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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Customers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Customers" Customers" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Number of Customers" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",1,".",1 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1 "RV CSU Power II LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1,".",".",1

2

Non-utility power generation continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

This article examines why the number of non-utility power plants is increasing. The topics include the impact of the changes to the Public Utility Holding Company Act, and bidding for capacity. It includes a look at Texaco's Puget Sound oil refinery and how its efficiency problems were solved using cogeneration including the need to improve energy balance and engineering of the plant. Grayling generating station (wood waste) and Kalaeloa cogeneration power plant (low sulfur fuel oil) are also discussed.

Smith, D.J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Sales"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales" Sales" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Sales (Megawatthours)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",33463,".",33463 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",6883,".",6883 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",1820,".",".",1820 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",9651,".",".",9651

4

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

5

Economic impact of non-utility generation on electric power systems .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-Utility Generation is a major force in the way electrical energy is now being produced and marketed, and electric utilities are reacting to the growth… (more)

Gupta, Rajnish

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Commercialization of coal diesel engines for non-utility and export power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic motivation behind this project is to develop coal-burning heat engine technology primarily for 10-100 MW modular stationary power applications in the late 1990`s and beyond, when oil and gas prices may return to the $5--7/MMBtu range. The fuel is a low-cost, coal-based liquid with the consistency of black paint, composed of 12-micron mean size premium 2% ash coal dust mixed 50/50 with water. The Clean Coal Diesel Plant of the future is targeted for the 10-100 MW non-utility generation (NUG) and small utility markets, including independent power producers (IPP) and cogeneration. A family of plant designs will be offered using the Cooper-Bessemer 3.8, 5.0, and 6.3 MW Model LS engines as building blocks. In addition, larger plants will be configured with an engine in the 10-25 MW class (Cooper will license the technology to other large bore stationary engine manufacturers). The reciprocating engine offers a remarkable degree of flexibility in selecting plant capacity. This flexibility exists because the engines are modular in every sense (fuel cell stacks have similar modularity). Scale-up is accomplished simply by adding cylinders (e.g., 20 vs 16) or by adding engines (4 vs 3). There is no scale-up of the basic cylinder size. Thus, there is essentially no technical development needed to scale-up the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Coal Diesel Technology all the way from 2 MW (one 6-cylinder engine) to 50 MW (eight 20-cylinder engines), other than engineering adaptation of the turbocharger to match the engine.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E.; Mayville, R.A.; Itse, D.; Kimberley, J.; Parkinson, J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Commercialization of coal-fired diesel engines for cogeneration and non-utility power markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this METC project is to established practical, durable components compatible with clean coal slurry fuel and capable of low emissions. The components will be integrated into a coal power system for a 100-hr proof-of-concept test. The goal of this program is to advance the stationary coal-fueled diesel engine to the next plateau of technological readiness, and thus provide the springboard to commercialization.

Wilson, R.P.; Rao, K.; Benedek, K.R.; Itse, D.; Parkinson, J.; Kimberley, J.; Balles, E.N.; Benson, C.E.; Smith, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

10

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Iowa Utilities Board All electric utilities operating in Iowa, including those not rate-regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB), are required to offer green power options to their customers. These programs allow customers to make voluntary contributions to support the development of renewable energy sources in Iowa. Utilities must file their program plans and tariff schedules with the IUB; however, the filings for non-rate-regulated utilities are intended to be for informational purposes only. This policy

13

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via ...  

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via Responsive Loads Technology Summary A new methodology for dynamically managing an electrical ...

14

Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 Asheville, NC April 1996 Donald E. OsbornDavid E. Collier Sacramento Municipal Utility...

15

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In Montana, regulated electric utilities are required to offer customers the option of purchasing electricity generated by certified, environmentally-preferred resources that include, but are not...

16

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) River Falls Municipal Utilities - Non-Profit Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Nonprofit Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate 60% of project cost, up to $5,000 Program Info Funding Source POWERful Choices Initiative Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentive equal to Focus on Energy Incentive River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) provides matching rebates to

17

Real Power Regulation for the Utility Power Grid via Responsive ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent ... •Manufacturers of equipment sold to utilities to maximize the efficiency power generation More ...

18

Concentrating solar power technologies offer utility-scale power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) is a utility-scale renewable energy option for generating electricity that is receiving considerable attention in the southwestern ...

19

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Utility Power Plant Construction (Indiana) Eligibility Construction InstallerContractor MunicipalPublic Utility Rural Electric...

20

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The Sacramento power utility experience in solar  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the development of three solar power technologies for use in Sacramento, California is provided. A central receiver power plant, Solar One, is being converted to a molten salt design with thermal energy storage by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and six other utilities. SMUD is also investigating a solar dish/sterling engine system and technologies to reduce photovoltaic conversion costs.

Smeloff, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Utilities expand baseload power plant plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the plans being made by electric utilities to expand the number of baseload plants to accommodate increasing power demands. The results of a survey of utility's construction plans is presented. The topics include current construction, construction planning in the Southeast, current baseload technology, nuclear potential, and incorporation of environmental externalities impact in planning.

Smock, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs (as of December 2012) Which utilities are having the greatest success with their green power programs? NREL has compiled extensive data on utility green power programs and produced the following "Top Ten" lists of program characteristics and results: total sales of renewable energy to program participants; total number of customer participants; customer participation rates; percentage of renewable energy in total retail sales; the lowest premium charged to support new renewables development; and utilities using at least two percent solar to supply their green pricing programs. Download Information Release: NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Previous Top Ten Lists - December 2010, December 2009, December 2008, December 2007, December 2006, December 2005, December 2004, December 2003, December 2002, December 2001, June 2001, November 2000, April 2000

27

Green Power Network: Mandatory Utility Green Power Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option A number of states have adopted policies requiring or encouraging electricity suppliers to offer green power options to consumers. This section provides summaries of these policies and links to the full text of the legislation or public utility commission rules. Connecticut Iowa Maine Minnesota Montana New Jersey New Mexico Oregon Vermont Virginia Washington Connecticut June 2003—On June 26, Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland signed a bill (SB 733) amending the state's Electric Restructuring Act and granting authority to the Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to require electric distribution companies to offer green power options. The legislation enables the DPUC to determine the terms and conditions of renewable energy or energy efficiency options, including the contract terms and the minimum percentage of electricity to be derived from renewable energy sources. The green energy options will be developed and implemented by third-party companies selected through a competitive bidding process.

28

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

29

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

30

Globally Optimal Distributed Power Control for Nonconcave Utility Maximization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future wireless networks are expected to operate in dense environments where the system capacity is fundamentally limited by severe co-channel interference among neighboring links. Transmit-power control has been recently explored as an important interference-mitigation technique that aims to maximize a system efficiency metric, which is often measured by a system utility function. Optimal power control is known to be difficult to achieve, mainly because the optimization problem is in general highly non-convex. This problem had eluded researchers and remained open until our recent work [11], where a centralized optimal power control algorithm, referred to as MAPEL, is developed based on a monotonic optimization framework. However, there does not yet exist a distributed power control algorithm that achieves the global optimal solution for generic utility functions, although the distributed implementation is crucial for the wireless infrastructureless networks such as ad hoc and sensor networks. This paper fill...

Qian, Li Ping; Zhang,; Chiang, Mung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Public Power & Utility, Inc. (New York) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc. (New York) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Power & Utility, Inc. Place New York Utility Id 56259 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

32

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Jump to: navigation, search Several states require certain electric utilities to offer customers the option of buying electricity generated from renewable resources, commonly known as “green power.” Typically, utilities offer green power generated using renewable resources that the utilities own (or for which they contract), or they buy renewable energy credits (RECs) from a renewable energy provider certified by a state public utilities commission [1] Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 17) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active DEMEC - Green Power Program (Delaware) Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Delaware Municipal Utility Solar Water Heat

33

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

green-power program. A "significant portion" of the electricity sold by a utility as green power must be generated using qualifying renewables, including wind energy,...

34

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to purchase green power from any licensed retail supplier. For information about the green power utilities and suppliers in Virginia, see the Department of Energy, Energy...

35

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Legislation enacted in 2009 directed the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to develop a program offering green power as an option to residential and small commercial customers in the state. The PUC issued rules in October 2010 and issued an RFP. The PUC selected a company, 3 Degrees, to manage the statewide green power program for Maine's transmission and distribution territories. The program includes community-based renewable

36

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Utility Incentives for Combined Heat and Power Focus Area: Solar Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.epa.gov/chp/documents/utility_incentives.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/utility-incentives-combined-heat-and- Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report reviews a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study that researched 41 U.S. utilities and found that nearly half provided some kind of support for combined heat and power (CHP). Here they profile 16 utility programs that support CHP in ways excluding direct financial incentives. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Incentives_for_Combined_Heat_and_Power&oldid=514610

37

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable technologies. This policy complements Colorado's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires municipal utilities serving more than 40,000 customers to use renewable energy and energy recycling to account for 10% of retail sales by 2020.

38

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Washington State Department of Commerce In May 2001, Washington enacted legislation (EHB 2247) that requires all electric utilities serving more than 25,000 customers to offer customers the option of purchasing renewable energy. Eligible renewables include wind, solar, geothermal, landfill gas, wave or tidal action, wastewater treatment gas, certain biomass resources, and "qualified hydropower" that is fish-friendly. Beginning January 1, 2002, each electric utility must inform its customers

39

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geothermal Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, 2010 Report Number N/A DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement Citation U.S. Geothermal Inc.. 2010. Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase Agreement. Boise Idaho: (!) . Report No.: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Idaho_Public_Utilities_Commission_Approves_Neal_Hot_Springs_Power_Purchase_Agreement&oldid=682748"

40

Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number NA DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Idaho Public Utilities Commission Approves Neal Hot Springs Power Purchase...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa Sandra Halvatzis and David Keyser National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-53187 November...

42

UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UTILITIES UTILITIES COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 OREGON BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN POC Greg Eisenach Telephone (360) 418-8063 Email gaeisenach@bpa.gov Electric Bulk Power Transmission and Control 221121 Electric Power Distribution 221122 PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB - PA POC Larry Sullivan

43

Riverside Public Utilities - Non-Residential PV Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Residential PV Incentive Program Non-Residential PV Incentive Program Riverside Public Utilities - Non-Residential PV Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Whichever is less: 50% of project cost or specific dollar limits which vary according to the rate schedule of the applicant Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is currently on hold. See below for more information. Provider Riverside Public Utilities '''''Note: Funding for this program has been exhausted for the remainder of the fiscal year. The program is scheduled to reopen on July 1, 2014.''''' The non-residential photovoltaic (PV) rebate program provides financial incentives for Riverside Public Utilities' business customers to install

44

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers. This is a 28 percent decrease from the peak following the storm.

45

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power Restoration Efforts October 31, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department Jen Stutsman Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Restoring power is a top priority for the Obama Administration and the Department of Energy. As of 2 PM EDT today, utilities have restored power to nearly 2.4 million customers.

46

Planning Your First Wind Power Project: A Primer for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most U.S. utilities, wind power is a new technology they need to understand in order to evaluate its use in their systems. This primer addresses questions commonly asked by utilities and the issues to be considered in bringing a wind power plant on-line.

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Mandatory Utility Green Power Option < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider New Mexico Public Regulation Commission In addition to meeting the requirements of the state [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... renewables portfolio standard], New Mexico investor-owned utilities (IOUs) are required to offer a voluntary program for purchasing renewable energy to customers. The voluntary renewable tariff may also allow consumers to purchase renewable energy within certain energy blocks and by source of

48

Program on Technology Innovation: Distributed Photovoltaic Power Applications for Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging PV technology brings significant opportunities for many stakeholders including electric utilities, electric customers, energy-service providers and PV equipment vendors. The opportunities for utilities range from owning and deploying various PV generation resources and related products to incentivizing other owners to install PV systems and technology that provide benefits to the power system. This technical update describes PV power system concepts that utilities may want to consider as they pl...

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Power-grade butanol recovery and utilization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an alternative to the traditional recovery systems, it was proposed in a previous publication that the n-butanol/acetone/ethanol fermentation products could be recovered as a power grade fuel blend and used directly as a fuel. This would affect a savings in process energy requirements because each chemical component would not have to be processed individually to technical grade purity. Further, some residual water could be tolerated in the fuel blend. To develop such a power grade fuel recovery scheme beyond the conceptual stage, the Energy Research and Resource Division of the Kansas Energy Office undertook a two-fold program to demonstrate and test a power grade butanol/acetone/ethanol fuel recovery system, and further to demonstrate the feasibility of using the fuel blend in a standard type engine. A development program was initiated to accomplish the following objectives: design and test an operational power grade butanol recovery plant that would operate at one liter per hour output; and test and assess the performance of power grade butanol in a spark ignition automotive engine. This project has demonstrated that recovery of a power grade butanol fuel blend is simple and can be accomplished at a considered energy advantage over ethanol. It was further demonstrated that such a power grade blend works well in a typical spark ignition engine.

Noon, R.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

NREL: News - NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

213 213 NREL Highlights 2012 Utility Green Power Leaders Top 10 programs support more than 4.2 million MWh of voluntary green power June 5, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today released its assessment of leading utility green power programs. Under these voluntary programs, residential and commercial consumers can choose to help support additional electricity production from renewable resources - such as wind and solar - that diversify our nation's energy portfolio and protect our air and water. "Participating in utility green power programs allows consumers to support renewable energy above and beyond what utilities are procuring to comply with state renewable portfolio standards," NREL Analyst Jenny Heeter said. "These utilities are offering first-rate programs that give

51

Power generating system and method utilizing hydropyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor transmission cycle is described which burns a slurry of coal and water with some of the air from the gas turbine compressor, cools and cleans the resulting low-Btu fuel gas, burns the clean fuel gas with the remaining air from the compressor, and extracts the available energy in the gas turbine. The cycle lends itself to combined-cycle cogeneration for the production of steam, absorption cooling, and electric power.

Tolman, R.

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report NRELTP-670-43532 August 2008 Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs Lori A. Bird and Karlynn S. Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

53

Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-Profit Project Development (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide is organized around three sponsorship models: utility-sponsored projects, projects sponsored by special purpose entities - businesses formed for the purpose of producing community solar power, and non-profit sponsored projects. The guide addresses issues common to all project models, as well as issues unique to each model.

Coughlin, J.; Grove, J.; Irvine, L.; Jacobs, J. F.; Johnson Phillips, S.; Sawyer, A.; Wiedman, J.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Utility Response to Railroad Market Power: Assessment of Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal transportation is one of the largest and potentially least competitive costs of power generation. This report reviews possible strategies and recourse available to utilities to counter railroad market power. The implosion of the major carriers into just two major companies in the east and the west heralds an era of duopoly pricing for which no single solution presents itself, past strategies may no longer apply, and the prospect of burgeoning power transactions may offer surprisingly little help to ...

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems  

SciTech Connect

High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Combined Heat and Power with Your Local Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Working Group Combined Heat and Power C.A. Skip Cofield October 16, 2012 Agenda * Southern Company * Combined Heat and Power (CHP) * Southern Company CHP * Utility Partnerships 2 Southern Company Overview Operating Companies: * Alabama Power * Georgia Power * Gulf Power * Mississippi Power Subsidiaries: * Southern LINC * Southern Nuclear * Southern Power * Southern Telecom 3 Retail Generating Units Wholesale Generating Units * 4.4 million customers * 43,500+ MW * 26,000+ employees * 120,000 square miles of retail service territory * 27,000 mi. of transmission lines * 3,700 substations * $17.7B in operating revenue * $2.2B in net income * $39.2B in market cap * $59.3B in assets * $13.5B annual op. expense 4 Southern Company Overview

59

Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design, reliability/ availability, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples of some of the major factors which could impact the project developer and his economics, as well as discuss potential mitigation measures. Areas treated include wheeling, utility ownership interests, dispatchability, regulatory acceptance and other considerations which could significantly affect the plant definition and, as a result, its attendant business and financing structure. Finally, suggestions are also made for facilitating the process of integration with the electric utility.

Felak, R. P.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

Farhar, B. C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Power Switches Utilizing Superconducting Material for Accelerator Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power switches that utilize superconducting material find application in superconducting systems. They can be used for the protection of magnets as a replacement for warm DC breakers, as well as for the replacement of cold diodes. This paper presents a comparison of switches made of various superconducting materials having transport currents of up to 600 A and switching times of the order of milliseconds. The switches operate in the temperature range 4.2-77 K and utilize stainless steel clad YBCO tape and MgB2 tape with a nickel, copper, and iron matrix. Results from simulations and tests are reported.

March, S A; Yang, Y; 10.1109/TASC.2009.2017890

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolysis: Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute â—Ź Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities B. Kroposki, J. Levene, and K. Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P.K. Sen Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado F. Novachek Xcel Energy Denver, Colorado Prepared under Task No. HY61.3620 Technical Report NREL/TP-581-40605 September 2006

66

Central station advanced power conditioning: technology, utility interface, and performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept is proposed for central station SPV power conditioning. It avoids heavy dc bus and extensive ac distribution, and so offers technical, cost, and efficiency advantages. Cost and efficiency comparisons with a more conventional approach, akin to that being implemented for the SMUD installation, are presented. Although the capital gains are not great, the simplification of site preparation and installation is considerable. The design used to generate data for this paper if fully compatible with utility transmission system requirements.

Wood, P.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Power quality - Utilities begin to set up monitoring networks  

SciTech Connect

The time of day at which power-quality problems occur, and their coincidence with other events on the electrical system, are two of the earliest clues to the source of the problem. Today, utilities are beginning to answer customer complaints by installing networks of power-monitoring devices and showing the customer how to use the data they supply. A monitoring network often provides the additional benefit of enabling an engineer to anticipate power-quality problems before the begin to affect production. Advanced electronic packaging allows power-quality monitors to perform three functions that originally required several different instruments: Transient recording and analysis; Harmonics analysis; and, Power measurement-including demand, kilowatt-hours, VArs, power factor, etc. There is a wide range of power-quality monitors on the market with a confusing array of capabilities. The problem is complicated by the frequent introduction of new models, designed to meet specific applications at the lowest possible cost. This paper describes the important features to look for, which include: sampling rate, peak detection, channels, communications, environmental capability, analysis, protocols, and portability. 3 figs.

Reason, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Economic analysis of municipal wastewater utilization for thermoelectric power production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermoelectric power industry in the U.S. uses a large amount of freshwater. The large water demand is increasingly a problem, especially for new power plant development, as availability of freshwater for new uses diminishes in the United States. Reusing non-traditional water sources, such as treated municipal wastewater, provides one option to mitigate freshwater usage in the thermoelectric power industry. The amount of freshwater withdrawal that can be displaced with non-traditional water sources at a particular location requires evaluation of the water management and treatment requirements, considering the quality and abundance of the non-traditional water sources. This paper presents the development of an integrated costing model to assess the impact of degraded water treatment, as well as the implications of increased tube scaling in the main condenser. The model developed herein is used to perform case studies of various treatment, condenser cleaning and condenser configurations to provide insight into the ramifications of degraded water use in the cooling loops of thermoelectric power plants. Further, this paper lays the groundwork for the integration of relationships between degraded water quality, scaling characteristics and volatile emission within a recirculating cooling loop model.

Safari, I.; Walker, M.; Abbasian, J.; Arastoopour, H.; Hsieh, M-K.; Theregowda, R.; Dzombak, D.; Miller, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

Wills, R.H. [Solar Design Associates, Harvard, MA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Conductor requirements for high-temperature superconducting utility power transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors in utility power transformers must satisfy a set of operating requirements that are driven by two major considerations-HTS transformers must be economically competitive with conventional units, and the conductor must be robust enough to be used in a commercial manufacturing environment. The transformer design and manufacturing process will be described in order to highlight the various requirements that it imposes on the HTS conductor. Spreadsheet estimates of HTS transformer costs allow estimates of the conductor cost required for an HTS transformer to be competitive with a similarly performing conventional unit.

Pleva, E. F. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Mehrotra, V. [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reliability analysis of a utility-scale solar power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a reliability analysis for a solar central receiver power plant that employs a salt-in-tube receiver. Because reliability data for a number of critical plant components have only recently been collected, this is the first time a credible analysis can be performed. This type of power plant will be built by a consortium of western US utilities led by the Southern California Edison Company. The 10 MW plant is known as Solar Two and is scheduled to be on-line in 1994. It is a prototype which should lead to the construction of 100 MW commercial-scale plants by the year 2000. The availability calculation was performed with the UNIRAM computer code. The analysis predicted a forced outage rate of 5.4% and an overall plant availability, including scheduled outages, of 91%. The code also identified the most important contributors to plant unavailability. Control system failures were identified as the most important cause of forced outages. Receiver problems were rated second with turbine outages third. The overall plant availability of 91% exceeds the goal identified by the US utility study. This paper discuses the availability calculation and presents evidence why the 91% availability is a credible estimate. 16 refs.

Kolb, G.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Utility interface requirements for a solar power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study specifies that the southern tier of the US (south of the 36th parallel) should be examined to see what problems might develop with the installation of a Satellite Power System (SPS) in the year 2000. One or more 5-GW SPS units could be installed in the utility systems of the southern states in the year 2000. The 345- and 500-kV transmission systems that will probably exist at that time could be readily extended to accommodate the SPS units. The operation of the units will present the utilities with new and difficult problems in system stability and frequency control. The problems will arise because a somewhat variable 5-GW output will be produced by a generator having no mechanical inertia. The unavoidable time lag in controlling the position of the energy beam at the receiving station may have a very critical effect on the stability of the utility systems. The maintenance problems associated with the energy-receiving device, a continuous structure covering more than 40 mi/sup 2/, must be given careful consideration. Repair of lightning damage while maintaining SPS operation may be the most critical requirement. Acquisition and preparation of the 90 mi/sup 2/ land required for the receiving antenna (rectenna) will create many new and difficult environmental problems.

Donalek, P.J.; Whysong, J.L.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Solar Power in Wireless Sensor Networks Thiemo Voigt, Hartmut Ritter, Jochen Schiller propose to utilize solar power in wireless sensor networks, establishing a topology where ­ changing over show that both protocols provide significant energy savings when utilizing solar power. The paper shows

Voigt, Thiemo

76

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) Place Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 521 157 Sector Biomass Product AP-based, biomass project developers References Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) is a company located in Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Veeraiah_Non_Conventional_Power_Projects_Ltd_VNCPPL&oldid=352749"

79

Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-Profit Project Development (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the DOE Solar America Communities report Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development.

Ruckman, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

IMPACTS ASSESSMENT OF PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES ON ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND REGIONAL U.S. POWER GRIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily generation flexibility in the installed hydro capacity, the total annual energy produced, 2003] 6 #12;· Renewable (non-conventional hydro) energy generation. This includes wind, solar, conventional hydro power, and renewable energy capacities because these are already fully utilized. Nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest New Crop (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop is a trifold brochure that strives to educate rural landowners and rural co-op utilities about the benefits of wind power development. It provides examples of rural utilities that have successful wind energy projects and supportive statements from industry members.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. Provides detailed statistics on existing generating units operated by electric utilities as of December 31, 2000, and certain summary statistics about new generators planned for operation by electric utilities during the next 5 years.

Information Center

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Uses and Applications of Climate Forecasts for Power Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uses and potential applications of climate forecasts for electric and gas utilities were assessed 1) to discern needs for improving climate forecasts and guiding future research, and 2) to assist utilities in making wise use of forecasts. In-...

Stanley A. Changnon; Joyce M. Changnon; David Changnon

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Non-destructive metallurgical analysis of astrolabes utilizing synchrotron radiation.  

SciTech Connect

From the experiments performed it is possible to determine a wide range of information about the metallurgy of the astrolabes studied. It was found that different brass alloys were used for components that were cast and those that were mechanically deformed. Chemical composition, forming history, and thickness measurements are all determined non-destructively, illustrating that this technique could be useful for many applications with metal artifact analysis where non-intrusive methods are required.

Newbury, B.; Stephenson, B.; Almer, J. D.; Notis, M.; Haeffner, D. R.; Slade Cargill, G., III

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

87

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Residential Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart ™ provides energy efficiency incentives to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. Efficiency Smart assists residential, commercial , and...

88

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

89

Reti attive di distribuzione: le applicazioni Virtual Power Plant e Virtual Utility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il presente lavoro si occupa di nuove applicazioni per la gestione e l’ottimizzazione di risorse distribuite, cosě dette Virtual Power Plant (VPP) o Virtual Utility… (more)

Baroncelli, Paolo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0095(2000) Inventory of Electric Utility Power Plants in the United States 2000 March 2002 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric

91

Equilibrium with exponential utility and non-negative consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a multi-period Arrow-Debreu equilibrium in a heterogeneous economy populated by agents trading in a complete market. Each agent is represented by an exponential utility function, where additionally no negative level of consumption is permitted. We derive an explicit formula for the optimal consumption policies involving a put option depending on the state price density. We exploit this formula to prove the existence of an equilibrium and then provide a characterization of all possible equilibria, under the assumption of positive endowments. Via particular examples, we demonstrate that uniqueness is not always guaranteed. Finally, we discover the presence of infinitely many equilibria when endowments are vanishing.

Muraviev, Roman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Delimiting “Thunderstorm Watch” Periods by Real-Time Lightning Location for a Power Utility Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During times of thunderstorm activity, the power utility serving metropolitan New York enters a potentially costly “thunderstorm watch” mode of operation which is designed to prevent a major power outage caused by lightning. To evaluate the ...

Vincent P. Idone; Richard E. Orville

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Design & optimization of automotive power electronics utilizing FITMOS MOSFET technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power electronics are essential to many automotive applications, and their importance continues to grow as more vehicle functions incorporate electronic controls. MOSFETs are key elements in automotive power electronic ...

Li, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Solar two: Utility-scale power from the sun  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented on the Solar Two solar-powered electric generating plant located east of Barstow California.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... M. Misakian, TL Nelson and WE Feero. Regarding Electric Energy Savings, Power Factors, and Carbon Footprints: A Primer. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project Sacramento Utility to Launch Concentrating Solar Power-Natural Gas Project October 31, 2013 - 11:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced a new concentrating solar power (CSP) project led by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The project will integrate utility-scale CSP technology with SMUD's 500-megawatt (MW) natural gas-fired Cosumnes Power Plant. Supported by a $10 million Energy Department investment, this project will help design, build and test cost-competitive CSP-fossil fuel power generating systems in the United

97

Interruptible Power Rates and Their Role in Utility Distributed Resources Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-site generators installed primarily for use during power outages represent a significant distributed resource (DR). These generators can be readily incorporated into power markets through existing "interruptible" rate structures where customers agree to reduce the electrical demand (on the utility) for specified periods. The extent to which utilities have adopted and/or encouraged interruptible rates is the subject of this report.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wireless Product Applications for Utilities: Technical Services for Power Utilities in Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless technology applications are abundant, with products and services ranging from two-way paging to Personal Communications Services (PCS) to low cost satellite data transmission. With this in mind, utilities are encouraged to develop relationships and business arrangements with telecommunication companies--relationships that can benefit both industries. These arrangements promise to streamline utility operations and, in selected cases, create new businesses and provide sources of revenue for utilit...

1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy-based analysis of utility scale hybrid power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The promise of large-scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for supplying electrical power is tempered by the sources' transient behavior and the… (more)

Agyenim-Boateng, Kwame

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy Department and Federal Efforts to Support Utility Power...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

currently repairing power lines across the Mid-Atlantic in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department 58,000 workers are currently repairing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development Jump to: navigation, search Name A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Department of Energy Partner National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development, Keyes and Fox, Stoel Rives, Bonneville Environmental Foundation Sector Energy Focus Area People and Policy, Solar Phase Evaluate Options, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Guide/manual Availability Free; publicly available Publication Date 11/1/2010 Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11o References A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development[1] Overview This guide provides information for communities interested in developing

102

City of Palo Alto Utilities- Commercial and Non-Profit Efficiency Loan Program (California)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

City of Palo Alto Utilities (CPAU) provides 0% loans to business and non-profit customers to offset the need for upfront energy efficiency investments in qualifying facilities. Loans are only...

103

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description of a new power cycle, based on the use of a multicomponent working fluid, was published earlier. A thermodynamic analysis of this cycle has demonstrated its superiority over the currently used Rankine Cycle, and a distribution of losses in the subsystems of this cycle has been established. A new, improved variant of the cycle, which provides 10% efficiency improvement over the initial variant, has been developed. The new variant employs a cooling of the working fluid between turbine stages and a recuperation of the released heat for supplementation of the boiler heat supply. Analysis shows that with this new, improved cycle efficiencies of up to 52% for a combined-cycle system employing standard turbines, and of up to 55% when modern high-temperature gas turbines are employed, can be achieved. The same cycle can be utilized to retrofit existing direct-fired power plants, providing an efficiency of up to 42%. The possible implications off such a cycle implementation are briefly discussed. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is now conducting a study of this cycle.

Kalina, A. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Utility-Scale Power Router: Dynamic Control of Grid Assets Using Direct AC Converter Cells  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Georgia Tech is developing a cost-effective, utility-scale power router that uses an enhanced transformer to more efficiently direct power on the grid. Existing power routing technologies are too expensive for widespread use, but the ability to route grid power to match real-time demand and power outages would significantly reduce energy costs for utilities, municipalities, and consumers. Georgia Tech is adding a power converter to an existing grid transformer to better control power flows at about 1/10th the cost of existing power routing solutions. Transformers convert the high-voltage electricity that is transmitted through the grid into the low-voltage electricity that is used by homes and businesses. The added converter uses fewer steps to convert some types of power and eliminates unnecessary power storage, among other improvements. The enhanced transformer is more efficient, and it would still work even if the converter fails, ensuring grid reliability.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Feasibility of Utility-Provided Uninterruptible DC Power for Telecommunication Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing uninterruptible power to the telecommunication industry is a natural fit for the expertise of the electric utility industry and represents a significant opportunity for revenue growth. This report analyzes the power requirements for different sectors of the telecommunication industry and examines existing and emerging technologies for providing uninterruptible power.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) (Redirected from Burbank Water and Power) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery

107

City of Palo Alto Utilities - Commercial and Non-Profit Efficiency Loan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Non-Profit Efficiency and Non-Profit Efficiency Loan Program (California) City of Palo Alto Utilities - Commercial and Non-Profit Efficiency Loan Program (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Nonprofit Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $50,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $5,000 - $50,000 Provider Commercial Financing City of Palo Alto Utilities (CPAU) provides 0% loans to business and non-profit customers to offset the need for upfront energy efficiency

108

From Investor-owned Utility to Independent Power Producer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L G & E Energy Corporation Xcel Energy IPP Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y YAmerican Electric Power Co Ine Xcel Energy IPP Y Y Y N Y Y NPower Co Ine UtiliCorp United Xcel Energy American Electric

Ishii, Jun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Siting Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, Congress asked the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and scope out an initiative to fulfill the goal of having 1,000 megawatts (MW) of new parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine solar capacity supplying the southwestern United States. In this paper, we present a review of the solar resource for Arizona, California, Nevada, and New Mexico. These four states have the greatest number of ''premium'' solar sites in the country and each has a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). We present information on the generation potential of the solar resources in these states. We also present regions within New Mexico that may be ideally suited for developing large-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants because of their proximity to load and their access to unconstrained transmission.

Mehos, M.; Owens, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reducing Power Production Costs by Utilizing Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke. It is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance, and is generally less reactive than coal. Therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the comb...

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Un Seminar On The Utilization Of Geothermal Energy For Electric Power Production And Space Heating, Florence 1984, Section 2- Geothermal Resources Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): o ozkocak Published: Geothermics, 1985 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) Reflection Survey (Ozkocak, 1985) Unspecified Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Un_Seminar_On_The_Utilization_Of_Geothermal_Energy_For_Electric_Power_Production_And_Space_Heating,_Florence_1984,_Section_2-_Geothermal_Resources&oldid=386949"

112

City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power, California (Utility Company) Power, California (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Burbank Water and Power Place Burbank, California Utility Id 2507 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project was awarded $20,000,000 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $62,650,755.

113

Coordination of reactive power scheduling in a multi-area power system operated by independent utilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the problem of reactive power scheduling in a power system with several areas controlled by independent transmission system operators (TSOs). To design… (more)

Phulpin, Yannick

114

Offering Premium Power to Select Customer Segments: Using Distributed Resources for Distribution Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric sector restructuring will likely lead to increased opportunities for distributed resources (DR) technologies and solutions. In particular, distribution utilities may be able to use DR to provide innovative services that can help increase customer value and open new sources of revenue. Using DR to offer premium power services to customers with special sensitivity to power quality disturbances is one such opportunity.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

MPC for Wind Power Gradients --Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPC for Wind Power Gradients -- Utilizing Forecasts, Rotor Inertia, and Central Energy Storage iterations. We demonstrate our method in simulations with various wind scenarios and prices for energy. INTRODUCTION Today, wind power is the most important renewable energy source. For the years to come, many

116

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

117

Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging problems is known as islanding phenomenon. This situation occurs when a network is disconnected from utility grid and is energized by local DFPGs. It can possibly result in injury to utility personnel arriving to service isolated feeders, equipment damage, and system malfunction. In response to the concern, this dissertation aims to develop a robust anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of DFPGs. In the first part, digital signal processor (DSP) controlled power electronic converters for utility interconnection of DFPGs are developed. Current control in a direct-quadrature (dq) synchronous frame is proposed. The real and reactive power is controlled by regulating inverter currents. The proposed digital current control in a synchronous frame significantly enhances the performance of DFPGs. In the second part, the robust anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of a DFPG is developed. The power control algorithm is proposed based on analysis of a real and reactive power mismatch. It continuously perturbs (±5%) the reactive power supplied by the DFPG while monitoring the voltage and frequency. If islanding were to occur, a measurable frequency deviation would take place, upon which the real power of the DFPG is further reduced to 80%; a drop in voltage positively confirms islanding. This method is shown to be robust and reliable. In the third part, an improved anti-islanding algorithm for utility interconnection of multiple DFPGs is presented. The cross correlation method is proposed and implemented in conjunction with the power control algorithm. It calculates the cross correlation index of a rate of change of the frequency deviation and (±5%) the reactive power. If this index increases above 50%, the chance of islanding is high. The algorithm initiates (±10%) the reactive power and continues to calculate the correlation index. If the index exceeds 80%, islanding is now confirmed. The proposed method is robust and capable of detecting islanding in the presence of several DFPGs independently operating. Analysis, simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 2001 December 2001 Customer Participants (as of December 2001) Rank Utility Program # of Participants 1 Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Green Power for a Green L.A. 87,0001 2 Xcel Energy (Colorado) WindSource 18,600 3 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Greenergy - All Renewables 14,200 4 Xcel Energy (Colorado) Renewable Energy Trust 10,900 5 Wisconsin Electric Power Company Energy for Tomorrow 10,700 6 PacifiCorp Blue Sky 7,300 7 Austin Energy GreenChoice 6,600 8 Portland General Electric Company Salmon Friendly Clean Wind Power 5,700 9 Wisconsin Public Service SolarWise for Schools 5,200 10 Tennessee Valley Authority Green Power Switch 4,9002 Source: NREL Notes: 1 About half of the total are low-income customers that receive existing renewables at no extra cost.

119

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric power generation business. Included is a comparison between heavy-duty industrial combustion turbines and their rapidly evolving competition, aeroderivative machines, with emphasis on the appropriate application of each. The prospects for future improvements in the cost and performance of combustion turbines are reviewed, and the likely impact of advanced combustion turbine power generation concepts is considered. Also summarized is the outlook for power generation fuels, including the longer term reemergence of coal and the potential for widespread use of coal gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper draws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy companies that includes utilities, independent power producers (IPPs), and power industry equipment vendors.

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions (PUCs). Economic performance incentives established by state PUCs are applicable to the construction or operation of about 45 nuclear power reactors owned by 30 utilities in 17 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Petersen, J.C.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state Public Utility Commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic performance incentives established by state Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) currently are applicable to the construction or operation of approximately 73 nuclear power reactors owned by 27 utilities with investment greater than 10% in 18 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its headquarters and regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state PUCs presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Martin, R.L.; Olson, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Hendrickson, P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant January 19, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in the Texas Clean Energy Project. | Photo courtesy of llnlphotos. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon

123

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Railroad Consolidation and Market Power: Challenges to a Deregulating Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The railroad industry is shrinking into a handful of mega-carriers, a development of great importance to the electric utility industry, which depends on railroads for most shipments of coal. As the electric utilities face deregulation, the impact of railroad market power on the delivered price of coal is a critical competitive issue. This report examines the motivations for railroad consolidation and assesses the likely business strategies of the five major coal hauling railroads.

1997-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

SciTech Connect

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Technology Advancements to Support Growth in Geothermal Power Sales in a Dynamic Utility Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are assembled today to discuss the opportunities and challenges for expanding the sales of geothermally-generated electric power in a competitive utility market. First, however, I would like to note that growth in geothermal sales might not be a germane topic were it not for the early participation in the development of the geothermal industry by utilities themselves. Without their contributions to research and development, environmental breakthroughs, and, perhaps, above all, their early use of geothermal power and continuing investment in the industry, we might still be at ''Square One''--confronting inhibiting doubts of the energy utilization industry. I feel certain that utility involvement has served to inspire far greater confidence in the reliability of the resource on the part of other utilities and other investors than could have been generated by federal programs and/or the resource developer arm of the geothermal community. While acknowledging that we have not completely resolved all problems which geothermal energy faced 20 years ago--confidence, institutional restraints, environmental compliance, and technical and economic uncertainties--this audience and our predecessors have addressed them, individually and collectively, and, to a large extent, we have surmounted them. But it took generation or contracted purchase of geothermal power by utilities--whatever their discrete reasons for doing so--to demonstrate to the public and government regulators that there is a place for geothermal power in the service areas of large utilities. In addition, in using an alternative fuel, the participating utilities have already exposed themselves to changing concepts and practices in their industry.

Mock, John E.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Wind power and electric utilities: a review of the problems and prospects. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of windpower poses a variety of problems for utilities primarily due to the uncontrollability of the power source and the high degree of variability of the wind. Differences in the dynamic behavior of the wind and of utility load patterns and the problems that arise from these differences are described. Utility capacity expansion methods and modifications to them to incorporate the characteristics of wind machines into the analytic procedure are outlined and results from initial studies employing these modifications are reviewed. These results indicate that, in general, storage devices are too expensive to be purchased by utilities if they serve mainly to balance the output of the wind machines; wind machines tend to supplant purchases of conventional baseload capacity but require additional peaking units; and the economic value of wind machines to utilities is composed of savings in both fuel and capacity related expenditures for conventional equipment.

Davitian, H

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

130

Information content of the non-linear matter power spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use an ensemble of N-body simulations of the currently favoured (concordance) cosmological model to measure the amount of information contained in the non-linear matter power spectrum about the amplitude of the initial power spectrum. Two surprising results emerge from this study: (i) that there is very little independent information in the power spectrum in the translinear regime (k ~ 0.2-0.8 Mpc/h at the present day) over and above the information at linear scales and (ii) that the cumulative information begins to rise sharply again with increasing wavenumber in the non-linear regime. In the fully non-linear regime, the simulations are consistent with no loss of information during translinear and non-linear evolution. If this is indeed the case then the results suggest a picture in which translinear collapse is very rapid, and is followed by a bounce prior to virialization, impelling a wholesale revision of the HKLM-PD formalism.

C. D. Rimes; A. J. S. Hamilton

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

Real power regulation for the utility power grid via responsive loads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for dynamically managing an electrical power system that determines measures of performance and control criteria for the electric power system, collects at least one automatic generation control (AGC) input parameter to at least one AGC module and at least one automatic load control (ALC) input parameter to at least one ALC module, calculates AGC control signals and loads as resources (LAR) control signals in response to said measures of performance and control criteria, propagates AGC control signals to power generating units in response to control logic in AGC modules, and propagates LAR control signals to at least one LAR in response to control logic in ALC modules.

McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN); Kirby, Brendan J. (Knoxville, TN); Kisner, Roger A. (Knoxville, TN), Van Dyke, James W. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Co-utilization of biomass and natural gas: a new route for power productin from biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Co-utilization of biomass and natural gas: a new route for power productin from biomass production is proposed in which biomass energy is used to partially reform natural gas in gas turbines. As a result, part of the natural gas fuel supply can be replaced by biomass while keeping the biomass

Glineur, François

135

Low complexity subcarrier and power allocation for utility maximization in uplink OFDMA systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the joint subcarrier and power allocation problem with the objective of maximizing the total utility of users in the uplink of an OFDMA system. Our formulation includes the problems of sum rate maximization, proportional fairness and max-min ...

Cho Yiu Ng; Chi Wan Sung

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Concentrating Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics Projects: A Technology and Market Overview Michael Mendelsohn, Travis Lowder, and Brendan Canavan Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51137 April 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaics Projects: A Technology and Market Overview Michael Mendelsohn, Travis Lowder, and Brendan Canavan Prepared under Task No. SM10.2442

137

Notices DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

670 Federal Register 670 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 212 / Wednesday, November 2, 2011 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Inc.: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Hold Public Scoping Meetings AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Rural Utilities Service (RUS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for Basin Electric Power Cooperative's (Basin Electric) proposed Antelope Valley Station (AVS) to Neset Transmission Project (Project) in North Dakota. RUS is issuing this Notice of Intent (NOI) to inform the public and interested parties about the proposed Project, conduct a public

138

DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More DOE Announces Webinars on the Distributed Wind Power Market, Utility Energy Service Contracts, and More August 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars August 21: Live Webinar on the 2012 Distributed Wind Market Report Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Program The Energy Department will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications" on Wednesday,

139

Expected Power-Utility Maximization Under Incomplete Information and with Cox-Process Observations  

SciTech Connect

We consider the problem of maximization of expected terminal power utility (risk sensitive criterion). The underlying market model is a regime-switching diffusion model where the regime is determined by an unobservable factor process forming a finite state Markov process. The main novelty is due to the fact that prices are observed and the portfolio is rebalanced only at random times corresponding to a Cox process where the intensity is driven by the unobserved Markovian factor process as well. This leads to a more realistic modeling for many practical situations, like in markets with liquidity restrictions; on the other hand it considerably complicates the problem to the point that traditional methodologies cannot be directly applied. The approach presented here is specific to the power-utility. For log-utilities a different approach is presented in Fujimoto et al. (Preprint, 2012).

Fujimoto, Kazufumi, E-mail: m_fuji@kvj.biglobe.ne.jp [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan)] [Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., Corporate Risk Management Division (Japan); Nagai, Hideo, E-mail: nagai@sigmath.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan)] [Osaka University, Division of Mathematical Science for Social Systems, Graduate School of Engineering Science (Japan); Runggaldier, Wolfgang J., E-mail: runggal@math.unipd.it [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica Pura ed Applicata (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Commercialization of PV-powered pumping systems for use in utility PV service programs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report was a commercialization effort focused on cost-effective remote water pumping systems for use in utility-based photovoltaic (PV) service programs. The project combined a commercialization strategy tailored specifically for electric utilities with the development of a PV-powered pumping system that operates conventional ac pumps rather than relying on the more expensive and less reliable PV pumps on the market. By combining these two attributes, a project goal was established of creating sustained utility purchases of 250 PV-powered water pumping systems per year. The results of each of these tasks are presented in two parts contained in this Final Summary Report. The first part summarizes the results of the Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) as a new business venture, while the second part summarizes the results of the Golden Photon system installations. Specifically, results and photographs from each of the system installations are presented in this latter part.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability  

SciTech Connect

Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Wind Power for Municipal Utilities. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Brochure.  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Clean energy has a bright future. Today a growing number Clean energy has a bright future. Today a growing number of public utilities are harvesting a new source of homegrown energy. From Massachusetts to California, more than two dozen municipal utilities have wind power in their energy mix. Wind energy is attractive for many reasons: * Wind energy is clean and renewable. * Wind energy is economically competitive. * Wind energy reduces energy price risks. Unlike coal, natural gas, or oil, the "fuel" for a wind turbine will always be free. * Wind energy is popular with the public. A RECORD YEAR - Wind power is booming. Worldwide, a record 3,800 megawatts (MW) were installed in 2001. These sleek, impressive wind turbines have closed the cost gap with conventional power plants. Depending on size and location, wind farms produce electricity for 3-6

143

Efficient Power Converters for PV Arrays : Scalable Submodule Power Conversion for Utility-Scale Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar ADEPT Project: SolarBridge is developing a new power conversion technique to improve the energy output of PV power plants. This new technique is specifically aimed at large plants where many solar panels are connected together. SolarBridge is correcting for the inefficiencies that occur when two solar panels that encounter different amounts of sun are connected together. In most conventional PV system, the weakest panel limits the energy production of the entire system. That’s because all of the energy collected by the PV system feeds into a single collection point where a central inverter then converts it into useable energy for the grid. SolarBridge has found a more efficient and cost-effective way to convert solar energy, correcting these power differences before they reach the grid.

None

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The following utility- and site-specific conditions that may affect the economic viability of distributed renewable energy sources were considered: distribution system characteristics, and design standards, and voltage levels; load density, reliability, and power quality; solar insolation and wind resource levels; utility generation characteristics and load profiles; and investor-owned and publicly owned utilities, size, and financial assumptions.

Zaininger, H.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Non-stationary power signal processing for pattern recognition using HS-transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach to time-frequency transform and pattern recognition of non-stationary power signals is presented in this paper. In the proposed work visual localization, detection and classification of non-stationary power signals are achieved using hyperbolic ... Keywords: Fuzzy C-means clustering, Genetic algorithm, HS-transform, Non-stationary power signals, Power quality (PQ)

B. Biswal; P. K. Dash; B. K. Panigrahi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, including states with new programs, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Elliot, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Power Electronics for Distributed Energy Systems and Transmission and Distribution Applications: Assessing the Technical Needs for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power electronics can provide utilities the ability to more effectively deliver power to their customers while providing increased reliability to the bulk power system. In general, power electronics is the process of using semiconductor switching devices to control and convert electrical power flow from one form to another to meet a specific need. These conversion techniques have revolutionized modern life by streamlining manufacturing processes, increasing product efficiencies, and increasing the quality of life by enhancing many modern conveniences such as computers, and they can help to improve the delivery of reliable power from utilities. This report summarizes the technical challenges associated with utilizing power electronics devices across the entire spectrum from applications to manufacturing and materials development, and it provides recommendations for research and development (R&D) needs for power electronics systems in which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) could make a substantial impact toward improving the reliability of the bulk power system.

Tolbert, L.M.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIR TOXICS AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Prepared Under Burns and Roe Services Corporation Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC92100 .Subtask 44.02 July 1996 SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN . . UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center . Prepared by Adrian Radziwon and Edward Winter Burns and Roe Services Corporation Terence J. McManus, Oak Ridge Associated Universities July 1996 TABLE OF CONTERlW SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................... 1 Background . : .................. 1 Objectives .................... 1 Report Structure ................. 3 Uncertainties ................... 3 SECTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................. 7

150

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2007) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MW)a 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 577,636,840 65.9 2 Portland General Electricb Geothermal, biomass, wind 553,677,903 63.2 3 PacifiCorpcde Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 383,618,885 43.8 4 Florida Power & Lightb Biomass, wind, landfill gas, solar 373,596,000 42.6 5 Xcel Energyef Wind 326,553,866 37.3 6 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, landfill gas, small hydro, solar 275,481,584 31.4 7 Puget Sound Energye Wind, solar, biomass, landfill gas 246,406,200 28.1 8 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Wind 226,474,000 25.9 9 National Gridgh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 180,209,571 20.6

151

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Harmonization of Utility Common Information Model (CIM) with other IEC Power System Management Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has sponsored the development of a number of international standards which provide the basis for information exchange to support power system management. One of the most important is the Common Information Model (CIM), which is rapidly gaining acceptance throughout the world as a common semantic model to unify and integrate the data from a myriad of systems involved in support of real-time electric utility operations. As its acceptance as the basis for information integration grows and areas of appl...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

PQ TechWatch: What To Expect from Normal, Utility-Grade Electrical Power: Educating End Users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although “perfect” electrical power—power that never stops or deviates from a true sine wave—may be an impossibility, consumers want to know what kind of power they can expect from electric power providers. It is up to utilities to educate their customers on what normal, utility-grade power looks like, how it is generated and distributed, and how to identify and deal with problems related to reliability and power quality. This education should also lead to a two-way ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for renewable energy projects than for non-renewable ones.Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Utility-Scale Solar Power Converter: Agile Direct Grid Connect Medium Voltage 4.7-13.8 kV Power Converter for PV Applications Utilizing Wide Band Gap Devices  

SciTech Connect

Solar ADEPT Project: Satcon is developing a compact, lightweight power conversion device that is capable of taking utility-scale solar power and outputting it directly into the electric utility grid at distribution voltage levels—eliminating the need for large transformers. Transformers “step up” the voltage of the power that is generated by a solar power system so it can be efficiently transported through transmission lines and eventually “stepped down” to usable voltages before it enters homes and businesses. Power companies step up the voltage because less electricity is lost along transmission lines when the voltage is high and current is low. Satcon’s new power conversion devices will eliminate these heavy transformers and connect a utility-scale solar power system directly to the grid. Satcon’s modular devices are designed to ensure reliability—if one device fails it can be bypassed and the system can continue to run.

None

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dependence of delivered energy on power conditioner electrical characteristics for utility-interactive PV systems  

SciTech Connect

In a utility-interactive photovoltaic system, the electrical characteristics of the dc-to-ac power-conditioning unit (inverter) influence the quantity of electrical energy delivered by the system, and therefore, affect the user worth of the system. An analysis of the effect of relevant inverter electrical characteristics on the quantity of system-delivered energy is undertaken using computer simulations of system behavior. Significant conclusions are that: (1) the annual system performance advantage of maximum-power-point voltage tracking is small compared with fixed-dc-input voltage operation; (2) low levels of inverter ac-power consumption during times of zero insolation can significantly degrade system performance; (3) the effect of small changes in the array-to-inverter size ratio on the user worth of the system is small; and (4) most of the system energy is delivered at power levels greater than one-half of the nominal array rating, and consequently, the inverter low-power efficiency is less important than is its full-power efficiency. A formula that approximates the inverter annual throughput efficiency with only four laboratory measurements on the inverter is presented.

Rasmussen, N.E.; Branz, H.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Optimal site selection and sizing of distributed utility-scale wind power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As electric market product unbundling occurs, sellers in the wholesale market for electricity will find it to their advantage to be able to specify the quantity of electricity available and the time of availability. Since wind power plants are driven by the stochastic nature of the wind itself, this can present difficulties. To the extent that an accurate wind forecast is available, contract deviations, and therefore penalties, can be significantly reduced. Even though one might have the ability to accurately forecast the availability of wind power, it might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility`s peak load than a single site. There are several wind plants in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming and Iowa. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically diverse sites on the efficiency of the overall wind plant. In this paper, the authors use hourly wind-speed data from six geographically diverse sites to provide some insight into the potential benefits of disperse wind plant development. They provide hourly wind power from each of these sites to an electric reliability simulation model. This model uses generating plant characteristics of the generators within the state of Minnesota to calculate various reliability indices. Since they lack data on wholesale power transactions, they do not include them in the analysis, and they reduce the hourly load data accordingly. The authors present and compare results of their methods and suggest some areas of future research.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Green Power Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2005) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MWa) 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 435,140,739 49.7 2 Portland General Electricb Existing geothermal and hydro, wind 339,577,170 38.8 3 PacifiCorpcd Wind, biomass, solar 234,163,591 26.7 4 Florida Power & Light Biomass, wind, solar 224,574,530 25.6 5 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, landfill gas, small hydro, solar 195,081,504 22.3 6 Xcel Energyef Wind 147,674,000 16.9 7 National Gridghi Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 127,872,457 14.6 8 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Wind 113,957,000 13.0 9 Puget Sound Energy Wind, solar, biogas 71,341,000 8.1 10 OG&E Electric Services Wind 63,591,526 7.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Green Power Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2006) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MWa) 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 580,580,401 66.3 2 Portland General Electricb Existing geothermal and hydro, wind 432,826,408 49.4 3 Florida Power & Light Landfill gas, biomass, wind, solar 302,792,000 34.6 4 PacifiCorpcd Wind, biomass, solar 299,862,690 34.2 5 Xcel Energyef Wind 236,505,718 27.0 6 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Wind 217,427,000 24.8 7 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, landfill gas,small hydro 216,476,278 24.7 8 National Gridghi Biomass, wind,small hydro, solar 156,447,869 17.9 9 OG&E Electric Services Wind 134,553,920 15.4 10 Puget Sound Energy Wind, solar, biogas 131,742,000 15.0

162

Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy values and estimation of power generation potentials of some non-woody biomass species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of high energy potentials in non-woody biomass species and an increasing interest in their utilization for power generation, an attempt has been made in this study to assess the proximate analysis and energy content of different components of Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species (both non-woody), and their impact on power generation and land requirement for energy plantations. The net energy content in Ocimum canum was found to be slightly higher than that in Tridax procumbens. In spite of having higher ash contents, the barks from both the plant species exhibited higher calorific values. The results have shown that approximately 650 and 1,270 hectares of land are required to generate 20,000 kWh/day electricity from Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species. Coal samples, obtained from six different local mines, were also examined for their qualities, and the results were compared with those of studied biomass materials. This comparison reveals much higher power output with negligible emission of suspended particulate matters (SPM) from biomass materials.

Kumar, M.; Patel, S.K. [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Multi-area power system state estimation utilizing boundary measurements and phasor measurement units ( PMUs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to prove the validity of a multi-area state estimator and investigate the advantages it provides over a serial state estimator. This is done utilizing the IEEE 118 Bus Test System as a sample system. This thesis investigates the benefits that stem from utilizing a multi-area state estimator instead of a serial state estimator. These benefits are largely in the form of increased accuracy and decreased processing time. First, the theory behind power system state estimation is explained for a simple serial estimator. Then the thesis shows how conventional measurements and newer, more accurate PMU measurements work within the framework of weighted least squares estimation. Next, the multi-area state estimator is examined closely and the additional measurements provided by PMUs are used to increase accuracy and computational efficiency. Finally, the multi-area state estimator is tested for accuracy, its ability to detect bad data, and computation time.

Freeman, Matthew A

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sacramento Municipal Utility District 100 MW Photovoltaic Power Plant: Final environmental impact report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) proposes constructing a 100 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. The project, to be built in increments over the next 12 years, is the largest facility of its kind proposed by any utility in the country. The initial 1 MW photovoltaic field will consist of four 250 kW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. Photovoltaic cell modules will be mounted on flat-plate arrays attached to centrally located torque tubes which allow the arrays to rotate on their long axis to )openreverse arrowquotes)track)closereverse arrowquotes) the sun. This Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) addresses environmental aspects of the proposed project according to the guidelines for implementing the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Enviornmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 2009 December 2009 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2009) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (aMW)a 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 764,895,830 87.3 2 Portland General Electricb Wind, biomass, geothermal 740,880,487 84.6 3 PacifiCorpcde Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 578,744,080 66.1 4 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districtc Wind, hydro, biomass, solar 377,535,530 43.1 5 Xcel Energycf Wind, solar 374,296,375 42.7 6 Puget Sound Energycg Wind, landfill gas, biomass, small hydro, solar 303,046,167 34.6 7 Connecticut Light and Power/ United Illuminating Wind, hydro 197,458,734 22.5 8 National Gridh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 174,536,130 19.9 9 Public Service Company of New Mexico Wind 173,863,751 19.8

167

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Superconducting magnetic energy storage applications and benefits for electric utility power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large SMES units are being studied for electric utility applications as diurnal, load-curve leveling and as transient stabilizer units. Such SMES units show promise of providing greater operating flexibility than pumped-hydro or other types of energy storage. This operating flexibility, together with its fast response capability to provide transient and dynamic stabilization benefits to a power system, are discussed. Small SMES units are being designed for dynamic stability applications on electric power systems for use when negatively damped system operating conditions are encountered. The 30-MJ, 10-MW SMES dynamic-stabilizer design is presented; and the status of the component development and fabrication contracts which have been placed with commercial manufacturers is discussed.

Turner, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Green Power Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2004) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MWa) 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas, small hydro 334,446,101 38.2 2 Portland General Electricb Existing geothermal, wind, small hydro 262,142,564 29.9 3 PacifiCorpcd Wind, biomass,solar 191,838,079 21.9 4 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Landfill gas, wind, small hydro, solar 176,774,804 20.2 5 Xcel Energy Wind 137,946,000 15.7 6 National Gridfgh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 88,204,988 10.1 7 Los Angeles Department of Power & Water Wind and landfill gas 75,528,746 8.6 8 OG&E Electric Services Wind 56,672,568 6.5 9 Puget Sound Energy Wind, solar, biogas 46,110,000 5.3 10 We Energiese Landfill gas, wind, small hydro 40,906,410 4.7

173

A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

Klara, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Weinstein, R.E. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Wherley, M.R. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A control system for improved battery utilization in a PV-powered peak-shaving system  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) power systems offer the prospect of allowing a utility company to meet part of the daily peak system load using a renewable resource. Unfortunately, some utilities have peak system- load periods that do not match the peak production hours of a PV system. Adding a battery energy storage system to a grid-connected PV power system will allow dispatching the stored solar energy to the grid at the desired times. Batteries, however, pose system limitations in terms of energy efficiency, maintenance, and cycle life. A new control system has been developed, based on available PV equipment and a data acquisition system, that seeks to minimize the limitations imposed by the battery system while maximizing the use of PV energy. Maintenance requirements for the flooded batteries are reduced, cycle life is maximized, and the battery is operated over an efficient range of states of charge. This paper presents design details and initial performance results on one of the first installed control systems of this type.

Palomino, E [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Power Transistors: 15 kV SiC IGBT Power Modules for Grid Scale Power Conversion  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Cree is developing silicon carbide (SiC) power transistors that are 50% more energy efficient than traditional transistors. Transistors act like a switch, controlling the electrical energy that flows through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon semiconductors to conduct electricity. However, transistors with SiC semiconductors operate at much higher temperatures, as well as higher voltage and power levels than their silicon counterparts. SiC-based transistors are also smaller and require less cooling than those made with traditional silicon power technology. Cree's SiC transistors will enable electrical circuits to handle higher power levels more efficiently, and they will result in much smaller and lighter electrical devices and power converters. Cree, an established leader in SiC technology, has already released a commercially available SiC transistor that can operate at up to 1,200 volts. The company has also demonstrated a utility-scale SiC transistor that operates at up to 15,000 volts.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Small power systems study technical summary report. Volume II. Inventory of small generating units in U. S. utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Data identifying small (less than or equal to 10 MW) power units in the United States are tabulated. The data are listed alphabetically by state and are reported sequentially for investor owned utilities, municipal utilities, and electrical cooperatives and other utility systems. For a given utility system, the generating units are divided into steam turbines, diesel generators and gas turbines. The number and size of generating units are listed. A summary tabulation of the number of generating units of each type and total generating capacity by state is presented.

Sitney, L.R.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2002) Rank Utility Resources Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MW)1 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas, solar 251,520,000 28.7 2 Sacramento Municipal Utility District Landfill gas, wind, solar 104,344,0002 11.9 3 Xcel Energy Wind and solar 103,739,0003 11.8 4 Los Angeles Department of Power and Water Wind and landfill gas 66,666,0004 7.6 5 Portland General Electric5 Wind and geothermal 57,989,000 6.6 6 PacifiCorp5 Wind and geothermal 55,615,000 6.3 7 Tennessee Valley Authority Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 35,955,000 4.1 8 We Energies Landfill gas, wind, hydro 35,161,000 4.0 9 Puget Sound Energy Wind and solar 20,334,000 2.3 10 Madison Gas and Electric Wind 15,593,000 1.8

178

Utility-scale combined-cycle power systems with Kalina bottoming cycles  

SciTech Connect

A new power-generation technology, often referred to as the Kalina cycle, is being developed as a direct replacement for the Rankine steam cycle. It can be applied to any thermal heat source, low or high temperature. Among several Kalina cycle variations, there is one that is particularly well suited as a bottoming cycle for utility combined-cycle applications. It is the subject of this paper. Using an ammonia/water mixture as the working fluid and a condensing system based on absorption-refrigeration principles, the Kalina bottoming cycle outperforms a triple-pressure steam cycle by 16%. Additionally, this version of the Kalina cycle is characterized by an intercooling feature between turbine stages, diametrically opposite to normal reheating practice in steam plants. Energy and mass balances are presented for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina bottoming cycle. Kalina cycle performance is compared to a triple-pressure steam plant. Energy and mass balances are presented as well for a 200-MW(electric) Kalina direct-fired cycle designed for utility purposes.

Kalina, A.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandReactivePowerCharge DemandReactivePowerCharge Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandReactivePowerCharge" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 00b7ccdc-c7e0-40d2-907f-acb6ae828292 + 0.25 + 00e0b930-90c6-43c2-971a-91dade33f76a + 0.32 + 00e2a43f-6844-417a-b459-edf32d33b051 + 0.0092 + 00fb7dca-d0a6-4b11-b7de-791c2fb9f2e1 + 2.7 + 01a64840-7edc-4193-8073-ed5604e098ca + 0.83 + 035f3d22-3650-47cc-a427-bb35170db128 + 0.3 + 042f06f4-6a5b-424f-a31f-8e1c5a838700 + 0.27 + 0479cd85-894d-412b-b2ce-3b96912e9014 + 0.2 + 04bab597-fe1e-4507-8d90-144980aeba73 + 0.3 + 05211bd7-b6d3-425c-9f96-0845b7828c3c + 0.27 + 052fbe23-ac02-4195-b76d-e572cc53f669 + 0.68 + 05490683-8158-4d2f-ad96-66d5e4980890 + 0.25 +

180

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE/EA-1498: Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky (01/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1498 EA-1498 Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky Final Environmental Assessment January 2005 Note: No comments were received during the public comment period from September 25 to October 25, 2004. Therefore, no changes to the Draft Environmental Assessment were necessary. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed Federal action is to provide funding, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF), Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), for the design, construction, and operation of an advanced coal ash beneficiation processing plant at Kentucky Utilities (KU) Ghent Power Station in Carroll County, Kentucky.

182

Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide is designed as a resource for those who want to develop community solar projects, from community organizers or solar energy advocates to government officials or utility managers.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Sacramento Municipal Utility District, 100-MW photovoltaic power plant: draft environmental impact report  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District proposes constructing a 100 MW solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. After a brief description of the proposed facility, including the location and an explanation of the need for it, the project-specific environmental analysis is presented. This addresses: geology/seismicity, soils, biological resources, land use, air quality, water resources, water quality, wastes management, public/occupational health, safety, energy and material resources, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and aesthetics. For each of these areas, the setting is described, impacts analyzed, mitigation measures given where appropriate, and cumulative impacts described. Unavoidable adverse environmental effects, irreversible environmental changes and irretrievable commitments of energy and materials are summarized. Also briefly summarized is the relationship between local short-term use of the environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity. Environmental benefits and disadvantages associated with various alternatives to building and operating the proposed solar photovoltaic power plant are described, considering project objectives other than producing electricity. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Three Human Factors Engineering Training Courses for Utilities Involved in New Nuclear Power Plant Designs, Construction and Operati on  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product provides an assembled package of three Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed human factors engineering (HFE) training courses to support a range of needs. The training materials for these courses were developed for utility personnel involved in new nuclear power plant (NPP) design, construction and operation. The training material is also useful for vendors and other stakeholders. The primary focus of the HFE training courses is the main control room and its human-system interfa...

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

186

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines utility experiences when offering the fixed-price benefits of renewable energy in green pricing programs, including the methods utilized and the impact on program participation. It focuses primarily on utility green pricing programs in states that have not undergone electric industry restructuring.

Bird, L. A.; Cory, K. S.; Swezey, B. G.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

189

$18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations...

190

The ambiguous infrastructural ideal: the urbanisation of water and power and the 'golden age' of utility networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The ambiguous infrastructural ideal: the urbanisation of water and power and the 'golden age' of utility networks Denis Bocquet (CNRS-LATTS) and Fionn Mackillop (LATTS) Abstract Current debates around historically allowed for service universalization and the emergence of a "modern infrastructural ideal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. Volume II. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study extends the Phase I study to also include a hazards evaluation for two new emerging coal power plant technologies: coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed and pressurized fluidized bed power generating systems. The study also considers the sensitivity of the hazards ranking for all the non-nuclear power plants to the effects of population density, mode of plant operation, technical changes, location and environmental (temperature) effects. Information is provided under the following section headings: background; environmental and public health concerns associated with fluidized-bed combustion power plants; description of a conceptual atmospheric fluidized-bed power plant; pressurized fluidized-bed combustion combined cycle (PFBCC) power plant; hazard ranking and risk assessment for non-nuclear power plants; and, hazards sensitivity analysis.

Fell, R.W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Survey of Instrumentation and Control Practices in the Process Industries for Application to the Power Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With impending deregulation and ever-tightening environmental constraints, utilities are increasing their emphasis on maximizing operating efficiency and reducing maintenance and operational costs. It is likely that utilities can use the capabilities of modern control and information management systems more effectively than they currently do. This report documents lessons learned over many years by experts in the process industries that might benefit the utility industry as it transitions to a competitiv...

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOENETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOENETL-311040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an...

194

The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Throughput Optimal Policies for Energy Harvesting Wireless Transmitters with Non-Ideal Circuit Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterizing the fundamental tradeoffs for maximizing energy efficiency (EE) versus spectrum efficiency (SE) is a key problem in wireless communication. In this paper, we address this problem for a point-to-point additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel with the transmitter powered solely via energy harvesting from the environment. In addition, we assume a practical on-off transmitter model with non-ideal circuit power, i.e., when the transmitter is on, its consumed power is the sum of the transmit power and a constant circuit power. Under this setup, we study the optimal transmit power allocation to maximize the average throughput over a finite horizon, subject to the time-varying energy constraint and the non-ideal circuit power consumption. First, we consider the off-line optimization under the assumption that the energy arrival time and amount are a priori known at the transmitter. Although this problem is non-convex due to the non-ideal circuit power, we show an efficient optimal solution that in g...

Xu, Jie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Non-electric utilization of geothermal energy in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information on the geothermal resources of the San Luis Valley, Colorado, has been gathered and reviewed and a preliminary, quantitative assessment of the magnitude and quality of resources present was carried out. Complete process designs were developed for the processes of producing crystal sugar from beets and for malting barley for use in the brewing industry, in each case adapting the processes to use a 302/sup 0/F geothermal water supply as the main process energy source. A parametric design analysis was performed for a major pipeline to be used to ship geothermal water, and thus deliver its heat, out of the San Luis Valley to three major Colorado cities along the eastern threshold of the Rocky Mountains. Cost estimates for capital equipment and energy utilization are presented. The analyses of the two process applications indicate favorable economics for conversion and operation as geothermally-heated plants. A major geothermal water pipeline for this region is seriously limited on achievement of the economy of scale by the physical absence of significant demand for heat energy. Finally, the development and utilization of Colorado's San Luis Valley geothermal groundwaters hold the potential to contribute to the prudent and beneficial management of that area's natural water resources systems.

Vorum, M.; Coury, G.E.; Goering, S.W.; Fritzler, E.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Power Harvesting for Sensors in Electric Power Utility Applications: State of Science Review and Test Bed Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The value of wireless sensor networks in remote locations or at high-voltage applications depends on the networks’ reliable operation for extended period of times without human intervention. Therefore, a major consideration when using wireless sensors is the problem of providing power to the sensors. Presently, wireless sensor nodes are commonly powered by batteries. This situation presents a substantial roadblock to the widespread deployment of wireless sensors due to battery lifetimes and other issues ...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

Documenting Wind Speed and Power Deficits behind a Utility-Scale Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-spatial-and-temporal-resolution radial velocity measurements surrounding a single utility-scale wind turbine were collected using the Texas Tech University Ka-band mobile research radars. The measurements were synthesized to construct the ...

Brian D. Hirth; John L. Schroeder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Studies of solar hybrid repowering of utility electric-power plants (interim report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A baseline repowering configuration used as a reference is defined, and the potential benefits of repowering are outlined from the programmatic, utility, and national viewpoints. The market size for solar repowering is reviewed with the split by plants and their requirements imposed on solar technology and plant design. Various solar technology implementation options are discussed. Highlights of the key results of studies on the economics of integration of solar repowered plants into utility systems are presented. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Dynamic ModelingDynamic Modeling the Electric Power Networkthe Electric Power Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distribution of Electric Power (ELECTRIC UTILITIES) At that time, many businesses (non-utilities) generated of power supplied by efficient, low-cost utility generation, transmission, and distribution was a natural;ElectricElectric PowerPower GenerationGeneration Steam Units: Steam produ

Oro, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Learning Geo-Temporal Non-Stationary Failure and Recovery of Power Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart energy grid is an emerging area for new applications of machine learning in a non-stationary environment. Such a non-stationary environment emerges when large-scale failures occur at power distribution networks due to external disturbances such as hurricanes and severe storms. Power distribution networks lie at the edge of the grid, and are especially vulnerable to external disruptions. Quantifiable approaches are lacking and needed to learn non-stationary behaviors of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. This work studies such non-stationary behaviors in three aspects. First, a novel formulation is derived for an entire life cycle of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. Second, spatial-temporal models of failure and recovery of power distribution are developed as geo-location based multivariate non-stationary GI(t)/G(t)/Infinity queues. Third, the non-stationary spatial-temporal models identify a small number of parameters to be learned. Learning is applied to two ...

Wei, Yun; Galvan, Floyd; Couvillon, Stephen; Orellana, George; Momoh, James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Human Factors Engineering Training Course for Utilities Involved in New Nuclear Power Plant Designs, Construction, and Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides training materials for a three-day course in human factors engineering (HFE). The course was developed for utility personnel involved in new nuclear power plant (NPP) design and is also useful for vendors and other stakeholders. The primary focus of the HFE training is the main control room and its human-system interfaces (HSIs). However, it also addresses other operator work locations such as the remote shutdown station, local control stations, and emergency response facilities. In ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integrated Control of Active and Reactive Power Flow Controllers to Optimize Transmission System Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimized power system control requires oversight of numerous control elements to efficiently and reliably transfer power across the system. The objective of this project was to minimize losses in the Consolidated Edison Electric power system via modification of control variables available to the system operator. These variables include generator voltages, transformer voltage/phase angle tap set points, and switched shunt status. System constraints include bus voltages, branch/interface flow limits, ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

Design and analysis of modern three-phase AC/AC power converters for AC drives and utility interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant advances in modern ac/ac power converter technologies and demands of industries have reached beyond standard ac/ac power converters with voltage-source inverters fed from diode rectifiers. Power electronics converters have been matured to stages toward compact realization, increased high-power handling capability, and improving utility interface. Modern ac/ac power converter topologies with various control strategies have been introduced for the further improvements, such as matrix converters, current-fed converters, PWM rectifiers, and active power filters. In this dissertation, several new converter topologies are proposed in conjunction with developed control schemes based on the modern ac/ac converters which enhance performance and solve the drawbacks of conventional converters. In this study, a new fault-tolerant PWM strategy is first proposed for matrix converters. The added fault-tolerant scheme would strengthen the matrix converter technology for aerospace and military applications. A modulation strategy is developed to reshape output currents for continuous operation, against fault occurrence in matrix converter drives. This study designs a hybrid, high-performance ac/ac power converter for high power applications, based on a high-power load commutated inverter and a mediumpower voltage source inverter. Natural commutation of the load commutated inverter is actively controlled by the voltage source inverter. In addition, the developed hybrid system ensures sinusoidal output current/voltage waveforms and fast dynamic response in high power areas. A new topology and control scheme for a six-step current source inverter is proposed. The proposed topology utilizes a small voltage source inverter, to turn off main thyristor switches, transfer reactive load energy, and limit peak voltages across loads. The proposed topology maximizes benefits of the constituent converters: highpower handling capability of large thyristor-based current source inverters as well as fast and easy control of small voltage source inverters. This study analyzes, compares, and evaluates two topologies for unity power factor and multiple ac/ac power conversions. Theoretical analyses and comparisons of the two topologies, grounded on mathematical approaches, are presented from the standpoint of converter kVA ratings, dc-link voltage requirements, switch ratings, semiconductor losses, and reactive component sizes. Analysis, simulation, and experimental results are detailed for each proposed topology.

Kwak, Sangshin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage performance on the Bonneville Power Administration utility transmission system*  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 30 MJ, 10 MW superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system was devised to interact in the Western U.S. Power System as an alternate means to damp unstable oscillations at 0.35 Hz on the Pacific HVAC Intertie. The SMES unit was installed at the Tacoma Substation of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The operating limits of the 30 MJ SMES unit were established, and different means of controlling real and reactive power were tested. The unit can follow a sinusoidal power demand signal with an amplitude of up to 8.6 MW with the converter working in a 12 pulse mode. When the converter operates in the constant VAR mode, a time varying real power demand signal of up to 5 MW can be met. Experiments showed that the Pacific AC Intertie has current and reactive power variations of the same frequency as the modulating frequency of the SMES device. Endurance tests were run to assess the reliability of the SMES subsystems with a narrow band noise input, which is characteristic of the modulation signal for stabilizer operation. In this mode, the energy of the power spectrum is not concentrated at one frequency to avoid exciting a resonance frequency of the ac transmission system. During the endurance tests, parameters of the ac power system were determined. Accurate power system data are necessary for tuning the control algorithm so that the SMES unit can operate in the closed loop stabilizer mode.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

UMCP-BG and E collaboration in nuclear power engineering in the framework of DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Utility Nuclear Power Engineering Education Matching Grant Program has been established to support the education of students in Nuclear Engineering Programs to maintain a knowledgeable workforce in the United States in order to keep nuclear power as a viable component in a mix of energy sources for the country. The involvement of the utility industry ensures that this grant program satisfies the needs and requirements of local nuclear energy producers and at the same time establishes a strong linkage between education and day-to-day nuclear power generation. As of 1997, seventeen pairs of university-utility partners existed. UMCP was never a member of that group of universities, but applied for the first time with a proposal to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in January 1999 [1]. This proposal was generously granted by BG&E [2,3] in the form of a gift in the amount of $25,000 from BG&E's Corporate Contribution Program. Upon the arrival of a newly appointed Director of Administration in the Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, the BG&E check was deposited into the University's Maryland Foundation Fund. The receipt of the letter and the check enabled UMCP to apply for DOE's matching funds in the same amount by a proposal.

Wolfe, Lothar PhD

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermodynamics of non-local materials: extra fluxes and internal powers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most usual formulation of the Laws of Thermodynamics turns out to be suitable for local or simple materials, while for non-local systems there are two different ways: either modify this usual formulation by introducing suitable extra fluxes or express the Laws of Thermodynamics in terms of internal powers directly, as we propose in this paper. The first choice is subject to the criticism that the vector fluxes must be introduced a posteriori in order to obtain the compatibility with the Laws of Thermodynamics. On the contrary, the formulation in terms of internal powers is more general, because it is a priori defined on the basis of the constitutive equations. Besides it allows to highlight, without ambiguity, the contribution of the internal powers in the variation of the thermodynamic potentials. Finally, in this paper, we consider some examples of non-local materials and derive the proper expressions of their internal powers from the power balance laws.

Mauro Fabrizio; Barbara Lazzari; Roberta Nibbi

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public paper: Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System, dated September 13, 2007. The Grant done a very thorough job of assessing the current and future carbon dioxide footprints of the Northwest

209

Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Synchronization and Transient Stability in Power Networks and Non-Uniform Kuramoto Oscillators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by recent interest for multi-agent systems and smart power grid architectures, we discuss the synchronization problem for the network-reduced model of a power system with non-trivial transfer conductances. Our key insight is to exploit the relationship between the power network model and a first-order model of coupled oscillators. Assuming overdamped generators (possibly due to local excitation controllers), a singular perturbation analysis shows the equivalence between the classic swing equations and a non-uniform Kuramoto model. Here, non-uniform Kuramoto oscillators are characterized by multiple time constants, non-homogeneous coupling, and non-uniform phase shifts. Extending methods from transient stability, synchronization theory, and consensus protocols, we establish sufficient conditions for synchronization of non-uniform Kuramoto oscillators. These conditions reduce to and improve upon previously-available tests for the standard Kuramoto model. Combining our singular perturbation and Kuramoto analyses, we derive concise and purely algebraic conditions that relate synchronization and transient stability of a power network to the underlying system parameters and initial conditions.

Florian Dorfler; Francesco Bullo

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

A non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

Hawsey, R.A.; Scudiere, M.B.

1991-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

A non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor. 4 figs.

Hawsey, R.A.; Scudiere, M.B.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Utility Activities for Nuclear Power Plant Life Cycle Management and License Renewal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to nuclear utilities on steps to take, industry activities undertaken, and products developed for life cycle management and license renewal (LCM/LR) activities. It provides information for establishing LCM/LR programs and may be useful to those underway.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Independent Power Independent Power Producer Financing Co-op Financing Cost of Energy (cents /kWh) 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 Installed Wind Turbine Capacity 2 MW 10 MW 50 MW 50 MW Without Federal incentives (current $) With Federal incentives (current $) WIND ECONOMICS AT A GLANCE Wind power is one of mankind's oldest energy sources. In 1700, the most powerful machines in Europe were Dutch windmills. During the 1930s, half a million windmills pumped water on the Great Plains. Today's wind turbine is a far cry from the old water pumpers. By using state-of-the-art engineering, wind turbine manufacturers have produced sleek, highly efficient machines that produce inexpensive electricity, and lots of it. Depending on their size and location, wind farms can produce electricity for 4-6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

215

Utilizing Load Response for Wind and Solar Integration and Power System Reliability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Responsive load is still the most underutilized reliability resource in North America. This paper examines the characteristics of concern to the power system, the renewables, and to the loads.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of wind turbine and related technology for both onshore and offshore applications and presents the results of an engineering and economic evaluation of the performance and cost of onshore and offshore wind power plants.

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Computer simulation of the operations of utility grid connected photovoltaic power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the commercial viability of photovoltaic power systems it is necessary to have reliable estimates and descriptions of the supply of electricity generated by the solar technology, the demand for that electricity, and the market application. ...

Chester S. Borden

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Test of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell / Uninterruptible Power Supply for Electric Utility Battery Replacement Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sub-scale polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell/capacitor uninterruptible power supply (UPS) was designed and constructed based on previous research. Testing of this sub-scale UPS as a replacement for existing battery systems is documented in this report. The project verified that the PEM fuel cells, coupled with an ultracapacitor, could functionally replace batteries used for emergency power at electric generating stations. Remaining steps to commercialization include continuing market research...

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

The influence of utility - interactive PV system characteristics to AC power network  

SciTech Connect

Two experimental PV systems are constructed and operated. One is a system with a line-commutated inverter and another uses a self-commutated inverter and is operated alone as an independent power source when the power network is in trouble. Operating and generating characteristics have been measured for the line-commutated inverter system and for the self-commutated inverter system connected to the Ac simulated network which simulates the actual power distribution system. For the system voltage fluctuation, amplitude of variation in AC voltage was measured at the joining point of the simulated distribution network connected to the PV system by changing the system short circuit current ration. For the harmonics characteristics, the line-commutated inverter system is a harmonic current power source and the self-commutated inverter system is a harmonic voltage power source. The protective sequence for failures in the power system or PV system is also studied. An optimum protection control method with an emphasis on safety is proposed for the self-commutated inverter system. This paper also describes examples of failures in solar cell arrays during the operation of these PV systems and proposes data for improving the reliability of solar cell arrays.

Takeda, Y.; Kaminosono, H.; Takigawa, K.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electric power annual 1995. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Optimal consumption and investment with bounded downside risk for power utility functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate optimal consumption and investment problems for a Black-Scholes market under uniform restrictions on Value-at-Risk and Expected Shortfall. We formulate various utility maximization problems, which can be solved explicitly. We compare the optimal solutions in form of optimal value, optimal control and optimal wealth to analogous problems under additional uniform risk bounds. Our proofs are partly based on solutions to Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, and we prove a corresponding verification theorem. This work was supported by the European Science Foundation through the AMaMeF programme.

Kluppelberg, Claudia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solar cogeneration: Cimarron River station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site-specific conceptual design progress is described for a solar central receiver cogeneration facility at a Kansas utility. The process is described which led to the selection of the preferred solar cogeneration facility. The status of the conceptual design is presented. The evaluation of system performance is described. A test program is described that is to determine the magnitude of impact that local environmental factors have on collector system performance and to measure the direct normal insolation at the cogeneration facility site. The system specification is appended. (LEW)

Harder, J.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Green Power Network: Top Ten Utility Green Pricing Programs, December 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Green Pricing Program Renewable Energy Sales (as of December 2008) Rank Utility Resources Used Sales (kWh/year) Sales (Avg. MW)a 1 Austin Energy Wind, landfill gas 723,824,901 82.6 2 Portland General Electricb Wind, biomass 681,943,576 77.9 3 PacifiCorpcde Wind, biomass, landfill gas, solar 492,892,222 56.3 4 Xcel Energyef Wind 362,040,082 41.3 5 Sacramento Municipal Utility Districte Wind, solar, biomass, landfill gas, hydro 325,275,628 37.1 6 Puget Sound Energye Wind, solar, biomass, landfill gas, hydro 291,166,600 33.2 7 Public Service Company of New Mexico Wind 176,497,697 20.1 8 We Energiese Wind, landfill gas, solar 176,242,630 20.1 9 National Gridgh Biomass, wind, small hydro, solar 174,612,444 19.9 10 PECOi Wind 172,782,490 19.7

224

High geothermal energy utilization geothermal/fossil hybrid power cycle: a preliminary investigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combining geothermal and fossil fuel energy into the so-called hybrid cycle is compared with a state-of-the-art double-flash geothermal power cycle using resources which vary from 429/sup 0/K (312/sup 0/F) to 588/sup 0/K (598/sup 0/F). It is demonstrated that a hybrid plant can compete thermodynamically with the combined output from both a fossil-fired and a geothermal plant operating separately. Economic comparison of the hybrid and double-flash cycles is outlined, and results are presented that indicate the performance of marginal hydrothermal resources may be improved enough to compete with existing power cycles on a cost basis. It is also concluded that on a site-specific basis a hybrid cycle is capable of complementing double-flash cycles at large-capacity resources, and can operate in a cycling load mode at constant geothermal fluid flow rate.

Grijalva, R. L.; Sanemitsu, S. K.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

European legislation in the United Kingdom: a threat to coal-fired power station product utilization?  

SciTech Connect

The author considers that the European Union has not taken the approach adopted in the USA where environmental regulators are keen to promote the use of coal-fired power station ash by-product and recycled materials. The United Kingdom has seen, with some dismay, the effects EU legislation is having on the ash industry. This article outlines only some of the problems being tackled. The Waste Framework Directive is difficult to interpret and fails to define critical aspects of the problem. This directive is discussed at some length in the article. A total of nine directives effect the operation of coal-fired power plant. Many are imprecise and open to interpretation and cause a deal of frustration, delays and confusion to the ash supplier and contractor. This is causing markets to suffer.

Sear, K.A. [Quality Ash Association (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Enloe power development feasibility assessment report. Public utility district No. 1 of Okanogan County  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of rehabilitating an existing power house at the Enloe Dam in Washington was evaluated with consideration of expected power production, social and environmental impacts, regulatory aspects, technical requirements, financing, costs, and market potential. This assessment showed that rebuilding the existing powerhouse and appurtenant facilities is technically feasible. Rebuilding the existing turbines and generators proved to be the most desirable of three alternatives considered. The following four factors lead to this conclusion: rebuilding the old equipment is less costly than installing new turbines and generators; no major structural changes to the powerhouse would be required; rebuilding the turbines with increased flow capacity made the rebuilding alternative competitive with new equipment from an energy production standpoint; and rebuilding is compatible with the Enloe site's recent addition to the National Register of Historic Places.

None

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Re-Examining first principles of regulation: NRG power marketing, LLC v. Maine public utilities Commission  

SciTech Connect

Maine PUC and Morgan Stanley have resolved some of the key issues facing the energy industry. The Supreme Court has plainly and directly in both cases reaffirmed the central role that private contracts play in the energy industry and set terms to balance the need to secure long-term investment with the public interest that lies at the heart of the Federal Power Act. (author)

Haskell, Mark R.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Investigation of a family of power conditioners integrated into a utility grid: final report Category I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted of the requirements for and technologies applicable to power conditioning equipment in residential solar photovoltaic systems. A survey of companies known or thought to manufacture power conditioning equipment was conducted to asses the technology. Technical issues regarding ac and dc interface requirements were studied. A baseline design was selected to be a good example of existing technology which would not need significant development effort for its implementation. Alternative technologies are evaluated to determine which meet the baseline specification, and their costs and losses are evaluated. Areas in which cost improvements can be obtained are studied, and the three best candidate technologies--the current-sourced converter, the HF front end converter, and the programmed wave converter--are compared. It is concluded that the designs investigated will meet, or with slight improvement could meet, short term efficiency goals. Long term efficiency goals could be met if an isolation transformer were not required in the power conditioning equipment. None of the technologies studied can meet cost goals unless further improvements are possible. (LEW)

Wood, P.; Putkovich, R.P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

{open_quotes}Secure Bus{close_quotes} disturbance-free power at the utility substation level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 18 months Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), El Camino Real Engineering, Inc. (CRE), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have worked on the development of disturbance-free power at the medium voltage substation level. The work resulted in the Secure Bus concept, a system in which a medium voltage bus in a substation is immune to power outages and voltage sags on the utility source. The Secure Bus voltage is also immune to voltage sags resulting from faults on any distribution feeder connected to the bus. The Secure Bus concept originated from work conducted to improve power quality for large high-tech manufacturing facilities, in particular for large semiconductor manufacturing plants. For the demands on quality power of a modern facility conventional equipment is not adequate for protecting the end user. For example, the operation of conventional vacuum breakers during short circuit conditions on a feeder circuit, requiring 3 to 5 cycles for breaker opening, does not allow for fast enough current interruption to avoid a voltage dip on the main bus. A sever voltage sag could result in a shut down of sensitive equipment being supplied by the other feeder circuits, which are connected to the main bus. The circumvent the problem, a fast breaker was introduced which interrupts the short circuit before the current causes a significant voltage disturbance. To make the bus immune also to power disturbances caused by power outages, energy storage is introduced to provide the necessary energy back-up in case the primary source is not available.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jones, W.H. [El Camino Real Engineering, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electric utility system planning studies for OTEC power integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Florida Power Corporation (FPC) conducted an evaluation of the possible integration of OTEC into the FPC system. Existing system planning procedures, assumptions, and corporate financial criteria for planning new generating capacity were used without modification. A baseline configuration for an OTEC plant was developed for review with standard planning procedures. The OTEC plant characteristics and costs were incorporated in considerable detail. These basic inputs were examined using the FPC system planning methods. It was found that with the initial set of conditions, OTEC would not be economically viable. Using the same system planning procedures, a number of adjustments were made to the key study assumptions. It was found that two considerations dominate the analysis; the assumed rate of fuel cost escalation, and the projected capital cost of the OTEC plant. The analysis produced a parametric curve: on one hand, if fuel costs were to escalate at a rate greater than assumed (12% vs the assumed 5% for coal), and if no change were made to the OTEC input assumptions, the basic economic competitive criteria would be equivalent to the principal alternative, coal fueled plants. Conversely, if the projected cost of the OTEC plant were to be reduced from the assumed $2256/kW to $1450/kW, the economic competitiveness criterion would be satisfied. After corporate financial analysis, it was found that even if the cost competitive criterion were to be reached, the plan including OTEC could not be financed by Florida Power Corporation. Since, under the existing set of conditions for financing new plant capital requirements, FPC could not construct an OTEC plant, some other means of ownership would be necessary to integrate OTEC into the FPC system. An alternative such as a third party owning the plant and selling power to FPC, might prove attractive. (WHK)

None

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Analysis of an improved solar-powered cooling system utilizing open-cycle absorbent regeneration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar-powered cooling system which promises high system C.O.P.'s and low collector costs is analyzed. It consists of a desiccant and an absorption cooling system operating in series to both dry and cool the air. A common solution of lithium chloride is used as the absorbant. The lithium chloride solution is regenerated by evaporating the excess water to the atmosphere in an ''open'' collector. This collector consists merely of a blackened flat surface. The weak solution of lithium chloride is introduced at the top of the collector and then flows by gravity over the entire collector surface where it is subsequently heated and dried. The daily performance of this combined system is compared by computer simulation to that of either an absorption or desiccant system alone using actual weather data for five typical U.S. cities. The performance improvement of the combined system ranged from 25% to 95%, the greatest improvement being for humid, windy conditions.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An assessment of the use of direct contact condensers with wet cooling systems for utility steam power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential use of a direct contact condenser for steam recovery at the turbine exhaust of a utility power plant using a wet cooling system is investigated. To maintain condensate separate from the cooling water, a bank of plate heat exchangers is used. In a case study for a nominal 130-MW steam power plant, two heat rejection systems, one using a conventional surface condenser and another using a direct contact condenser together with a set of plate heat exchangers are compared on the basis of their performance, operation and maintenance, and system economics. Despite a higher initial cost for the direct contact system, the advantages it offers suggests that this system is viable both technically and economically. Key to the improvements the direct contact system offers is a higher equivalent availability for the power system. Reduction of dissolved oxygen and other metallic ions in the condensate, reduced use of chemical scavengers and polishers, and potential elimination of a plant floor are also major benefits of this system. Drawbacks include added plant components and higher initial cost. The potential for long-term cost reduction for the direct contact system is also identified.

Bharathan, D.; Hoo, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); D`Errico, P. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Non-Traditional Water Use of Non-Traditional Water for Power Plant Applications: An Overview of DOE/NETL R&D Efforts November 1, 2009 DOE/NETL-311/040609 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

235

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman, D.; Simpkins, T.; Argo, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

SciTech Connect

Large blackouts, such as the August 14-15, 2003 blackout in the northeasternUnited States and Canada, focus attention on the importance of reliable electric service. As public and private efforts are undertaken to improve reliability and prevent power interruptions, it is appropriate to assess their effectiveness. Measures of reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities to state public utility commissions for many years. This study examines current state and utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based primarily on reliability information for 2006 reported by 123 utilities to 37 state public utility commissions.

LaCommare, Kristina H.; Eto, Joseph H.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

City of Celina, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Celina, Ohio (Utility Company) Celina, Ohio (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Celina City of Place Ohio Utility Id 3216 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Light and Power (Rural Demand) Commercial Commercial Light and Power (Rural Non-Demand) Commercial Commercial Light and Power (Urban Demand) Commercial Commercial Light and Power (Urban Non-Demand) Commercial Contract Power Service (Primary) (Rural Demand) Commercial Contract Power Service (Primary) (Urban Demand) Commercial

242

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

244

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

246

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants: phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric generating stations can impose on and expose the general public and environment to adverse demands and emissions that may be considered detrimental or degrading. For example, a conventional coal fired plant demands coal as its fuel which, in turn, creates a demand for coal mining and coal transportation systems that may degrade the environment. In addition, the emissions from the coal plant (sulfur dioxide, ash, and other waste products), if not managed and controlled properly, might lead to a diminution in public health. These environmental and public hazards have been qualitatively ranked for a modern conventional coal fired power plant in the Phase I study report dated January 1978. This Phase II study extends the Phase I study to also include a hazards evaluation for two new emerging coal power plant technologies: coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) and pressurized fluidized bed combined-cycle (PFBCC) power generating systems, and considers the sensitivity of the hazards ranking for all the non-nuclear, i.e. coal-fired, oil-fired, and geothermal, power plants to the effects of population density, mode of plant operation, technical changes, location and environmental (temperature) effects.

Fell, R.W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

City of Quitman, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

profile. Create one now This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Rates- Commercial Power Non-Demand...

248

New Prague Utilities Commission- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally-owned member utilities...

249

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally-owned member utilities...

250

Waseca Utilities- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally-owned member utilities...

251

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP while demonstrating the ICCT CT-121 FGD Project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is performing comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions from eight selected coal-fired electric utility units. This program responds to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utility power plants for Potential health risks. The resulting data will be furnished to EPA utility power plants and health risk determinations. The assessment of emissions involves the collection and analysis of samples from the major input, process, and output streams of each of the eight power plants for selected hazardous Pollutants identified in Title III of the Clean Air Act. Additional goals are to determine the removal efficiencies of pollution control subsystems for these selected pollutants and the Concentrations associated with the particulate fraction of the flue gas stream as a function of particle size. Material balances are being performed for selected pollutants around the entire power plant and several subsystems to identify the fate of hazardous substances in each utility system. Radian Corporation was selected to perform a toxics assessment at a plant demonstrating an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project. The site selected is Plant Yates Unit No. 1 of Georgia Power Company, which includes a Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 demonstration project.

Not Available

1994-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Optimization of non-condensable gas removal system in geothermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of non-condensable gas (hereinafter called N.C.G.) removal system in geothermal power station, in a special case that the geothermal steam contains large amount of noncondensable gas, is discussed. Four different alternative N.C.G. removal systems are studied, which are steam jet gas ejectors, centrifugal gas compressors, combined systems of steam ejectors and centrifugal compressors and back pressure turbine-without N.C.G. removal system. This report summarizes the results and gives recommendations as to the most suitable gas removal system and also as to optimum condenser pressure, in cases of large quantity N.C.G. content in geothermal steam.

Tajima, S.; Nomura, M.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

McGregor, Douglas S. (Riley, KS); Shultis, John K. (Manhattan, KS); Rice, Blake B. (Manhattan, KS); McNeil, Walter J. (Winnfield, KS); Solomon, Clell J. (Wichita, KS); Patterson, Eric L. (Manhattan, KS); Bellinger, Steven L. (Manhattan, KS)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Method and apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid in a binary power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for removing non-condensible gas from a working fluid utilized in a thermodynamic system comprises a membrane having an upstream side operatively connected to the thermodynamic system so that the upstream side of the membrane receives a portion of the working fluid. The first membrane separates the non-condensible gas from the working fluid. A pump operatively associated with the membrane causes the portion of the working fluid to contact the membrane and to be returned to the thermodynamic system.

Mohr, Charles M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mines, Gregory L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bloomfield, K. Kit (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Case Studies of Potential Facility-Scale and Utility-Scale Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Projects across Reclamation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an assessment and analysis of renewable energy opportunities conducted for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Tasks included assessing the suitability for wind and solar on both a utility and facility scale.

Haase, S.; Burman, K.; Dahle, D.; Heimiller, D.; Jimenez, A.; Melius, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; VanGeet, O.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the distortion on the electrical distribution system for a high voltage DC Integrated Power System (IPS). The analysis was concentrated on the power supplied to a propulsion motor driven by an ...

Fallier, William F. (William Frederick)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparing the costs of renewable energy across ownershipof low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy productionCost Recovery System Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Department of Energy has opted to utilize the following agreement for Designated Non-Proprietary User Facilities transactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Proprietary User Non-Proprietary User Facilities transactions. Because these transactions are widespread across Departmental facilities, uniformity in agreement terms is desirable. Except for the *** provisions, minor modifications to the terms of this agreement may be made by CONTRACTOR, but any changes to the *** provisions or substantive changes to the non *** provisons will require approval by the DOE Contracting Officer, WHICH WILL LIKELY DELAY YOUR ACCESS TO THE USER FACILITY. In instances where DOE Contracting Officer approval for substantive changes cannot be obtained, Work for Others (WFOs) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) may be more appropriate due to the increased flexibility such agreements afford. Where this agreement is to be used as an umbrella agreement for multiple transactions it may be modified to reflect such

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

City of Adel, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Adel, Georgia (Utility Company) Adel, Georgia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Adel Place Georgia Utility Id 123 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC ERCOT Yes NERC SERC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Extra Large power Service Industrial General Service Non-Demand Commercial Large Power Service- Commercial Commercial Large Power Service- Industrial Industrial Medium Power Service- Commercial Commercial Medium Power Service- Industrial Industrial

262

Human Factors Engineering for Managers: Computer-Based Training for Utilities Involved in New Nuclear Power Plant Designs, Construct ion and Operation - 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product provides a computer-based training (CBT) course in human factors engineering (HFE) for managers. The training materials for this course were developed to provide a foundation in HFE for managers at utilities involved in new nuclear power plants (NPPs). This course will help managers who may be expected to manage the interactions with the vendor and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) during new plant design certification, detailed design and implementation, and development of procedur...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Methods of Using Existing Wire Lines (power lines, phone lines, internet lines) for Totally Secure Classical Communication Utilizing Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We outline some general solutions to use already existing and currently used wire lines, such as power lines, phone lines, internet lines, etc, for the unconditionally secure communication method based on Kirchoff's Law and Johnson-like Noise (KLJN). Two different methods are shown. One is based on filters used at single wires and the other one utilizes a common mode voltage superimposed on a three-phase powerline.

Laszlo B. Kish

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rooftop Solar Challenge NEUP Award Recipients NEUP Award Recipients 2011 Grants for Offshore Wind Power 2011 Grants for Offshore Wind Power 2011 Grants for Advanced...

265

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the European Wind Energy Conference held February 27--March 2, 2006, in Athens, Greece, showing grid impacts of wind power variability.

Parsons, B.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Executive Director for Operations UPDATE OF ISSUES RELATED TO NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR FINANCIAL QUALIFICATIONS IN RESPONSE TO RESTRUCTURING OF THE ELECTRIC UTILITY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide the Commission with an update of electric utility deregulation and restructuring issues regarding the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their facilities safely. BACKGROUND: On October 24, 1997, the staff sent to the Commission SECY-97-253, "Policy Options for Nuclear Power Reactor Financial Qualifications in Response to Restructuring of the Electric Utility Industry. " In that paper, the staff discussed three options for the Commission's consideration regarding possible approaches that the NRC could use in assessing the financial qualifications of power reactor licensees to operate their plants safely. (The impact of deregulation and restructuring on decommissioning funding assurance is being addressed in a separate rulemaking, which was published in the Federal Register on September 10, 1997. A final rule is scheduled to be sent to the Commission by June 30, 1998.) In response to SECY-97-253, the Commission issued a staff requirements memorandum on January 15, 1998, and directed the staff to maintain the existing financial qualifications framework as discussed in Option 2 of SECY-97-253 and to "develop a coherent, efficient plan that would allow timely confirmation of the status of licensees (i.e., whether they meet the definition of 'electric utility')as deregulation actions are finalized by States. " In response, on April 16, 1998, the

L. Joseph Callan /s; Robert S. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Non-Thermal X-ray Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical study of the non-thermal X-ray emission of 27 young rotation powered pulsars (RPPs) and 24 pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by using the Chandra and the XMM-Newton observations, which with the high spatial resolutions enable us to spatially resolve pulsars from their surrounding PWNe. We obtain the X-ray luminosities and spectra separately for RPPs and PWNe, and then investigate their distribution and relation to each other as well as the relation with the pulsar rotational parameters. In the pair-correlation analysis we find that: (1) the X-ray (2-10 keV) luminosities of both pulsar and PWN (L_{psr} and L_{pwn}) display a strong correlation with pulsar spin down power Edot and characteristic age, and the scalings resulting from a simple linear fit to the data are L_{psr} \\propto Edot^{0.92 \\pm 0.04} and L_{pwn} \\propto Edot^{1.45 \\pm 0.08} (68% confidence level), respectively, however, both the fits are not statistically acceptable; (2) L_{psr} also shows a possible weak correlation with pulsar period P and period derivative Pdot, whereas L_{pwn} manifests a similar weak correlation with Pdot only; (3) The PWN photon index Gamma_{pwn} is positively correlated with L_{pwn} and L_{pwn}/Edot. We also found that the PWN X-ray luminosity is typically 1 to 10 times larger than that from the underlying pulsar, and the PWN photon indices span a range of ~1.5 to ~2. The statistic study of PWN spectral properties supports the particle wind model in which the X-ray emitting electrons are accelerated by the termination shock of the wind.

Xiang-Hua Li; Fang-Jun Lu; Zhuo Li

2007-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

269

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Delaware...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Chesapeake Utilities Information for Businesses Delmarva Power...

270

Making Biopower Work for Utilities: A Rationale for Near-Term Investment in Integrated Biomass Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the feasibility studies of six very different integrated biomass power systems suggests potentially large future payoffs from near-term R&D. At this time, when biomass crops are more expensive than fossil fuels, it is the corollary benefits or coproducts associated with biomass power production that make the economics of a system work.

1996-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

• Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. Phase I and Phase II. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed in the first step of an evaluation of the public health and safety hazards associated with non-nuclear plants is reported. This study was limited to hazards which could affect the general public outside the plant boundaries. Public health and safety hazards were identified for seven types of power plants: coal-fired conventional boiler, atmospheric fluidized bed boiler, pressurized fluidized bed-combined cycle, oil-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. Major plant systems effecting the hazards were identified and are described. Potentially hazardous conditions and events were identified for normal and abnormal plant operating conditions and for accidents at the plant. A classification of each hazard was made which identifies the initiating event, the hazard source, equipment or conditions that increase, monitor or mitigate the hazard. An event tree was developed for each plant which relates the effect on the general public for each hazard and initiating event. A semi-quantitative hazard ranking was developed that provides a method of comparing the hazards and events at different types of plants. Consideration was given to the sensitivity of the hazard ranking to population density, changes in operating mode and technology changes.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

On Expressive Powers of Timed Logics: Comparing Boundedness, Non-punctuality and Deterministic Freezing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timed temporal logics exhibit a bewildering diversity of operators and the resulting decidability and expressiveness properties also vary considerably. We study the expressive powers of timed logics TPTL[U,S] and MTL[U,S] as well as their several fragments. Extending the LTL EF games of Etessami and Wilke, we define MTL Ehrenfeucht-Fraisse games on a pair of timed words. Using the associated EF theorem we show that, expressively, the timed logics BoundedMTL[U,S], MTL[F,P] and MITL[U,S] (respectively incorporating the restrictions of boundedness, unary modalities and non-punctuality), are all pairwise incomparable. Going to more expressive logics, we show that MTL[U,S] is expressively incomparable with the unary freeze logic TPTL[F,P] extending the result of Bouyer et al. Finally, we consider the deterministic freeze logic TTL[X,Y], which is expressively equivalent to partially ordered 2-way deterministic timed automata (po2DTA). As our second main result, we show by explicit reductions that TTL[X,Y] lies stri...

Pandya, Paritosh K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Town of Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Kingsford Heights Place Indiana Utility Id 10330 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Churches, Schools, Commercial and Small Power Service Commercial General Power Service Rate C- Demand Metered Commercial General Power Service Rate C- Non Demand Metered Commercial General Service Rate M- Demand Metered Commercial General Service Rate M- Non Demand Metered Commercial

275

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Three-phase power conversion system for utility-interconnected PV applications. Phase 1 technical progress report, 1 October 1995--17 April 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Omnion Power Corporation under Phase 1 of a two-phase subcontract. During this phase, Omnion researchers: designed an advanced product specification to guide prototype design and development; analyzed field failure data with Omnion`s hard-switched insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor technology hardware to better understand where design improvements were needed; presented and reviewed product specifications with key customers/users; drafted a working product specification to serve as a baseline in developing the new power conversion system; developed the core-resonant converter technology in conjunction with Soft Switching Technologies Corp.; designed a 100-kW prototype power conversion system; designed a prototype system package; initiated interaction with vendors to optimize component selection and specifications; initiated the preparation of design documentation; built the prototype core-resonant converter and initiated preliminary testing; and initiated the assembly of a 1-kW prototype power conversion system. This work has demonstrated the potential of the soft-switching resonant DC link (RDCL) inverter and its application to a three-phase utility-interconnected PV power conversion system. The RDCL inverter has demonstrated its advantage over hard-switching pulse-width modulated inverters in terms of efficiency and audible noise. With proper package design and manufacturing process design and implementation, the RDCL power conversion system has the potential to be low-cost and reliable with superior performance.

Porter, D.G.; Meyer, H.; Leang, W. [Omnion Power Engineering Corp., East Troy, WI (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders 2012 Green Utility Leaders Ranking the Top...

278

Non-destructive evaluation means and method of flaw reconstruction utilizing an ultrasonic multi-viewing transducer data acquistion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-viewing ultrasound transducer acquisition system for non-destructive evaluation, flaw detection and flaw reconstruction in materials. A multiple transducer assembly includes a central transducer surrounded by a plurality of perimeter transducers, each perimeter transducer having an axis of transmission which can be angularly oriented with respect to the axis of transmission of the central transducer to intersect the axis of transmission of the central transducer. A control apparatus automatically and remotely positions the transducer assembly with respect to the material by a positioning apparatus and adjusts the pe GRANT REFERENCE This invention was conceived and reduced to practice at least in part under a grant from the Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7407-ENG-82.

Thompson, Donald O. (Ames, IA); Wormley, Samuel J. (Ames, IA)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Final Summary Report: Em-Powering Coastal States and Utilities through Model Offshore Wind Legislation and Outreach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final summary report summarizes the most significant findings from three project reports detailing: feed-in tariffs, model request for proposals for new generation, and model state offshore wind power legislation.

Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration at Industrial Customer Sites: Industrial and Utility Harmonic Mitigation Guideline s and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However the restructuring of the electric power industry shakes out, the commercial/industrial customer's need for quality power will increase; and customer service will remain a key to retaining current accounts and attracting new customers. The need for demonstrating new harmonics mitigation technologies will thus be an important factor for the wire side of the business as well as for energy service companies. This report provides guidelines for implementing harmonics mitigation demonstration projects ...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Non-pulp utilization of above-ground biomass of mixed-species forests of small trees  

SciTech Connect

This solution proposes to rehabilitate annually - by clear felling, site preparation, and planting - 25,000 acres of level to rolling land averaging about 490 cubic feet per acre of stemwood in small hardwood trees 5 inches in diameter at breast height (dbh) and larger, and of many species, plus an equal volume of above-ground biomass in stembark and tops, and in trees smaller than 5 inches in dbh. By usual utilization procedures, such wood is an unmerchantable residue from the harvest of merchantable southern pines. On an annual basis, 398,265 tons (oven-dry basis) of such wood and bark will be harvested and converted in an energy self-sufficient plant to the following: 208,688 tons of structural flakeboard sheathing and decking (sold at $200/ton), 16,298 tons of decorative hardwood plywood ($400/ton), and 20.191 tons of long fabricated joists with parallel-laminated veneer flanges and flakeboard webs ($600/ton), for a total product yield of about 60% - all on a dry-weight basis. Following are projected operating results and other essential data for a three-shift operation: capital investment, including working capital, $50,000,000; operating costs, annual, $40,000,000; sales, annual, $60,371,400; net profit, annual (before income taxes) $20,371,400; return on sales 33.7%; return on investment 40.7%; number of mill employees (harvesting and planting are contracted 250; electrical energy purchased annually 0 kWh; diesel fuel and propane for front-end loaders and lift trucks (oil equivalent) 150,000 gallons; wood residues burned annually (oven-dry-weight basis), all available from mill residues. (Refs. 16).

Koch, P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Utilizing the connected power electronic converter for improved condition monitoring of induction motors and claw-pole generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation proposes several simple, robust, and non-intrusive condition monitoring methods for induction motors fed by closed-loop inverters and claw-pole generators with built-in rectifiers. While… (more)

Cheng, Siwei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Utility Wind Interest Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Interest Group Wind Interest Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Utility Wind Interest Group Place Reston, Virginia Zip VI 20195 Sector Wind energy Product The Utility Wind Interest Group (UWIG) is a non-profit corporation whose mission is to accelerate the appropriate integration of wind power into the electric system. References Utility Wind Interest Group[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Wind Interest Group is a company located in Reston, Virginia . References ↑ "Utility Wind Interest Group" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Utility_Wind_Interest_Group&oldid=352690" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

284

Gainesville Regional Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gainesville Regional Utilities Gainesville Regional Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Gainesville Regional Utilities Place Florida Utility Id 6909 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric - Regular Service Residential Electric - Time-of-Use Service Residential General Service Demand Industrial General Service Non-Demand Commercial Large Power Service Industrial Average Rates

285

Electric load information system based on non-intrusive power monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Obtaining high quality information economically and reliably is always a difficult objective to achieve. The electric power industry and consumers recently face many challenges, such as deregulation, autonomous power systems ...

Lee, Kwangduk Douglas, 1970-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development utilizing advanced, high-performance heat transfer techniques. Volume 1. Conceptual design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant. In turn, this Demonstration Plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an ocean thermal power plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the Demonstration Plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibility studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report describes the full-size power system module, and summarizes the design parameters and associated costs for the Demonstration Plant module (prototype) and projects costs for commercial plants in production. The material presented is directed primarily toward the surface platform/ship basic reference hull designated for use during conceptual design; however, other containment vessels were considered during the design effort so that the optimum power system would not be unduly influenced or restricted. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

City of Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) Thomaston, Georgia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Thomaston Place Georgia Utility Id 18847 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial Service Industrial Large Power Commercial Medium Power Rate Commercial Off-Peak Billing Demand Rider Residential Power Residential School Electric Service Commercial Small General Service Non-Demand Commercial Small-Power Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0840/kWh

288

The political effectiveness of non-state violence : paradox, polarity, and the pursuit of power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When is non-state violence politically effective? Existing scholarship suggests that insurgency and terrorism are generally effective or ineffective based on the analysis of unitary non-state coercers operating solely at ...

Krause, Peter John Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Combined cycle and waste heat recovery power systems based on a novel thermodynamic energy cycle utilizing low-temperature heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A new thermodynamic energy cycle has been developed, using a multicomponent working agent. Condensation is supplemented with absorption, following expansion in the turbine. Several combined power systems based on this cycle have been designed and cost-estimated. Efficiencies of these new systems are 1.35 to 1.5 times higher than the best Rankine Cycle system, at the same border conditions. Investment cost per unit of power output is about two-thirds of the cost of a comparable Rankine Cycle system. Results make cogeneration economically attractive at current energy prices. The first experimental installation is planned by Fayette Manufacturing Company and Detroit Diesel Allison Division of General Motors.

Kalina, A.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Village of Arcadia, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio (Utility Company) Ohio (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Arcadia Place Ohio Utility Id 282 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Lighting Service Rate(150 Watt HPS) Commercial Rate Code 1(Non-Residential Service Schedule)-Single Phase Commercial Rate Code 2 (Non-Residential Service Schedule)-Three Phase Commercial Rate Code 3 (Non-Residential Service Schedule) Commercial Rate Code 4 (Non-Residential Service Schedule) Commercial Rate Code 5 (Large Power Rate (LP)) Commercial

291

NON  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NON-ENERGY BENEFITS OF ADVANCED WINDOWS NON-ENERGY BENEFITS OF ADVANCED WINDOWS Objectives: The project aims to discover and quantify the correlations between advanced windows and human comfort. This project builds on comfort research and applies it to fenestration products. When properly selected and operated, high-performance windows reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Individual designers and consumers, who are not easily persuaded that operational energy savings justify a capital cost premium, would probably respond well if improved comfort were recognized and quantified. High-performance glazing systems also provide improved protection for interior furnishings against fading damage caused by ultraviolet and short-wave visible light. This project builds on ongoing LBNL research on glazing properties to provide technical information to window specifiers regarding fading protection and advanced windows.

292

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are initiating business plans that enable them to play a more integral role in the solar power value chain. This report summarizes research completed to identify and track utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. EPRI and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort to evaluate the expanding range of utility activities in acquiring solar energy, including photovoltaic (PV) asset ownership. Throughout 2011, USBMs have been ca...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Utility green pricing programs: A statistical analysis of program effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Size Participation Rate (%) Utility Size (# customers) Non-Size Participation Rate (%) Utility Size (# customers)non-residential participation rates in utility green pricing

Wiser, Ryan; Olson, Scott; Bird, Lori; Swezey, Blair

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Technology R&D Needs for Integrating High Penetrations of Variable Utility-Scale Renewable Power Sources into the Electric Power Inf rastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the North American electric energy resource portfolio continues to evolve, integrating large-scale renewable resources into the electric power infrastructure presents significant challenges. This is particularly true of variable renewable resources, such as wind and solar, which represent two of the most rapidly growing renewable resources being deployed. The root of this challenge lies in the inherent variability of wind and solar resources, which differentiates these from other renewable resource...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Maine ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maine Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Central Maine Power...

299

Abstract--This paper addresses a problem in state estimators for power systems. The issue of non-collocated measurements is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformer (CT) and the potential trans- former (PT) of a power measurement instrument is separated1 Abstract-- This paper addresses a problem in state estimators for power systems. The issue of non to active and reactive power which are transmitted to the state estimator. If the voltage and current

300

An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

John Rodgers; James Castle

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A retrofit 60 Hz current sensor for non-intrusive power monitoring at the circuit breaker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new sensor for power monitoring that measures current flow in a circuit breaker without permanent modification of the breaker panel or the circuit breaker itself. The sensor consists of three parts: an inductive ...

Clifford, Zachary

302

A retrot current sensor for non-intrusive power monitoring at the circuit breaker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new sensor for power monitoring that measures current flow in a circuit breaker without permanent modification of the breaker panel or the circuit breaker itself. At the breaker panel, an inductive ...

Vickery, Daniel Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Circuit Card Life-Cycle Management Good Practices from Non-Nuclear Power Industries in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circuit cards of instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in nuclear power plants are designed to be used for several decades and are subject to aging and external factors that alter their electrical characteristics. Aging can result in numerous failures or lead to a drift of a component’s electrical properties with critical consequences that depend on the system. The risk of failure increases with aging. Described here are the results of a benchmarking effort performed with different nonnuclear power i...

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Power Management Solutions Based on Isolated and Non-Isolated Configurations of MMCCC Converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the various configurations of a multilevel modular capacitor-clamped converter (MMCCC), and it reveals many useful and new formations of the original MMCCC for transferring power in either an isolated or nonisolated manner. The various features of the original MMCCC circuit are best suited for a multibus system in future plug-in hybrid or fuel-cell-powered vehicles' drive train. The original MMCCC is capable of bidirectional power transfer using multilevel modular structure with capacitor-clamped topology. It has a nonisolated structure, and it offers very high efficiency even at partial loads. This circuit was modified to integrate single or multiple high-frequency transformers by using the intermediate voltage nodes of the converter. On the other hand, a special formation of the MMCCC can exhibit dc outputs offering limited isolation without using any isolation transformer. This modified version can produce a high conversion ratio from a limited number of components and has several useful applications in providing power to multiple low-voltage loads in a hybrid or electric automobile. This paper will investigate the origin of generating ac outputs from the MMCCC and shows how the transformer-free version can be modified to create limited isolation from the circuit. In addition, this paper will compare various modified forms of the MMCCC topology with existing dc-dc converter circuits from compactness and component utilization perspectives.

Khan, Faisal H [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Webb, William E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Maltodextrin-powered enzymatic fuel cell through a non-natural enzymatic pathway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER POWER 14400 P-authorquery-v9 AUTHOR QUERY FORM Journal: POWER Please e-mail or fax your responses and any corrections to: E-mail: corrections.esil@elsevier.thomsondigital.com Article Number: 14400 Fax: +353 6170 9272 Dear Author, Please check your proof carefully and mark all corrections at the appropriate place in the proof (e.g., by using on-screen annotation in the PDF file) or compile them in a separate list. To ensure fast publication of your paper please return your corrections within 48 hours. For correction or revision of any artwork, please consult http://www.elsevier.com/artworkinstructions. Any queries or remarks that have arisen during the processing of your manuscript are listed below and highlighted by flags in the proof. Click on the 'Q' link to go to the location in the proof. Location in Query / Remark: click on the Q link to go article Please insert your reply

307

Analysis of mass transfer processes in geothermal power cycles utilizing direct contact heat exchange. Report of work, September 21, 1978 to September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program was developed which calculates the isobutane content of the spent brine and the liquid-vapor distribution of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide throughout the components of a geothermal power plant using direct contact heat exchange. The program model assumes separate boiler and preheater vessels, with the preheater being a spray tower. The condenser model is a horizontal tube surface condenser with condensation on the outside. The program was written in Fortran language. The Fortran source deck consists of 976 cards. The program utilizes 320K for compilation and 72K for execution on an IBM 370/3031. Sample cases were run which illustrate the effects of salt concentration in the brine and isobutane-to-brine ratio on isobutane and noncondensible gas content of the spent brine.

Knight, J.J.; Perona, J.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Development of turbine driven centrifugal compressors for non-condensible gas removal at geothermal power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Initial field tests have been completed for a Non-Condensible Gas (NCG) turbocompressor for geothermal power plants. It provides alternate technology to steam-jet ejectors and liquid-ring vacuum pumps that are currently used for NCG removal. It incorporates a number of innovative design features to enhance reliability, reduce steam consumption and reduce O&M costs. During initial field tests, the turbocompressor has been on-line for more than 4500 hours as a third stage compressor at The Geysers Unit 11 Power Plant. Test data indicates its overall efficiency is about 25% higher than a liquid-ring vacuum pump, and 250% higher than a steam-jet ejector when operating with compressor inlet pressures of 12.2 in-Hga and flow rates over 20,000 lbm/hr.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity from WMAP7 and luminous red galaxies power spectrum and forecast for future surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We place new constraints on the primordial local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} using recent cosmic microwave background anisotropy and galaxy clustering data. We model the galaxy power spectrum according to the halo model, accounting for a scale-dependent bias correction proportional to f{sub NL}/k{sup 2}. We first constrain f{sub NL} in a full 13 parameters analysis that includes 5 parameters of the halo model and 7 cosmological parameters. Using the WMAP7 CMB data and the SDSS DR4 galaxy power spectrum, we find f{sub NL}=171{sub -139}{sup +140} at 68% C.L. and -69forecast the constraints on f{sub NL} from future surveys as EUCLID and from CMB missions as Planck showing that their combined analysis could detect f{sub NL{approx}}5.

De Bernardis, Francesco [Physics Department and INFN, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Melchiorri, Alessandro [Physics Department and INFN, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Power scaling analysis of fiber lasers and amplifiers based on non-silica materials  

SciTech Connect

A developed formalism for analyzing the power scaling of diffraction limited fiber lasers and amplifiers is applied to a wider range of materials. Limits considered include thermal rupture, thermal lensing, melting of the core, stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, optical damage, bend induced limits on core diameter and limits to coupling of pump diode light into the fiber. For conventional fiber lasers based upon silica, the single aperture, diffraction limited power limit was found to be 36.6kW. This is a hard upper limit that results from an interaction of the stimulated Raman scattering with thermal lensing. This result is dependent only upon physical constants of the material and is independent of the core diameter or fiber length. Other materials will have different results both in terms of ultimate power out and which of the many limits is the determining factor in the results. Materials considered include silica doped with Tm and Er, YAG and YAG based ceramics and Yb doped phosphate glass. Pros and cons of the various materials and their current state of development will be assessed. In particular the impact of excess background loss on laser efficiency is discussed.

Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Heebner, J E; Pax, P H; Sridharan, A K; Bullington, A L; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C P; Dubinskii, M

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists of major events for only 55 of the 123 such utilities.List of Figures and Tables Figure ES- 1. Summary of States that Provided Utility-

LaCommare, Kristina H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Advanced Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems, Part 2: Modeling, Development, and Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Control Functions for Single-Phase Utility-Connected Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrating renewable energy and distributed generations into the Smart Grid architecture requires power electronic (PE) for energy conversion. The key to reaching successful Smart Grid implementation is to develop interoperable, intelligent, and advanced PE technology that improves and accelerates the use of distributed energy resource systems. This report describes the simulation, design, and testing of a single-phase DC-to-AC inverter developed to operate in both islanded and utility-connected mode. It provides results on both the simulations and the experiments conducted, demonstrating the ability of the inverter to provide advanced control functions such as power flow and VAR/voltage regulation. This report also analyzes two different techniques used for digital signal processor (DSP) code generation. Initially, the DSP code was written in C programming language using Texas Instrument's Code Composer Studio. In a later stage of the research, the Simulink DSP toolbox was used to self-generate code for the DSP. The successful tests using Simulink self-generated DSP codes show promise for fast prototyping of PE controls.

Chakraborty, S.; Kroposki, B.; Kramer, W.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Non Linear Techniques for Increasing Harvesting Energy from Piezoelectric and Electromagnetic Micro-Power-Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-linear techniques are used to optimize the harvested energy from piezoelectric and electromagnetic generators. This paper introduces an analytical study for the voltage amplification obtained from these techniques. The analytical study is experimentally validated using a macro model of piezoelectric generator. Moreover, the integration influences on these techniques is studied. Through all the obtained results, a suitable structure for autonomous microsystems is proposed.

Ammar, Yasser

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort, initiated in 2011, to define, track, and evaluate the expanding range of regulated utility solar energy acquisition activities. This report provides a high-level overview of the conceptual framework by which EPRI-SEPA are classifying regulated utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. It then provides five case studies detailing existing ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

318

Modeling the performance of the piston ring-pack with consideration of non-axisymmetric characteristics of the power cylinder system in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of the piston ring-pack is directly associated with the friction, oil consumption, wear, and blow-by in internal combustion engines. Because of non-axisymmetric characteristics of the power cylinder system, ...

Liu, Liang, 1971-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 1, Executive summary: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. Specific conclusions are as follows: (1) To implement CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration on a national scale will decrease power plant net efficiencies and significantly increase the cost of electricity. To make responsible societal decisions, accurate and consistent economic and environmental analysis of all alternatives for atmospheric CO{sub 2} mitigation are required. (2) Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive and energy intensive, exists today. (3) The most promising approach to more economical CO{sub 2} capture is to develop power plant systems that facilitate efficient CO{sub 2} capture. (4) While CO{sub 2} disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is feasible today, the ability to dispose of large quantities Of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain because of both technical and institutional issues. Disposal into the deep ocean or confined aquifers offers the potential for large quantity disposal, but there are technical, safety, liability, and environmental issues to resolve. Therefore, the highest priority research should focus on establishing the feasibility of large scale disposal options.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effect of non condensable gases on the performance of geothermal steam power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influencce of dissolved carbon dioxide on the thermodynamic performance of geothermal steam systems is analyzed. The system is divided into its main component: the flash tank, the turbine, the condenser and the gas extraction system, and the effect of non condensables is studied for each. The effect of the noncondensable gas on the output of the whole system is deduced from its effect on the individual components. The analysis of actual systems is preceded by an analysis of an ideal system. The optimum condenser pressure for actual systems is obtained for different gas extraction system efficiencies. Economic considerations, however, are only qualitatively addressed.

Khalifa, H.E.; Michaelides, E.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Colorado...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Colorado Springs Utilities Information for Businesses Nebraska Municipal Power Pool...

322

Electric cartridge-type heater for producing a given non-uniform axial power distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric cartridge heater is provided to simulate a reactor fuel element for use in safety and thermal-hydraulic tests of model nuclear reactor systems. The electric heat-generating element of the cartridge heater consists of a specifically shaped strip of metal cut with variable width from a flat sheet of the element material. When spirally wrapped around a mandrel, the strip produces a coiled element of the desired length and diameter. The coiled element is particularly characterized by an electrical resistance that varies along its length due to variations in strip width. Thus, the cartridge heater is constructed such that it will produce a more realistic simulation of the actual nonuniform (approximately ''chopped'' cosine) power distribution of a reactor fuel element.

Clark, D.L.; Kress, T.S.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

2012 Green Utility Leaders | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-powered Dams U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams Creating an Energy Innovation Ecosystem Creating an Energy Innovation Ecosystem Sunshot Rooftop Solar...

324

City of Douglas, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Douglas, Georgia (Utility Company) Douglas, Georgia (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Douglas Place Georgia Utility Id 5325 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Irrigation Time of Use Service Commercial Large Power Industrial Medium Power Industrial Residential Residential Seasonal Agricultural Service Commercial Security Lights - 100 Watt HPS Vapor - Non-Metered Lighting Security Lights - 1000 Watt MH Flood Vapor - Metered Lighting

325

Treatment of power utilities exhaust  

SciTech Connect

Provided is a process for treating nitrogen oxide-containing exhaust produced by a stationary combustion source by the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide in the presence of a reductant comprising hydrogen, followed by ammonia selective catalytic reduction to further reduce the nitrogen oxide level in the exhaust.

Koermer, Gerald (Basking Ridge, NJ)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microsoft PowerPoint - Wayne_Shirley_Decoupling_Mechanics_and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

expect poor results Utility Financial Structures y Enhance Power of Incentives Few non-production costs vary with sales - So, increased sales increase profits C l d d l d fi -...

327

Village of Bradner, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio (Utility Company) Ohio (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bradner Village of Place Ohio Utility Id 2128 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Power Commercial Non-Residential Single phase(General Service) Commercial Non-Residential Three phase(General Service) Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1030/kWh Commercial: $0.1290/kWh Industrial: $0.1290/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

328

Feasibility study of low-head hydrolectric power on Carlyle Reservoir for the Carlyle, Illinois Municipal Electric Utility - City of Carlyle, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of the city of Carlyle, Illinois developing hydroelectric power on Carlyle Reservoir was determined. The hydrologic conditions under which the proposed project would operate were investigated herein along with the marketability of production from the facility and the facility's compatability with present reservoir functions as well as with the environment. A conceptual plant design has been developed in detail for a power plant consisting of two horizontal shaft, adjustable blade, fixed vane hydroelectric turbines each connected through speed increasing gear boxes to 4375 kW generators. The site selected is west of and immediately adjacent to the stilling basin of the spillway for Carlyle Reservoir. Two 13.5 penstocks would be bored through the existing concrete non-overflow dam adjacent to the present gated spillway structure. The total estimated project cost is $7,550,000 or an average of $863.00 per installed kilowatt. The development of the proposed project is believed to require 45 months and will produce an estimated average annual output of approximately 21,500,000 kWh. The conceptual design herein developed is believed to have the capability of an eventual detailed engineering design which will be acceptable to all approving authorities, and particularly the U.S. Corps of Engineers.

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Georgia Power Company The Renewable and Non-Renewable Resource tariff is authorized by the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC), which requires that the investor owned utility, Georgia Power Company, purchase renewable energy cumulative

330

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

City of Oxford, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxford Oxford Place Kansas Utility Id 14276 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial and Small Power Outside city limits Commercial Commercial and Small Power Within city limits Commercial Non-Profit Organizations Power Service Outside city limits Commercial Power Service Within city limits Commercial Residential Service Outside city limits Residential Residential Service Within city limits Residential

332

Deregulating the electric utility industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many functions must be performed in any large electric power system. A specific proposal for a deregulated power system, based on a real-time spot energy marketplace, is presented and analyzed. A central T&D utility acts ...

Bohn, Roger E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Utility Lines and Facilities (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to the construction of utility and power lines and facilities. They address the use of public right-of-ways for such construction, underground power lines, and construction...

334

Things to Consider When Upgrading a Non-Power Reactor to a Digital I&C System  

SciTech Connect

Non-Power Reactor (NPR) licensees are increasing their use of state-of-the-art digital technology in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems because digital systems offer improved reactor control, information processing, and information storage. In Generic Letter GL 95-02, the NRC recognized that the design characteristics specific to the new digital electronics could result in failure modes and system malfunctions that either were not considered during the initial plant design or not evaluated in sufficient detail in the safety analysis report. These concerns include potential common mode failures. A conversion from analog to digital I&C systems in NPRs solves some problems while potentially introducing others. Good design, engineering, review, and testing can identify and minimize these risks.

Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Hardin, LeRoy A [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Hardesty, Duane [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Utah |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utah Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Bonneville Power Administration Information for Businesses Rocky Mountain Power (formerly...

336

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Virginia...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Delmarva Power Information for Businesses Dominion Virginia Power Information for...

337

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Wyoming...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Bonneville Power Administration Information for Businesses Cheyenne Light, Fuel & Power...

338

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Idaho ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Bonneville Power Administration Information for Businesses Idaho Power Company...

339

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Florida...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Florida Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Florida Power & Light Information for Businesses Gulf Power Company Information for...

340

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Kansas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Kansas City Power & Light (KSP&L) Information for Businesses Kansas Electric Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powered, the limited-energy issue typical with other wireless sensor networks powered by batteries is non energy usage of the entire system, and to reinforce the wireless network links and compensate for lostEnergy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office Yao

Agogino, Alice M.

342

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs | Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Programs Suggest a Listing Efficiency United The energy efficiency program for 18 Michigan Utilities including Alpena Power Company, Baraga Electric Utility, Bayfield Electric Cooperative, City of Crystal Falls Electric Department, City of Gladstone Department of Power & Light, City of South Haven Public Works, Daggett Electric Company, Hillsdale Board of Public Utilities, Indiana Michigan Power Company, L'Anse Electric Utility, Michigan Gas Utilities, Negaunee Electric Department, The City of Norway Department of Power & Light, SEMCO ENERGY Gas Company, Upper Peninsula Power Company, We Energies, Wisconsin Public Service and Xcel Energy. Energy Company Links A directory of approximately 700 oil and gas companies, utilities and oil

343

Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Minnesota...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minnesota Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Minnesota Power Information for Businesses Xcel Energy (Minnesota...

345

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Mississippi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Entergy Corporation (Mississippi) Information for Businesses Mississippi Power...

346

Corrosion and biofouling on the non-heat-exchanger surfaces of an ocean thermal energy conversion power plant: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the many foreseeable problems confronting economical ocean thermal energy conversion operation, two major items are the deterioration of the structural and functional components, which prevents efficient operation, and the biofouling of the surfaces, which adds excess weight to the floating ocean platform. The techniques required for effective long-term control of deterioration and corrosion have been investigated actively for many years, and successful solutions for most situations have been developed. For the most part, these solutions can be directly transferred to the ocean thermal energy conversion plant. The majority of problems in these areas are expected to be associated with scale-up and will require some advanced development due to the immensity of the ocean thermal energy conversion platform. Current antifouling control systems are not effective for long-term fouling prevention. Commercially available antifouling coatings are limited to a 3-year service life in temperate waters, and even shorter in tropical waters. However, underwater cleaning techniques and some fouling-control systems presently being used by conventional power plants may find utility on an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. In addition, some recent major advances in long-term antifouling coatings sponsored by the Navy may be applicable to ocean thermal energy conversion. 132 references.

Castelli, V.J. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

348

PRELIMINARY DESIGN AND COST ESTIMATE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CENTRAL STATION POWER FROM AN AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR UTILIZING THORIUM-URANIUM-233  

SciTech Connect

The design and economics of the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor as basically under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. The reactor system utilizes thorium-U-233 fuel. Conditions accompanying reactor systems generating up to l080 mw of net electrical energy are covered. The study indicates that a generating station, with a net thermal efficiency of 28.l%, might be constructed for approximately 0/kw and 0/kw at the l80 mw and l080 mw electrical levels, respectively. These values result in capital expenses of approximately 4.72 and 2.86 milis/kwh. A major part of fuel cost is the expense of chemical processing. It is therefore advantageous 10 schedule fuel through a relatively large processing system since fixed charges are insensitive to chemical plant size. By handling fuel through a plant large enough for processing 200 kg of thorium per day, total fuel costa of about 1 mill/kwh result. This cost for fuel processing appears applicable to generating stations up to abeut 540 mw in size, decreasing to about 0.6 mills/kwh at the l080 mw level. Operating and maintenance expense, including heavy water cost on a lease basis, varies between l.34 and 0.89 mills/kwh for l80 and l080 megawatts respectively. If the purchase of heavy water is required, 0.3 to 0.4 mills/kwh must be added. It is concluded that the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor may produce electrical power competitive with conventional generating systems when the remaining technical problems are solved. It is felt ihat the research and development now programed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will solve these problems and affect costs favorably. (auth)

Carson, H.G.; Landrum, L.H. eds.

1955-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Oconomowoc Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Oconomowoc Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 13963 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

350

Coal Utilization Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

351

Power Electronics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power electronics (PE) play a critical role in transforming the current electric grid into the next-generation grid.  PE enable utilities to deliver power to their customers effectively while...

352

Wisconsin Power & Light Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power & Light Co (Redirected from Wisconsin Power and Light Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Wisconsin Power & Light Co Place Madison, Wisconsin Utility Id 20856 Utility...

353

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

City of Lawrenceville, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lawrenceville Lawrenceville Place Georgia Utility Id 10800 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL NON DEMAND Commercial LARGE POWER Commercial MEDIUM POWER Commercial RESIDENTIAL Residential SECURITY LIGHTING, HPS 100W Lighting SECURITY LIGHTING, HPS 150W Lighting SECURITY LIGHTING, HPS 250W Lighting SECURITY LIGHTING, HPS 400W Lighting SECURITY LIGHTING, MH 1000W Lighting SECURITY LIGHTING, MH 400W Lighting SECURITY LIGHTING, MV 175W Lighting SMALL POWER Commercial

355

Nuclear Non-Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subjects of C1 should be selected to take ~1/4 of Total Number of Credits; Subjects of C2 should be selected to take ~1/4 of TNC; Subjects of S1 (or S2, S3) should be selected to take ~ 1/2 of TNC.

Reference Curricula

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

An analog and digital data acquisition system for Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) is a method for characterizing and monitoring discrete loads connected to a power distribution system. This can include a ship, a car, or a utility distribution system. The entire concept ...

Clifford, Zachary Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. Volume 1. Summary report. Phase I and Phase II. Consultant report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first step in an evaluation of the public health and safety hazards associated with non-nuclear plants. The study was limited to hazards that could affect the general public outside the plant boundaries. Public health and safety hazards are identified for seven types of power plants: coal-fired conventional boiler, atmospheric fluidized bed boiler, pressurized fluidized bed-combined cycle, oil-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. Major plant systems associated with specific hazards are identified and described. Potentially hazardous conditions and events are identified for normal and abnormal plant operating conditions and for accidents at the plant. A classification of each hazard identifies the initiating event, the hazard source, equipment, or conditions that increase, monitor, or mitigate the hazard. An event tree developed for each plant relates the effect on the general public for each hazard and initiating event. A semi-quantitative hazard ranking provides a method of comparing the hazards and events at different types of plants. Consideration is given to the sensitivity of the hazard ranking to population density, changes in operating mode, and technology changes.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mezzanine utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Compressed air. Helium gas. Chilled water. Various types of electrical power are also available. We also have several vacuum pumps: ...

360

City of Torrington, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Torrington, Wyoming (Utility Company) Torrington, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Torrington Place Wyoming Utility Id 19032 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial General Service Demand Commercial General Service Heat Commercial Irrigation and Non-Potable Pumps Commercial Large Power Industrial Resident Electric Heat Rate (ALL Electric) Residential Residential Residential Street Lights Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0857/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Format and Content. NUREG-1537, Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG - 1537, Part 1 gives guidance to non-power reactor licensees and applicants on the format and content of applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for licensing actions. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Standard review plan and acceptance criteria. NUREG - 1537, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

NUREG - 1537, Part 2 gives guidance on the conduct of licensing action reviews to NRC staff who review non-power reactor licensing applications. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc of sufficient strength to withstand handling, transfer and long term exposure. The final phase (4) was designed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

365

OpenEI - US utilities  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Utility Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (Utilities" title="http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities">http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

366

US utilities | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6489 6489 Varnish cache server US utilities Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

367

Green Power Purchasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Purchasing Purchasing Jump to: navigation, search Government entities, businesses, residents, schools, non-profits and others can play a significant role in supporting renewable energy by buying electricity from renewable resources, or by buying renewable energy credits (RECs). Many state and local governments, as well as the federal government, have committed to buying green power to account for a certain percentage of their electricity consumption. Green power purchases are typically executed through contracts with green power marketers or project developers, through utility green power programs, or through community aggregation. [1] Green Power Purchasing Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 77) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

368

Public Utilities (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities (Florida) Utilities (Florida) Public Utilities (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Florida Public Service Commission Chapter 366 of the Florida Statutes governs the operation of public utilities, and includes a section pertaining to cogeneration and small power production (366.051). This section establishes the state's support for incorporating cogenerators and small power producers into the grid, and directs the Public Service Commission to establish regulations and

369

Energy Harvesting Aware Power Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schiller, “Utilizing solar power in wireless sensorthat only the actual solar power available, and not anyconverted to electric power using solar cells. The magnitude

Kansal, Aman; Srivastava, Mani B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Town of Walkerton, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walkerton Walkerton Place Indiana Utility Id 20021 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Large Commercial Commercial Large Commercial- Non-Demand Metered Commercial Power Service (Primary) Industrial Power Service (Secondary) Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0947/kWh Commercial: $0.0645/kWh Industrial: $0.0381/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

371

Characterization of air toxics from a laboratory coal-fired combustor and utility scale power plants. Quarterly progress report No. 14, January--March, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report summarized progress on Task 3, Power Plant Studies, and Task 4, Technical Management and Reporting. Task 3 this quarter involved sampling of flue gas from Units 6 and 7 of the host power plant. The operating parameters during the sampling period are given. Laboratory analyses are in progress. Under Task 4, internal and external QA/QC audits were conducted. A data base management system was prepared. An appendix contains a data compilation of plant operating data.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slinger Utilities Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Slinger Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 17324 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase- Time-of-Day Commercial Industrial Power- Time-of-Day Industrial Large Power- Time-of-Day Commercial Ornamental Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting Overhead Street Lighting- 150W HPS Lighting

373

City of Lexington, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lexington City of Lexington City of Place Nebraska Utility Id 10967 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Heat Commercial Commercial- Large Commercial Commercial- Small Commercial High Tension Service Industrial Industrial- Non-Interruptible Industrial Irrigation- Non-Interruptible Commercial Municipal Power & Light Lighting Municipal Street Lights Lighting Residential- All Electric Residential Residential- Basic Residential Yard Light Service Lighting

374

City of Falls City, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Falls City Falls City Place Nebraska Utility Id 6175 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Demand Charges Commercial Commercial- No Demand Charges Non-Tax Commercial Commercial- No Demand Charges Tax Commercial Industrial- Demand Charges Industrial Industrial- No Demand Charges Non-Tax Industrial Industrial- No Demand Charges Tax Industrial Large Power Service Industrial Residential Residential

375

City of Barnesville, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barnesville Barnesville Place Georgia Utility Id 1232 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Electric Rates- Large Industrial Industrial Large Industrial Power Cost Adjustment Industrial Municipal Service Commercial Public Schools Demand Commercial Public schools Non-Demand Commercial Residential Service Residential Security Lighting 100 W HPSV Lighting Security Lighting Service 1000 W MH Lighting Security Lighting Service 150 W HPSV Lighting

376

A model specific simulation of power distribution grids for non-destructive testing of network reconfiguration schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes a simulation platform used to study and test grid control schemes for electric power distribution systems. The effectiveness of proposed control schemes can be simulated using the platform and prototyped within a hardware testbed ... Keywords: distribution automation, electric power distribution systems, network reconfiguration

Christian Schegan; Valentina Cecchi; Xiaoguang Yang; Karen Miu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Electric Power Metrology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next-generation "smart" electrical meters for residential and commercial ... NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction Devices Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Utility-affiliated cogeneration developer perspective  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the cogeneration industry to address electric power market requirements, some market observations and forecasts, and changes in the cogeneration industry are discussed. It is concluded that utility planning will increasingly need to account for the noted changing power market characteristics. Effective planning for electric utilities will require recognition of the competitive nature of the power business.

Ferrar, T.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EM Utility Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 12 EM UTILITY CONTRACT Site State Supplier Executed Contract Type DOE Contract # East Tennessee Technology Park TN Tennessee Valley Authority 4/27/2007 Energy supply contract (retail) DE-AC05-07OR23242 Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2001 Transmission Service Agreement Hanford WA Bonneville Power Administration 10/1/2011 Power Sales Agreement (retail) Moab UT Paducah KY Electric Energy, Inc. (EEI as agent for DOE) Original Power Contract Portsmouth OH Pike Natural Gas 2/28/2007 Negotiated contract Portsmouth OH Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) 9/10/2008 Letter Agreement DE-AC05-03OR22988 Savannah River Site SC South Carolina Electric & Gas

380

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate Pasadena Water and Power - Solar Power Installation Rebate < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems up to 30 kW have the option of receiving an expected performance based buydown (EPBB) or a performance based incentive (PBI). Systems larger than 30 kW are only eligible for the PBI. EPBB (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $1.40/watt AC Commercial and all PPAs: $0.85/watt AC Non-profits and Government: $1.60/watt AC Income-qualified residential: $4.00/watt PBI (effective 6/1/12): Residential: $0.212/kWh Commercial and all PPAs: $0.129/kWh

382

Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program Eligibility...

383

EIS-0037: Springfield City Utilities, James River Generating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Springfield City Utilities, James River Generating Station, Power Plants 3 and 4, Springfield, Greene County, Missouri EIS-0037: Springfield City Utilities, James River...

384

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development (Book), Powered by SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development (Book), Powered by SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) This guide is organized around three sponsorship models: utility-sponsored projects, projects sponsored by special purpose entities - businesses formed for the purpose of producing community solar power, and non-profit sponsored projects. The guide addresses issues common to all project models, as well as issues unique to each model. 54570.pdf More Documents & Publications Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project

385

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development (Book), Powered by SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development (Book), Powered by SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) This guide is organized around three sponsorship models: utility-sponsored projects, projects sponsored by special purpose entities - businesses formed for the purpose of producing community solar power, and non-profit sponsored projects. The guide addresses issues common to all project models, as well as issues unique to each model. 54570.pdf More Documents & Publications Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project

386

Flora Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flora Utilities Flora Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Flora Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 6425 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Municipal Rate Commercial Power Acct. Rate Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0958/kWh Commercial: $0.0893/kWh Industrial: $0.0805/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flora_Utilities&oldid=410706

387

Spot pricing of public utility services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes how public utility prices should be changed over time and space. Earlier static and non spatial models of public utility pricing emerge as special cases of the theory developed here. Electricity is ...

Bohn, Roger E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

389

Definition: Independent Power Producer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producer Producer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Independent Power Producer Any entity that owns or operates an electricity generating facility that is not included in an electric utility's rate base. This term includes, but is not limited to, cogenerators and small power producers and all other nonutility electricity producers, such as exempt wholesale generators, who sell electricity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An Independent Power Producer is an entity, which is not a public utility, but which owns facilities to generate electric power for sale to utilities and end users. NUGs may be privately held facilities, corporations, cooperatives such as rural solar or wind energy producers, and non-energy industrial concerns capable of feeding excess energy into

390

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois power station with coal-fueled oxy- combustion * Utilize existing 200 MWe steam turbine & Meredosia plant infrastructure * Pipeline CO 2 30 miles to sequestration...

391

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Ohio |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Dayton Power & Light (DL&L) Information for Businesses Duke Energy (Ohio) Information for...

392

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Montana...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Energy West Information for Businesses Bonneville Power Administration Information for...

393

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Vermont...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vermont Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Green Mountain Power Information for Businesses Central Vermont Public Service...

394

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Georgia...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georgia Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Georgia Power Information for Businesses South Carolina Electric & Gas (SCE&G)...

395

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Alabama...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Alabama Power Company Information for Businesses Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)...

396

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Louisiana...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Entergy Corporation Information for Businesses Southwestern Electric Power Company...

397

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Maryland...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Baltimore Gas & Electric (BGE) Information for Businesses Delmarva Power Information for...

398

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Connecticut...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecticut Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Connecticut Light & Power Information for Businesses Southern Connecticut Gas...

399

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Nevada...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Bonneville Power Administration Information for Businesses Southwest Gas Corporation...

400

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Oregon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oregon Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Bonneville Power Administration Information for Businesses Eugene Water & Electric Board...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Nebraska...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Nebraska Municipal Power Pool (NMPP) Information for Businesses NorthWestern Energy...

402

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Iowa |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Alliant Energy Information for Businesses Nebraska Municipal Power Pool...

403

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Washington...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing Puget Sound Energy Information for Businesses Bonneville Power Administration...

404

Butler Public Power District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Power District (Redirected from Butler County Rural P P D) Jump to: navigation, search Name Butler Public Power District Place Nebraska Utility Id 2643 Utility Location Yes...

405

Cargill Power Markets LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Markets LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Cargill Power Markets LLC Place Minnesota Utility Id 2481 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location MRO Activity Buying...

406

Wisconsin River Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Wisconsin River Power Company Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20863 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC MRO Yes...

407

Wisconsin Power & Light Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power & Light Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Wisconsin Power & Light Co Place Madison, Wisconsin Utility Id 20856 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location MRO NERC MRO...

408

Arizona Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Arizona Power Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 798 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity...

409

Central Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Electric Power Assn Place Mississippi Utility Id 2849 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity...

410

Calpine Power Management LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Calpine Power Management LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Calpine Power Management LLC Place Texas Utility Id 49824 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location TRE NERC...

411

Central Iowa Power Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa Power Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Iowa Power Cooperative Place Iowa Utility Id 3258 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes...

412

Electric Utility Terrain Vehicle Demonstration at a Military Base in Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-road electric vehicles such as lift trucks, airport ground support equipment and underground mining vehicles have proven themselves in the marketplace. However, heavy-duty utility-terrain vehicles (UTVs) powered exclusively by electricity have been introduced only recently. To test the capabilities of electric UTVs, two demonstration vehicles were instrumented for data acquisition and placed in ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Estimating electricity storage power rating and discharge duration for utility transmission and distribution deferral :a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a methodology for estimating the power and energy capacities for electricity energy storage systems that can be used to defer costly upgrades to fully overloaded, or nearly overloaded, transmission and distribution (T&D) nodes. This ''sizing'' methodology may be used to estimate the amount of storage needed so that T&D upgrades may be deferred for one year. The same methodology can also be used to estimate the characteristics of storage needed for subsequent years of deferral.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Butler, Paul Charles; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (,.Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Utilizing Renewable Energy in Cluster-based Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation plays a crucial in wireless sensor networks since such networks are designed to be placed in hostile and non-accessible areas. While battery-driven sensors will run out of battery sooner or later, the use of renewable energy sources such as solar power or gravitation may extend the lifetime of a sensor. We propose to utilize solar power in wireless sensor networks and extend LEACH a well-known cluster-based protocol for sensor networks to become solar-aware. The presented simulation results show that making LEACH solar-aware significantly extends the lifetime of sensor networks.

Thiemo Voigt; Hartmut Ritter; Jochen Schiller

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Albertville Municipal Utils Bd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albertville Municipal Utils Bd Albertville Municipal Utils Bd Jump to: navigation, search Name Albertville Municipal Utils Bd Place Alabama Utility Id 241 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Rate - SGSC Commercial General Power Rate - SGSD Industrial General Power Rate(Schedule GSA)-Part 1 Commercial General Power Rate(Schedule GSA)-Part 2 Commercial General Power Rate(Schedule GSA)-Part 3 Commercial Manufacturing Service Rate - SMSB Industrial Manufacturing Service Rate - SMSC Industrial

416

A Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development (Book), Powered by SunShot, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonpro t Project Development ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This guide is an updated version of the original Guide to Community Solar, published November 2010 (see www.nrel.gov/docs/fy11osti/49930.pdf), which was developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory by Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development, Keyes and Fox, Stoel Rives, and the Bonneville Environmental Foundation. This guide builds on the research and writing from the Northwest Community Solar Guide, published by Bonneville Environmental Foundation and Northwest SEED. AUTHORS Jason Coughlin, Jennifer Grove, Linda Irvine, Janet F. Jacobs, Sarah Johnson Phillips, Alexandra Sawyer, Joseph Wiedman REVIEWERS AND CONTRIBUTORS Dick Wanderscheid, Bonneville Environmental Foundation; Stephen Frantz, Sacramento Municipal

417

Bonneville Power Administration 1991 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Congress enacted the Bonneville Project Act in 1937, creating the Bonneville Power Administration to market and transmit the power produced by Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. Since then, Congress has directed BPA to sell at wholesale the power produced at a total of 30 Federal dams in the Pacific Northwest, and to acquire conservation and generating resources sufficient to meet the needs of BPA`s customer utilities. The dams and the electrical system are known as the Federal Columbia River Power System. Bonneville sells wholesale power to public and private utilities, rural cooperatives, large industries, and Federal agencies. BPA also sells or exchanges power with utilities in California. BPA uses revenues from the sale of power and transmission services to recover its own expenses, to repay the Federal investment in the power system, and to pay for the resources it has acquired. BPA pays for operation and maintenance expenses at the Federal dams and at non-Federal power plants. It also pays for irrigation benefits of Federal projects allocated to power to repay, and for fish and wildlife projects which offset damage to these resources by the Federal hydropower system. This document is the 1991 statement of budget, financial statement, cash flows, capitalization, expenses, and projects. An organization chart is included.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Estimating electricity storage power rating and discharge duration for utility transmission and distribution deferral :a study for the DOE energy storage program.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a methodology for estimating the power and energy capacities for electricity energy storage systems that can be used to defer costly upgrades to fully overloaded, or nearly overloaded, transmission and distribution (T&D) nodes. This ''sizing'' methodology may be used to estimate the amount of storage needed so that T&D upgrades may be deferred for one year. The same methodology can also be used to estimate the characteristics of storage needed for subsequent years of deferral.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Butler, Paul Charles; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (,.Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power system development: utilizing advanced high performance heat transfer techniques. Final technical progress report, August 1-December 11, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are: (1) development of a preliminary design for the full-sized power system module to be used in the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant by 1984 to demonstrate operational performance and to project economic viability; (2) preliminary design for a proof-of-concept 5 MWe (nominal pilot plant, (Test Article); (3) preliminary design for proof-of-concept 1 MWe scaled heat exchangers (Test Articles); and (4) preparation of a Phase II hardware and support plan (proposal) for the scaled test articles. Status of the program is described. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs West Virginia...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Energy Crossroads Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing American Electric Power (AEP) Information for Businesses Allegheny Power...

422

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Utility Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Nebraska Public Power District, Connexus Energy, BC Hydro, KEPRI Nuclear Power Laboratory, Arizona Public Service Company, Entergy,...

423

Project Financial Summary Report Concerning Financing Surface Facilities for a 50 Megawatt Geothermal Electric Power Plant Facility in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic and financial conditions pertaining to geothermal electric power plant utilization of geothermal fluids produced from the Roosevelt Hot springs area of Utah. The first year of electric power generation is scheduled to be 1982. The non-resource facilities will be called ''surface facilities'' and include the gathering system, the power plant, the substation, and the injection system.

None

1978-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Waupun Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waupun Utilities Waupun Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Waupun Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20213 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Renewable Energy Residential Residential Small Power Industrial Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0968/kWh Industrial: $0.0770/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

426

Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program – Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) R&D Roadmap for Cables is to support the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) R&D pathway. The focus of the workshop was to identify the technical gaps in detecting aging cables and predicting their remaining life expectancy. The workshop was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on July 30, 2012, at Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation (AMS) headquarters. The workshop was attended by 30 experts in materials, electrical engineering, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory), NDE instrumentation development, universities, commercial NDE services and cable manufacturers, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The motivation for the R&D roadmap comes from the need to address the aging management of in-containment cables at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Brenchley, David L.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hashemian, Hash; Konnik, Robert; Ray, Sheila

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hustisford Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hustisford Utilities Hustisford Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Hustisford Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9124 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional Time-of-Day Service Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional

428

Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

Hualapai Tribal Nation

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

Electric Power Annual - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Industry - Electricity Purchases, 2002 through 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers

430

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. [Public health hazards of fossil-fuel, combined cycle, combustion turbine, and geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Public health and safety hazards have been identified for five types of power plants: coal-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. The results of the analysis show that air pollutants are the major hazard that affects the health and safety of the general public. A total of ninety plant hazards were identified for the five plant types. Each of these hazards were rated in six categories as to their affect on the general public. The criteria used in the analysis were: area/population exposed; duration; mitigation; quantity to toxicity ratio; nature of health effects; and public attitude. Even though ninety hazards were identified for the five plants analyzed, the large majority of hazards were similar for each plant. Highest ratings were given to the products of the combustion cycle or to hydrogen sulfide emissions from geothermal plants. Water pollution, cooling tower effects and noise received relatively low ratings. The highest rated of the infrequent or hypothetical hazards were those associated with potential fires, explosions, and chlorine releases at the plant. Hazards associated with major cooling water releases, water pollution and missiles received the lowest ratings. Since the results of the study clearly show that air pollutants are currently considered the most severe hazard, additional effort must be made to further understand the complex interactions of pollutants with man and his environment. Of particular importance is the determination of dose-response relationships for long term, low level exposure to air pollutants. (EDB)

Roman, W.S.; Israel, W.J.; Sacramo, R.F.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Avista Utilities - Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering Avista Utilities - Net Metering < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Idaho Program Type Net Metering Provider Avista Utilities Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net-metering tariff that has been approved by the Idaho Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The framework of the utilities' net-metering programs is similar, in that each utility: (1) offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using solar,

432

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MARKET-BASED ADVANCED MARKET-BASED ADVANCED COAL POWER SYSTEMS FINAL REPORT MAY 1999 DOE/FE-0400 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 Market-Based Advanced Coal Power Systems 1-1 December 1998 1. INTRODUCTION As deregulation unfolds and privatization of the utility market takes shape, priorities for power plant economics have shifted toward those of a "bottom-line" business and away from a regulated industry. Competition in utility generation and the exposure risks of large capital investments have led to a preference to minimize capital costs and fixed and variable operation and maintenance costs. With global competition from independent power producers (IPPs), non- utility generators, and utilities, the present trend of investments is with conventional pulverized

433

Non-Road Industry Advisory Council: September 5 - 6, 2007 Meeting Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Non-Road Transportation Industry Advisory Council brings together industry's stakeholders to promote non-road electrification. The Council's September 5 8212 6, 2007 meeting included stakeholders from utilities, universities, and manufacturers. Twelve presentations dealt with these major categories: air quality, batteries, lift trucks, energy use, utility vehicles, and ground support equipment. During a re-cap of the meeting, participants identified these six items to follow up: 1) address power r...

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

2006 UDI directory of electric power producers and distributors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The directory contains profiles of nearly 5,000 energy-related companies across the USA and Canada. This includes over 17,000 executives and other key personnel at: 3,600 regulated electric utilities and holding companies; 700 non-utility generators and service companies; 350 associations; power pools and independent system operators, architects, engineers, consultants, agencies and commissions. The directory covers such essential business information as: electric customer classifications; revenues and sales for utilities; number of employees; electric production and delivery system design; performance data; major interconnections; sources of purchased power; and service territories.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Design Techniques for High Speed Low Voltage and Low Power Non-Calibrated Pipeline Analog to Digital Converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profound digitization of modern microelectronic modules made Analog-to- Digital converters (ADC) key components in many systems. With resolutions up to 14bits and sampling rates in the 100s of MHz, the pipeline ADC is a prime candidate for a wide range of applications such as instrumentation, communications and consumer electronics. However, while past work focused on enhancing the performance of the pipeline ADC from an architectural standpoint, little has been done to individually address its fundamental building blocks. This work aims to achieve the latter by proposing design techniques to improve the performance of these blocks with minimal power consumption in low voltage environments, such that collectively high performance is achieved in the pipeline ADC. Towards this goal, a Recycling Folded Cascode (RFC) amplifier is proposed as an enhancement to the general performance of the conventional folded cascode. Tested in Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18?m Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology, the RFC provides twice the bandwidth, 8-10dB additional gain, more than twice the slew rate and improved noise performance over the conventional folded cascode-all at no additional power or silicon area. The direct auto-zeroing offset cancellation scheme is optimized for low voltage environments using a dual level common mode feedback (CMFB) circuit, and amplifier differential offsets up to 50mV are effectively cancelled. Together with the RFC, the dual level CMFB was used to implement a sample and hold amplifier driving a singleended load of 1.4pF and using only 2.6mA; at 200MS/s better than 9bit linearity is achieved. Finally a power conscious technique is proposed to reduce the kickback noise of dynamic comparators without resorting to the use of pre-amplifiers. When all techniques are collectively used to implement a 1Vpp 10bit 160MS/s pipeline ADC in Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) 0.18[mu]m CMOS, 9.2 effective number of bits (ENOB) is achieved with a near Nyquist-rate full scale signal. The ADC uses an area of 1.1mm2 and consumes 42mW in its analog core. Compared to recent state-of-the-art implementations in the 100-200MS/s range, the presented pipeline ADC uses the least power per conversion rated at 0.45pJ/conversion-step.

Assaad, Rida Shawky

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nondestructive Evaluation: Historical View of Non-Destructive Evaluation for Stress Corrosion Cracking at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commercial nuclear power industry has been dealing with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for almost 50 years. A tremendous and broad-ranging amount of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) experience has transpired, from thin-wall tubing in steam generators to thick-wall dissimilar metal piping welds connecting to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). However, the industry might not be aware of the extent of the work that has been conducted in the United States and other countries. In the United States, the us...

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Green Power Network: Green Power Leadership Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards will highlight the accomplishments of green power suppliers (utilities, retail suppliers, REC marketers, and renewable energy project developers) that are innovators and...

438

Wisconsin Dells Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dells Electric Util Dells Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Wisconsin Dells Electric Util Place Wisconsin Utility Id 20844 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service- Single Phase Commercial General Service- Three Phase Commercial Large General Service Commercial Large Power Service Industrial Large Power Service(Primary Metering & Transformer Ownership) Industrial Large Power Service(Primary Metering) Industrial Large Power Service(Transformer Ownership) Industrial

439

Reedsburg Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reedsburg Utility Comm Reedsburg Utility Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Reedsburg Utility Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15804 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership Discount Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

440

Kauai Island Utility Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island Utility Cooperative Island Utility Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name Kauai Island Utility Cooperative Place Hawaii Utility Id 10071 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location HICC Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png D Residential Service Residential General Light and Power Service Schedule G Commercial General Light and Power Service Schedule J Commercial Large Power Secondary Schedule P Industrial Large Power Service Schedule L Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Rice Lake Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rice Lake Utilities Rice Lake Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Rice Lake Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15938 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial

442

Methods for and products of processing nanostructure nitride, carbonitride and oxycarbonitride electrode power materials by utilizing sol gel technology for supercapacitor applications  

SciTech Connect

Metal nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder with high surface area (up to 150 m.sup.2 /g) is prepared by using sol-gel process. The metal organic precursor, alkoxides or amides, is synthesized firstly. The metal organic precursor is modified by using unhydrolyzable organic ligands or templates. A wet gel is formed then by hydrolysis and condensation process. The solvent in the wet gel is then be removed supercritically to form porous amorphous hydroxide. This porous hydroxide materials is sintered to 725.degree. C. under the ammonia flow and porous nitride powder is formed. The other way to obtain high surface area nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder is to pyrolyze polymerized templated metal amides aerogel in an inert atmosphere. The electrochemical capacitors are prepared by using sol-gel prepared nitride, carbonitride, and oxycarbonitride powder. Two methods are used to assemble the capacitors. Electrode is formed either by pressing the mixture of nitride powder and binder to a foil, or by depositing electrode coating onto metal current collector. The binder or coating is converted into a continuous network of electrode material after thermal treatment to provide enhanced energy and power density. Liquid electrolyte is soaked into porous electrode. The electrochemical capacitor assembly further has a porous separator layer between two electrodes/electrolyte and forming a unit cell.

Huang, Yuhong (West Hills, CA); Wei, Oiang (West Hills, CA); Chu, Chung-tse (Chatsworth, CA); Zheng, Haixing (Oak Park, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Athens Utility Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Athens Utility Board Athens Utility Board Place Tennessee Utility Id 947 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Power Rates - Residential Residential General Power Rate - Schedule GSA: Commercial General Power Rate - Schedule GSA: Demand 1000KW-5000KW Commercial General Power Rate - Schedule GSA: Demand 50KW-1000KW Commercial General Power Rate-Schedule GSB Industrial Outdoor Lighting(Part A) Lighting Outdoor Lighting: High Pressure Sodium 1000W Lighting Outdoor Lighting: High Pressure Sodium 100W Lighting

445

City of Fredericksburg, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Texas Utility Id 6758 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Non-Demand Electric Rate (Commercial / Secondary) Commercial Large Power Electric / Large Secondary Rate Industrial Residential Residential Security Lighting - 175 to 400 watts Lighting Security Lighting - 400 watts or larger Lighting Street Lighting Electric Rate Schedule Lighting security Light Electric Rate - 175 watts or smaller Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0869/kWh Commercial: $0.0823/kWh

446

City of Peru, Illinois (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru Peru Place Illinois Utility Id 14840 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Economic Development Rate Commercial Large Power Industrial Municipal Commercial Non-Profit Hospital Commercial Residential Residential Time of Day Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0904/kWh Commercial: $0.0947/kWh Industrial: $0.0768/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

447

City of Niles, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niles Niles Place Michigan Utility Id 13604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DOMESTIC USE - IN CITY Residential DOMESTIC USE - OUT OF CITY Residential DUSK TO DAWN OUTDOOR LIGHTING (1000 watt) Lighting DUSK TO DAWN OUTDOOR LIGHTING (175 watt) Lighting DUSK TO DAWN OUTDOOR LIGHTING (400 watt) Lighting GENERAL SERVICE -IN CITY AND OUT OF CITY Less than 25 kW Commercial GENERAL SERVICE 1 - CITY AND NON-CITY More than 25 kW Commercial MEDIUM INDUSTRIAL POWER(Distribution Voltage) Industrial

448

Town of Mansfield, Massachusetts (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mansfield Mansfield Place Massachusetts Utility Id 11586 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png BACKUP AND STANDYBY RATE Commercial COMMERCIAL SERVICE RATE Commercial F-1 Firm Transmission Rate Commercial GENERAL SERVICE POWER RATE Commercial GENERAL SERVICE PRIMARY VOLTAGE Commercial NON FIRM TRANSMISSION SERVICE Commercial RATE 49- STREET LIGHTING RATE Lighting RESIDENTIAL SERVICE RATES Residential STANDARD COST CHARGE SCHEDULE Residential

449

Meeker Coop Light & Power Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meeker Coop Light & Power Assn Meeker Coop Light & Power Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Meeker Coop Light & Power Assn Place Minnesota Utility Id 12227 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cycle Air Conditioning Residential Dual Fuel Space Heating Residential Heat Pump and Cooling Residential Irrigation Industrial Large Power Peak Alert: 350 KVA or Greater Industrial Large Power Peak Alert: 350 KVA or Greater- Non Control Commercial

450

Jefferson Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jefferson Utilities Jefferson Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 9690 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional Time-of-Day Service 7am-9pm with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Service between 50kW and 200kW Demand Optional

451

New Service Opportunities for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Faced with intensifying competitive pressures, many utilities are offering non-traditional services that provide new revenue sources. This report provides an overview of utility experience with diversification into non-traditional areas and identifies meaningful utility opportunities in several areas. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index.asp .

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

Green Power Network: Green Pricing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Utility Programs by State Table of Utility Programs by State List of Utilities Offering Green Power Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Green Pricing Green pricing is an optional utility service that allows customers an opportunity to support a greater level of utility company investment in renewable energy technologies. Participating customers pay a premium on their electric bills to cover the incremental cost of the additional renewable energy. To date, more than 860 utilities, including investor-owned, municipal utilities, and cooperatives, offer a green pricing option. Table of Utility Programs by State List of Utilities Offering Green Power Top Ten Utility Green Power Programs National Green Pricing Map

453

Private-sector power generation in Thailand: potential, impediments, and policy issues. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Royal Thai Government (RTG) is exploring ways of involving the private sector in electricity generation. The study: (1) assesses the sector's potential for non-utility power generation, including such options as industrial cogeneration, agricultural-waste-based energy systems, and large-scale systems using domestic fossil fuels; (2) reviews existing power-sector institutions in Thailand and analyzes the major issues and impediments associated with private-sector power generation; and (3) based on U.S. experience, describes possible approaches to establishing the price of non-utility electricity.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Electric Power Monthly January 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly January 2012 With Data for November 2011 ... Electric Utility Power Generation Station (PGS) 2 CA 57696 1 3.8 OBG GT

455

29-11-061ETSAP Wind power in the EC RES2020 project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs 4. RES2020 Project ­ Intelligent Energy ­ Europe (IEE) ­ EU RES Directives ­ Project overview29-11-061ETSAP Wind power in the EC RES2020 project Wind power in technology-rich energy system costs Max. contribution margin/utility Constraints: Demands Commodity balances Flow-capacity Non

456

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Research and development of a 3 MW power plant from the design, development, and demonstration of a 100 KW power system utilizing the direct contact heat exchanger concept for geothermal brine recovery project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design phase for the 100 KW unit consumed the months of May through November 1978, with the final design selected as having a direct contact boiler and condenser, a single-stage radial inflow induction turbine-generator using isopentane as the working fluid, and a single cell ejector-type cooling tower. The unit was constructed on two, forty-foot flatbed trailers between the months of October 1978 and June 1979. Systems start-up testing, in-field modifications, unit operation, and performance testing were performed between July and December 1979. AP and L (Arkansas Power and Light) personnel assumed responsibility of the unit at that time and conducted further maintenance, operations, and testing through August 1980.

Huebner, A.W.; Wall, D.A.; Herlacher, T.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Carbon Power & Light, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Power & Light, Inc Carbon Power & Light, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Power & Light, Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 2998 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service 1-Phase Non-Seasonal Commercial Commercial General Service 1-Phase Non-Seasonal Residential Residential General Service 1-Phase Seasonal Commercial Commercial General Service 1-Phase Seasonal Residential Residential General Service 3-Phase Commercial Commercial

459

Texas-New Mexico Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas-New Mexico Power Co Texas-New Mexico Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas-New Mexico Power Co Place Texas Service Territory Texas Website www.tnmp.com Green Button Landing Page www.smartmetertexas.com/C Green Button Reference Page www.emeter.com/smart-grid Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 40051 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Non-Roadway Outdoor Lighting Service (Closed) - Lamp-Flood Light, - 400W, MV Lighting Non-Roadway Outdoor Lighting Service (Closed) - Lamp-Flood Light, - 250W,

460

McCook Public Power District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McCook Public Power District McCook Public Power District Place Nebraska Utility Id 10550 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting HPS Non-Metered Lighting Area Lighting HPS Residential/Non-Domestic Metered Lighting Area Lighting HPS Residential/Non-Domestic Unmetered Lighting Area Lighting HPS Street Lighting Lighting Commercial Oil Commercial Commercial Oil, Load Management Rates Commercial Idel Fee 1 Phase Commercial Idel Fee 3 Phase 150-250 HP Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "non utility power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Category:Utility Company Aliases | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aliases Aliases Jump to: navigation, search Category for Utility Company Aliases. Pages in category "Utility Company Aliases" The following 155 pages are in this category, out of 155 total. A ACE AEP Ohio Alaska Power Co Ameren Illinois Ameren Missouri American Electric Power Co., Inc. Anaheim Public Utilities Anaheim Utilities B BGE BlueStar Boston Edison Company Buckeye Irrigation District Butler County Rural P P D BWL C Calpine Power America LP Calpine Power Management CEMC CenterPoint Energy Houston Electric, LLC Central Illinois Light Co City of Berea Municipal Utilities, Kentucky City of Cornelius, North Carolina (Utility Company) City of Crlisle, Iowa (Utility Company) City of Los Angeles, California (Utility Company) City of Muscoda, Wisconsin (Utility Company) City Utilities

462

Manitowoc Public Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Utilities Public Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Manitowoc Public Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 11571 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering Discount with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service Primary Metering and Transformer Ownership

463

Bristol Virginia Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bristol Virginia Utilities Bristol Virginia Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Bristol Virginia Utilities Place Virginia Utility Id 2248 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub.