bound organic acids with 12 N formic acid (8). The collected organic acid fraction was then reduced in volume under vacuum, dithiothreitol in excess added..., the pellet was then weighed to give a fresh weight for the sample. The samples were then homogenized, in either a mortar with sand or in a hand held tissue homogenizer, using 5 ml of 12 N formic acid to extract. The samples were then centrifuged to pellet...

Kruse, David Howard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

The vanadyl complex of N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1, 5-diazacyclooctane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighter green band occasionally remains at the top of the column or smears 18 part way down. However, this does not seem to affect the purity of the (bme-daco)VO eluted. (Bme-daco)VO is soluble in dichloromethane and sparingly soluble in alcohols... saturated solution of the complex in dichloromethane. N, N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1, 5-diazacyclooctane- chlorogallium(III), (bme-daco)GaCI. Gallium(III)chloride (0. 91 g, 5. 1 mmol) was dissolved in dry ethanol and transferred via cannula to a solution...

Hatley, Michelle Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect

A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered for cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance, quantification of cesium adsorption performance as a function of operating temperature and pH, and evaluation of sodium uptake (titration) as function of pH and counteranion concentration. The results of these efforts are presented in this report. Hydraulic performance of the resin and the use of eluant alternatives to nitric acid have also been evaluated and have been reported elsewhere (Taylor 2009, Taylor and Johnson 2009).

Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Collins, Robert T [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Selective enrichment of phenols from coal liquefaction oil by solid phase extraction method  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the solid phase extraction method for the enrichment and separation of phenol from coal liquefaction oil. The phenols' separation efficiency was compared on different solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges, and the effect of solvents with different polarity and solubility parameter on amino-bonded silica was compared for selection of optimal elution solution. The result showed that amino-bonded silica has the highest selectivity and best extraction capability due to two factors, weak anion exchange adsorption and polar attraction adsorption.

Tian, M.; Feng, J. [Taiyuan University of Technoloy, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Synthesis of N-carbobenzoxy-L-valyl-L-valyl-4-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylhexanoic acid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and dried over sodium sulfate. The sol- vent was removed by evaporation in vacuo and the products isolated by silica gel chromatography, eluting with 25% ethyl acetate/hexane, to give the following results: Ethyl (38, 4S)-N-t-butyloxycarbonyl-4-amino-3... columns prepacked with silica gel 60 (EM Reagents). Amino acids were coupled using mixed anhydride coupling methods. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author is grateful to Dr, G. I. Glover for all the guidance and support he has provided, A special thanks to Dr, E...

Hicks, Gary Dean

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Levels in 221Fr fed by the ? decay of 225Ac  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ? decay of 225Ac to 221Fr was reinvestigated by ?-ray spectroscopic studies with HPGe detectors and 225Ac sources purified using continuous elution processes. Energies and intensities of about 120 ?-ray transitions were measured. Among these, 40 are reported for the first time. A 221Fr level scheme with 46 excited states and 124 transitions is proposed. The level structure is described in terms of a reflection asymmetric structure with parity doublet bands K?=1/2, 3/2, 5/2, and 3/2 in order of increasing energy. Both strong and intermediate coupling models have been shown to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

G. Ardisson; J. Gasparro; V. Barci; R. K. Sheline

2000-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

200

Identification and functional characterization of lipid binding proteins in liver and adipose tissues of Gallus domesticus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; whereas the second hepatic lipid transport protein is most likely liver-FABP (L-FABP). An FABP from chicken adipose cytosol (A-FABP) was purified by membrane ultrafiltration and molecular sieve chromatography. Purification was verified by SDS... via ion exchange chromatography, pH 7. 73. Purification was verified by ligand binding assays and SDS-PAGE. The first protein eluted (designated ns-LTP) had a molecular weight of approximately 14. 5 kDa and the second protein (designated L...

Sams, Gretchen Hubler

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Identification of organonitrogen compounds from thermally dissolved Huolinguole lignite in ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal dissolution of Huolinguole lignite (HL) in ethanol was conducted at 330C for 2 h. The soluble fraction was sequentially eluted with petroleum ether (PE), ethyl acetate (EA)/PE mixed solvents with increased EA to PE ratio, and EA to afford five eluted fractions (EF1-EF5) through a silica gel-packed column. In total, 49 organonitrogen compounds (ONCs), including N-heterohexacyclic compounds (NHHCCs), N-heteropentacyclic compounds, nitrogen-containing group-substituted benzenes (NCGSBs), condensed N-heterocyclic compounds, and amides were detected in EF2 and EF3 with a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer. Among the ONCs, NHHCCs are dominant and most of them are alkyl pyridines (APs), suggesting that APs are the main existing modes of ONCs in HL. As the main NCGSBs, anilines may originally exist in HL or were released by HL ethanolysis. This investigation provides an effective approach for understanding the modes of ONC occurrences in lignites. [Received: April 11, 2013; Accepted: February 20, 2014

Yu-Gao Wang; Xian-Yong Wei; Hong-Lei Yan; Zhi-Min Zong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102  

SciTech Connect

The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103  

SciTech Connect

The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Compound J in Late Cretaceous/Tertiary terrigenous oils revisited: Structure elucidation of a rearranged oleanane coeluting on GC with 18?(H)-oleanane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A C30 pentacyclic triterpane eluting slightly after 18?(H)-oleanane in the m/z 191 mass chromatograms of Late Cretaceous/Tertiary terrigenous oils (peak J in the early literature) has been isolated from a Niger Delta oil and identified using NMR spectroscopy as 3?-methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane. The previous assignment as 18?(H)-oleanane is therefore partly erroneous. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane affords a larger m/z 412?356 response than the oleananes and the relative contribution of 3?-methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane to the 412?191 oleanane peak can be roughly estimated from comparison of the 412?356/412?191 ratio from the oleanane peak with that of the pure compounds. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-18?(H)-oleanane can be as abundant as 18?(H)-oleanane in oils having a high concentration of early eluting rearranged oleananes. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-19?(H)-taraxastane was also tentatively assigned in the oils on the basis of its mass spectrum as well as its gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography retention times. 3?-Methyl-24-nor-gammacerane was tentatively assigned in a similar way in an oil containing gammacerane. All 3?-methyl-24-nor-triterpanes could be formed via dehydration, rearrangement and hydrogenation of triterpenoids having an OH group at C-3.

Hans Peter Nytoft; Geir Kildahl-Andersen; Tatjana olevi? Knudsen; Ksenija Stojanovi?; Frode Rise

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Determination of actinides in environmental and biological samples using high-performance chelation ion chromatography coupled to sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-performance chelation ion chromatography, using a neutral polystyrene substrate dynamically loaded with 0.1 mM dipicolinic acid, coupled with sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been successfully used for the separation of the actinides thorium, uranium, americium, neptunium and plutonium. Using this column it was possible to separate the various actinides from each other and from a complex sample matrix. In particular, it was possible to separate plutonium and uranium to facilitate the detection of the former free of spectral interference. The column also exhibited some selectivity for different oxidation states of Np, Pu and U. Two oxidation states each for plutonium and neptunium were found, tentatively identified as Np(V) and Pu(III) eluting at the solvent front, and Np(IV) and Pu(IV) eluting much later. Detection limits were 12, 8, and 4 fg for 237Np, 239Pu, and 241Am, respectively, for a 0.5 ml injection. The system was successfully used for the determination of 239Pu in NIST 4251 Human Lung and 4353 Rocky Flats Soil, with results of 57029 and 2939226 fg g?1, respectively, compared with a certified range of 227951 fg g?1 for the former and a value of 3307 248 fg g?1 for the latter.

Jason B. Truscott; Phil Jones; Ben E. Fairman; E. Hywel Evans

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Chemical Properties of Elements 99 and 100 [Einsteinium and Fermium  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A description of some of the chemical properties and of the methods used in the separations of elements 99 [Einsteinium] and 100 [Fermium] are given. The new elements exhibit the properties expected for the tenth and eleventh actinide elements. Attempts to produce an oxidation state greater than III of element 99 have been unsuccessful. In normal aqueous media only the III state of element 100 appears to exist. The relative spacings of the elution peaks of the new elements in some separations with ion exchange resin columns are the same as the relative spacings of the homologous lanthanide elements. The results of experiments involving cation exchange resins with very concentrated hydrochloric acid eluant show that the new elements, like the earlier actinides, are more strongly complexed than the lanthanides. The new elements also exist partially as anions in concentrated hydrochloric acid, as do earlier actinide elements, and they may be partially separated from each other by means of ion exchange resins. With some eluants interesting reversals of elution positions are observed in the region Bk-Cf-99-100, indicating complex ion formation involving unusual factors.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Harvey, B. G.; Choppin, G. R.

1954-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

Interpretation of data obtained from non-destructive and destructive post-test analyses of an intact-core column of culebra dolomite  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Pefiormance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long- term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanisq migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of T~ U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quantifi parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Pknt (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of analyses for 241Pu and 241Am distributions developed during transport experiments in one of these cores. All intact-core column transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AK). Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for intact-core columns were obtained via experiments using conservative tracer `Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers `2U and `?Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of these species. Elution experiments with tracers 24% and 24*Arn were performed, but no elution of either species was observed in any flow experiment to date, including experiments of many months' duration. In order to quanti~ retardation of the non-eluted species 24*Pu and 241Arn afler a period of brine flow, non-destructive and destructive analyses of an intact-core column were carried out to determine distribution of these actinides in the rock. Analytical results indicate that the majority of the 241Am is present very near the top (injection) surface of the core (possibly as a precipitate), and that the majority of the 241Pu is dispersed with a very high apparent retardation value. The 24]Pu distribution is interpreted using a single-porosity advection-dispersion model, and an approximate retardation value is reported for this actinide. The specific radionuclide isotopes used in these experiments were chosen to facilitate analysis. Even though these isotopes are not necessarily the same as those that are most important to WIPP performance, they are isotopes of the same elements, and their chemical and transport properties are therefore identical to those of isotopes in the inventory.

Lucero, Daniel L.; Perkins, W. George

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

210

JGI - Why Sequence Hyperthermophilic Archaea?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyperthermophilic Archaea? Hyperthermophilic Archaea? The hyperthermophile genus Pyrobaculum represents a unique clade among the archaea because its cultured members respire toxic metals such as arsenic and selenium, sulfur compounds, ferric (Fe(III)) iron, nitrate, and oxygen. Pyrobaculum species are also capable of chemolithotrophic and organotrophic growth. In contrast to the emerging crenarchaeal model Sulfolobus, which is an acidophilic obligate aerobe, Pyrobaculum provides an alternative archaeal system to investigate biological processes in non-acidic, aerobic/anaerobic, high-temperature environments. This project involves sequencing multiple Pyrobaculum genomes, which will significantly advance the genus's establishment as a model system. Unfortunately, the first member of this genus to be sequenced, P. aerophilum, is not easily

211

Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing a new fuel cell membrane for vehicles that relies on cheaper and more abundant materials than those used in current fuel cells. Conventional fuel cells are very acidic, so they require acid-resistant metals like platinum to generate electricity. The University of Delaware is developing an alkaline fuel cell membrane that can operate in a non-acidic environment where cheaper materials like nickel and silver, instead of platinum, can be used. In addition to enabling the use of cheaper metals, the University of Delawares membrane is 500 times less expensive than other polymer membranes used in conventional fuel cells.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusions (CX)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEPA NEPA National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations CX Posting No. Project Title Posted DOE-ID-13-085 Organic Speciation and Interactions in ALSEP - One Step Partitioning Process of Minor Actinides, Lanthanides, and Fission Products - Oregon State University - 15 Kb 12/12/13 DOE-ID-13-084 Enhancement of the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater - University of Maryland - 13 Kb 12/11/13 DOE-ID-13-082 Long-Term Prediction of Emissivity of Structural Material for High Temperature Reactor Systems - University of Missouri - 13 Kb 12/10/13 DOE-ID-13-081 Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoximebased Sorbents - University of Idaho - 14 Kb 12/06/13 DOE-ID-13-080 Glass Composition and Solution Effects on Stage III Dissolution - Pennsylvania State University - 12 Kb 12/06/13

213

FE Press Releases and Techlines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 14, 2012 November 14, 2012 Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease Washington, DC - A new stent that incorporates an innovative metal alloy developed by scientists at Boston Scientific Corporation and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received European approval for use in the treatment of certain peripheral arterial diseases. Initially developed for use as a coronary stent, the new PROMUS ELEMENT™ PLUS BTK drug-eluting stent system is designed for treatment of critical limb ischemia, a severe obstruction of arteries within the extremities which reduces blood flow and can damage tissues. November 9, 2012 Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery

214

CX-002884: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002884: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low pH Resin Batch Contact Work CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde organic resin (MSDS # 36589) will be contacted with various chemical solutions so that adsorption and desorption of cesium, potassium, mercury, and other metal ions can be measured. Solutions are Savannah River National Laboratory (on site) generated simulants of Savannah River Site tank salt wastes or are elution reagents. This work does not involve any radioactive material. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002884.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005500: Categorical Exclusion Determination

215

Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease Platinum/Chromium-Based Stents Approved for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease November 14, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new stent that incorporates an innovative metal alloy developed by scientists at Boston Scientific Corporation and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received European approval for use in the treatment of certain peripheral arterial diseases. Initially developed for use as a coronary stent, the new PROMUS ELEMENT™ PLUS BTK drug-eluting stent system is designed for treatment of critical limb ischemia, a severe obstruction of arteries within the extremities which reduces blood flow and can damage tissues. Restoring and maintaining peripheral blood flow in

216

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-052 Chicago EC B3-6.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 SECTION A. Project Title: Development of Novel Porous Sorbents for Extraction of Uranium from Seawater - The University of Chicago SECTION B. Project Description The University of Chicago proposes to develop highly porous sorbents for the extraction of uranium from seawater. This will be accomplished through design and investigation of new multifunctional uranyl chelators and engineering on nanoporous supports that facilitate cooperative sorbent interactions. Once candidate materials have been synthesized, they will be evaluated for uranium binding capacities, selectivity, uptake and elution kinetics, durability, and reusability. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects / Potential Sources of Impact Radioactive Material Use - It is expected that 2 grams of depleted uranium will be used each year. The depleted uranium is

217

Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells  

SciTech Connect

The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Increasing Antioxidant Activity of Procyanidin Extracts from the Pericarp of Litchi chinensis Processing Waste by Two Probiotic Bacteria Bioconversions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total antioxidant capability (T-AOC) of LPOPCs before and after microbial incubation was estimated, and the results suggested that probiotic bacteria bioconversion is a feasible and efficient method to convert litchi pericarp procyanidins to a more effective antioxidant agent. ... However, the pericarp of litchi, which accounts for 15% of the fresh weight of the fruit, becomes desiccated and turns brown at ambient temperature within 2 or 3 days pastharvest and is often thrown away as waste. ... Elution conditions were as follows: a linear gradient from 5 to 35% B in 40 min, from 35 to 50% B in 5 min, from 50 to 80% B in 5 min, and from 80 to 5% B in 5 min, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. ...

Shuyi Li; Lu Chen; Ting Yang; Qian Wu; Zhejuan Lv; Bijun Xie; Zhida Sun

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

REAL WASTE TESTING OF SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on batch contact and column testing tasks for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. The testing used a non-radioactive simulant of SRS Tank 2F dissolved salt, as well as an actual radioactive waste sample of similar composition, which are both notably high in sodium (6 M). The resin was Microbeads batch 5E-370/641 which had been made on the hundred gallon scale. Equilibrium batch contact work focused on cesium at a temperature of 25 C due to the lack of such data to better benchmark existing isotherm models. Two campaigns were performed with small-scale ion exchange columns, first with Tank 2F simulant, then with actual dissolved salt in the Shielded Cells. An extrapolation of the batch contact results with radioactive waste over-predicted the cesium loaded onto the IX sRF resin bed by approximately 11%. This difference is not unexpected considering uncertainties from measurement and extrapolation and because the ion exchange that occurs when waste flows through a resin bed probably cannot reach the same level of equilibrium as when waste and resin are joined in a long term batch contact. Resin was also characterized to better understand basic chemistry issues such as holdup of trace transition metals present in the waste feed streams. The column tests involved using two beds of sRF resin in series, with the first bed referred to as the Lead column and the second bed as the Lag column. The test matrix included two complete IX cycles for both the simulant and actual waste phases. A cycle involves cesium adsorption, until the resin in the Lead column reaches saturation, and then regenerating the sRF resin, which includes eluting the cesium. Both the simulated and the actual wastes were treated with two cycles of operation, and the resin beds that were used in the Lead and Lag columns of simulant test phase were regenerated and reused in the actual waste test phase. This task is the first to demonstrate the treatment of SRS waste with sRF resin and the tests clearly demonstrated cesium decontamination for actual waste. The results of the column tests were similar for both the simulated and the actual waste and demonstrated Cs removal with sRF from both wastes. For a flowrate of 1.4 bed volumes (BV)/hour at 25 C those results with sRF resin were: (1) Simulant and actual waste results are equivalent; (2) Cs breakthrough began between 200 and 250 BV; (3) Cs breakthrough reached 100% at around 400 BV; (4) Cs breakthrough curve from 5% to 100% is approximately linear; (5) Cs elution with 0.5 M HNO3 starts at 2 BV and ends at 6BV; (6) Most, if not all, of Cs adsorbed during treatment is released during elution; (7) At 100% breakthrough of Cs the resin bed adsorbs approximately 85% of full capacity before detection in the effluent; the remaining 15% is adsorbed at saturation; (8) Approximately 90% of resin bed changes (color and volume) are complete by 6 BV; and (9) During elution the resin shrinks to about 80% of its fully working (sodium form) BV.

Nash, C.; Duignan, M.

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Intercalation of Trichloroethene by Sediment-Associated Clay Minerals  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to examine the potential for intercalation of trichloroethene (TCE) by clay minerals associated with aquifer sediments. Sediment samples were collected from a field site inTucson, AZ. Two widely used Montmorillonite specimen clays were employed as controls. X-ray diffraction, conducted with a controlled-environment chamber, was used to characterize smectite interlayer dspacing for three treatments (bulk air-dry sample, sample mixed with synthetic groundwater, sample mixed with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater). The results show that the d-spacing measured for the samples treated with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater are larger (*26%) than those of the untreated samples for all field samples as well as the specimen clays. These results indicate that TCE was intercalated by the clay minerals, which may have contributed to the extensive elution tailing observed in prior miscible-displacement experiments conducted with this sediment.

Matthieu, Donald E.; Brusseau, Mark; Johnson, G. R.; Artiola, J. L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Curry, J. E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Influence of Contact Time on the Extraction of 233Uranyl Spike and Contaminant Uranium From Hanford Sediment  

SciTech Connect

In this study 233Uranyl nitrate was added to uranium (U) contaminated Hanford 300 Area sediment and incubated under moist conditions for 1 year. It hypothesized that geochemical transformations and/or physical processes will result in decreased extractability of 233U as the incubation period increases, and eventually the extraction behavior of the 233U spike will be congruent to contaminant U that has been associated with sediment for decades. Following 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year incubation periods, sediment extractions were performed using either batch or dynamic (sediment column flow) chemical extraction techniques. Overall, extraction of U from sediment using batch extraction was less complicated to conduct compared to dynamic extraction, but dynamic extraction could distinguish the range of U forms associated with sediment which are eluted at different times.

Smith, Steven C.; Szecsody, James E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

DePaoli, David W. (Knoxville, TN); Hu, Michael Z. (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Clavier, John W. (Elizabethton, TN)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

Regan, John Frederick

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pretreatment/Radionuclide Separations of Cs/Tc from Supernates  

SciTech Connect

Significant improvements have been made in ion exchange and solvent extraction materials and processes available for separation of the radionuclides cesium and technetium from both acid and alkaline waste solutions. New ion exchange materials and solvent extraction reagents are more selective for Cs over sodium and potassium than previous materials. The higher selectivity gives higher Cs capacity and improved separation processes. Technetium removal has been improved by new ion exchange resins, which have either improved capacity or easier elution. Several different crown ethers have been shown to extract pertechnetate ion selectively over other anions. Organic complexants in some waste solutions reduce pertechnetate ion and stabilize the reduced species. Selective oxidation allows conversion to pertechnetate without oxidation of the organic complexants.

Thompson, M.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Effects on the positive electrode of the corrosion of AB{sub 5} alloys in nickel-metal-hydride batteries  

SciTech Connect

Effects of corrosion of MmNi{sub 4.3{minus}x}Mn{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.4}Co{sub x} alloys (where Mm = Ce 50%, La 30%, Nd 15%, Pr 5%) are evaluated in nickel-metal-hydride (Ni-MH) cells. Particularly, it is shown how Al released by the corroded alloys pollutes the positive electrode, which endures a loss of charging efficiency, due to the formation of a hydrotalcite-like phase stabilized with Al. Furthermore, since Al is eluted from the hydride electrode and is completely trapped in the positive active material, the titration of this element in the positive electrode is a powerful technique for quantification of the corrosion of AB{sub 5} alloys in Ni-MH cells.

Bernard, P. [SAFT, Marcoussis (France). Research Dept.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Biomedical silver-109m isotope generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, composition of matter, and apparatus for producing substantially pure Ag-109m for use in biomedical imaging techniques. Cd-109, which decays with a half-life of 453 days to Ag-109m, is loaded onto an ion exchange column consisting of particulate tin phosphate. After secular equilibrium is reached in about ten minutes, Ag-109m may be selectively eluted from the column by means of a physiologically acceptable aqueous buffered eluent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and either ascorbic acid or dextrose. The breakthrough of toxic Cd-109 is on the order of 1 x 10-7, which is sufficiently low to permit administration of the Ag-109m-containing eluate, with but a minor pH adjustment, directly to a human patient within a matter of seconds. 1 fig.

Wanek, P.M.; Steinkruger, F.J.; Moody, D.C.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Biomedical silver-109m isotope generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, composition of matter, and apparatus for producing substantially pure Ag-109m for use in biomedical imaging techniques. Cd-109, which decays with a half-life of 453 days to Ag-109m is loaded onto an ion exchange column consisting of particulate tin phosphate. After secular equilibrium is reached in about ten minutes, Ag-109m may be selectively eluted from the column by means of a physiologically acceptable aqueous buffered eluent solution of sodium thiosulfate, and either ascorbic acid or dextrose. The breakthrough of toxic Cd-109 is on the order of 1.times.10.sup.-7, which is sufficiently low to permit administration of the Ag-109m-containing eluate, with but a minor pH adjustment, directly to a human patient within a matter of seconds.

Wanek, Philip M. (Los Alamos, NM); Steinkruger, Frederick J. (Los Alamos, NM); Moody, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

An integrated approach to the degradation of phytates in the corn wet milling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated process was developed to hydrolyze the phytates in light steep water (LSW) and to simultaneously isolate inorganic phosphate (Pi) and myo-inositol products. The proposed integrated process will be helpful in resolving the environmental and nutritional concerns in the use of corn gluten feed (CGF) in the animal diets. This process comprised of partial and total hydrolysis of LSW and intermediate anion exchange separation technique. The phytates in LSW were initially degraded to negatively charged myo-inositol phosphates (InsP2InsP5). The optimized experimental parameters for the partial hydrolysis of LSW were determined to be 2h hydrolysis with 1FTU Aspergillus niger/g substrate at 35C. The negatively charged species of the partially hydrolyzed substrate were separated on a strong base anion exchange resin. The negatively charged species, retained by the resin, were eluded with 1M NaCl solution and were subjected to complete hydrolysis with the Escherichia coli, A. niger derived phytases and their respective combinations. The maximum amount of myo-inositol released from the anion exchange column was 3.730.03mg/NaCl elution which was detected after 48h reactions catalyzed by 100FTU E. coli, 150FTU E. coli, and 150FTU the combination of A. niger and E. coli. The time course of Pi released showed a similar trend to that of myo-inositol and the released Pi reached a maximum amount of 3.300.05mg/g NaCl elution after 48h incubation at the enzyme loadings for which the maximum concentration of myo-inositol were reached.

H. Noureddini; J. Dang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Determination of actinide elements at femtogram per gram levels in environmental samples by on-line solid phase extraction and sector-field-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An on-line solid phase extraction method has been developed for the determination of 232Th, 237Np, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Am and 243Am in biological certified reference material using a column containing TRU-Spec resin coupled with sector-field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Absolute detection limits were 0.7, 0.85, 0.6, and 0.65fg for 237Np, 239Pu, 241Am and 243Am, respectively. The 239Pu was determined in NIST Human Liver (963297fgg?1 compared with a certified value of 848161fgg?1) using a dry and wet ashing sample preparation method, and in a spiked cabbage reference material (39454fgg?1 compared to an indicative value of 467fgg?1) using microwave digestion. Sequential separation of Pu and U was achieved by on-column reduction of Pu with titanium(III) chloride and elution in 4M \\{HCl\\} to facilitate the determination of 239Pu in samples containing high levels of 238U, thereby eliminating the interference of 238U1H+ at m/z 239. The sequential elution procedure was used to determine 239Pu in NIST human lung (81455fgg?1 compared with a certified range of 227951fgg?1) and NIST Rocky Flats Soil (2423137fgg?1 compared with a certified value of 3307248fgg?1).

Jason B Truscott; Phil Jones; Ben E Fairman; E.Hywel Evans

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Genome sequence of the chemoheterotrophic soil bacterium Saccharomonospora cyanea type strain (NA-134(T))  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomonospora cyanea Runmao et al. 1988 is a member of the genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae that is moderately well characterized at the genome level thus far. Members of the genus Saccharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as soil, leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they probably play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Species of the genus Saccharomonospora are usually Gram-positive, non-acid fast, and are classified among the actinomycetes. S. cyanea is characterized by a dark blue (= cyan blue) aerial mycelium. After S. viridis, S. azurea, and S. marina, S. cyanea is only the fourth member in the genus for which a completely sequenced (non-contiguous finished draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,408,301 bp long chromosome with its 5,139 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P. [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany] [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Potter, Gabriele [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany] [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL] [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany] [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany] [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany] [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Environmental aspects of coal production in the Appalachian region. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive, multiyear study of environmental effects related to steep slope surface mining has integrated hydrology, water quality, geology, and biology at a single study area in the Appalachian Coal fields of northeast Tennessee. From this study, hydrology, water quality, and biological changes have been quantified and related to the types of mining and reclamation that are practical, the extent of watershed disturbed and the time since mining activity was completed. Since drainage in the study area was essentially non-acid in drainage characteristics, mining impacts aside from the more widely publicized acid mine drainage problem could be evaluated. Surface mining of steep slopes causes altered stream hydrology. There are increases in both peak storm water flow and dry weather flows. This is accompanied by long-term changes in water quality. Calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron, and sulfate levels are elevated. Increases in alkalinity and pH are probably caused more by clay formation and the solution chemistry of some elements than by presence of carbonate minerals. Of these changes, the major factors affecting biological characteristics of these streams are catastrophic storm flows and increased silt loading. Species diversity, richness and population densities were invariably reduced after mining. Presently used sediment-control measures do not mitigate these effects. The practical models for mining operation and the design of control structures which have been developed in this study show promise for wide application with suitable refinement.

Minear, R.A.; Tschantz, B.A.; Vaughan, G.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Relationships between stripmining-induced changes and benthic insect communities in the southern Appalachian Region  

SciTech Connect

Increased demands for coal to supply America's energy needs, as well as the controversy surrounding the requirements and enforcement of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, point directly to the need for determination of specific factors associated with stripmining alteration that produce major environmental impacts. Numerous studies have demonstrated physical and chemical alterations to southern Appalachian streams subject to stripmining effluents found that the two major factors resulting in physical alterations were increased runoff and resultant sedimentation. Studies in streams receiving acid mine drainage showed that benthic insect communities differed in undisturbed and stripmining disturbed streams. Branson and Batch noted differences in benthic communities in Kentucky streams disturbed by non-acid stripmining. Tolbert found significant differences in benthic communities between undisturbed and nonacid mining streams. This paper describes research to determine what stripmining-altered parameters are responsible for differences in benthic insect communities. The results of this study can be applied toward validation of control measures required by the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act.

Tolbert, V.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Genome sequence of the ocean sediment bacterium Saccharomonospora marina type strain (XMU15T)  

SciTech Connect

Saccharomonospora marina Liu et al. 2010 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Organisms belonging to the genus are usually Gram-positive staining, non-acid fast, and classify among the actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis and S. azurea, S. marina is the third member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced (permanent draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,965,593 bp long chromosome with its 5,727 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lu, Megan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Potter, Gabriele [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Li, Wen-Jun [Yunnan University, Kunming, China; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Efficient production and purification of recombinant human interleukin-12 (IL-12) overexpressed in mammalian cells without affinity tag  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Interleukin-12 is a heterodimeric, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is a key driver of cell-mediated immunity. Clinical interest in IL-12 is significant due to its potent anti-tumor activity and efficacy in controlling certain infectious diseases such as Leishmaniasis and Listeria infection. For clinical applications, the ease of production and purification of IL-12 and the associated cost continues to be a consideration. In this context, we report a simple and effective heparin-affinity based purification of recombinant human IL-12 (hIL-12) from the serum-free supernatants of stable IL-12-transduced HEK293 cells. Fractionation of culture supernatants on heparin Sepharose columns revealed that hIL-12 elutes as a single peak in 500mM NaCl. Coomassie staining and Western blot analysis showed that hIL-12 eluted in 500mM NaCl is homogeneous. Purity of hIL-12 was ascertained by RP-HPLC and ESI-MS analysis, and found to be ?98%. Western blot analysis, using monoclonal antibodies, demonstrated that the crucial inter-subunit disulfide bond linking the p35 and p40 subunits is intact in the purified hIL-12. Results of far UV circular dichroism, steady-state tryptophan fluorescence, and differential scanning calorimetry experiments suggest that purified hIL-12 is in its stable native conformation. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and bioactivity studies demonstrate that hIL-12 is obtained in high yields (0.310.05mg/mL of the culture medium) and is also fully bioactive. Isothermal titration calorimetry data show that IL-12 exhibits a moderate binding affinity (Kd(app)=691?M) to heparin. The purification method described in this study is expected to provide greater impetus for research on the role of heparin in the regulation of the function of IL-12. In addition, the results of this study provide an avenue to obtain high amounts of IL-12 required for structural studies which are aimed at the development of novel IL-12-based therapeutics.

Srinivas Jayanthi; Bhanu prasanth Koppolu; Sean G. Smith; Rashmi Jalah; Jenifer Bear; Margherita Rosati; George N. Pavlakis; Barbara K. Felber; David A. Zaharoff; Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Multidimensional gas chromatography of oxidative degradation products in algae-derived fuel oil samples using narrow heartcuts and rapid cycle times  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To characterize a fuel's thermal and storage stability an understanding of the process of oxidation and oxidation pathways is essential. Oxidation pathways commence with hydroperoxides which quickly decompose to form a range of alcohols, acids and other oxygen-containing species. In the presence of significant levels of hydrocarbon-based matrix, analysis of these heteroatomic species is difficult. Applying multidimensional gas chromatography with very narrow heart-cut windows (0.20min) minimizes the number of compounds transferred to the second dimension (2D) column during each heart-cut. Successive heart-cuts every 2.00min are taken throughout the analytical run, since each heart-cut has a maximum retention on 2D of <2.00min on the fast elution 2D column. Subsequent analyses involve incrementing or offsetting the heart-cut windows by 0.20min, so after 10 analyses, a complete coverage of the sample components can be obtained. On the polar 1D and non-polar 2D phase column arrangement, non-polar matrix compounds elute last on the 2D column, and this determines the largest 2tR; i.e. 2tR

Blagoj Mitrevski; Rene L. Webster; Paul Rawson; David J. Evans; Hyung-Kyoon Choi; Philip J. Marriott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 10:47:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country" "Sourcekey","MTTNTUS2","MTTNTUSPG2","MTTNT_NUS-ME0_2","MTTNTUSAG2","MTTNTUSAO2","MTTNTUSEC2","MTTNTUSIR2","MTTNT_NUS-NIZ_2","MTTNTUSKU2","MTTNT_NUS-NLY_2","MTTNTUSNI2","MTTNTUSQA2","MTTNTUSSA2","MTTNTUSTC2","MTTNTUSVE2","MTTNTUSVV2","MTTNT_NUS-NAF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAC_2","MTTNTUSAR2","MTTNT_NUS-NAE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAA_2","MTTNTUSAS2","MTTNT_NUS-NAU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAJ_2","MTTNTUSBF2","MTTNT_NUS-NBA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBO_2","MTTNTUSBE2","MTTNT_NUS-NBH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBK_2","MTTNTUSBR2","MTTNTUSBX2","MTTNT_NUS-NBU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCB_2","MTTNTUSCM2","MTTNTUSCA2","MTTNT_NUS-NCJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCI_2","MTTNTUSCH2","MTTNTUSCO2","MTTNTUSCF2","MTTNTUSCG2","MTTNT_NUS-NCW_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDR_2","MTTNTUSEG2","MTTNT_NUS-NES_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NET_2","MTTNT_NUS-NER_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFI_2","MTTNTUSFR2","MTTNT_NUS-NFP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFG_2","MTTNTUSGB2","MTTNT_NUS-NGG_2","MTTNTUSBZ2","MTTNT_NUS-NGH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGI_2","MTTNTUSGR2","MTTNT_NUS-NGL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGJ_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NGP_2","MTTNTUSGT2","MTTNT_NUS-NGV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIC_2","MTTNTUSIN2","MTTNTUSID2","MTTNT_NUS-NEI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIS_2","MTTNTUSIT2","MTTNT_NUS-NIV_2","MTTNTUSJM2","MTTNTUSJA2","MTTNT_NUS-NJO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKE_2","MTTNTUSKS2","MTTNT_NUS-NKT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMA_2","MTTNTUSMY2","MTTNT_NUS-NMV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NML_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NRM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMP_2","MTTNTUSMX2","MTTNT_NUS-NFM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMQ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMG_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NMJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNP_2","MTTNTUSNL2","MTTNTUSNA2","MTTNT_NUS-NNC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNE_2","MTTNTUSNO2","MTTNTUSMU2","MTTNT_NUS-NPK_2","MTTNTUSPM2","MTTNT_NUS-NPP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPA_2","MTTNTUSPE2","MTTNT_NUS-NRP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPO_2","MTTNTUSRQ2","MTTNTUSRO2","MTTNT_NUS-NRS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NST_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NYI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSF_2","MTTNTUSSP2","MTTNT_NUS-NPG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWZ_2","MTTNTUSSW2","MTTNT_NUS-NSZ_2","MTTNTUSSY2","MTTNTUSTW2","MTTNT_NUS-NTZ_2","MTTNTUSTH2","MTTNT_NUS-NTO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTN_2","MTTNTUSTD2","MTTNT_NUS-NTS_2","MTTNTUSTU2","MTTNT_NUS-NTX_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUR_2","MTTNTUSUK2","MTTNT_NUS-NUY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVI_2","MTTNTUSVQ2","MTTNTUSYE2","MTTNT_NUS-NYO_2","MTTNTUSWW2"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" 2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1981" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:29:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAC_1","MTTEXAR1","MTTEX_NUS-NAE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAA_1","MTTEXAS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAJ_1","MTTEXBF1","MTTEXBA1","MTTEX_NUS-NBB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBO_1","MTTEXBE1","MTTEX_NUS-NBH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBK_1","MTTEXBR1","MTTEX_NUS-NBX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCM_1","MTTEXCA1","MTTEX_NUS-NCJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCD_1","MTTEXCI1","MTTEXCH1","MTTEXCO1","MTTEX_NUS-NCF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCG_1","MTTEXCS1","MTTEX_NUS-NHR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCZ_1","MTTEXDA1","MTTEX_NUS-NDJ_1","MTTEXDO1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NDR_1","MTTEXEC1","MTTEXEG1","MTTEXES1","MTTEX_NUS-NEK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NER_1","MTTEX_NUS-NEN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NET_1","MTTEX_NUS-NFJ_1","MTTEXFI1","MTTEXFR1","MTTEX_NUS-NFG_1","MTTEXFP1","MTTEX_NUS-NGB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGG_1","MTTEXBZ1","MTTEXGH1","MTTEX_NUS-NGI_1","MTTEXGR1","MTTEX_NUS-NGL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGJ_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NGP_1","MTTEXGT1","MTTEX_NUS-NGV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NHA_1","MTTEXHO1","MTTEXHK1","MTTEX_NUS-NHU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIC_1","MTTEXIN1","MTTEXID1","MTTEX_NUS-NIR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIZ_1","MTTEXEI1","MTTEXIS1","MTTEXIT1","MTTEX_NUS-NIV_1","MTTEXJM1","MTTEXJA1","MTTEX_NUS-NJO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKE_1","MTTEXKS1","MTTEX_NUS-NKN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMA_1","MTTEXMY1","MTTEX_NUS-NMV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NML_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMP_1","MTTEXMX1","MTTEX_NUS-NFM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMQ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMG_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NMJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNP_1","MTTEXNL1","MTTEXNA1","MTTEX_NUS-NNC_1","MTTEXNZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NNU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNG_1","MTTEXNI1","MTTEX_NUS-NNE_1","MTTEXNO1","MTTEX_NUS-NMU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPK_1","MTTEXPM1","MTTEX_NUS-NPP_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPA_1","MTTEXPE1","MTTEXRP1","MTTEXPL1","MTTEXPO1","MTTEXRQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NQA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NST_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSM_1","MTTEXSA1","MTTEX_NUS-NSG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NYI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSL_1","MTTEXSN1","MTTEX_NUS-NSK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBP_1","MTTEXSF1","MTTEXSP1","MTTEX_NUS-NPG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSU_1","MTTEXNS1","MTTEX_NUS-NWZ_1","MTTEXSW1","MTTEXSZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NSY_1","MTTEXTW1","MTTEX_NUS-NTZ_1","MTTEXTH1","MTTEX_NUS-NTN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTO_1","MTTEXTD1","MTTEX_NUS-NTS_1","MTTEXTU1","MTTEX_NUS-NTX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUR_1","MTTEXTC1","MTTEXUK1","MTTEXUY1","MTTEX_NUS-NUZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNH_1","MTTEXVE1","MTTEX_NUS-NVM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVI_1","MTTEXVQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NYE_1","MTTEXYO1","MTTEX_NUS-NZA_1"

242

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" 1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1981" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_expc_a_ep00_eex_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 7:28:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination" "Sourcekey","MTTEXUS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAC_1","MTTEXAR1","MTTEX_NUS-NAE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAA_1","MTTEXAS1","MTTEX_NUS-NAU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NAJ_1","MTTEXBF1","MTTEXBA1","MTTEX_NUS-NBB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBO_1","MTTEXBE1","MTTEX_NUS-NBH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBK_1","MTTEXBR1","MTTEX_NUS-NBX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCM_1","MTTEXCA1","MTTEX_NUS-NCJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCD_1","MTTEXCI1","MTTEXCH1","MTTEXCO1","MTTEX_NUS-NCF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCG_1","MTTEXCS1","MTTEX_NUS-NHR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCZ_1","MTTEXDA1","MTTEX_NUS-NDJ_1","MTTEXDO1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NDR_1","MTTEXEC1","MTTEXEG1","MTTEXES1","MTTEX_NUS-NEK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NER_1","MTTEX_NUS-NEN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NET_1","MTTEX_NUS-NFJ_1","MTTEXFI1","MTTEXFR1","MTTEX_NUS-NFG_1","MTTEXFP1","MTTEX_NUS-NGB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGG_1","MTTEXBZ1","MTTEXGH1","MTTEX_NUS-NGI_1","MTTEXGR1","MTTEX_NUS-NGL_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGJ_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NGP_1","MTTEXGT1","MTTEX_NUS-NGV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NGY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NHA_1","MTTEXHO1","MTTEXHK1","MTTEX_NUS-NHU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NIC_1","MTTEXIN1","MTTEXID1","MTTEX_NUS-NIZ_1","MTTEXEI1","MTTEXIS1","MTTEXIT1","MTTEX_NUS-NIV_1","MTTEXJM1","MTTEXJA1","MTTEX_NUS-NJO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKE_1","MTTEXKS1","MTTEX_NUS-NKN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NKU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLY_1","MTTEX_NUS-NLH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMA_1","MTTEXMY1","MTTEX_NUS-NMV_1","MTTEX_NUS-NML_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMT_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMR_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMP_1","MTTEXMX1","MTTEX_NUS-NFM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMQ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMD_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMG_1","M_EP00_EEX_NUS-NMJ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMH_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NMZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNP_1","MTTEXNL1","MTTEXNA1","MTTEX_NUS-NNC_1","MTTEXNZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NNU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNG_1","MTTEXNI1","MTTEX_NUS-NNE_1","MTTEXNO1","MTTEX_NUS-NMU_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPK_1","MTTEXPM1","MTTEX_NUS-NPP_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPF_1","MTTEX_NUS-NPA_1","MTTEXPE1","MTTEXRP1","MTTEXPL1","MTTEXPO1","MTTEXRQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NQA_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRO_1","MTTEX_NUS-NRS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NST_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSB_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVC_1","MTTEX_NUS-NWS_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSM_1","MTTEXSA1","MTTEX_NUS-NSG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NYI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSL_1","MTTEXSN1","MTTEX_NUS-NSK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSI_1","MTTEX_NUS-NBP_1","MTTEXSF1","MTTEXSP1","MTTEX_NUS-NPG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NCE_1","MTTEX_NUS-NSU_1","MTTEXNS1","MTTEX_NUS-NWZ_1","MTTEXSW1","MTTEXSZ1","MTTEX_NUS-NSY_1","MTTEXTW1","MTTEX_NUS-NTZ_1","MTTEXTH1","MTTEX_NUS-NTN_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTO_1","MTTEXTD1","MTTEX_NUS-NTS_1","MTTEXTU1","MTTEX_NUS-NTX_1","MTTEX_NUS-NTK_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUG_1","MTTEX_NUS-NUR_1","MTTEXTC1","MTTEXUK1","MTTEXUY1","MTTEX_NUS-NUZ_1","MTTEX_NUS-NNH_1","MTTEXVE1","MTTEX_NUS-NVM_1","MTTEX_NUS-NVI_1","MTTEXVQ1","MTTEX_NUS-NYE_1","MTTEXYO1","MTTEX_NUS-NZA_1"

243

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" Annual",2012,"6/30/1973" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_neti_a_ep00_imn_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 10:46:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country" "Sourcekey","MTTNTUS2","MTTNTUSPG2","MTTNT_NUS-ME0_2","MTTNTUSAG2","MTTNTUSAO2","MTTNTUSEC2","MTTNTUSIR2","MTTNT_NUS-NIZ_2","MTTNTUSKU2","MTTNT_NUS-NLY_2","MTTNTUSNI2","MTTNTUSQA2","MTTNTUSSA2","MTTNTUSTC2","MTTNTUSVE2","MTTNTUSVV2","MTTNT_NUS-NAF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAC_2","MTTNTUSAR2","MTTNT_NUS-NAE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAA_2","MTTNTUSAS2","MTTNT_NUS-NAU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NAJ_2","MTTNTUSBF2","MTTNT_NUS-NBA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBO_2","MTTNTUSBE2","MTTNT_NUS-NBH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBK_2","MTTNTUSBR2","MTTNTUSBX2","MTTNT_NUS-NBU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NBM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCB_2","MTTNTUSCM2","MTTNTUSCA2","MTTNT_NUS-NCJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCI_2","MTTNTUSCH2","MTTNTUSCO2","MTTNTUSCF2","MTTNTUSCG2","MTTNT_NUS-NCW_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NDR_2","MTTNTUSEG2","MTTNT_NUS-NES_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NET_2","MTTNT_NUS-NER_2","MTTNT_NUS-NEN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFI_2","MTTNTUSFR2","MTTNT_NUS-NFP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NFG_2","MTTNTUSGB2","MTTNT_NUS-NGG_2","MTTNTUSBZ2","MTTNT_NUS-NGH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGI_2","MTTNTUSGR2","MTTNT_NUS-NGL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGJ_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NGP_2","MTTNTUSGT2","MTTNT_NUS-NGV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NGY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NHU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIC_2","MTTNTUSIN2","MTTNTUSID2","MTTNT_NUS-NEI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NIS_2","MTTNTUSIT2","MTTNT_NUS-NIV_2","MTTNTUSJM2","MTTNTUSJA2","MTTNT_NUS-NJO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKE_2","MTTNTUSKS2","MTTNT_NUS-NKT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NKG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NLH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMA_2","MTTNTUSMY2","MTTNT_NUS-NMV_2","MTTNT_NUS-NML_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMT_2","MTTNT_NUS-NRM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMR_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMP_2","MTTNTUSMX2","MTTNT_NUS-NFM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMQ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMD_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMG_2","M_EP00_IMN_NUS-NMJ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NMZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWA_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNP_2","MTTNTUSNL2","MTTNTUSNA2","MTTNT_NUS-NNC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNU_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNE_2","MTTNTUSNO2","MTTNTUSMU2","MTTNT_NUS-NPK_2","MTTNTUSPM2","MTTNT_NUS-NPP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPF_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPA_2","MTTNTUSPE2","MTTNT_NUS-NRP_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NPO_2","MTTNTUSRQ2","MTTNTUSRO2","MTTNT_NUS-NRS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NST_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSB_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVC_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NYI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSL_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSN_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSI_2","MTTNT_NUS-NSF_2","MTTNTUSSP2","MTTNT_NUS-NPG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NCE_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNS_2","MTTNT_NUS-NWZ_2","MTTNTUSSW2","MTTNT_NUS-NSZ_2","MTTNTUSSY2","MTTNTUSTW2","MTTNT_NUS-NTZ_2","MTTNTUSTH2","MTTNT_NUS-NTO_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTN_2","MTTNTUSTD2","MTTNT_NUS-NTS_2","MTTNTUSTU2","MTTNT_NUS-NTX_2","MTTNT_NUS-NTK_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUG_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUR_2","MTTNTUSUK2","MTTNT_NUS-NUY_2","MTTNT_NUS-NUZ_2","MTTNT_NUS-NNH_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVM_2","MTTNT_NUS-NVI_2","MTTNTUSVQ2","MTTNTUSYE2","MTTNT_NUS-NYO_2","MTTNTUSWW2"

244

Four methods for determining the composition of trace radioactive surface contamination of low-radioactivity metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four methods for determining the composition of low-level uranium- and thorium-chain surface contamination are presented. One method is the observation of Cherenkov light production in water. In two additional methods a position-sensitive proportional counter surrounding the surface is used to make both a measurement of the energy spectrum of alpha particle emissions and also coincidence measurements to derive the thorium-chain content based on the presence of short-lived isotopes in that decay chain. The fourth method is a radiochemical technique in which the surface is eluted with a weak acid, the eluate is concentrated, added to liquid scintillator and assayed by recording beta-alpha coincidences. These methods were used to characterize two `hotspots' on the outer surface of one of the He-3 proportional counters in the Neutral Current Detection array of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment. The methods have similar sensitivities, of order tens of ng, to both thorium- and uranium-chain contamination.

O'Keeffe, H M; Cleveland, B T; Doucas, G; Gagnon, N; Jelley, N A; Kraus, C; Lawson, I T; Majerus, S; McGee, S R; Myers, A W; Poon, A W P; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Rosten, R C; Stonehill, L C; VanDevender, B A; Van Wechel, T D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Four methods for determining the composition of trace radioactive surface contamination of low-radioactivity metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four methods for determining the composition of low-level uranium- and thorium-chain surface contamination are presented. One method is the observation of Cherenkov light production in water. In two additional methods a position-sensitive proportional counter surrounding the surface is used to make both a measurement of the energy spectrum of alpha particle emissions and also coincidence measurements to derive the thorium-chain content based on the presence of short-lived isotopes in that decay chain. The fourth method is a radiochemical technique in which the surface is eluted with a weak acid, the eluate is concentrated, added to liquid scintillator and assayed by recording beta-alpha coincidences. These methods were used to characterize two `hotspots' on the outer surface of one of the He-3 proportional counters in the Neutral Current Detection array of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment. The methods have similar sensitivities, of order tens of ng, to both thorium- and uranium-chain contamination.

H. M. O'Keeffe; T. H. Burritt; B. T. Cleveland; G. Doucas; N. Gagnon; N. A. Jelley; C. Kraus; I. T. Lawson; S. Majerus; S. R. McGee; A. W. Myers; A. W. P. Poon; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; R. C. Rosten; L. C. Stonehill; B. A. VanDevender; T. D. Van Wechel

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

Monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysis of starch by microdialysis sampling coupled on-line to anion exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed electrochemical detection using post-column switching  

SciTech Connect

A quantitative evaluation of the hydrolysis of wheat starch using Termamyl, a thermostable {alpha}-amylase, is reported. Data from the monitoring of the hydrolysis of wheat starch indicated that, after 1 h, glucose and maltooligosaccharides up to DP 7 were the main hydrolysis products and thus enabled optimization of a liquefaction step during the production of L-lactic acid. The monitoring system used, both in the on- and off-line mode, was based on continuous flow microdialysis sampling (CFMS) coupled to anion exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed electrochemical detection (IPED). A microdialysis probe equipped with a 5-mm polysulfone (SPS 4005) membrane, with a molecular-weight cut-off of 5 kDa, was used to sample the hydrolysis products of native wheat starch at 90 C. Characteristic fingerpoint separations were achieved by anion exchange chromatography after enzymatic hydrolysis. Post-column switching improved the detection and, consequently, also quantification of the hydrolysates as fouling of the electrode could be reduced. Maltooligosaccharide standards were used for quantification and to verify the elution of the hydrolysates by spiking the off-line samples.

Torto, N.; Gorton, L.; Emneus, J.; Laurell, T. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden)] [Univ. of Lund (Sweden); Marko-Varga, G. [Astra Draco AB, Lund (Sweden). Bioanalytical Chemistry] [Astra Draco AB, Lund (Sweden). Bioanalytical Chemistry; Akerberg, C.; Zacchi, G. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; [Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden)

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Detailed analyses of FCC decant oil as a starting feedstock for mesophase pitch  

SciTech Connect

Four typical DOs supplied from Japanese refineries were analyzed in detail by GC, FD-MS {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-NMR after the fractionations by column chromatography. A DO carries 30% saturate and 70% aromatic fractions. The saturate consisted principally of the straight paraffins. The aromatic fraction was separated into five substractions (AR1 - AR5) of which contents distributed rather evenly, the middle fraction (AR 3) occupying the largest of 30%. The aromatic components had consisted of aromatic rings from 2(AR1) to 4(AR4+5), of some aryl-aryl linkages and naphthenic rings being included. The lighter aromatic fraction carried more alkyl groups, enhance its solubility and elution in the column. B DO appeared heaviest among the DOs in the present study. The oils carried only 10% of the saturate and 75% of AR3-AR5 aromatic subfractions. Its saturate was of carried rather short chains and more isoparaffins. Its aromatic components had very similar aromatic units to those of A DO in the same subfraction, although the heaviest fraction of the former once contained also a small portion of 6 aromatic rings.

Mochida, I.; Korai, Y.; Hieida, T. (Inst. of Advanced Material Study, Kyushu Univ. 86, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816 (JP)); Azuma, A.; Kitajima, E. (Osaka Research Lab., Koa Oil Co. Ltd., Takaishi-shi Osaka 592 (JP))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Perch population assessment in lakes reclaimed using oil-sands derived material  

SciTech Connect

The mining and extraction of petroleum products from oil-sands involves large areas of land and produces enormous volumes of tailings. One possible land reclamation option is to incorporate fine-tailings material into the bottoms of constructed lakes capped with natural surface water. The wet landscape method represents potential risk to aquatic biota-naphthenic acids and PAHs elute from pore water contained in the fine-tailings substrate. In spring 1995 yellow perch were stocked into a large-scale (5ha) experimental pond that consisted of fine-tailings capped with natural water as well as into two other reclaimed ponds that were constructed with oil-sands overburden material. Prior to stocking of perch, ponds had colonized with cyprinids, macrophytes and benthic invertebrates over a two year period. Perch were sampled in fall 1995 for age, condition factor, liver size, gonad size, fecundity, stomach contents, liver mixed-function oxygenase activity (MFO), bile PAH metabolites and plasma steroid hormones. When compared to the source lake, perch in the DP did not show reduced reproductive potential. Perch in all of the reclaimed ponds demonstrated exposure to organic compounds as indicated by marginally induced MFO activity and increased liver size. Exposure to naphthenates and PAHs in water as well as ecological environmental factors will be discussed.

Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Power, M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Boerger, H.; MacKinnon, M.D.; Meer, T. van [Syncrude Canada, Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Membrane associated phospholipase C from bovine brain  

SciTech Connect

Cytosolic fractions of bovine brain contain 2 immunologically distinct phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase (PLC), PLC-I and PLC-II, whose MW are 150,000 and 145,000 respectively, under a denaturing condition. Monoclonal antibodies were derived against each form and specific radioimmunoassays were developed. Distribution of PLC-I and PLC-II in cytosolic and particulate fractions was measured using the radioimmunoassay. More than 90% of PLC-II was found in the cytosolic fraction, while the anti-PLC-I antibody cross-reacting protein was distributed nearly equally between the soluble fraction and the 2 M KCl extract of particulate fraction. The PLC enzyme in the particulate fraction was purified to homogeneity, yielding 2 proteins of 140 KDa and 150 KDa when analyzed on SDS-PAGE. Neither of the 2 enzymes cross-reacted with anti-PLC-II antibodies, but both could be immunoblotted by all 4 different anti-PLC-I antibodies. This suggests that the 140 KDa PLC was derived from the 150 KDa form. The 150 Kda form from particulate fraction was indistinguishable from the cytosolic PLC-I when their mixture was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. In addition, the elution profile of tryptic peptides derived from the 150 KDa particulate form was identical to that of cytosolic PLC-I. This result indicates that PLC-I is reversibly associated to membranes.

Lee, K.; Ryu, S.H.; Suh, P.; Choi, W.C.; Rhee, S.G.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

SPHERICAL RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE PERFORMANCE TESTING WITH HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The efficacy of a new spherically engineered form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin was tested for cesium removal on two actual Hanford tank wastes. Small-scale processing was conducted according to the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant flowsheet in a lead-lag column format. The RF resin processed 95 bed volumes (BVs) of high potassium-bearing waste (AP-101) and >200 BVs of a high complexant-bearing waste (AN-102) before reaching 50% cesium breakthrough. Elution with 0.5 M nitric acid was effective and complete after processing 16 BVs. Cesium and other analyte fractionations to the process stream effluent and eluate were evaluated. The RF resin resulted in very little metal and radionuclide fractionation, other than cesium, to the eluate. The spent resins were measured for most analytes relevant to land-disposal requirements. The actinide concentrations on the spent resins were <3% of the transuranic waste limit; the residual cesium concentrations were <4 mCi/kg; chromium was the only metal, regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act, that was measured in quantities significant to land-disposal regulations.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Arm, Stuart T.; Steele, Marilyn J.; Thorson, Murray R.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

251

Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp  

SciTech Connect

This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

Simo Sarkanen

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

252

Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending March 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

In this report the first fabrication and evaluation of an activated carbon-based osmium-194/iridium-194 generator system is described. Iridium-194 (t{sub {1/2}} = 19.2 h) decays by {Beta}{sup {minus}} emission (E{sub max} = 2.24 MeV) and is a potential candidate for radioimmunotherapy. An important characteristic is availability of {sup 194}Ir from decay of reactor-produced {sup 194}Os (t{sub {1/2}} = 6 y). A novel gas thermochromatographic method was developed for the one step conversion of metallic Os to OsO{sub 4} and subsequent separation and purification of OsO{sub 4}, which was then converted to the K{sub 2}OsCl{sub 6} for generator loading. The yield and the elution profile of carrier-free {sup 194}Ir, and {sup 194}Os breakthrough were determined for a prototype generator which was evaluated over a 10 month-period.l During this period several agents were also supplied to Medical Cooperative investigators, including iodine-123-labelled and iodine-125-labelled fatty acid analogues for studies at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition, gold-198 and tungsten-188/-rhenium-188 generators were shipped to various investigators for therapeutic studies involving tumor-specific antibodies. 19 refs., 3 figs.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C.; Allred, J.F.; Hasan, A.; Lambert, C.R.; Lambert, S.J.; Rice, D.E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

SciTech Connect

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ultratrace detector for hand-held gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and C0.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethal Island, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Method for detection of extremely low concentration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and CO.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethal Island, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Influencia del sexo en los resultados clnicos de los stents liberadores de everolimus en comparacin con los stents metlicos sin recubrimiento en el infarto agudo de miocardio con elevacin del segmento ST. Perspectivas del ensayo EXAMINATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ResumenIntroduccin y objetivos Los stents liberadores de frmaco (farmacoactivos) de segunda generacin, en comparacin con los stents metlicos sin recubrimiento, reducen la tasa de eventos adversos cardiacos mayores de los pacientes con infarto agudo de miocardio con elevacin del segmento ST. El objetivo es evaluar la influencia del sexo del paciente en el resultado obtenido con los stents liberadores de everolimus en comparacin con los stents metlicos sin recubrimiento en pacientes con infarto agudo de miocardio con elevacin del segmento ST a los 2 aos de seguimiento. Mtodos Se llev a cabo un subestudio del ensayo clnico EXAMINATION, en el que se aleatoriz a 1.498 pacientes con infarto agudo de miocardio con elevacin del segmento ST tratados con intervencin coronaria percutnea al grupo de stents liberadores de everolimus o al de stents metlicos sin recubrimiento. El objetivo principal fue la combinacin de muerte por cualquier causa, cualquier recurrencia de infarto agudo de miocardio y cualquier revascularizacin. Todos los objetivos se analizaron en funcin del sexo del paciente en el seguimiento realizado a los 2 aos. Resultados De los 1.498 pacientes incluidos en el ensayo, 254 (17,0%) eran mujeres. Las mujeres eran de ms edad y tenan mayor prevalencia de hipertensin arterial y menor prevalencia de tabaquismo que los varones. Respecto a los varones, el dimetro mximo del stent en las mujeres result menor. Tras realizar un anlisis multivariable, el objetivo principal fue similar entre mujeres y varones (hazard ratio=0,95; intervalo de confianza del 95%, 0,66-1,37), y en el anlisis realizado sobre las mujeres, fue similar entre tratadas con stents metlicos sin recubrimiento y tratadas con stents liberadores de everolimus (hazard ratio=2,48; intervalo de confianza del 95%, 0,95-6,46). Las mujeres presentaron una tasa de revascularizacin repetida menor que los varones (hazard ratio=0,55; intervalo de confianza del 95%, 0,32-0,95), a pesar de sus peores caractersticas basales. Esta diferencia se explica por un mejor resultado del stent liberador de everolimus en las mujeres. Conclusiones Pese a tener caractersticas basales peores, las mujeres con infarto agudo de miocardio con elevacin del segmento ST tratadas con intervencin coronaria percutnea obtuvieron resultados similares a los de los varones. El uso de stents liberadores de everolimus puede aportar un valor aadido en las mujeres, puesto que se demostr una reduccin de la tasa de revascularizacin repetida en comparacin con los varones. AbstractIntroduction and objectives The use of second-generation drug-eluting stents compared with bare-metal stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reduces the rate of major adverse cardiac events. We aimed to evaluate the impact of sex on the performance of everolimus-eluting stents vs bare-metal stents in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction at 2-year follow-up. Methods This is a sub-study of the EXAMINATION trial that randomized 1498 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to everolimus-eluting or bare-metal stents. Primary end point was combined all-cause death, any recurrent myocardial infarction, and any revascularization. All end points were analyzed according to sex at 2-year follow-up. Results Of 1498 patients included in the trial, 254 (17.0%) were women. Women were older and had higher prevalence of hypertension and lower prevalence of smoking compared with men. In contrast with men, stent diameter was smaller in women. After multivariate analysis, the primary end point was similar between women and men (hazard ratio=0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.37), and among women, between those treated with bare-metal vs everolimus-eluting stents (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-6.46). Women showed a lower rate of repeat revascularization than men (hazard ratio=0.55; 95

Ander Regueiro; Diego Fernndez-Rodrguez; Salvatore Brugaletta; Victoria Martn-Yuste; Monica Masotti; Xavier Freixa; ngel Cequier; Andrs iguez; Patrick W. Serruys; Manel Sabat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Literature Review of Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde for Cesium Ion Exchange  

SciTech Connect

The current report summarizes work performed throughout the scientific community and DOE complex as reported in the open literature and DOE-sponsored reports to evaluate the Cs+ ion exchange (CIX) characteristics of SRF resin. King (2007) completed a similar literature review in support of material selection for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project. Josephson et al. (2010) and Sams et al. (2009) provided a similar brief review of SRF CIX for the near-tank Cs+ removal (NTCR) project. Thorson (2008a) documented the basis for recommending SRF over SuperLigTM 644 as the primary CIX resin in the WTP. The current review expands on previous work, summarizes additional work completed to date, and provides a broad view of the literature without focusing on a specific column system. Although the focus of the current review is the SRF resin, many cited references include multiple materials such as the non-spherical GGRF and SuperLigTM 644 organic resins and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) IONSIVTM IE-911, a non-elutable inorganic material. This report summarizes relevant information provided in the literature.

Brown, Garrett N.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effect on Intimal Hyperplasia of Dexamethasone Released from Coated Metal Stents Compared with Non-Coated Stents in Canine Femoral Arteries  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Polymer-coated, dexamethasone (DXM)-releasing stents were tested in order to assess the efficacy of DXM released locally for the prevention of stent restenosis due to intimal hyperplasia. Methods: Strecker stents coated with a biodegradable membrane containing DXM were implanted percutaneously into the femoral artery in 14 dogs. The contralateral artery received a conventional non-coated stent serving as control. The drugs are eluted by degradation of the carrier membrane. Follow-up intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was obtained at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 weeks with subsequent autopsy. Specimens for gross and microscopic pathology were obtained and histomorphometry was performed. Results: Four of 14 DXM-coated stents showed thrombotic occlusion within the first 3 weeks; ten DXM-coated stents remained patent. At follow-up DSA, DXM-coated stents showed a significantly wider lumen than the non-coated stents. At morphometry there was less intimal hyperplasia over DXM-coated stents than over non-coated stents (p < 0.05). Conclusion: DXM-coated stents reduce neointimal hyperplasia in dogs when compared with non-coated stents.

Strecker, Ernst-Peter [Department of Radiology, Diakonissen-Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, D-76199 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gabelmann, Andreas [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Boos, Irene [Department of Radiology, Diakonissen-Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, D-76199 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lucas, Christopher [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 366, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Xu, Zhongying [Department of Radiology, Diakonissen-Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, D-76199 Karlsruhe (Germany); Haberstroh, Joerg [Department of Surgical Research, University Hospital, Breisacher Strasse 64, D-79108 Freiburg (Germany); Freudenberg, Nicolaus [Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Albertstrasse 19, D-79002 Freiburg (Germany); Stricker, Helmut [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 366, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Langer, Mathias [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Betz, Eberhard [Department of Physiology, University Tuebingen, Gmelinstrasse 5, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

1998-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS  

SciTech Connect

A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit.

Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non-acid elution nae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Determination of an unstable pentapeptide, monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor, in dog blood by LCMS/MS: Application to a pharmacokinetic study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS) method has been developed and established for the quantitative determination of monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor, a pentapeptide (Met-Gln-Cys-Asn-Ser) produced by Entamoeba histolytica in axenic culture, in dog blood. The main challenge was the chemical and enzymatic instability of the peptide which was successfully overcome. After a simple protein precipitation, MLIF was separated from AS-5 (Met-Gln-Gly-Asn-Ser), acted as an internal standard, on a Gemini C18 column (5?m, 50mmנ4.6mm i.d.) using a gradient elution of acetonitrile (0.2% formic acid) and water (0.2% formic acid) and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Excellent linearity was achieved (r>0.9943) over the linear range 51000ng/ml using 0.2ml blood sample. The validation results demonstrated that this method was specific, accurate and precise. It was successfully applied in measuring MLIF following intravenous infusion its administration at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8mg/kg in beagle dogs to support the pre-clinical pharmacokinetic study.

Huafang Jiang; Ji Li; Xin Zhao; Yu Zhou; You Li; Fanlu Sun; Xun Hu; Jinghua Huang; Yaocheng Rui; Guorong Fan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

New ion exchangers and solvent extractants for pre-analysis separation of actinides. Annual report, June 1982-May 1983  

SciTech Connect

Prior to radiochemical determination of actinide elements such as uranium, neptunium and plutonium, an ion exchange or solvent extraction method is often employed to separate these from themselves and other interfering elements. In order to improve the separation efficiency and reduce time, cost, and liquid waste of analytical separation methods, new and better ion exchangers and solvent extractants are under evaluation. New microreticular and macroreticular anion exchange resins and bifunctional organophosphorus solvent extractants have been evaluated for uranium, neptunium and plutonium separations. Previous work comparing numerous anion exchange resins has shown the macroreticular Amberlite IRA-938 resin as having the highest actinide capacity and best elution kinetics. Recent studies have confirmed the resin has advantages over others for Pu-U separations. Work at Rocky Flats on bifunctional organophosphorus solvent extractants for the recovery and purification of actinides has led to the identification of several new separation systems applicable for radiochemical analysis. Dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP), its dibutyl analog DBDECMP, and DHDECMP-tributylphosphate (TBP) using liquid-liquid or extraction chromatography techniques are applicable for plutonium-americium and plutonium separations. Both DHDECMP and DBDECMP extract actinides strongly, extract lanthanides, iron, gallium, molybdenum, titanium, vanadium, zirconium partially, and do not extract most other elements from 5 to 7M nitric acid. With the DHDECMP-TBP and DBDECMP-TBP systems, synergistic effects have been observed for both plutonium and americium. The chemistry and application for pre-analysis separations of these solvent extraction systems are described. 11 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

Navratil, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Neptunium Valence Chemistry in Anion Exchange Processing  

SciTech Connect

The current anion resin in use in HB-Line Phase II, Reillex{trademark} HPQ, was tested in the laboratory under expected plant conditions for Np processing and was found to load between 50 and 70 g Np per liter of resin. Losses varied from 0.2 to 15 percent depending on a number of parameters. Hydrazine in the feed at 0.02 to 0.05 M appeared to keep the Np from oxidizing and increasing the losses within four to seven days after the FS addition. Losses of up to three percent were observed five days after FS addition when hydrazine was not used in the feed, compared with 0.3 percent when the feed was loaded immediately after FS addition. Based on these test results the following processing conditions are recommended: (1) Feed conditions: 8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Wash conditions: 100 liters of 8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (3) Elution conditions: 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS. (4) Precipitation feed conditions: 0.03 M excess ascorbic acid, no additional hydrazine, no FS, precipitation within three days.

KYSER, EDWARD

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Discovery and Optimization of 1,3,4-Trisubstituted-pyrazolone Derivatives as Novel, Potent, and Nonsteroidal Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Selective Antagonists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237, China ... (3) BA-activated FXR mediates hepatoprotection from excess BAs by preventing synthesis and uptake and promoting excretion of BAs: (1) reducing BA synthesis via indirect downregulation of liver-specific cholesterol 7?-hydroxylase (Cyp7A1),(4) a rate-limiting enzyme of the bile acid biosynthetic pathway,(5) (2) reducing the import of BAs from the plasma compartment into the hepatocyte via suppression of Na+-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP),(6) a hepatic BA import pumps, and (3) increasing the export of BAs out of the hepatocyte into the bile via upregulation of bile salt export pump (BSEP),(7) a hepatic bile acid export pumps. ... The residue was purified by flash chromatography on silica gel, eluted with a mixture of EtOAc/petroleum ether (1:4, v/v), to afford 17 (0.27 g, 77%) as a white solid. ...

Huang Huang; Ying Yu; Zhenting Gao; Yong Zhang; Chenjing Li; Xing Xu; Hui Jin; Wenzhong Yan; Ruoqun Ma; Jin Zhu; Xu Shen; Hualiang Jiang; Lili Chen; Jian Li

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

High-pressure/high-temperature gas-solubility study in hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems using static and chromatographic techniques  

SciTech Connect

The design and discovery of sources for alternative energy such as coal liquefaction has become of major importance over the past two decades. One of the major problems in such design in the lack of available data, particularly, for gas solubility in polycyclic aromatics at high temperature and pressure. Static and gas-liquid partition chromatographic methods were used for the study of hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems. The static data for these two binaries were taken along 398.2, 423.2, 448.2, and 473.2 K isotherms up to 25.23 MPa. Gas-liquid partition chromatography was used to study the infinite dilution behavior of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the hydrogen-phenanthrene system as well as hydrogen, ethane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the methane-phenanthrene binary. The principle objective was to examine the role of the elution gas. Temperatures were along the same isotherms as the static data and up to 20.77 MPa. With the exception of carbon dioxide, Henry's constants were calculated for all systems. Expressions for the heat of solution as a function of pressure were derived for both binary and chromatographic data. Estimates of delta H/sub i/sup sol/ at high pressure were presented.

Malone, P.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

SciTech Connect

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

Mike L. Laue

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Quantitative determination of salvinorin A, a natural hallucinogen with abuse liability, in Internet-available Salvia divinorum and endemic species of Salvia in Taiwan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent years, recreational use of Salvia divinorum (Lamiaceae), a herbal drug that contains a hallucinogenic ingredient, salvinorin A, has become a new phenomenon among young drug users. In Taiwan, as in many other countries, dry leaves of S. divinorum and its related concentrated extract products are available via the Internet. Besides S. divinorum, there are many endemic Salvia species whose salvinorin A content is yet unknown. To understand the abuse liability of these products, the aim of this study was to assess the concentration of salvinorin A in endemic Salvia species and Internet-available salvinorin A-related products. Samples of S. divinorum were purchased via the Internet and samples of eight endemic species of Salvia were collected in Taiwan, including S. arisanensis Hayata, S. coccinea Juss. ex Murr, S. hayatana Makino ex Hayata, S. japonica Thumb. ex Murr, S. nipponica Miq. Var. formosana (Hayata) Kudo, S. scapiformis Hance, S. tashiroi Hayata. Icon. PI. Formosan, and S. keitaoensis Hayata. The content of salvinorin A was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Salvinorin A was extracted from the dry leaves of S. divinorum and endemic species of Salvia with methanol and analyzed on a C-18 column by isocratic elution with a mobile phase of acetonitrilewater. Salvinorin A was detected in S. divinorum, but not in the endemic Salvia species of Taiwan. Therefore, endemic species of Salvia in Taiwan may not possess hallucinogenic potential. However, the potential harm from S. divinorum available via the Internet should be thoroughly assessed in Taiwan, and control measures similar to those implemented in many other countries should be considered.

Po-Xiang Lin; Jih-Heng Li; Su-Hwei Chen; Hsien-Chang Chang; Rebecca McKetin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Inorganic ion exchange evaluation and design: Silicotitanate ion exchange waste conversion  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange materials are being evaluated for removing Cs, SR from tank waste. Thermal conversion of a variety of compositions within the Cs{sub 2}O-TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} phase diagram yielded both glass and crystalline materials, some of which show low leach rates and negligible Cs losses during heat treatment. A new material, CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}, with a structure isomorphous to pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}0{sub 6}) has been identified. This material represents a new class of crystalline zeolite materials which contain large amounts of titanium. Direct conversion of Cs loaded silicotitanate ion exchangers to CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is an excellent alternative to dissolving the Cs-loaded or Cs-eluted exchangers in borosilicate glass because: CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is formed using a simple, one step heat treatment. The unique crystalline pollucite-like structure of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} traps Cs, and exhibits extremely low Cs leach rates. CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} is converted to solid waste at a low processing temperature of 700 to 800 C (nominal melter operating temperatures are 1150 C). CsTiSi{sub 2}0{sub 6} concentrates the waste, thus generating lower volumes of expensive HLW. Cs losses due to volatilization during processing of CsTiSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} are extremely low.

Balmer, M.L.; Bunker, B.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The preparation and the in-vitro pharmacodynamics study of the intracapsular sustained-release preparations for the prevention of posterior capsule opacification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Docetaxel-loaded sustained-release preparation based on 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and Methyl methacrylate (MMA) cross-linked copolymer (P(HEMA-co-MMA)) was prepared to examine the potential use for preventing posterior capsule opacification (PCO). The preparations were prepared by polymerizing the mixture of HEMA, MMA, cross-linking agent (EGDMA), initiator (AIBN) and docetaxel. The influence factors and mechanism of drug release were studied in the experiments. FT-IR, X-RD and SEM methods were used to characterize the polymer (P(HEMA-co-MMA)) and docetaxel-loaded sustained-release preparations. Biocompatibility of P(HEMA-co-MMA) and in-vitro effect of docetaxel-loaded sustained-release preparations were also evaluated. The results showed that docetaxel could release sustainedly from these preparations prepared by cross-linking polymerization. And the release rate could be accelerated by increasing the MMA ratio or EGDMA ratio of the polymer. Release mechanism of docetaxel fitted the Higuchi model well. The results of IR and X-RD showed that only a hydrogen bond was formed between docetaxel and P(HEMA-co-MMA). Docetaxel dispersed in P(HEMA-co-MMA) in amorphous form. The elution test showed that P(HEMA-co-MMA) had good biocompatibility and the in-vitro pharmacodynamics study proved that docetaxel could release stably from the preparations and inhibit HLECs' proliferation. The docetaxel-loaded sustained-release preparations proved to be a promising therapy for preventing PCO. These results also lay a theoretical and experimental foundation for the future.

Qian Dong; Shaoling Yi; Zihang Peng; Chunshun Zhao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY  

SciTech Connect

A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

Nash, C.

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fisetin disposition and metabolism in mice: Identification of geraldol as an active metabolite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the natural flavonoid fisetin (3,3?,4?,7-tetrahydroxyflavone) has been recently identified as an anticancer agent with antiangiogenic properties in mice, its in vivo pharmacokinetics and metabolism are presently not characterized. Our purpose was to determine the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of fisetin in mice and determine the biological activity of a detected fisetin metabolite. After fisetin administration of an efficacious dose of 223mg/kg i.p. in mice, the maximum fisetin concentration reached 2.5?g/ml at 15min and the plasma concentration declined biphasically with a rapid half-life of 0.09h and a terminal half-life of 3.1h. Three metabolites were detected, one of which was a glucuronide of fisetin (M1), whereas another glucuronide (M2) was a glucuronide of a previously unknown fisetin metabolite (M3). HPLCMS/MS analysis indicated that M3 was a methoxylated metabolite of fisetin (MW=300Da). The UV spectrum of M3 was identical to that of fisetin and standard 3,4?,7-trihydroxy-3?-methoxyflavone (geraldol). In addition, because M3 co-eluted with standard geraldol in 4 different chromatographic ternary gradient conditions, M3 was therefore assigned to geraldol. Of interest, this metabolite was shown to achieve higher concentrations than fisetin in Lewis lung tumors. We also compared the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic activities of fisetin and geraldol in vitro and it was found that the latter was more cytotoxic than the parent compound toward tumor cells, and that it could also inhibit endothelial cells migration and proliferation. In conclusion, these results suggest that fisetin metabolism plays an important role in its in vivo anticancer activities.

Yasmine S. Touil; Nicolas Auzeil; Franois Boulinguez; Hanane Saighi; Anne Regazzetti; Daniel Scherman; Guy G. Chabot

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Analysis of synthetic cannabinoids in herbal blends by means of nano-liquid chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a rapid and simultaneous separation of 12 synthetic cannabinoids and ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (?9-THC) in herbal blends was obtained by means of nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC). The nano-LC experiments were performed in a 100?m i.d. capillary column packed with Cogent bidentate C18 silica particles for 25.0cm. All compounds were resolved using an isocratic elution mode in less than 30min. A mobile phase containing ACN/MeOH/H2O/formic acid 69/5/25/1 (v/v/v/v) was employed for the chromatographic separation. The developed analytical method was validated in terms of precision, linearity, sensitivity and accuracy. Under optimal nano-LCUV conditions, the resulting RSD percentages for intra-day and inter-day repeatability, related to retention time and peak area, were below 2.98 and 6.40%, respectively. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5?g/mL, respectively, for all the studied compounds. Linearity was assessed in the concentration range of interest for all analytes with determination coefficients r2?0.9975. The method was then applied to the determination of synthetic cannabinoids in herbal blends. Quantitative analyses of the cannabimimetic compounds in six products showed that there was a wide difference in the concentration of the studied compounds among different products. Further, the nano-LC system was coupled with a mass spectrometer measuring the MS and MSMS spectra to unequivocally identify the cannabinoids present in smoking mixtures.

Gustavo Merola; Zeineb Aturki; Giovanni DOrazio; Rossella Gottardo; Teodora Macchia; Franco Tagliaro; Salvatore Fanali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A microfluidics-based technique for automated and rapid labeling of cells for flow cytometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flow cytometry is a powerful technique capable of simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of heterogeneous cell populations for research and clinical applications. In recent years, the flow cytometer has been miniaturized and made portable for application in clinical- and resource-limited settings. The sample preparation procedure, i.e. labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to fluorescent labels, is a time consuming (~45min) and labor-intensive procedure. Microfluidics provides enabling technologies to accomplish rapid and automated sample preparation. Using an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a labeling and washing module, we demonstrate a new protocol that can eliminate sample handling and accomplish sample and reagent metering, high-efficiency mixing, labeling and washing in rapid automated fashion. The labeling module consists of a long microfluidic channel with an integrated chaotic mixer. Samples and reagents are precisely metered into this device to accomplish rapid and high-efficiency mixing. The mixed sample and reagents are collected in a holding syringe and held for up to 8min following which the mixture is introduced into an inertial washing module to obtain 'analysis-ready' samples. The washing module consists of a high aspect ratio channel capable of focusing cells to equilibrium positions close to the channel walls. By introducing the cells and labeling reagents in a narrow stream at the center of the channel flanked on both sides by a wash buffer, the elution of cells into the wash buffer away from the free unbound antibodies is accomplished. After initial calibration experiments to determine appropriate 'holding time' to allow antibody binding, both modules were used in conjunction to label MOLT-3 cells (T lymphoblast cell line) with three different antibodies simultaneously. Results confirm no significant difference in mean fluorescence intensity values for all three antibodies labels (p

Phani K Patibandla; Rosendo Estrada; Manasaa Kannan; Palaniappan Sethu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Efficient one-cycle affinity selection of binding proteins or peptides specific for a small-molecule using a T7 phage display pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here, we report an efficient one-cycle affinity selection using a natural-protein or random-peptide T7 phage pool for identification of binding proteins or peptides specific for small-molecules. The screening procedure involved a cuvette type 27-MHz quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) apparatus with introduction of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for a specific small-molecule immobilization on the gold electrode surface of a sensor chip. Using this apparatus, we attempted an affinity selection of proteins or peptides against synthetic ligand for FK506-binding protein (SLF) or irinotecan (Iri, CPT-11). An affinity selection using SLF-SAM and a natural-protein T7 phage pool successfully detected FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12)-displaying T7 phage after an interaction time of only 10min. Extensive exploration of time-consuming wash and/or elution conditions together with several rounds of selection was not required. Furthermore, in the selection using a 15-mer random-peptide T7 phage pool and subsequent analysis utilizing receptor ligand contact (RELIC) software, a subset of SLF-selected peptides clearly pinpointed several amino-acid residues within the binding site of FKBP12. Likewise, a subset of Iri-selected peptides pinpointed part of the positive amino-acid region of residues from the Iri-binding site of the well-known direct targets, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and carboxylesterase (CE). Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of this method and general applicability for a wide range of small-molecules.

Yoichi Takakusagi; Kouji Kuramochi; Manami Takagi; Tomoe Kusayanagi; Daisuke Manita; Hiroko Ozawa; Kanako Iwakiri; Kaori Takakusagi; Yuka Miyano; Atsuo Nakazaki; Susumu Kobayashi; Fumio Sugawara; Kengo Sakaguchi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF {sup 228}Ra IN WATER SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in natural water samples has been developed at the SRNL/EBL (Savannah River National Lab/ Environmental Bioassay Laboratory) that can be used for emergency response or routine samples. While gamma spectrometry can be employed with sufficient detection limits to determine {sup 228}Ra in solid samples (via {sup 228}Ac) , radiochemical methods that employ gas flow proportional counting techniques typically provide lower MDA (Minimal Detectable Activity) levels for the determination of {sup 228}Ra in water samples. Most radiochemical methods for {sup 228}Ra collect and purify {sup 228}Ra and allow for {sup 228}Ac daughter ingrowth for ~36 hours. In this new SRNL/EBL approach, {sup 228}Ac is collected and purified from the water sample without waiting to eliminate this delay. The sample preparation requires only about 4 hours so that {sup 228}Ra assay results on water samples can be achieved in < 6 hours. The method uses a rapid calcium carbonate precipitation enhanced with a small amount of phosphate added to enhance chemical yields (typically >90%), followed by rapid cation exchange removal of calcium. Lead, bismuth, uranium, thorium and protactinium isotopes are also removed by the cation exchange separation. {sup 228}Ac is eluted from the cation resin directly onto a DGA Resin cartridge attached to the bottom of the cation column to purify {sup 228}Ac. DGA Resin also removes lead and bismuth isotopes, along with Sr isotopes and {sup 90}Y. La is used to determine {sup 228}Ac chemical yield via ICP-MS, but {sup 133}Ba can also be used instead if ICP-MS assay is not available. Unlike some older methods, no lead or strontium holdback carriers or continual readjustment of sample pH is required.

Maxwell, S.

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

Removal of Pu238 from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect

A new anion flowsheet for use in HB-Line was tested in the lab with Reillex{trademark} HPQ for removal of Pu{sup 238} contamination from Np. Significant rejection of Pu{sup 238} was observed by washing with 6 to 12 bed volumes (BV) of reductive wash containing reduced nitric acid concentration along with both ferrous sulfamate (FS) and hydrazine. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 1500 to 2200 g Np were observed with modest losses for up-flow washing. Down-flow washing was observed to have high losses. The following are recommended conditions for removing Pu{sup 238} from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: Up-flow 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: Up-flow 6-12 BV of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS, 0.05 M hydrazine. 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: Up-flow 1-2 BV of 6.4-8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (4) Elution conditions: Down-flow 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin  

SciTech Connect

The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

5-fluorocytosine in DNA is a mechanism-based inhibitor of HhaI methylase  

SciTech Connect

5-Fluorodeoxycytidine (FdCyd) was incorporated into a synthetic DNA polymer containing the GCGC recognition sequence of HhaI methylase to give a polymer with about 80% FdCyd. In the absence of AdoMet, poly(FdC-dG) bound competitively with respect to poly(dG-dC). In the presence of AdoMet, the analogue caused a time-dependent, first-order inactivation of the enzyme. There is an ordered mechanism of binding in which enzyme first binds to poly(FdC-dG), then binds to AdoMet, and subsequently forms stable, inactive complexes. The complexes did not dissociate over the course of 3 days and were stable to heat (95/sup 0/C) in the presence of 1% SDS. Gel filtration of a complex formed with HhaI methylase, poly(FdC-dG), and (methyl-/sup 3/H)AdoMet gave a peak of radioactivity eluting near the void volume. Digestion of the DNA in the complex resulted in a reduction of the molecular weight to the size of the methylase, and the radioactivity in this peak was shown to be associated with protein. These data indicate that the complexes contain covalently bound HhaI methylase, poly(FdC-dG), and methyl groups and that 5-fluorodeoxycytidine is a mechanism-based inactivator of the methylase. By analogy with other pyrimidine-modifying enzymes and recent studies on the mechanism of HhaI methylase, these results suggest that an enzyme nucleophile attacks FdCyd residues at C-6, activating the 5-position for one-carbon transfer. Subsequent transfer of the methyl group of AdoMet to the activated FdCyd forms a stable complex in which the enzyme is covalently bound to the 6-position of FdCyd in the polymer and a methyl group is attached to C-5. The effect of 5-fluorodeoxycytidine on the inhibition of DNA-cytosine methyltransferases is thus due to irreversible, covalent inactivation.

Osterman, D.G.; DePillis, G.D.; Wu, J.C.; Matsuda, A.; Santi, D.V.

1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

282

Estimation of Sorption Behavior of Europium(III) Using Biotite Flakes - 13272  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of biotite and Eu(III) (europium (III)) was examined by using secondary ion-microprobe mass spectrometer (SIMS), fluorescence emission spectrum and decay behavior of fluorescence emission spectrum in addition to the time-changes of Eu(III) and potassium ions concentrations in a solution, using the flake form samples. The results of SIMS showed that the intensity of Eu was gradually decreasing with depth, while the intensity of Eu in the case shaken for 30 days exceeded that in the case for 1 day. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of Eu(III) and potassium ions in the flake of biotite suggested that Eu ions diffuse mainly from the edges of biotite flake, while Eu ions can slightly diffuse through some small cracks existing on the flake surface far from the edges. Besides, the elution amount of potassium from the biotite flakes into a solution was proportional to the sorption amount of Eu(III). The changes nearly revealed ion exchange between these ions, while muscovite flake sample did not show such ion exchange reaction. In addition, from the time-change of Eu(III) concentration, an apparent diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 8.0x10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s, by using two-dimensional diffusion model coupled with a film between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Furthermore, the fluorescent intensity decreased with the shaking (contacting) time. This means that Eu(III) gradually diffuses into the inside of biotite edges of the biotite flakes, after the sorption of Eu(III) in the edges. This tendency was observed also in the powder samples. The observed fluorescence decay (at 592 nm in wave length) showed almost similar curve in any samples, indicating a certain sorption form of Eu(III) onto the edges of the biotite flakes. These results mentioned above suggest that the diffusion processes through internal layer in biotite mainly control the sorption behavior of multivalent ions. Such diffusion processes affect the retardation-effects on fracture surfaces in the rock matrix, depending on the fluid flow velocity of groundwater. That is, a more reliable model considering the mass transfer in the internal layer of biotite may be required to estimate the sorption behavior of RNs with biotite which controls the whole sorption behavior of granite. (authors)

Sasaki, Go; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kirishima, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials Tohoku University 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development Of Ion Chromatography Methods To Support Testing Of The Glycolic Acid Reductant Flowsheet In The Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

Ion Chromatography (IC) is the principal analytical method used to support studies of Sludge Reciept and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) chemistry at DWPF. A series of prior analytical ''Round Robin'' (RR) studies included both supernate and sludge samples from SRAT simulant, previously reported as memos, are tabulated in this report.2,3 From these studies it was determined to standardize IC column size to 4 mm diameter, eliminating the capillary column from use. As a follow on test, the DWPF laboratory, the PSAL laboratory, and the AD laboratory participated in the current analytical RR to determine a suite of anions in SRAT simulant by IC, results also are tabulated in this report. The particular goal was to confirm the laboratories ability to measure and quantitate glycolate ion. The target was + or - 20% inter-lab agreement of the analyte averages for the RR. Each of the three laboratories analyzed a batch of 12 samples. For each laboratory, the percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) of the averages on nitrate, glycolate, and oxalate, was 10% or less. The three laboratories all met the goal of 20% relative agreement for nitrate and glycolate. For oxalate, the PSAL laboratory reported an average value that was 20% higher than the average values reported by the DWPF laboratory and the AD laboratory. Because of this wider window of agreement, it was concluded to continue the practice of an additional acid digestion for total oxalate measurement. It should also be noted that large amounts of glycolate in the SRAT samples will have an impact on detection limits of near eluting peaks, namely Fluoride and Formate. A suite of scoping experiments are presented in the report to identify and isolate other potential interlaboratory disceprancies. Specific ion chromatography inter-laboratory method conditions and differences are tabulated. Most differences were minor but there are some temperature control equipment differences that are significant leading to a recommendation of a heated jacket for analytical columns that are remoted for use in radiohoods. A suggested method improvement would be to implement column temperture control at a temperature slightly above ambient to avoid peak shifting due to temperature fluctuations. Temperature control in this manner would improve short and longer term peak retention time stability. An unknown peak was observed during the analysis of glycolic acid and SRAT simulant. The unknown peak was determined to best match diglycolic acid. The development of a method for acetate is summaraized, and no significant amount of acetate was observed in the SRAT products tested. In addition, an alternative Gas Chromatograph (GC) method for glycolate is summarized.

Wiedenman, B. J.; White, T. L.; Mahannah, R. N.; Best, D. R.; Stone, M. E.; Click, D. R.; Lambert, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Enzymatic synthesis of dimaltosyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin via a transglycosylation reaction using TreX, a Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 debranching enzyme  

SciTech Connect

Di-O-{alpha}-maltosyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin ((G2){sub 2}-{beta}-CD) was synthesized from 6-O-{alpha}-maltosyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (G2-{beta}-CD) via a transglycosylation reaction catalyzed by TreX, a debranching enzyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2. TreX showed no activity toward glucosyl-{beta}-CD, but a transfer product (1) was detected when the enzyme was incubated with maltosyl-{beta}-CD, indicating specificity for a branched glucosyl chain bigger than DP2. Analysis of the structure of the transfer product (1) using MALDI-TOF/MS and isoamylase or glucoamylase treatment revealed it to be dimaltosyl-{beta}-CD, suggesting that TreX transferred the maltosyl residue of a G2-{beta}-CD to another molecule of G2-{beta}-CD by forming an {alpha}-1,6-glucosidic linkage. When [{sup 14}C]-maltose and maltosyl-{beta}-CD were reacted with the enzyme, the radiogram showed no labeled dimaltosyl-{beta}-CD; no condensation product between the two substrates was detected, indicating that the synthesis of dimaltosyl-{beta}-CD occurred exclusively via transglycosylation of an {alpha}-1,6-glucosidic linkage. Based on the HPLC elution profile, the transfer product (1) was identified to be isomers of 6{sup 1},6{sup 3}- and 6{sup 1},6{sup 4}-dimaltosyl-{beta}-CD. Inhibition studies with {beta}-CD on the transglycosylation activity revealed that {beta}-CD was a mixed-type inhibitor, with a K{sub i} value of 55.6 {mu}mol/mL. Thus, dimaltosyl-{beta}-CD can be more efficiently synthesized by a transglycosylation reaction with TreX in the absence of {beta}-CD. Our findings suggest that the high yield of (G2){sub 2}-{beta}-CD from G2-{beta}-CD was based on both the transglycosylation action mode and elimination of the inhibitory effect of {beta}-CD.

Kang, Hee-Kwon; Cha, Hyunju; Yang, Tae-Joo; Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Seungjae [Center for Agricultural Biomaterials, Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Wan [Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Auh, Joong-Hyuck [Department of Food Science and Technology, Chungang University, Anseong 456-756 (Korea, Republic of); Okada, Yasuyo [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University, Nishinomiya 663-8179 (Japan); Kim, Jung-Wan [Department of Biology, University of Incheon, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jaeho [Department of Biological Science, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chung Ho [Department of Food and Nutrition, Seowon University, Cheongju 361-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwan-Hwa [Center for Agricultural Biomaterials, Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: parkkh@plaza.snu.ac.kr

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Targeted alpha therapy for cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 11.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 Ci in human patients are effective in regressing melanomas, with no concomitant complications. These results point to the application of local and systemic TAT in the management of secondary cancer. Results of the phase 1 clinical trial of TAT of subcutaneous, secondary melanoma indicate proof of the principle that TAT can make tumours in patients regress.

Barry J Allen; Chand Raja; Syed Rizvi; Yong Li; Wendy Tsui; David Zhang; Emma Song; Chang Fa Qu; John Kearsley; Peter Graham; John Thompson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR IN-TANK ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. A small column ion-exchange (SCIX) process is being designed to treat dissolved saltcake waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. The waste is caustic with high concentrations of various sodium salts and lower concentrations of radionuclides. Two cation exchange media being considered are a granular form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and a spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. CST is an inorganic material highly selective for cesium that is not elutable. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into ion exchange media (either CST or RF) which is packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs cannot handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media. Performance degradation with regard to cesium removal has been observed between 50 and 80 C for CST [1] and at 65 C for RF resin [2]. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130 C. If the columns boiled dry, the sorbent material could plug the column and lead to replacement of the entire column module. Alternatively, for organic resins such as RF there is risk of fire at elevated temperatures. The objective of the work is to compute temperature distributions across CST- and RF-packed columns immersed in waste supernate under accident scenarios involving loss of salt solution flow through the beds and, in some cases, loss of coolant system flow. For some cases, temperature distributions are determined as a function of time after the initiation of a given accident scenario and in other cases only the final steady-state temperature distributions are calculated. In general, calculations are conducted to ensure conservative and bounding results for the maximum temperatures achievable using the current baseline column design. This information will assist in SCIX design and facility maintenance.

Lee, S; Frank02 Smith, F

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

RAPID DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES IN URINE BY INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY: A HYBRID APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid separation method that allows separation and preconcentration of actinides in urine samples was developed for the measurement of longer lived actinides by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration, if required, is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation. Similar technology has been applied to separate actinides prior to measurement by alpha spectrometry, but this new method has been developed with elution reagents now compatible with ICP-MS as well. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long- and short-lived actinide isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 24 samples (including QC samples) in less than 3 h. Simultaneous sample preparation can offer significant time savings over sequential sample preparation. For example, sequential sample preparation of 24 samples taking just 15 min each requires 6 h to complete. The simplicity and speed of this new method makes it attractive for radiological emergency response. If preconcentration is applied, the method is applicable to larger sample aliquots for occupational exposures as well. The chemical recoveries are typically greater than 90%, in contrast to other reported methods using flow injection separation techniques for urine samples where plutonium yields were 70-80%. This method allows measurement of both long-lived and short-lived actinide isotopes. 239Pu, 242Pu, 237Np, 243Am, 234U, 235U and 238U were measured by ICP-MS, while 236Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm were measured by alpha spectrometry. The method can also be adapted so that the separation of uranium isotopes for assay is not required, if uranium assay by direct dilution of the urine sample is preferred instead. Multiple vacuum box locations may be set-up to supply several ICP-MS units with purified sample fractions such that a high sample throughput may be achieved, while still allowing for rapid measurement of short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Characterization of biliary conjugates of 4,4'-methylenedianiline in male versus female rats  

SciTech Connect

4,4'-Methylenedianiline (4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane; DAPM) is an aromatic diamine used in the production of numerous polyurethane foams and epoxy resins. Previous studies in rats revealed that DAPM initially injures biliary epithelial cells of the liver, that the toxicity is greater in female than in male rats, and that the toxic metabolites of DAPM are excreted into bile. Since male and female rats exhibit differences in the expression of both phase I and phase II enzymes, our hypothesis was that female rats either metabolize DAPM to more toxic metabolites or have a decreased capacity to conjugate metabolites to less toxic intermediates. Our objective was thus to isolate, characterize, and quantify DAPM metabolites excreted into bile in both male and female bile duct-cannulated Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were gavaged with [{sup 14}C]-DAPM, and the collected bile was subjected to reversed-phase HPLC with radioisotope detection. Peaks eluting from HPLC were collected and analyzed using electrospray MS and NMR spectroscopy. HPLC analysis indicated numerous metabolites in both sexes, but male rats excreted greater amounts of glutathione and glucuronide conjugates than females. Electrospray MS and NMR spectra of HPLC fractions revealed that the most prominent metabolite found in bile of both sexes was a glutathione conjugate of an imine metabolite of a 4'-nitroso-DAPM. Seven other metabolites were identified, including acetylated, cysteinyl-glycine, glutamyl-cysteine, glycine, and glucuronide conjugates. While our prior studies demonstrated increased covalent binding of DAPM in the liver and bile of female compared to male rats, in these studies, SDS-PAGE with autoradiography revealed 4-5 radiolabeled protein bands in the bile of rats treated with [{sup 14}C]-DAPM. In addition, these bands were much more prominent in female than in male rats. These studies thus suggest that a plausible mechanism for the increased sensitivity of female rats to DAPM toxicity may be decreased conjugation of reactive DAPM metabolites, leading to greater levels of protein adduct formation.

Chen, Kan; Cole, Richard B. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States); Santa Cruz, Vicente [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Blakeney, Ernest W. [Department of Chemistry, Centenary College, Shreveport, LA (United States); Kanz, Mary F. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States); Dugas, Tammy R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130 (United States)], E-mail: tdugas@lsuhsc.edu

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Development and validation of a HILICMS/MS method for quantification of decitabine in human plasma by using lithium adduct detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A highly sensitive, selective, and rugged quantification method was developed and validated for decitabine (5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine) in human plasma treated with 100?g/mL of tetrahydrouridine (THU). Chromatographic separation was accomplished using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and detection used electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) by monitoring lithiated adducts of the analytes as precursor ions. The method involves simple acetonitrile precipitation steps (in an ice bath) followed by injection of the supernatant onto a Thermo Betasil Silica-100, 100נ3.0mm, 5?m LC column. Protonated ([M+H]+), sodiated ([M+Na]+), and lithiated ([M+Li]+) adducts as precursor ions for MS/MS detection were evaluated for best sensitivity and assay performance. During initial method development abundant sodium [M+Na]+ and potassium [M+K]+ adducts were observed while the protonated species [M+H]+ was present at a relative abundance of less than 5% in Q1. The alkali adducts were not be able to be minimized by the usual approach of increasing acid content in mobile phases. Significant analyte/internal standard (IS) co-suppression and inter-lot response differences were observed when using the sodium adduct as the precursor ion for quantification. By adding 2mM lithium acetate in aqueous mobile phase component, the lithium adduct effectively replaced other cationic species and was successfully used as the precursor ion for selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The method demonstrated the separation of anomers and from other endogenous interferences using a 3-min gradient elution. Decitabine stock, working solution stabilities were investigated during method development. Three different peaks, including one from anomerization, were observed in the SRM transition of the analyte when it was in neutral aqueous solution. The assay was validated over a concentration range of 0.5500ng/mL (or 0.44440pg injected on column) in 50?L of human plasma. The accuracy and precision were within 8.6% relative error and 6.3% coefficient of variation, respectively. Decitabine was stable in THU treated human plasma for at least 68 days and after 5 freezethaw cycles when stored at ?70C. Stability of decitabine in THU treated human whole blood, matrix factor and recovery were also evaluated during method validation. The method was successfully used for clinical sample analysis.

Wenyi Hua; Thomas Ierardi; Michael Lesslie; Brian T. Hoffman; Daniel Mulvana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin  

SciTech Connect

BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] {approximately} 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K{sub d} {approximately} 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the loss of barium be correlated with the resin's ability to selectively complex sulfate, then maintaining even the current limited resin characteristics for sulfate complexation over multiple cycles becomes questionable.

DE Kurath; JR Bontha; DL Blanchard; SK Fiskum; BM Rapko

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Small Column Ion Exchange Testing of Superlig 644 for Removal of 137Cs from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (Tank 241-AN-107)  

SciTech Connect

The current BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment of the Hanford high-level tank wastes includes the use of Superlig{reg_sign} materials for removing {sup 137}Cs from the aqueous fraction of the waste. The Superlig materials applicable to cesium removal include the cesium-selective Superlig 632and Superlig 644. These materials have been developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, Utah. This report describes the testing of the Superlig 644 ion exchange material in a small dual-column system. The bed volume of the lead column was 18.6 mL (L/D = 7), and the bed volume of the lag column was 15.9 mL (L/D = 6) during the loading phase. The sample processed was approximately 1.6 L of diluted waste ([Na{sup +}] = 4.84 M) from Tank 241-AN-107 (Envelope C). This sample had been previously treated for removal of Sr/transuranic (TRU) values and clarified in a single tube cross-flow filtration unit. All ion exchange process steps were tested, including resin-bed preparation, loading, feed displacement, water rinse, elution, eluant rinse, and resin regeneration. A summary of performance measures for both columns is shown in Table S1. The Cs {lambda} values represent a measure of the effective capacity of the SL-644 resin. The Cs {lambda} of 20 for the lead column is much lower than the estimated 150 obtained by the Savannah River Technology Center during Phase 1A testing. Equilibrium data obtained with batch contacts using the AN-107 Cs IX feed predicts a Cs {lambda} of 183. A Cs {lambda} for the lag column could not be determined due to insufficient breakthrough, but it appeared to work well and removed nearly all of the cesium not removed by the lead column. The low value for the lead column indicates that it did not perform as expected. This may have been due to air or gas in the bed that caused fluid channeling or blinding of the resin. The maximum decontamination factor (DF) for {sup 137}Cs listed in Table S1 is based on {sup 137}Cs concentration in the first samples collected from each column and the {sup 137}Cs concentration in the feed. The composite DF for {sup 137}Cs was 1,760, which provided an effluent with a {sup 137}Cs concentration of 8.7E-02 Ci/m{sup 3}. The {sup 137}Cs concentration is below the basis of design limit and is 7.2% of the contract limit for {sup 137}Cs.

DE Kurath; DL Blanchard; JR Bontha

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effect of Fe2+ Oxidation on the Removal of 238Pu from Neptunium Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect

The effect of ferrous sulfamate (FS) oxidation and variation in nitric acid concentration on the removal of {sup 238}Pu contamination from Np by the HB-Line anion exchange flowsheet has been tested. Significant rejection of {sup 238}Pu was observed by washing with a reductive wash solution containing 6.0 to 6.8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) with as little as 30% of the Fe{sup 2+} from the FS remaining in its reduced form. To achieve the desired 30% removal of {sup 238}Pu from the process, conditions should be controlled to maintain the Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratio in the reductive wash to be greater than 60%/40% (or 1.5). Since Fe{sup 2+} oxidation is strongly affected by temperature and nitric acid concentration, these parameters (as well as time after FS addition) need to be controlled to ensure predictable results. A shortened-height column was utilized in these tests to match changes in the plant equipment. Lab experiments scaled to plant batch sizes of 2000 g Np were observed with modest losses for ''up-flow'' washing. The following are recommended conditions for removing {sup 238}Pu from Np solutions by anion exchange in HB-Line: (1) Feed conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), 0.05 M excess FS. (2) Reductive Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 6 Bed volumes (BV) of 6.4 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M FS (minimum 0.03M Fe{sup 2+} during wash cycle), 0.05 M hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (3) Decontamination Wash conditions: ''Up-flow'' 1-2 BV of 6.4-8.0 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine, less than 1.8 mL/min/cm{sup 2} flowrate. (4) Elution conditions: ''Down-flow'' 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS.

KYSER, EDWARD

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Recovery of minor actinides from spent fuel using TPEN-immobilized gels  

SciTech Connect

A series of separation experiments was performed in order to study the recovery process for minor actinides (MAs), such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm), from the actual spent fuel by using an extraction chromatographic technique. N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(4-propenyloxy-2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPPEN) is an N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) analogue consisting of an incorporated pyridine ring that acts as not only a ligand but also as a site for polymerization and crosslinking of the gel. The TPPEN and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) were dissolved into dimethylformamide (DMF, Wako Co., Ltd.) and a silica beads polymer, and then TTPEN was immobilized chemically in a polymer gel (so called TPEN-gel). Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which was highly irradiated up to 119 GWD/MTM in the experimental fast reactor Joyo, was used as a reference spent fuel. First, uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were separated from the irradiated fuel using an ion-exchange method, and then, the platinum group elements were removed by CMPO to leave a mixed solution of MAs and lanthanides. The 3 mol% TPPEN-gel was packed with as an extraction column (CV: 1 ml) and then rinsed by 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}(pH 4.0) for pH adjustment. After washing the column by 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} (pH 4.0), Eu was detected and the recovery rate reached 93%. The MAs were then recovered by changing the eluent to 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} (pH 2.0), and the recovery rate of Am was 48 %. The 10 mol% TPPEN-gel was used to improve adsorption coefficient of Am and a condition of eluent temperature was changed in order to confirm the temperature swing effect on TPEN-gel for MA. More than 90% Eu was detected in the eluent after washing with 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} (pH 3.5) at 5 Celsius degrees. Americium was backwardly detected and eluted continuously during the same condition. After removal of Eu, the eluent temperature was changed to 32 Celsius degrees, then Am was detected (pH 3.0). Finally remained Am could be stripped from TPPEN-gel by changing the pH of the eluent to 2.0. These results These results prove that the proposed recovery process for MAs is a potential candidate for future reprocessing methods based on the extraction chromatographic technique. (authors)

Koyama, S.; Suto, M.; Ohbayashi, H. [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai (Japan); Oaki, H. [Solutions Research Organization, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Takeshita, K. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.

Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

296

Synthesis, spectroscopy, and structural characterization of six-coordinate bis(aryldiazenido)rhenium and bis(diarylhydrazido)rhenium complexes. X-ray structures of (Et{sub 4}N)[Re(NNPh){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}], (Et{sub 4}N)[Re(NNPh{sub 2}){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}], and Na[Re(NNPh){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}]{center_dot}CH{sub 3}CN  

SciTech Connect

The reactions of the cis-dioxorhenium(VII)-catecholate complex [(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 4}N][ReO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}] (1) with either monosubstituted organohydrazines (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}NHNH{sub 2}; 4-BrC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NHNH{sub 2}) or 1,1 disubstituted organohydrazines (Ph{sub 2-}NNH{sub 2}) yield the cis-bis(diazenido) core complexes [(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 4}N][Re(NNR){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}] (5, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; 6, R = 4-BrC{sub 6}H{sub 4}) and the cis-bis(hydrazido) core species [(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 4}N][Re(NNPh{sub 2}){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C36H{sub 4}){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C36H{sub 4}){sub 2}] (7). Elution of 5 in a 3:1 mixture of toluene/methanol on a column of silica gel resulted in cation exchange to give Na[Re(NNPh){sub 2}-(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}]{center_dot}CH{sub 3}CN (8) as a one-dimensional polymer ([Na(CH{sub 3}CN)]{sup +}[Re(NNPh){sub 2}(O{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup {minus}}){sub 2}. Crystal data for C{sub 32}H{sub 38}N{sub 5}O{sub 4}Re (5): P2{sub 1}/c,a = 14.458(3) {angstrom}, b = 10.436(2) {angstrom}, c = 21.767(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 107.04(3){degrees}, V = 3140(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 4, D {sub calc} = 1.572 g cm{sup {minus}3}; structure solution and refinement based on 3256 reflections with I{sub o} {ge} 3{sigma}(I{sub o}) converged at R = 0.053. Crystal data for C{sub 44}H{sub 48}N{sub 5}O{sub 4}Re (7): P1, a = 11.660(2) {angstrom}, b = 11.864(2) {angstrom}, c = 15.400(2) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 107.12(3){degrees}, {beta} = 94.99(3){degrees}, {gamma} = 97.61(3){degrees}, V = 2000(1) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2, D{sub calc} = 1.490 g cm{sup {minus}3}; 3702 reflections, R = 0.0534. Crystal data for C{sub 26}H{sub 18}N{sub 5}NaO{sub 4}Re (8): P2/n, a = 5.785(1) {angstrom}, b = 9.670(2) {angstrom}, c = 23.142(5) {angstrom}. {beta} = 90.91(30)degrees, V = 1294.4(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 2, D{sub calc} = 1.737 g cm{sup {minus}3}; 1517 reflections, R = 0.049.

Kettler, P.B.; Chang, Yuan-Da; Zubieta, J. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Comparacin de los stents liberadores de frmaco y los convencionales en puentes de safena. Resultados inmediatos y a largo plazo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduccin y objetivos Los stents farmacoactivos (SLF) consiguen reducir la reestenosis en vasos nativos. Sin embargo, los resultados en safenas son ms confusos. Se comparan los resultados de dichos dispositivos con los de los stents convencionales (SC) en estenosis de novo. Mtodos Se estudiaron las intervenciones en safenas con SLF en cinco centros desde el inicio de su uso hasta julio de 2007 y se compararon con una cohorte histrica de SC en dos de los centros. Se analizan los resultados intrahospitalarios y a largo plazo y predictores de supervivencia y revascularizacin. Resultados Se incluy a 98 pacientes y 107 estenosis con SLF y 113 pacientes y 130 estenosis con SC. Haba diferencias basales, con mayor edad y menor frecuencia de trombo en los SLF. Tambin se encontraron diferencias en el procedimiento con mayor longitud de stent y menos implante directo y dimetro de stent en SLF. La ausencia de mortalidad cardiaca a los 12, 24 y 30 meses fue: SLF, 95% 2%, 91% 3% y 89% 3%; SC, 95% 2%, 90% 3% y 87% 3% (p=0,66), y la ausencia de revascularizacin del vaso tratado: 90% 3%, 86% 4% y 83% 4% en SLF y 94% 2%, 87% 3% y 87% 3% en SC (p=0,49). El nico predictor de mortalidad cardiaca fue la fraccin de eyeccin y no se encontraron predictores de nueva revascularizacin. Conclusiones En nuestra serie los SLF en safenas no se asociaron a disminucin de mortalidad ni revascularizacin del vaso tratado. El nico predictor de mortalidad cardiaca fue la fraccin de eyeccin, y no se encontraron predictores de nueva revascularizacin. Introduction and objectives Drug-eluting stents (DES) reduce the restenosis rate in native vessels. However, results in saphenous vein grafts (SVG) are less clear. The aim of this study was to compare DES and bare metal stents (BMS) in de novo stenosis in SVG. Methods The study included all percutaneous interventions involving a DES in SVG carried out at five centers up until July 2007. Findings were compared with those in a historical cohort that used conventional stents at two centers. The study analyzed in-hospital and long-term outcomes and predictors of survival and revascularization. Results The study included 107 stenoses treated with \\{DESs\\} in 98 patients and 130 stenoses treated with BMS in 113 patients. The DES group was older at baseline and had thrombus less often. There were also procedural differences: in the DES group, stents were longer, direct stenting was used less, and the stent diameter was smaller. The proportion of patients who experienced cardiac death by 12, 24 and 30 months was 95%2%, 91%3% and 89%3%, respectively, in the DES group and 95%2%, 90%3% and 87%3% in the BMS group (P=.66). The proportion without target vessel revascularization at 12, 24 and 30 months was 90%3%, 86%4% and 83%4%, respectively, in the DES group and 94%2%, 87%3% and 87%3% in the BMS group (P=.49). The only predictor of cardiac death was the ejection fraction. There was no predictor of revascularization. Conclusions In our series, using \\{DESs\\} in \\{SVGs\\} was not associated with a reduction in mortality or target vessel revascularization. The only predictor of cardiac death was the ejection fraction. There was no predictor of revascularization.

igo Lozano; Tamara Garca-Camarero; Pilar Carrillo; Jos A. Baz; Jos M. de la Torre; Ramn Lpez-Palop; Eduardo Pinar; Neus Salvatella; Pablo Avanzas; Mariano Valds

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column  

SciTech Connect

This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

Laurinat, J

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although a Supplemental LAW feed simulant has previously been prepared, this feed composition differs from that simulant because those tests examined only the fully soluble aqueous solution at room temperature, not the composition formed after evaporation, including the insoluble solids that precipitate after it cools. The conceptual flow sheet for Supplemental LAW immobilization has an option for removal of {sup 99}Tc from the feed stream, if needed. Elutable ion exchange has been selected for that process. If implemented, the stream would need filtration to remove the insoluble solids prior to processing in an ion exchange column. The characteristics, chemical speciation, physical properties, and filterability of the solids are important to judge the feasibility of the concept, and to estimate the size and cost of a facility. The insoluble solids formed during these tests were primarily natrophosphate, natroxalate, and a sodium aluminosilicate compound. At the elevated temperature and 8 M [Na+], appreciable insoluble solids (1.39 wt%) were present. Cooling to room temperature and dilution of the slurry from 8 M to 5 M [Na+] resulted in a slurry containing 0.8 wt% insoluble solids. The solids (natrophosphate, natroxalate, sodium aluminum silicate, and a hydrated sodium phosphate) were relatively stable and settled quickly. Filtration rates were in the range of those observed with iron-based simulated Hanford tank sludge simulants, e.g., 6 M [Na+] Hanford tank 241-AN-102, even though their chemical speciation is considerably different. Chemical cleaning of the crossflow filter was readily accomplished with acid. As this simulant formulation was based on an average composition of a wide range of feeds using an integrated computer model, this exact composition may never be observed. But the test conditions were selected to enable comparison to the model to enable improving its chemical prediction capability.

McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z