Sample records for noaa surface meteorology

  1. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................11 Table of Maximum Recorded Water Level Residuals (Storm Surge.................................................................17 Time-Series Plots of Observed, Predicted and Residual Water LevelsNOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY Silver Spring, Maryland January 24

  2. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE ISAAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services Photo Credit: NOAA National high tide cycle was not measured due to station/sensor damage (Appendix 3). Individual time series

  3. NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy: Methodology Energy Technology (RET) projects. These climatological profiles are used for designing systems that have of the renewable energy resource potential can be determined for any location on the globe. That estimate may

  4. Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

  5. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg).

  6. ARM Surface Meteorology Systems Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Surface Meteorology Systems consist mainly of conventional in situ sensors that obtain a defined “core” set of measurements. The core set of measurements is: Barometric Pressure (kPa), Temperature (°C), Relative Humidity (%), Arithmetic-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), Vector-Averaged Wind Speed (m/s), and Vector-Averaged Wind Direction (deg). The sensors that collect the core variables are mounted at the standard heights defined for each variable: • Winds: 10 meters • Temperature and Relative Humidity: 2 meters • Barometric Pressure: 1 meter. Depending upon the geographical location, different models and types of sensors may be used to measure the core variables due to the conditions experienced at those locations. Most sites have additional sensors that measure other variables that are unique to that site or are well suited for the climate of the location but not at others.

  7. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  8. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 143 NOAA Coral Reef Watch 50 km Satellite Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar-terrestrial sciences. From these sources, it develops and disseminates environmental data, energy development and distribution, global food supplies, and the development of natural resources. Mark Eakin1 William Skirving2,3 Tyler R. L. Christensen1,2 Alan E. Strong1,2 Jianke Li1,2 1 NOAA Coral

  9. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  10. Surface Meteorology, Barrow, Alaska, Area A, B, C and D, Ongoing from 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Bob; Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow. These data assist in the calculation of the energy balance at the land surface and are also useful as inputs into modeling activities.

  11. Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research #12;SMCD Roadmap 2 NOAA/NESDIS/STAR Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division Roadmap September 2005 NOAA Science Center, 5200 Auth Road, Room 712, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;SMCD

  12. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMay-June 2010 Volume 14, Number 3 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicator that 2010 will be an active year is NOAA's accumulated cycle energy (ACE) index, which measures factors that favor tropical cyclone activity. This probability is one of the highest ever issued by NOAA total seasonal activity based on the strength and duration of named storms and hurricanes. The ACE range

  13. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December 2009 Volume 13, Number 6 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research located on Virginia KeyAtlantic With an estimated 40% of the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) from fossil fuels having entered the oceans since the start studies in the Atlantic and equatorial Pacific performed by NOAA researchers and their affiliates. Carbon

  14. active region noaa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NWS, Allan Darling, Paula Davidson 23 NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report Geosciences Websites Summary: and Hawaii Meteorological Grids for NCEP Atmospheric...

  15. air medical meteorology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameters during 96 h transport to SPC Boyer, Edmond 105 NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report Geosciences Websites Summary: and Hawaii Meteorological...

  16. Validation of GOES-Derived Surface Radiation Using NOAA's Physical Retrieval Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was part of a multiyear collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to produce high-quality, satellite-based, solar resource datasets for the United States. High-quality, solar resource assessment accelerates technology deployment by making a positive impact on decision making and reducing uncertainty in investment decisions. Satellite-based solar resource datasets are used as a primary source in solar resource assessment. This is mainly because satellites provide larger areal coverage and longer periods of record than ground-based measurements. With the advent of newer satellites with increased information content and faster computers that can process increasingly higher data volumes, methods that were considered too computationally intensive are now feasible. One class of sophisticated methods for retrieving solar resource information from satellites is a two-step, physics-based method that computes cloud properties and uses the information in a radiative transfer model to compute solar radiation. This method has the advantage of adding additional information as satellites with newer channels come on board. This report evaluates the two-step method developed at NOAA and adapted for solar resource assessment for renewable energy with the goal of identifying areas that can be improved in the future.

  17. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJuly-August 2009 Volume13,Number4 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hurricanes with winds above 110 mph (categories 3, 4, and 5 on the Saffir- Simpon hurricane scale). In May been shown to curb hurricane activity in the Atlantic basin by increasing vertical wind shear, which of the Lesser Antilles. Ocean Surface Wind Product Derived from Satellite Data A new ocean surface wind product

  18. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  19. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  20. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-74 OBSERVATIONS OF CURRENTS, SURFACE WINDS AND BOTTOM PRESSURE IN SHELIKOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN SHELIKOF STRAIT, AUTUMN 1984 A. T. Roach J. D. Schumacher P. Stabeno Pacific Marine Environmental OF CURRENTS, SURFACE WINDS AND BOTTOM PRESSURE IN SHELIKOF STRAIT, AUTUMN 1984 A.T. Roach J.D. Schumacher P

  1. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Barrow (METTWR4H) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights (2m, 10m, 20m and 40m) on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at the base of the tower. Additionally, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer and an Ultrasonic wind speed sensor are located near the 2m level for comparison purposes.

  2. Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions in South Florida and its possible impacts on the number of Asthma cases: Five years of correlations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Contrasting Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter measurements with meteorological conditions, wind speed and direction), and air quality indicators (ozone O3 and particulate matter PM2.5) are presented in this study. Surface Ozone and Particulate Matter have been both important triggers of asthma

  3. Oumbe A., Blanc Ph., Schroedter-Homscheidt M., Wald L., 2010. Solar surface irradiance from new meteorological satellite data. In Proceedings of the 29th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tech, Center for Energy and Processes, BP 207, 06904 Sophia Antipolis, France b German Aerospace CenterOumbe A., Blanc Ph., Schroedter-Homscheidt M., Wald L., 2010. Solar surface irradiance from new, 320-328, doi:10.3233/978-1-60750-494-8-320 Solar surface irradiance from new meteorological satellite

  4. Comparison of surface meteorological data representativeness for the Weldon Spring transport and dispersion modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is conducting the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project under the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). The major goals of the SFMP are to eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment that associated with contamination at SFMP sites and to make surplus property available for other uses to the extent possible. This report presents the results of analysis of available meteorological data from stations near the Weldon Spring site. Data that are most representative of site conditions are needed to accurately model the transport and dispersion of air pollutants associated with remedial activities. Such modeling will assist the development of mitigative measures. 17 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Impacts of Large-scale Surface Modifications on Meteorological Conditions and Energy Use: A 10-Region Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    104. Pielke, R, 1984: Mesoscale Meteorological Modeling . •the CSUMM, as any other mesoscale model, is typically runApplications International Mesoscale Model. SYSAPP- 921069,

  6. 255FEBRUARY 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | he Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    that determine the surface energy budget and the sea­ice mass balance in the Arctic (Moritz et al. 1993; Perovich of the vertical and horizontal energy exchanges within the ocean­ice­atmosphere system. The SHEBA pro- gram for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; TURENNE--Canadian Coast Guard, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; SERREZE

  7. Forecast of surface layer meteorological parameters at Cerro Paranal with a mesoscale atmospherical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lascaux, Franck; Fini, Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article aims at proving the feasibility of the forecast of all the most relevant classical atmospherical parameters for astronomical applications (wind speed and direction, temperature) above the ESO ground-base site of Cerro Paranal with a mesoscale atmospherical model called Meso-Nh. In a precedent paper we have preliminarily treated the model performances obtained in reconstructing some key atmospherical parameters in the surface layer 0-30~m studying the bias and the RMSE on a statistical sample of 20 nights. Results were very encouraging and it appeared therefore mandatory to confirm such a good result on a much richer statistical sample. In this paper, the study was extended to a total sample of 129 nights between 2007 and 2011 distributed in different parts of the solar year. This large sample made our analysis more robust and definitive in terms of the model performances and permitted us to confirm the excellent performances of the model. Besides, we present an independent analysis of the model p...

  8. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    (Raytheon Information Solutions) TEST READINESS REVIEW REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-9.3 and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 3. All 10/1/2009 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR

  9. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    TITLE: DG-10.3: CODE TEST DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 No version 1 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-10.3, Code Test Document) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 3. All 10/1/2009 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-10

  10. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    GUIDELINE PG-1 ENTERPRISE PRODUCT LIFECYCLE PROCESS GUIDELINE Version 3.0 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR PROCESS GUIDELINE PG-1 Version: 3.0 Date: October 1, 2009 TITLE: Enterprise Product Lifecycle Process Guideline Page 2 of 2 Hardcopy Uncontrolled TITLE: PG-1: ENTERPRISE PRODUCT LIFECYCLE PROCESS GUIDELINE VERSION 3

  11. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    GUIDELINE PG-2 ENTERPRISE PRODUCT LIFECYCLE PROCESS GUIDELINE Version 3.0 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR PROCESS GUIDELINE PG-2 Version: 3.0 Date: October 1, 2009 TITLE: Enterprise Product Lifecycle Tailoring Guideline Page 2 of 2 Hardcopy Uncontrolled TITLE: PG-2: ENTERPRISE PRODUCT LIFECYCLE TAILORING GUIDELINE VERSION

  12. NOAA implements annual catch limits for all managed fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continental Shelf SEPT NOAA completes construction of supercomputers Stratus and Cirrus that improve weather NOAA releases Scientific Integrity Policy NOAA launches GOES-15 NOAA launches Suomi-NPP satellite NOAA

  13. www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed NOAA FY2012 Reorganization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Operations. The NOAA Central Library will move from the National Oceanographic Data Center to the NOAA Office of Commerce's authority under the National Climate Program Act (15 U.S.C. §2901, et seq.), the principal goal's overall science enterprise. In doing so, OAR will renew and expand its role as the focus for long

  14. METEOROLOGY 130 Boundary Layer Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    4) Turbulence Kinetic Energy · TKE budget and terms · Stability concepts · Richardson number 5) Measuring the Boundary Layer · Balloons · Radars · Sodars · Towers (micrometeorology) · Measuring Turbulence Time Series Analysis 8) Similarity Theory and Turbulence Closure 9) Surface Energy Budgets 10) Special

  15. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report October 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) to find good locations for meteorological equipment (both temporary and permanent), surface energy balance. Several possible energy balance sites were located. OU plans to install instruments on a 1500 ft radio Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. Progress on numerical modeling of flow and dispersion around, over

  16. Aircraft as a meteorological sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Meteorological Institute 2 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Photo cover: A KLM Airbus A330-200 landsAircraft as a meteorological sensor Using Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance data to derive upper air Meteorological Institute 3 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Aircraft as a meteorological sensor Using

  17. IMPLEMENTING THE NOAA NEXT GENERATION STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate modeling using NOAA's high performance computing abilities; · Expand the Climate Portal through

  18. Partial Support for the Federal Committee for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Samuel P

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE E-link Report Number DOE/ER62778 1999-2012 Please see attached Final Technical Report (size too large to post here). Annual Products Provided to DOE: Federal Plan for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research; National Hurricane Operations Plan; Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference Summary Report. All reports and publications can be found on the OFCM website, www.ofcm.noaa.gov.

  19. anemone ar noaa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling A NOAA, Physical Sciences Division Michael Fiorino and Steven E. Koch NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Global of NOAA's global forecast model. Unfortunately, our...

  20. NOAA Committee Memberships, 2004-2008 Eddie N. Bernard, Member, NOAA Tsunami Program Team, 2005-present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Koehn, Member, NOAA Science, Technology, and Infusion Program Team, 2003-2005 Mark P. Koehn, Member

  1. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  2. Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin 2009 NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research ......................................................................................................................................... 6 Sensor Physics Branch

  3. Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Tec / Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft L. M. McMillin D. Q. Wark J. M. Siomkajlo P. G. Abel A. Werbowetzki. E. Bittner C. M. Hayden #12;UDC 551.507.362.2:551.508.2:551.501.7:535-1 Physics Infrared radiation

  4. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Foundation.36 37 #12;2 Capsule Summary1 The Community Earth System Model provides the research for earth system15 studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth system model, its16 at the above DOI once it is available. © 2013 American Meteorological Society #12;1 The Community Earth System

  5. Air pollution meteorology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eagleman, J.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Pollution Meteorology is divided into three parts: air pollution fundamentals; concentration calculations and distributions; and pollution and meteorological interactions. The first section includes chapters on the following topics: the problem; measurements, sources, and standards; air stagnation and pollutant index; and effects. The second section of the book includes chapters on diffusion theory, the Gaussian plume dispersion model, plume rise, various dispersion models, scale considerations, and concentration trends. The third and final section (on pollution and meteorological interactions) begins with two chapters on radiative and wind effects on dispersion, and then follows with chapters on acid rain, the ozone hole, the greenhouse effect, and nuclear winter. In summary, Air Pollution Meteorology does a good job of covering the field for physics, chemistry, and engineering students who want to obtain an overview of the subject.

  6. Hurricane Floyd, 1999/NOAA hurricanes...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Hurricane Floyd, 1999/NOAA hurricanes... A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National's Fury FEMA #12;2 The term hurricane has its origin in the indigenous religions of old civilizations was called Huracan. Hurricanes may not be considered evil but they are one of nature's most powerful storms

  7. A new microtelesensor chip for meteorology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manges, W.W.; Smith, S.F.; Britton, C.L. [and others

    1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technology exploiting commercial, micro-sensors developed for atomic force microscopy offers breakthrough capability in high accuracy wireless sensors for meteorological measurements. Historically sensors used in air-borne and buoy-based platforms required compromises in performance to achieve the low-weight and low power requirements of the mobile platforms. Recent innovations in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) provided opportunities to reduce size, weight, and power requirements but each sensor required a specially fabricated device with inherent calibration, repeatability, and traceability problems. This new approach allows identical sensors to be fabricated on the same semiconductor substrate as the conditioning electronics and the telemetry components. Exploiting semiconductor fabrication technology offers the potential to reduce fabrication costs to a few dollars per component. Sensing humidity, temperature and pressure have been demonstrated with plans for meteorological deployment scheduled for later in 1997. Cost, reliability, size, power consumption, and accuracy are key factors in the deployment of advanced meteorological sensor arrays. ORNL is actively integrating the sensing technologies, electronic processing, and telemetry that build a family of sensors with multiple-input capabilities. One of the key elements in ORNL`s sensor technology is coated microcantilever arrays, which form a powerful universal platform for multiple physical and chemical measurements. Telemetry is also being developed to add robust spread-spectrum data transmission capabilities to the necessary signal processing electronics. In collaboration with the NOAA Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Lab, a chip-level temperature/humidity module with onboard telemetry is slated for demonstration later in 1997. Future additions would include sensors for atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, turbulence measurement, and radiometry.

  8. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  9. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, Margaret

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  10. The NOAA Central Library To efficiently and effectively provide NOAA staff with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to serve as the center in NOAA for providing NOAA staff with needed infor- mation and knowledge management on time-saving knowledge management and library resources to make research more efficient · Bibliographies and cooperation among scientists engaged in similar work. · Access, preservation, and permanent storage of NOAA

  11. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary and interpretation of information from National Weather Service watches and warnings by10 decision makers such an outlier to the regional severe weather climatology. An analysis of the synoptic and13 mesoscale

  12. NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Program(UAS) Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    FisheriesPartners: NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service / Southwest Fisheries Science Center Enerdyne

  13. Effects of urban land cover modifications in a mesoscale meteorological model on surface temperature and heat fluxes in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    in the modeling domain was calculated as part of the energy balance equation according to: E = a C CuM[qs(Tg) -qs MM5. The single urban category in the existing 25-category United States Geological Survey (USGS surface energy fluxes and ground temperature. Planetary boundary layer processes were included via the MRF

  14. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . http://www.ncddc.noaa.gov/website/CHP/viewer.htm · Joint Analysis Group (JAG) The Joint Analysis Group

  15. School of Meteorology Comprehensive Exam Policy Below is the Comprehensive Exam Policy as approved by the School of Meteorology Faculty at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    , tropical meteorology, mesoscale meteorology, turbulence and computational fluid dynamics. Normally

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: meteorological instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meteorological instrumentation Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind...

  17. Meteorological database for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, M.G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Indoor Air Meteorological Database for the United StatesUC-402 Meteorological Database for the United States M.G.Abstract A meteorological database has been developed to aid

  18. ACE 1992 summary data report: Aircraft measurements of meteorological parameters and SF6. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, B.A.; Boatman, J.F.; Wellman, D.L.; Wilkison, S.W.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological parameters and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were measured with the NOAA King Air C-90 aircraft during October 1992 in central Florida as part of the Air Force Technical Applications Command (AFTAC) Airborne Collection Equipment (ACE 1992) experiment. Airborne sampling was used to locate a plume containing SF6 as a tracer. Before take off, a trajectory model was used to provide the expected plume path. An onboard tracking program gave current predictions of the location of the plume, based on the location of tetroons expected to travel with the plume. Once the plume was located, samples were collected of triethyl phosphate oxide and methyl salicylate, which had been released with the SF6. This report discusses the objectives of ACE 1992, the instrumentation used and the data obtained by the NOAA King Air ground and airborne operation.

  19. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols........................................................................... 5 Clam Dredge Construction and Repair

  20. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys January 7, 2004 Prepared by: Members..................................................................................................................................... 5 NOAA Fisheries Sea Scallop Dredge Survey Protocols............................................................................................................................. 10 Changes to Regional Scallop Dredge Protocols

  1. Master thesis in Leipzig Cooperation of TROPOS Leipzig and Solar Energy Meteorology at Uni Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master thesis in Leipzig ­ Cooperation of TROPOS Leipzig and Solar Energy Meteorology at Uni in meteorology, satellite remote sensing and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good at the surface can be determined from satellite data using the Heliosat method, which is widely used for solar

  2. Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

  3. Interoperable Documentation Ted Habermann, NOAA/NESDIS/NGDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interoperable Documentation Ted Habermann, NOAA/NESDIS/NGDC NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory, June.ngdc.noaa.gov/eds/tds/oceanSITESMetadataAssessment.html Spirals: https://www.nosc.noaa.gov/dmc/swg/wiki/index.php?title=Creating_Good_Documentation Questions Documentation Life Cycle: OAIS Mandatory Archive Responsibility: Ensure that the information to be preserved

  4. New Surface Meteorological Measurements at SGP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R -Electrodes NewStaff ResearchNM,

  5. SATELLITE METEOROLOGY Guosheng Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    , USA Key Words: absorption, brightness temperature, radiometer, radiative transfer equation, remote Remote Sensing 2.1 Radiative Transfer in the Atmosphere 2.2 Thermal Radiation under Clear-Sky 2 Variation 3.2.4 Latent Heating 3.3 Clouds and Surface Energy Fluxes 3.3.1 Cloud Properties 3.3.2 Surface

  6. NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration STRATEGIC PLAN FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 U.S. Department information for decision making. Mary M. Glackin Assistant Administrator for Program Planning and Integration and Integration II. PPI Outcomes and Strategies III. PPI's Role in Executing Programs Appendices 1. Program

  7. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Monthly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with GSD's Homeland Security Project. The Earth System Research Laboratory's Global Systems Division (GSD's Homeland Security Project 2. Wildfire Smoke Forecasts 3. HYSPLIT Modifications for NOAA's Homeland Security Change Science Program (CCSP) Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 3.2 10. Air Quality Forecast Model

  8. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reporting ozonesonde stations), the ozone in the 16-24 km layer of the low stratosphere decreased by aboutNOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT ­ Extreme Turbulence (ET) Probe 2. Climate Research Committee Report 3. Global

  9. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report August 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT ­ Hurricane P3 Turbulence Studies 2. HIGHLIGHT ­ Smart Balloon Sets Distance Record ­ The Las Vegas Urban Test Bed 5. HIGHLIGHT ­ Urban Dispersion ­ New York City 6. Global Umkehr-Ozone Data as the '04 season gets into full swing. jeff.french@noaa.gov #12;2. Highlight ­ Smart Balloon Sets Distance

  10. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory Contents 1. Highlight -- UrbaNet 2. Highlight -- TEXAQSII Smart Balloon Deployment 3. New WRF in meetings with military, city, and commercial entities in the area. Memoranda of Understanding.carter@noaa.gov 2. Highlight -- TEXAQSII Smart Balloon Deployment. The FRD smart balloon team participated

  11. A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA Documentation: It's not just discovery... 50% change this settles the issue.. #12;New Documentation Needs For skeptics, the 1,000 or so e-mails and documents hacked Communities - Users Documentation: communicating with the future #12;Geoffrey Moore has attributed the S

  12. MAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    to understand onshore, offshore, and airborne wind power. Topics include: forces affecting-level winds: Pressure Gradient Force and Coriolis (pressure surfaces, geostrophic flowMAST/GEOG 667: Wind Power Meteorology Fall 2013, 3 credit hours 1

  13. Time-frequency Study of Nearshore Wind and Wave Processes Primary Investigator: Paul Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    represent a primary driving force for dynamic processes in the oceans and lakes. As long as wind wavesTime-frequency Study of Nearshore Wind and Wave Processes Primary Investigator: Paul Liu - NOAA, Chen H. Tsai - National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung Overview Surface wind-generated gravity waves

  14. Computational methods in wind power meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational methods in wind power meteorology Bo Hoffmann Jørgensen, Søren Ott, Niels Nørmark, Jakob Mann and Jake Badger Title: Computational methods in wind power meteorology Department: Wind in connection with the project called Computational meth- ods in wind power meteorology which was supported

  15. Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .bom.gov.au Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report | Low pressure system over southeast Australia A low pressure system of southeast Australia. In central Victoria, the low caused a storm surge and tidal flooding as well as large to power and transport as well as widespread coastal erosion. The strong winds caused downed trees, power

  16. Technical Work Plan For: Meteorological Monitoring Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Green

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorological monitoring and analysis program has five objectives. (1) Acquire qualified meteorological data from YMP meteorological monitoring network using appropriate controls on measuring and test equipment. Because this activity is monitoring (i.e., recording naturally occurring events) pre-test predictions are not applicable. All work will be completed in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Repository Development (ORD) administrative procedures and Bechtel SAIC Co., LLC (BSC) line procedures. The meteorological monitoring program includes measuring and test equipment calibrations, operational checks, preventive and corrective maintenance, and data collection. (2) Process the raw monitoring data collected in the field and submit technically reviewed, traceable data to the Technical Data Management System (TDMS) and the Records Processing Center. (3) Develop analyses or calculations to provide information to data requesters and provide data sets as requested. (4) Provide precipitation amounts to Site Operations to support requirements to perform inspections in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (implemented in LP-OM-050Q-BSC) following storm events of greater than 0.5 inches. The program also provides meteorological data during extreme weather conditions (e.g., high winds, rainstorms, etc.) to support decisions regarding worker safety. (5) Collect samples of precipitation for chemical and isotopic analysis by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The BSC ES&H Environmental Compliance organization is responsible for performing this work. Data from calendar-year periods are submitted to the TDMS to provide YMP users with qualified meteorological data for scientific modeling and analyses, engineering designs of surface facilities, performance assessment analyses, and operational safety issues.

  17. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009 Timothy P. Boyer John I. Antonov Olga K. Baranova ......................................................................................... 28 1.1.8. Application software interfaces

  18. Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMaio, Ernest Vincent, 1964-

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces is a collection of four individual essays which focus on the characteristics and tactile qualities of surfaces within a variety of perceived landscapes. Each essay concentrates on a unique surface theme and purpose; ...

  19. GORDON GUNTER NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER conducts fishery and marine resource research supporting NOAA's National Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . GORDON GUNTER normally operates in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. NOAA Marine and Aviation Ship Displacement: 1,546 tons · Gross Tonnage: 1,904 (Int'l) 1486 (U.S.) · Net Tonnage: 971 tons (U Manufacturer: Markey o Model: COM-7 o Drive: Electric, 7.5 HP o Drum Capacity: 2000 m of .322 EM Cable o

  20. NOAA/NMFS Developments LaCovey Is Named NOAA Public Affairs Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of fish on board, fishing without a permit, or failing to return prohibited species to the ocean. All a permit in U.S. waters in the Gulf of Mexico. Seizures and fines lev- ied against other countries were and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). LaCovey was a presidential staff assistant in 1976-77 and an assist- ant

  1. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STORM AND ANTECEDENT PRECIPITATION OVER TECHNICAL MEMORANDUMS National Weather Service. Office of Hydrology Series The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate prompt distribution of scientific

  2. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS OF OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION OVER THE BIGHydrology (HYDRO) ofthe National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river and water supply, and conducts pertinent research and development NOAA Teclmical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate

  3. NOAA Support for Puget Sound Shellfish: Native Oysters, Abalone &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Support for Puget Sound Shellfish: Native Oysters, Abalone & a Healthy Marine Habitatnoaa shellfish aquaculture and conservation in Puget Sound as part of NOAA's comprehensive strategy,000 to Rebuild Native Oysters in Puget Sound According to The Nature Conservancy, "shellfish reefs are the most

  4. NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA. This year, for example, climate data have been immensely valuable to the construction industry on Oahu October that the winter season would be much wetter than usual, his firm went into mitigation mode. PVT

  5. NOAA All-Hazards Concept of Operations Handbook December 2013 NOAA All-Hazards Concept of Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Operations for All-Hazards Incident Management (CONOPS) establishes an agency-wide framework Framework (NRF). This CONOPS covers the full spectrum of all-hazards incident management for NOAA. NOAA, implements the Incident Command System. This CONOPS does not change specific authorities and responsibilities

  6. An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

  7. DID YOU KNOW Facts about NOAA and its Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Response Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and livelihoods. ... NOAA's Satellite Analysis Branch has provided "shapefiles" depicting the location of spilled

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: advanced meteorological measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meteorological measurement Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy...

  9. CHAPTER 3 | NOAA PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, & CONSTRUCTION At Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the NOAA-N Prime spacecraft is set up for testing. NOAA-N Prime is the latest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,364 24,364 24,364 24,364 Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) Technology Infusion: NOAA

  10. Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting Nithya N. Vijayakumar {rramachandran, xli}@itsc.uah.edu Abstract-- Mesoscale meteorology forecasting as a data driven application Triggers, Data Mining, Stream Processing, Meteorology Forecasting I. INTRODUCTION Mesoscale meteorologists

  11. Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Solar Radiation and Meteorological Data Support for the Long Island Solar Farm and NSERCand NSERC-9 2011March 8 9, 2011 #12;LISF Solar Radiation and Meteorological Sensor Network ·· Technology Needs on intermittent source of solar radiationintermittent source of solar radiation #12;LISF Solar Radiation

  12. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier Office: Three, 1:00 ­ 2:30 pm Required Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes and physical analysis techniques to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale

  13. TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION Mesoscale Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    TENURE-TRACK FACULTY POSITION ­ Mesoscale Meteorology Colorado State University The Department or associate level faculty position specializing in mesoscale meteorology. Exceptionally qualified candidates in linking models and/or theory with observations for the study of mesoscale processes. The successful

  14. ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATS 641: Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2014 TR, 1:00-2:50 PM, ATS Room 101 Course Description and Prerequisites This course will cover the theory and application of mesoscale meteorology, and how mesoscale, students will be able to: · Describe the basic theories describing mesoscale weather phenomena · Understand

  15. METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4433, Mesoscale Meteorology Spring 2013 Instructor Dr. Kelvin K. Droegemeier (kkd Text Markowski, P. and Y. Richardson: Mesoscale Meteorology in Midlatitudes. Wiley-Blackwell, 430pp to mesoscale phenomena. Topics include definition of the term "mesoscale," radar principles and interpretation

  16. Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Jules Beersma #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. A Onderzoekschool (BBOS) #12;Extreme hydro-meteorological events and their probabilities Extreme hydro

  17. Re-evaluation of total and Umkehr ozone data from NOAA-CMDL Dobson spectrophotometer observatories. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komhyr, W.D.; Quincy, D.M.; Grass, R.D.; Koenig, G.L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)] [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to improve the quality of total ozone and Umkehr data obtained in the past at the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory and the Dobson spectrophotometer ozone observatories. The authors present results of total ozone data re-evaluations for ten stations: Byrd, Antarctica; Fairbanks, Alaska; Hallett, Antarctica; Huancayo, Peru; Haute Provence, France; Lauder, New Zealand; Perth, Australia; Poker Flat, Alaska; Puerto Montt, Chile; and South Pole, Antarctica. The improved data will be submitted in early 1996 to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Ozone Data Center (WODC), and the Atmospheric Environment Service for archiving. Considerable work has been accomplished, also, in reevaluating Umkehr data from seven of the stations, viz., Huancayo, Haute Provence, Lauder, Perth, Poker Flat, Boulder, Colorado; and Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

  18. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    world's top five most powerful computers - the Argonne National Laboratory's 557 TF IBM Blue GeneP and Oak Ridge National Laboratory's 263 TF Cray XT4. NOAA researchers will also...

  19. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

  20. NOAA Technical Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;450 NOAA Technical Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental Osteology in Taxonomic Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental Osteology in Taxonomic and Systematic Studies

  1. NOAA Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to 2:30PM EDT Hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this webinar will demonstrate the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit. Register for this webinar...

  2. Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamill, Tom

    Systems Division Stephen J. Lord Director, NWS NCEP Environmental Modeling Center 19 July 2010 (303) 4973060 tom.hamill@noaa.gov #12; 2 Executive Summary The accuracy of many

  3. In the Nation's Best Interest: Making the Most of NOAA's Science Enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...........................................................................................................7 Research Priorities for NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan...............................................................................24 Appendix IV: List of individuals and groups interviewed by Task Force and SAB Working Groups....................................................................25 Appendix V: Overview of the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan

  4. Rear Admiral David A. Score Deputy Director, NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horizon oil spill response. Since his commission as a NOAA Corps officer in 1990, RDML Score has served Score commanded NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter, which conducted key research missions during the BP Deepwater

  5. NOAA AND ENERGY NOAA's involvement with the energy sector is wide-ranging. NOAA has an interest or is actively engaged in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and production); liquefied natural gas (LNG); hydropower; offshore and land-based wind power; hydrokinetic ocean power; biomass and biofuel. NOAA provides data, scientific research, technical products, management science and management, Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) federal consistency reviews, and mediation

  6. DECEMBER 2004 1117D A I E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Drought Severity Index for 1870­2002: Relationship with Soil Moisture and Effects of Surface Warming AIGUO.g., meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural droughts; see Wilhite 2000 and Keyantash and Dracup 2002 (Manuscript received 24 February 2004, in final form 26 May 2004) ABSTRACT A monthly dataset of Palmer Drought

  7. Meteorological Observations for Renewable Energy Applications at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Alai, M; Myers, K

    2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In early October 2010, two Laser and Detection Ranging (LIDAR) units (LIDAR-96 and LIDAR-97), a 3 m tall flux tower, and a 3 m tall meteorological tower were installed in the northern section of Site 300 (Figure 1) as a first step in development of a renewable energy testbed facility. This section of the SMS project is aimed at supporting that effort with continuous maintenance of atmospheric monitoring instruments capable of measuring vertical profiles of wind speed and wind direction at heights encountered by future wind power turbines. In addition, fluxes of energy are monitored to estimate atmospheric mixing and its effects on wind flow properties at turbine rotor disk heights. Together, these measurements are critical for providing an accurate wind resource characterization and for validating LLNL atmospheric prediction codes for future renewable energy projects at Site 300. Accurate, high-resolution meteorological measurements of wind flow in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface-atmosphere energy exchange are required for understanding the properties and quality of available wind power at Site 300. Wind speeds at heights found in a typical wind turbine rotor disk ({approx} 40-140 m) are driven by the synergistic impacts of atmospheric stability, orography, and land-surface characteristics on the mean wind flow in the PBL and related turbulence structures. This section of the report details the maintenance and labor required in FY11 to optimize the meteorological instruments and ensure high accuracy of their measurements. A detailed look at the observations from FY11 is also presented. This portion of the project met the following milestones: Milestone 1: successful maintenance and data collection of LIDAR and flux tower instruments; Milestone 2: successful installation of solar power for the LIDAR units; and Milestone 3: successful implementation of remote data transmission for the LIDAR units.

  8. Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

  9. NOAA/NMFS Developments U.S. Seafood Exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA/NMFS Developments U.S. Seafood Exports and Trade Deficit Rise Table 1.-Selected U.S. fishery exports for 1981 (cumulative monthly lotals, January to December). Exports (t) Percent Value ($1 include Greek membership ladm 1/1/81). United States seafood exports in 1981 totalled a record $1

  10. Hurricane Earl, September 1, 2010/NOAA Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    Hurricane Earl, September 1, 2010/NOAA Tropical Cyclones A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT, 6 of which became hurricanes East Pacific Ocean: 15 tropical storms, 8 of which became hurricanes Central Pacific Ocean: 4 tropical storms, 2 of which became hurricanes Over a typical 2-year period, the U

  11. NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;· NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate Modeling · ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh- Efficiency and the Transcontinental Railroad, less because of their function than the unprecedented level of political and operational stories of the Department of Energy. Ironically, the political and operational discipline that made

  12. CHAPTER 8NOAA Special Exhibits CHAPTER 9 SPECIAL EXHIBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operations. These reductions are a key component of the President's Administrative Efficiency Initiative's Request, NOAA proposes consolidating climate related activities into a new line office the Climate Service AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION FY 2012 BUDGET SUMMARY 8-158 ADMINISTRATIVE COST SAVING The Administration

  13. NOAA Satellite and Information Service Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    infrastructure system, including transportation systems, power grids, telecommunications and GPS. NOAA such as the commercial airline, electric power and GPS industries. Our national security and economic well-being, which to a recent report by the National Academies,1 geomagnetic storm-disabled electric power grids and collateral

  14. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact water resources. A lack of adequate water supplies, an overabundance of water, or degraded waterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet WATER RESOURCES OVERVIEW Water is a fundamental component of life and water resources are directly dependent on climate. Climate change

  15. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact water resources. A lack of adequate water supplies, an overabundance of water, or degraded waterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet WATER RESOURCES Overview Water is a fundamental component of life and water resources are directly dependent on climate. Climate change

  16. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 67 Index Numbers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries, by Edward P. Myers, Donald E. Hoss, Walter M. Matsumoto Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service #12;NOAA TECHNICAL REPORT NMFS, by George A. Swan, Tommy G. Withrow, and Donn L. Park. April 1986, 34 p. 40. Potential impact of ocean

  17. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 40 The Potential Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NMFS 40 The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC. Uchida John D. Ditmars Robert A. Paddock June 1986 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic Pacific Ocean, by Arthur W. Kendall, Jr., and Beverly Vinter. March 1984,44 p. 3. Configurations

  18. NOAA NESDIS Cooperative Institutes (CI) Program August 24, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    . Corvallis, OR 973315503 5417373015 5417372064 Fax tstrub@coas.oregonstate.edu Dr. Graeme Stephens Director stephens@cira.colostate.edu Dr. Reza Khanbilvardi Director, CREST NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science Fax tom.achtor@ssec.wisc.edu Admin. Contact Ms. Rosalie Jones Research Coordinator 3014058291

  19. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1. Highlight -- Smart Balloon Test Success 2. NADP Interactions 3. Changes in Cloud Properties 4. New York City Study 18. Extreme Turbulence Probe 19. NOAA CIASTA - Urban Air Quality Study 20. Ozone Data from Upwind of Las Vegas 21. IMPROVE Steering Committee Highlights 1. Smart Balloon Test Success

  20. October 3, 2012 NOAA NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs to be flexible, and supports the Next Generation Strategic Plan of the National Oceanic and abundance for future generations. This vision complements the vision articulated in NOAA's Strategic Plan as meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations

  1. Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalakes, John

    Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR WRF Nature Run John Michalakes Josh Hacker overview and petascale issues Nature run methodology Results and conclusion #12;Mesoscale & Microscale's atmosphere #12;Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorological Division / NCAR Description of Science · Kinetic energy

  2. Integrated Meteorology and Chemistry Modeling: Evaluation and Research Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleim, Jonathan; Mathur, Rohit; Rao, S. T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Backlanov, Alexander

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a conference summary report that will be published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  3. A Note on Several Meteorological Topics Related to Polar Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sienicki, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the meteorology of Polar Regions is fundamental to the process of understanding the global climatology of the Earth and Earth-like planets. The nature of air circulation in a polar vortex is of preliminary importance. I have show that the local and continental spatiotemporal relationship between near surface wind events is self-organized criticality. In particular, the wind event size, wind event duration, and duration of quiescent wind event are well approximated by power-law distributions. On a continental scale, the wind events in the Antarctic tend to be self-organized criticality with ergodic properties. A similar self-organized criticality wind event was also found in Taylor Valley located at McMurdo Dry Valleys discovered by Captain Scott's expedition. Captain Scott's meteorological Terra Nova record was also examined. I have also revisited and re-analyzed wind events in Hornsund at Spitsbergen Island, in terms of marginal probabilities and marginal copulas which describe positive L\\'evy pr...

  4. COMPARISON OF MODIS AND MISR-DERIVED SURFACE ALBEDO WITH IN SITU MEASUREMENTS IN GREENLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    visible and near infrared (NIR) data from sensors such as the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution to spectral signatures for high- resolution snow albedo retrievals. This study evaluates snow surface albedo

  5. NOAA FORM 88-13 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (REV 10/95) NOAA-NMFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : PROCESSOR WHOLESALER (Does Not Process) COLD STORAGE OTHER ____________MAIL ADDRESS (Does Not Process) COLD STORAGE OTHER 2009 9 99 9997 999 2 2Page: of UNITFOR NMFS USE OUNCES VALUE FOB or INDUSTRIAL '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' 2 #12;NOAA FORM 88-13 U

  6. Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mass, Clifford F.

    Mesoscale Model Development and the Meteorological Community Cliff Mass University of Washington: Although the U.S. remains a leader in mesoscale model development and application, the community is not fulfilling its potential. The resources of the U.S. mesoscale forecasting community are considerable

  7. Surface Radiation from GOES: A Physical Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models to compute Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) have been in development over the last 3 decades. These models can be classified as empirical or physical, based on the approach. Empirical models relate ground based observations with satellite measurements and use these relations to compute surface radiation. Physical models consider the radiation received from the earth at the satellite and create retrievals to estimate surface radiation. While empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation for the solar energy industry the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from NOAA that computes GHI using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the GOES satellites. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and uses those properties in a radiative transfer model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, University of Wisconsin and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a 4 km GHI and DNI product every 30 minutes. This paper presents an outline of the methodology and a comprehensive validation using high quality ground based solar data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) (http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/surfrad/sitepage.html) and Integrated Surface Insolation Study (ISIS) http://www.srrb.noaa.gov/isis/isissites.html), the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sun Spot One (SS1) stations.

  8. OWAQ supports social science research that enables NOAA to test research results that improve communication during dangerous weather situations. For example, researchers from University of Oklahoma are using social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the adverse effects on humans, surface transportation and aviation. The Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 President's budget request for OWAQ through NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is $10.2M. The FY 2014 Omnibus funding for OWAQ is $7.1M and the FY 2013 actual budget was $3.9M. The Office of Weather

  9. NASA-Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon

  10. 1JULY 2005AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | STATE OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . STANLEY GOLDENBERG AND CHRISTOPHER LANDSEA, NOAA/ OAR/AOML Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida 21, University of California, La Jolla, California 28. ANDREW K. NJOGU, IGAD Climate Prediction and Applica. ANDREW B. WATKINS AND BLAIR TREWIN, Australian Bureau of Meteoro

  11. NOAA PA 200455 Datos relacionados con la resaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de sus oficinas transmiten un Surf Zone Forecast (Pronóstico para las zonas de oleaje). Cuando.ripcurrents.noaa.gov www.usla.org Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje indica la presencia de la resaca. De acuerdo con adentro. Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje. ¿ Qué debo hacer si la resaca me atrapa? Mantenga la

  12. CIOSS Executive Board Greg Withee: NOAA, Assistant Administrator for NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    20746-4304 Phone: 301-763-8231 x168 Fax: 301-763-8020 pablo.clemente-colon@noaa.gov James Coakley Phone.coas.oregonstate.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=faculty.detail&id=464 David Foley NESDIS/CoastWatch Environmental Research Division Southwest Fisheries Science Center 1352 Lighthouse Avenue Pacific Grove, CA 93950-2097 Phone: (831) 648-0632 Fax: (831) 648-8440 dave.foley

  13. Meteorological services annual data report for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser J.; Smith, S.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the meteorological data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Meteorological Services (Met Services) for the calendar year 2012. The purpose is to publicize the data sets available to emergency personnel, researchers and facility operations. Met services has been collecting data at BNL since 1949. Data from 1994 to the present is available in digital format. Data is presented in monthly plots of one-minute data. This allows the reader the ability to peruse the data for trends or anomalies that may be of interest to them. Full data sets are available to BNL personnel and to a limited degree outside researchers. The full data sets allow plotting the data on expanded time scales to obtain greater details (e.g., daily solar variability, inversions, etc.).

  14. NOAA Data Report ERL PMEL-2 LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS (C1 -c4),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or imply that the NOAA Environ- mental Research Laboratories approves, recommends, or endorses any pro) variations in the dissolved gaseous hydrocarbon fraction composed of methane, ethane, ethene, propane

  15. FEBRUARY 14, 2011 NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson approaches the Deepwater Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the successful implementation of NOAA's satellite program. Energy is everyone's business. Solar, wind, and wave that all offshore uses ­ include renewable energ

  16. NOAA and U.S. Department of Energy Expand Efforts to Increase...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The MOU details work NOAA and DOE will collaborate on, including identifying energy-saving measures, facilitating energy audits, and implementing clean, cutting-edge...

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  18. Cylindrical Equidis LAMONT (LDEO) WOODS HOLE O.I. NOAA U.HAWAII SOEST US NAVY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOLE O.I. NOAA U.HAWAII SOEST US NAVY SCRIPPS INST.OC U RHODE ISLAND RUSSIA US COAST GUARD GERMANY US NOAA 330 415326 415326 0 0 0 0 1932257 U.HAWAII SOEST 1 5873 5319 3992 5387 0 0 69927 US NAVY 3 3486

  19. Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co-Investigators: Thomas Croley - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover affects mass and energy exchange between the planetary boundary layer and the waters of the Great Lakes. The improved ice

  20. NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE USING SATELLITE Research Laboratories #12;NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE USING Appendix A: The observed and interpolated Lake Erie 1984 ice conditions.. 9 Appendix B: Buoy and wind

  1. NOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate data available from NOAA's various climate observing systems as well as the output data from state range of solar, geophysical, environmental, and human dimensions data. As an example of dataNOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

  2. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  3. Cloud structures from defense meteorological satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John Frederick

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McAlester, OK OKC Oklahoma City, OK PNC Ponca City, OK PNX Perrin AFB, TX SPS Sheppard AFB, TX TUL Tulsa, OK CHA? 6 aR I INTRODUCTORY RE~ In -arly 1947, at Nhite Sands I'roving Ground, New Mexico, techni- cians mounted a camera on a captured... meteorological tool, Crowson may not have been aware of a report issued in 1946 by Project RAND arguing strongly in favor of developing an Earth orbiting satel- lite, "both as a scientific tool and for it's psychological impact on 6 ' 9' ' 1 1' 6" IG1 1 19699...

  4. Sign singularity and flares in solar active region NOAA 11158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kazachenko, Maria D; Krucker, Sam; Primavera, Leonardo; Servidio, Sergio; Vecchio, Antonio; Welsch, Brian T; Fisher, George H; Lepreti, Fabio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares, and the presence of correlation with EUV and X-ray flux, suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small scale properties of the current structures.

  5. Funding Opportunity from NOAA's Office of Education | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino, Undersecretary11-161-LNG |ofFuel cells,NOAA's

  6. NOAA Hydropower and Fish Passage webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEFAppropriation and UsePacketWaterNOAA

  7. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory meteorological services instrument calibration plan and procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser .

    2013-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Meteorological Services (Met Services) Calibration and Maintenance Schedule and Procedures, The purpose is to establish the frequency and mechanism for the calibration and maintenance of the network of meteorological instrumentation operated by Met Services. The goal is to maintain the network in a manner that will result in accurate, precise and reliable readings from the instrumentation.

  9. UNIDATA AND THE SYNERGY BETWEEN GEODESY AND METEOROLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    beneficial relationships have more staying power. Geodesy needs more meteorological input. · If meteorology is associated with the induced dipole moment of all atmospheric components (including water vapor). The wet involves using GPS to sense Z, isolate the wet delay Zw, and transform Zw to PW (the total vertical column

  10. The data collection component of the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; Islam, M.M.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive program of meteorological monitoring is in place at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Program involves the measurement, observation, and storage of various meteorological data; continuous monitoring of regional weather conditions by a staff of professional meteorologists; and around-the-clock forecasting of weather conditions for the Hanford Site. The objective of this report is to document the data collection component of the program. In this report, each meteorological monitoring site is discussed in detail. Each site's location and instrumentation are described and photographs are presented. The methods for processing and communicating data to the Hanford Meteorology Station are also discussed. Finally, the procedures followed to maintain and calibrate these instruments are presented. 2 refs., 83 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Digital meteorological radar data compared with digital infrared data from a geostationary meteorological satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Rodney Stuart

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. DEDICATION . iv vi TABLE OF CONTENTS . vii LIST OF TABLES. IX LIST OF FIGURES . LIST OF ACRONYMS CHAPTER xii I. INTRODUCTION 1. The Need for This Investigation 2. Present Status of Research Relating... to This Investigation 3. Objectives of the Investigation 4. Techniques and Scope of the Investigation. II. METEOROLOGICAL RADAR DATA . 10 1. Basic Radar Theory . 2. Earth Curvature Correction . 3. The TAMU Weather Radar System. 4. Data Reduction and Display 10...

  12. JULY 1999 1711N O T E S A N D C O R R E S P O N D E N C E 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Surface Winds at Landfall of Hurricane Andrew (1992)--A Reply DA-LIN ZHANG Department of Meteorology appreciate this opportunity to (i) clarify the sim- ulation of surface winds at landfall of Hurricane Andrew comparisons with one of the most sophisticated surface analyses of a land- fallen hurricane by Powell

  13. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES ........................................................................................................ 2 2.2 Net Basin Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table lb.--Lag-Zero Cross Covariances and Cross Correlations Among Great Lakes Annual Connecting

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-154 SYSTEM POWER CONTROLLER: A LOW POWER CIRCUIT BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-154 SYSTEM POWER CONTROLLER: A LOW POWER CIRCUIT BOARD FOR THE CONTROLAND MONITORING OF SUBSYSTEM POWER IN DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS Ronald Muzzi Stephen Constant John LaneDesign...............................................................................................................................8 2.2.1Power

  15. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) User. NESDIS 114 Satellite Rainfall Estimation Over South America: Evaluation of Two Major Events. Daniel A

  16. Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Central Res. Institute Electric Power Industry, Japan, Uggo F. de Pinho - Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Chyng-Chu Teng - NOAA National Data Buoy Center, Chin H. Wu - Department of Civil

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-26 PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-26 PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISTRIBUTION OF LOW................................................... 31 3.1 Areal and Temporal Distributions .. 31 3. 1. 1 Methane....................................... 41 3.1.4 Propane...................................... 41 3.1.5 Propene

  18. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    1 Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) of GRACE, hydrological and hydro-meteorological signals M. J and Hydro-meteorology Hydrology GRACE Hydro-meteorology RQ dt dS dt dMdS RETP . dt AH a #12;3 GRACE, times based signals #12;12 CCA on catchments based ­ GRACE and hydro-meteorology T GDGDGD T VUQ dt d

  19. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS REPORT OF THE NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Laake Jeffrey E. Moore Patricia E. Rosel Barbara L. Taylor Paul R. Wade NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-507 U , Patricia E. Rosel 4 , Barbara L. Taylor 1 , Paul R. Wade 3 1 NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service., Laake, J.L., Moore, J.E., Rosel, P.E., Taylor, B.L and Wade, P.R. 2013. Report of the National Marine

  20. Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.

    TR-38 1971 Applications of Climatology and Meteorology to Hydrologic Simulation R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  1. Letter of transmittal Office of the Director of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ............................................ 138 South Australia....................................... 140 Western Australia Melbourne VIC 3001 Australia Australia's National Meteorological Service 700 Collins Street Docklands VIC continued its work of observing, analysing and predicting Australia's weather, climate, oceans and water

  2. Letter of transmittal Office of the Director of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    .................................................... 92 South Australia ............................................... 94 Western Australia Melbourne VIC 3001 Australia Australia's National Meteorological Service 700 Collins Street Docklands VIC continued its work of observing, analysing and predicting Australia's weather, climate, oceans, water

  3. Data Archive of Tracer Experiments and Meteorology Roland R. Draxler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to address these issues. In particular there has been consistent emphasis on nuclear reactor accidents since the Chernobyl accident by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Meteorological

  4. Analysis of Spatial Performance of Meteorological Drought Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sandeep 1986-

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological drought indices are commonly calculated from climatic stations that have long-term historical data and then converted to a regular grid using spatial interpolation methods. The gridded drought indices are mapped to aid decision making...

  5. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  6. International Surface Pressure Databank (ISPDv2) 1768 to 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The International Surface Pressure Databank (ISPD) is the world's largest collection of pressure observations. It has been gathered through international cooperation and is part of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project that uses resources of NERSC and ORNL. The ISPD version 2 consists of three components: station, marine, and tropical cyclone best track pressure observations. The station component is a blend of many national and international collections. Related resources can be found at the NOAA ESRL 20th Century Reanalysis Homepage (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/20thC_Rean/). Maps displaying the locations of ISPD observations in a selected year are available at (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/ISPD/v2.0/)[Taken and edited from http://rda.ucar.edu/datasets/ds132.0/

  7. 1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that qualitatively similar results apply to coupled atmosphere­ocean GCMs. The penetration of surface heat flux1352 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society The Deep-Ocean, Washington (Manuscript received 20 June 2002, in final form 3 November 2002) ABSTRACT The deep-ocean heat

  8. 3010 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1998 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Junhong

    of the role of clouds in the climate is on the average cloud effects on the earth and surface radiation3010 VOLUME 11J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 1998 American Meteorological Society Effects of Cloud macroscale cloud vertical structures (CVS). The overall effect of clouds, the role of their geographic

  9. Comparison of different global information sources used in surface radiative flux calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the Laboratoire de Me´te´orologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project surface albedos in the near-infrared remain poorly constrained (highly uncertain), they do not cause too

  10. Urban morphological analysis for mesoscale meteorological and dispersion modeling applications : current issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Ching, J. (Jason); Cheuk, M. L. (Mang Lung); Yuan, M. (May); McKinnon, A. T. (Andrew T.); Han, W. S. (Woo Suk)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate predictions of air quality and atmospheric dispersion at high spatial resolution rely on high fidelity predictions of mesoscale meteorological fields that govern transport and turbulence in urban areas. However, mesoscale meteorological models do not have the spatial resolution to directly simulate the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics in and around buildings and other urban structures that have been shown to modify micro- and mesoscale flow fields (e.g., see review by Bornstein 1987). Mesoscale models therefore have been adapted using numerous approaches to incorporate urban effects into the simulations (e.g., see reviews by Brown 2000 and Bornstein and Craig 2002). One approach is to introduce urban canopy parameterizations to approximate the drag, turbulence production, heating, and radiation attenuation induced by sub-grid scale buildings and urban surface covers (Brown 2000). Preliminary results of mesoscale meteorological and air quality simulations for Houston (Dupont et al. 2004) demonstrated the importance of introducing urban canopy parameterizations to produce results with high spatial resolution that accentuates variability, highlights important differences, and identifies critical areas. Although urban canopy parameterizations may not be applicable to all meteorological and dispersion models, they have been successfully introduced and demonstrated in many of the current operational and research mode mesoscale models, e.g., COAMPS (Holt et al. 2002), HOTMAC (Brown and Williams 1998), MM5 (e.g., Otte and Lacser 2001; Lacser and Otte 2002; Dupont et al. 2004), and RAMS (Rozoff et al. 2003). The primary consequence of implementing an urban parameterization in a mesoscale meteorological model is the need to characterize the urban terrain in greater detail. In general, urban terrain characterization for mesoscale modeling may be described as the process of collecting datasets of urban surface cover physical properties (e.g., albedo, emissivity) and morphology (i.e., ground elevation, building and tree height and geometry characteristics) and then processing the data to compute physical cover and morphological parameters. Many of the surface cover and morphological parameters required for mesoscale meteorological models are also needed by atmospheric dispersion models. Thus, most of the discussion below is relevant to both types of modeling. In this paper, the term urban morphological analysis will be used to define the component of urban terrain characterization concerned with the morphological parameters. Furthermore, the focus will be building morphological parameters; therefore, the term urban morphological analysis will refer exclusively to the task of inventorying, computing or estimating building morphological parameters. Several approaches to perform urban morphological analysis exist; however, all have in common three types of practice issues related to the uncertainty of (1) data, (2) parameter definitions and calculation methods, and (3) extrapolation techniques. The objective of this paper is to describe the state-of-the-practice of urban morphological analysis by reviewing the primary approaches presented in the literature and outlining and commenting on key aspects of the three types of practice issues listed above.

  11. The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

  12. THE NOAA HAZARDOUS WEATHER TESTBED: COLLABORATIVE TESTING OF ENSEMBLE AND CONVECTION-ALLOWING WRF MODELS AND SUBSEQUENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    THE NOAA HAZARDOUS WEATHER TESTBED: COLLABORATIVE TESTING OF ENSEMBLE AND CONVECTION-ALLOWING WRF NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) is a joint facility managed by the National Severe Storms and technologies into advances in forecasting and warning for hazardous mesoscale weather events throughout

  13. Multi-year observations of the tropical Atlantic atmosphere: Multidisciplinary applications of the NOAA Aerosols and Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the NOAA Aerosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) Nicholas R. Nalli Dell Services, Federal Science Expedition (AEROSE) field campaigns. Following the original 2004 campaign onboard the Ronald H. Brown, AEROSE has operated on a yearly basis since 2006 in collaboration with the NOAA Prediction

  14. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ProtecttheearthScience | Service | StewardShip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Go? Data collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imager. Courtesy NASA Data collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave "sports- men" to hunt polar bears for trophies. Legal hunting kills about 700 polar bears each year

  15. METEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGYMETEOROLOGY 280280280280 Intro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain MeteorologyIntro to Mountain Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    and mesoscale wind and precipitation processes in mountainous terrain. 3. the surface energy budgets that lead and behavior evaluate mountain weather impacts on snow pack behavior Required Texts/Readings Mountain review and a term paper. Assignments will include both in-class and take home components and will include

  16. THE UNIVERSITY OF READING Department of Meteorology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    pumping aids the ventilation of PV from the boundary layer, and shapes the resulting PV anomaly into one distributions are used to demonstrate why surface sensible heat fluxes only affect cyclone spin down when the PV a cyclone is investigated. Ekman pumping is compared to a recently-proposed baroclinic potential vorticity

  17. METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 18: 383405 (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duck, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar cycles combined with high surface albedo and long wave emissivity. The lim- ited geographical properties, can be obtained by using a light detection and ranging Correspondence to: G. J. Nott, Department of Physics and Atmo- spheric Science, 1459 Oxford Street, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2

  18. METEOROLOGICAL APPLICATIONS Meteorol. Appl. 18: 324333 (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011; Accepted 11 July 2011 1. Introduction Earth's radiative energy balance (solar radiative energy, Reading, Berks RG6 6AL, UK ABSTRACT: Satellite measurements and numerical forecast model reanalysis data radiative energy budget of the atmosphere and surface. The cloud radiative cooling effect through reflection

  19. The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

  20. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  1. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMay-June 2009 Volume13,Number3 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hurricane forecasters, who released their annual hurricane seasonal outlook on May 21st. The outlook. The outlook predicts a 70% probability for the following ranges of activity during the six-month long Atlantic hurricanes and two becoming major hurricanes. The accumulated cycle energy (ACE), a measure of the total

  2. Meteorological Simulations of Ozone Episode Case Days during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13,1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were petiormed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1,2,4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11-13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawirisonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. We found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  3. Meteorological simulations of ozone episode case days during the 1996 Paso del Norte ozone study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Costigan, K.; Muller, C.; Wang, G.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological simulations centered around the border cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez have been performed during an ozone episode that occurred on Aug. 13, 1996 during the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study field campaign. Simulations were performed using the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model using a 1, 2, 4, and 8 km horizontal grid size nested mesh system. Investigation of the vertical structure and evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer for the Aug. 11--13 time period is emphasized in this paper. Comparison of model-produced wind speed profiles to rawinsonde and radar profiler measurements shows reasonable agreement. A persistent upper-level jet was captured in the model simulations through data assimilation. In the evening hours, the model was not able to produce the strong wind direction shear seen in the radar wind profiles. Based on virtual potential temperature profile comparisons, the model appears to correctly simulate the daytime growth of the convective mixed layer. However, the model underestimates the cooling of the surface layer at night. The authors found that the upper-level jet significantly impacted the turbulence structure of the boundary layer, leading to relatively high turbulent kinetic energy (tke) values aloft at night. The model indicates that these high tke values aloft enhance the mid-morning growth of the boundary layer. No upper-level turbulence measurements were available to verify this finding, however. Radar profiler-derived mixing heights do indicate relatively rapid morning growth of the mixed layer.

  4. 1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    1931DECEMBER 2004AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | H PROGRESS IN HEAT WATCH­ WARNING SYSTEM climatology-based heat watch­warning systems have been implemented across the United States in circula- tion, in order to increase heat loss through radiation, as well as evaporative cooling by sweat

  5. Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Characteristics of meteorological parameters associated with Hurricane Isabel R. Gautam, G. Cervone-sea interactions associated with Hurricane Isabel, which landed on the east coast of the United States on September 18, 2003. Hurricane Isabel is considered to be one of the most significant and severe tropical

  6. 42 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Environment and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and hydrology to build world-class systems and prediction services to support decision-makers in government services, and energy and services sectors; · Australian, State and local governments and their agencies; · international organisations including the World Meteorological Organization and Pacific Island National

  7. 1819Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catling, David C.

    reduc- tions in expenditures (and costs) for natural gas and heating oil, record seasonal sales their strategy for pur- chasing natural gas, leading to major savings to their customers. #12;1820 Vol. 80, No. 9 Meteorological Society ABSTRACT This paper assesses the major impacts on human lives and the economy

  8. MPO 663 -Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MPO 663 - Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008 I intend for students and mesoscale phenomena. 2. Working understanding of several of these tools, cultivated via homework, including. A sense of how convective and mesoscale phenomena fit into larger scales, gained via short current

  9. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study, this 3DVAR analysis method is adapted to perform multiple Doppler wind analysis for CASA radars, together

  10. RisR1212(EN) Meteorology and lidar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Jørgensen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark May 2002 #12;Abstract This report describes sensors, thermocouple arrays, a fully instrumented release rig, a passive smoke machine, a meteorological were set out in the far range for the purpose of studying environ- mental effects. This report deals

  11. air pollution meteorology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution meteorology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Air Pollution Spring 2010...

  12. Radar MeteorologyRadar Meteorology Feb 20, 1941 10 cm (S-band) radar used to track rain showers (Ligda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    (Ligda) Possibility of such observations was predicted by Ryde (1941) MIT Radiation Laboratory made in 1943 First operational weather radar, Panama, 1943 Science of radar meteorology born from WWII research fluctuations at 1/2 the wavelength of the incident radiation (a few meters in this case). Power returned from

  13. tunahistory@noaa.gov Page 1 of 4 Tuna Industry Pioneers of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Reefer" refers to a cold storage vessel that receives fish from many fishing vessels and transshipstunahistory@noaa.gov Page 1 of 4 Tuna Industry Pioneers of San Pedro and Terminal Island 22, 2012 Nick Danelovich was recognized by many in the industry as one of the most respected tuna

  14. Providing scientific stewardship of marine data and information NOAA's Ocean Data Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Scientific journals, rare books, historical photo collections and maps through the NOAA Central Library for residents. NODC archives various types of weather data including air temperature, marine weather, cloud's Central Library preserves, digitizes, and makes accessible the National Weather Service Technical Reports

  15. Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to fishery stock assessment modeling? What is the suitability of the stock assessment models employed, taking1 Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014 Stock Assessment of this review is to examine and evaluate the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's (SEFSC) fishery stock

  16. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Science | Service | Stewardship Understand the earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World With NOAA 74 What You Will Need r Two empty two-liter plastic soda bottles r Tornado Tube plastic into the lower bottle as air simul- taneously bubbles up into the top bottle. The flow of water may come to a complete stop. Now, rapidly rotate the bottles in a horizontal circle a few times. Observe the formation

  17. NOAA N 22-65-73 (G) FEASIBiliTY OF BENEFICIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    under the cirrus shield. The solar energy absorption amounts to about,..., 2x 10 10 cal/lb per 10 hours by William M. Gray This report was prepared with support from NOAA Grant No. N 22-65-73 (G) Department be accomplished by the interruption of solar radiation by carbon black dust particles (radius,..., 0.1 micron

  18. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER USING LANDSAT the group means for snow- covered ice (group 15). 4. Comparison of LANDSAT 1 band 4 and band 7 to illustrate the influence of water on the tone of ice cover. 5. Mean digital counts of training sets--bands 4, 5, 6, and 7

  19. Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover is an important environmental factor affecting physical and biological processes in the coastal region of the Great Lakes. However, computerized ice thickness data along the shores of the Great

  20. Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co Board The formation, duration, and extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes has a major impact and cooling water intakes, and damaging shoreline structures. The ice cover also has an impact on the water

  1. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS R.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Observation density Average regional ice cover Percentage exceedance from average regional ice cover for discrete ice cover values Contour analysis of percentage ice cover exceedance

  2. NOAA's National Ocean Service: Education Currents NOS home NOS education home site index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Resources directs you to online data and education offerings from NOAA and other reliable resources in coastal rivers and estuaries, experience a "slack water" period of no velocity as they move from the ebbing to flooding stage, and vice versa. After a brief slack period, which can range from seconds

  3. Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa - NOAA of dreissenid biomass but there are no current, accurate estimates of biomass in this portion of the lake. Biomass is calculated from abundances, size- frequencies, and length-weights. The goal of this project

  4. NOAA Data Report ERL PMEL-THE 10 JUNE 1996 ANDREANOV TSUNAMI DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -of-the-art simulation capability for the three primary phases of tsunami evolution: generation, propagationNOAA Data Report ERL PMEL- THE 10 JUNE 1996 ANDREANOV TSUNAMI DATABASE M. C. Eble1 J. Newman2 J Preface This work is part of the Early Detection and Forecast of Tsunamis (EDFT) project initiated in 1996

  5. NOAA GREAT LAKES COASTAL FORECASTING SYSTEM Forecasts (up to 5 days in the future)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the Ohio State University, and is supported by the National Weather Service. Model output is available 734-741-2235 www.glerl.noaa.gov PREDICTING WHAT'S HAPPENING IN THE NEARSHORE ZONE Most human Lakes coasts. To date, two high resolution grid experimental models have been developed for Lake

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-122 Tidal Datum Distributions in Puget Sound,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-122 Tidal Datum Distributions in Puget Sound, Washington, Based . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3. Puget Sound Channel Tide Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.1 Description of the channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 9. Appendix: Tidal harmonic constants in Puget Sound . . . 30 10. References

  7. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-72 MEASUREMENTS OF BENTHIC SEDIMENT ERODIBILITY IN PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-72 MEASUREMENTS OF BENTHIC SEDIMENT ERODIBILITY IN PUGET SOUND ···························································· 30 iii #12;#12;MEASUREMENTS OF BENTHIC SEDIMENT ERODIBILITY IN PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON J.W. Lavelle 1 W.R. Davis 2 ABSTRACT. Rates of erosion of bottom sediment were studied at seven locations in Puget

  8. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-92 THE ANNUAL MEAN TRANSPORT IN PUGET SOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FILE NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-92 THE ANNUAL MEAN TRANSPORT IN PUGET SOUND E. D. Cokelet R Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-92 THE ANNUAL MEAN TRANSPORT IN PUGET SOUND E. D. Cokelet Pacific Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 7.2 Puget Sound's Main Axis 40 7.3 Hood Canal 43 7.4 Saratoga Passage and Deception Pass 43 7

  9. Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA MAURICE E. STANSBY fatty acids (which occur almost exclusively in the oil of fish) may have beneficial effects in re ducing research has also been carried out by laboratories of this agency on other aspects of fish oils which have

  10. Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven - NOAA elicited concern by fishery managers and commercial fishermen. We propose to use bioenergetics modeling that are contributing to declines in fish growth is bioenergetics modeling. We recently evaluated and modified

  11. Defining success in climate adaptation support Moderator: Adam Parris, NOAA Climate Program Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    demand from the decision making communities. Recommendations from the community of practice are often and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is conducting an evaluation designed to identify best practices for using interactions with decision makers (i.e. co-production), owning the responsibility for working with decision

  12. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: March 11, 2014 Jess.Beck@noaa.gov FB14-012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the release of millions barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. After 85 days, the well was successfully Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico Comment Period Extended to April 4, 2014 NOAA Fisheries is seeking public for Regulating Offshore Marine Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico (Aquaculture Plan). This document considers

  13. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Temperature time series from a 1 m Seacat, NX Modules at 1 m and 10 m, and downwelling solar values for a given day. . 6 #12;iv Contents #12;ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A

  14. Sediment Resuspension and Transport in Lake Michigan Primary Investigator: Nathan Hawley -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment Resuspension and Transport in Lake Michigan Primary Investigator: Nathan Hawley - NOAA to establish the conditions necessary for the resuspension of fine-grained bottom sediments in Lake Michigan and to assess the relative importance of local resuspension versus advective processes in the deeper parts

  15. Learn More: sos.noaa.gov 24 Science On a Sphere: Seeing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they have ever seen before. Called "Science On a Sphere®" (SOS), this wrap-around cinema system ­ inventedLearn More: sos.noaa.gov 24 EDUCATION Science On a Sphere®: Seeing the Dynamics of a Changing Earth of the sphere. Today, the SOS team has worked with science centers and museums to place SOS displays at more

  16. Request for Use of NOAA's Weather Radio All Hazard Logo Applicant Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Request for Use of NOAA's Weather Radio All Hazard Logo Applicant Information: Applicant's Name Equipment packaging Printed material Promotional media Other Specify Intended Use of Logo (Please Explain/or product specifications.) Submit one application for each model requesting use of NWR logo. Send samples to

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERl GLERL-13 ON THE USE OF MICROWAVE RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surveillance. Micro- wave systems are advantageous because they can penetrate cloud cover, operate day or night of backscattered radiation. Radar has been shown effective in classifying certain ice types, conditionsNOAA Technical Memorandum ERl GLERL-13 ON THE USE OF MICROWAVE RADIATION FOR GREAT LAKES ICE

  18. AFFILIATIONS: X. Li--GST, NOAA/NESDIS, College Park, Maryland; Zhang--Hurricane Research Division, AOML, NOAA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    at kilometer spa- tial resolution. However, the intense air­sea inter- action near the ocean surface cannot;radar that emits radar pulses that can penetrate through clouds. SAR then receives the radar back the ocean surface return--a process quite similar to the QuikSCAT scatterometer wind retrieval. As a result

  19. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  20. Estimating Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Using Standard Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat stress management program at the Department of Energy''s Savannah River Site (SRS) requires implementation of protective controls on outdoor work based on observed values of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). To ensure continued compliance with heat stress program requirements, a computer algorithm was developed which calculates an estimate of WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. In addition, scripts were developed to generate a calculation every 15 minutes and post the results to an Intranet web site.

  1. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76 George A. Leshkevich.2 Data Analysis 2 3. DATA PRESENTATION 4 3.1 Freezing Degree-Days 4 3.2 Composite Ice Charts 4 4. DISCUSSION 4 4.1 Winter Characteristics 4 4.2 General Seasonal Trends in Ice-Cover Distribution 5 4.3 Lake

  2. Relationship between meteorological variables and total suspended and heavy metal particulates in Little Rock, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avery, Mary Gwendolyn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY NFXAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLl'N AVERY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES AND TOTAL SUSPENDED AND HEAVY METAL PARTICULATES IN LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS A Thesis MARY GWENDOLYN AVERY Approved...

  3. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subj ect: Meteorology MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis...

  4. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 133: 101106 (2007)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Durranc a Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Croatia b Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Croatia c Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, WA Stiperski, Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Gric 3, HR -10000 Zagreb, Croatia. E-mail: stiperski

  5. A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    A review of statistical methods for the meteorological adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou adjustment of tropospheric ozone Mary Lou Thompson1 Joel Reynolds1 Lawrence H. Cox2 Peter Guttorp1 Paul D.larry@epamail.epa.gov ABSTRACT: A variety of statistical methods for meteorological adjustment of ozone have been proposed

  6. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. HighSelected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology

  7. Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 Draft Chapter from Mesoscale Dynamic Meteorology By Prof. Yu-lang Lin, North Carolina State University Chapter 1 Overview 1.1 Introduction The so-called mesometeorology or mesoscale meteorology as mesoscale phenomena by others (e.g. Orlanski 1975; Thunis and Bornstein 1996). Therefore, a more precise

  8. Marion Meteorological Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated in the monthly wind monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Marion Meteorological Tower Wind Monitoring This document provides information not repeated on the meteorological tower at Marion: Great Hill Dairy. A wind vane and two anemometers are located at two heights on the tower: 50 m and 38 m. Details of the equipment and models are: · NRG model Symphonie Cellogger · 4 ­ #40

  9. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  10. Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of Mexico near the spill site. At the time it was called on for this mission, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and extensive survey of atmospheric loadings of hydrocarbon and other organic species air pollution in the Gulf

  11. Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution in the Gulf of Mexico. During May, one of NOAA WP-3D aircraft, equipped with an extensive suite1 Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory within and above the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the Gulf of Mexico on 8 and 10 June 2010

  12. http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet See Report By GR1938 HISTORY - 1957 MONUMENTED CGS #12;DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl

  13. Summertime Influence of SST on Surface Wind Stress off the U.S. West Coast from the U.S. Navy COAMPS Model*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Summertime Influence of SST on Surface Wind Stress off the U.S. West Coast from the U.S. Navy Research Laboratory, Marine Meteorology Division, Monterey, CA 93943- 5502. E-mail: haack@nrlmry.navy

  14. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  15. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  16. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liljegren, J. C.; Carhart, R. A.; Lawday, P.; Tschopp, S.; Sharp, R.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  17. Meteorological significance of frontal thin-line angel echoes observed by CPS-9 radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Donald Bradford

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METEOROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF FRONTAL THIN-LINE ANGEL ECHOES OBSERVED BY CPS-9 RADAR A Thesis By DONAID B. MILLER I/Lt USAF Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1959 Ma]or Sub)ect Meteorology METEOROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF FRONTAL THIN-LINE ANGEL ECHOES OBSERVED BY CPS-9 RADAR A Thesi. s By DONALD B. MILLER I/Lt USAF Approved as to style and content by...

  18. FEBRUARY 2004 363S U N E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    , such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR because of its control of the upward terrestrial radiation and energy exchange between the earth's sur- face and the atmosphere. Derivation of LST from sat- ellite infrared radiometers has been proven

  19. A simplified system of pressure surfaces for atmospheric analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Francis Schofield

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A g M COLLEGE OF TEXAS A SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF PRESSURE SURFACES FOR ATMOSPHERIC ANALYSIS A Thesis By FRANCIS S. SHAY + Captain USAF Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1959 Major Subject: Meteorology A SIMPLIFIED SYSTEM OF PRESSURE SURFACES FOR ATMOSPHERIC ANALYSIS A Thesis By FRANCIS S. SHAY Captain USAF jpp roved j as to style and content...

  20. OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/20/2007 OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy Purpose: The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other support computers used by OCAO staff. To facilitate adequate capital planning and clarify acquisition policies, the following Computer Refreshment Policy

  1. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT of such products is not authorized. ii #12;CONTENTS Abstract 1. INTRODUCTION 2. THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF THE ICE GROWTH EQUATION 3. THE INFLUENCE OF SNOW COVER 4. THE DEGREE-DAY LINEAR MODEL 5. THE DATA SETS 5.1 Ice

  2. NOBOB-A (AssessmeNt): 2001-2005 Collaborators: NOAA-GLERL, Univ. of Mich., Univ. of Windsor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    integrated evaluation of the biological content of residual ballast water and sediment, vessel traffic://www.glerl.noaa.gov/res/projects/nobob/products/ NOBOBFinalReport.pdf Outcomes: NOBOB-A results showed that the residual ballast water and sediment in NOBOB in their ballast tanks, including residual water, is at or above 30 ppt (Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 168

  3. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-61 SEDIMENTATION RATES IN PUGET SOUND FROM 210pB MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-61 SEDIMENTATION RATES IN PUGET SOUND FROM 210pB MEASUREMENTS J ················································· 26 iii #12;#12;Sedimentation Rates in Puget Sound from 210Pb Measurements J. W. Lavelle G. J. Massoth of Puget Sound show that bottom sediments are accumulating at rates of 0.26 to 1.20 g/cm2/yr; these along

  4. Forest impact estimated with NOAA AVHRR and Landsat TM data related to an empirical hurricane wind-field distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Michael E.

    with Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The wind-field model projected that the highest wind speeds were in the southernForest impact estimated with NOAA AVHRR and Landsat TM data related to an empirical hurricane wind to relate forest type and hurricane-impact distribution with wind speed and duration to explain

  5. The Dark Ocean Inspired by "Now you see me, now you don't" on oceanexplorer.noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    The Dark Ocean Inspired by "Now you see me, now you don't" on oceanexplorer.noaa.gov Goals of the Lesson ­ Introduce how light penetrates water and explore how organisms have adapted to different light conditions. Key Concepts · Different wavelengths (colors) penetrate to different depths · Only a tiny portion

  6. FEBRUARY 2000 301S C H L O S S E R E T A L . 2000 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    , Institute of Water Problems, Moscow, Russia; Florence Habets, Me´te´o-France/CNRM, Toulouse, France; Jinwon, NOAA, Silver Spring, Maryland; Eva Kowalczyk, Division of Atmospheric Research, CSIRO, Aspendale

  7. Below Canopy Meteorological Measurements at Three Florida Sites with Varying Tree Cover and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J. K.; Vieira, R. K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . However, less research has examined how the heat island is impacted by the more localized meteorological environment. How does suburban development and tree canopy cover impact micro-climates in a suburban environment? This has implications, both...

  8. Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Timothy E.

    in uncovering linear relationships between meteorology and air pollutants in Chicago and aided in determining possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution . Multivariate statistics . Principal component analysis . Trace gasses Introduction Many air

  9. Ozone predictabilities due to meteorological uncertainties in the Mexico City basin using ensemble forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bei, Naifang

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the sensitivity of ozone (O3)[(O subscript 3)] predictions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) to meteorological initial uncertainties and planetary boundary layer ...

  10. Correlation of meteorological variables with total suspended particulate matter in Harris County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, G. Anderson

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conducive to pollutant transport into their respective regions. Thurston and Spengler did not attempt to relate a single event, such as pollution level, to meteorological conditions. Allender and Dejardin (1981) used a statistical method to predict air.... Meteorological variables used were maximum temperature, 1800 LST wind speed, and cosine of the wind direction at 0000 LST for the day previous to the forecast period. Selection of these parameters came from previous work. Allender and Dejardin claimed 85...

  11. COMPARISON OF CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS RESULTS FROM TWO METHODS OF PROCESSING SITE METEOROLOGICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (NOEMAIL), D

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Consequence analysis to support documented safety analysis requires the use of one or more years of representative meteorological data for atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations. At minimum, the needed meteorological data for most atmospheric transport and dispersion models consist of hourly samples of wind speed and atmospheric stability class. Atmospheric stability is inferred from measured and/or observed meteorological data. Several methods exist to convert measured and observed meteorological data into atmospheric stability class data. In this paper, one year of meteorological data from a western Department of Energy (DOE) site is processed to determine atmospheric stability class using two methods. The method that is prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for supporting licensing of nuclear power plants makes use of measurements of vertical temperature difference to determine atmospheric stability. Another method that is preferred by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relies upon measurements of incoming solar radiation, vertical temperature gradient, and wind speed. Consequences are calculated and compared using the two sets of processed meteorological data from these two methods as input data into the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System 2 (MACCS2) code.

  12. 2526 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittenberg, Andrew

    , Princeton, NJ 08544-0710. E-mail: atw@gfdl.noaa.gov observing platform (Smith 1988; Cardone et al. 1990; da

  13. Meteorological Integration for the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System: General Guidance for BWIC Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, William J.; Wang, Weiguo; Rutz, Frederick C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Xie, YuLong; Seiple, Timothy E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for developing systems to detect the release of aerosolized bioagents in urban environments. The system that accomplishes this, known as BioWatch, is a robust first-generation monitoring system. In conjunction with the BioWatch detection network, DHS has also developed a software tool for cities to use to assist in their response when a bioagent is detected. This tool, the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System, will eventually be deployed to all BioWatch cities to aid in the interpretation of the public health significance of indicators from the BioWatch networks. BWIC consists of a set of integrated modules, including meteorological models, that estimate the effect of a biological agent on a city’s population once it has been detected. For the meteorological models in BWIC to successfully calculate the distribution of biological material, they must have as input accurate meteorological data, and wind fields in particular. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for cities to use in identifying sources of good-quality local meteorological data that BWIC needs to function properly. This process of finding sources of local meteorological data, evaluating the data quality and gaps in coverage, and getting the data into BWIC, referred to as meteorological integration, is described. The good news for many cities is that meteorological measurement networks are becoming increasingly common. Most of these networks allow their data to be distributed in real time via the internet. Thus, cities will often only need to evaluate the quality of available measurements and perhaps add a modest number of stations where coverage is poor.

  14. !"#$%&'$"()'"*$+&,$'"+%-"#./0+&$"1$2$+'3,4"5"6+'&%$'2,/6")("&,$"""" 78'$+8")("9$&$)').):;"+%-"#4"9$.?)8'%$4"582&'+./+"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brassington, Gary

    of Meteorology, CSIRO the Royal Australian Navy, NASA, CNES, ESA, AVISO, NOAA, US Navy, the Argo Science team, Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO the Royal Australian Navy, NASA, CNES, ESA, AVISO, NOAA, US Navy, the Argo

  15. Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual-to-decadal time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Climatic regulation of the Black Sea hydro-meteorological and ecological properties at interannual Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract An examination of a wide spectrum of hydro

  16. Carbon project-atmosphere "BL meteorology along route

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of surface wind heteogenity #12;The input side of the CO2 cycle Wind turbines and energy production Energy production from windturbines does cover 20% of the the total energy production in Denmark Energy from a wind

  17. CHROMOSPHERIC MASS MOTIONS AND INTRINSIC SUNSPOT ROTATIONS FOR NOAA ACTIVE REGIONS 10484, 10486, AND 10488 USING ISOON DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardersen, Paul S. [Department of Space Studies, University of North Dakota, 4149 University Avenue, 530 Clifford Hall, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9008 (United States); Balasubramaniam, K. S. [Solar and Solar Wind Disturbances Program, Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Shkolyar, Svetlana, E-mail: Hardersen@space.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 Terrace Road, ISTB4, Tempe, AZ 85287-6004 (United States)

    2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This work utilizes Improved Solar Observing Optical Network continuum (630.2 nm) and H{alpha} (656.2 nm) data to: (1) detect and measure intrinsic sunspot rotations occurring in the photosphere and chromosphere, (2) identify and measure chromospheric filament mass motions, and (3) assess any large-scale photospheric and chromospheric mass couplings. Significant results from 2003 October 27-29, using the techniques of Brown et al., indicate significant counter-rotation between the two large sunspots in NOAA AR 10486 on October 29, as well as discrete filament mass motions in NOAA AR 10484 on October 27 that appear to be associated with at least one C-class solar flare.

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty studies of the CRAC2 code for selected non-meteorological models and parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.; Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the sensitivity of health impacts and economic costs from hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents, as predicted by the CRAC2 computer code, to undertainties in selected non-meteorological models and parameters. The sources of uncertainty include (1) dose conversion factors for inhalation as affected by uncertainties in the particle size of the carrier aerosol and clearance of radionuclides from the respiratory tract, (2) the weathering half-time for external ground-surface exposure, and (3) transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways. Uncertainties in inhalation dose conversion factors affected predicted early injuries by as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in runs with fixed weather sequences, whereas the effects on early fatalities were less than a factor of 2 and on latent cancer fatalities less than 10%. Uncertainties in the weathering half-time for ground-surface exposure affected latent fatalities by a factor of 2 to 3 but economic costs by less than a factor of 2. Uncertainties in the transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways affected latent fatalities by less than 15% and had no effect on economic costs. 10 references.

  19. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  20. 999Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    landfalling ones, have been identified as one of four key topics of focus in the United States Weather on the island of Hispaniola, leaving behind a trail of death and devastation, largely the result of excessive trapped beneath the eye's subsidence inversion. It is likely that surface rain rates increased during

  1. AUGUST 2002 705H A N S T R U M E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    -Season Tornadoes of California and Southern Australia BARRY N. HANSTRUM Bureau of Meteorology, Perth, Western Australia and Western Australia combined (gray) for each month for the 10 yr, 1987­96. FIG. 2. Map showing Australia, Australia GRAHAM A. MILLS Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  2. The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological, Satellite, and Model Archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The New Mexico State Climate Office and CARSAME Portal for Community Access to Meteorological and Environmental Sciences New Mexico State University dwdubois@nmsu.edu Our community data portal is using in Agriculture, Meteorology and Environment (CARSAME) and New Mexico Climate Center but not available

  3. Photospheric Electric Fields and Energy Fluxes in the Eruptive Active Region NOAA 11158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazachenko, Maria D; Welsch, Brian T; Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How much electromagnetic energy crosses the photosphere in evolving solar active regions? With the advent of high-cadence vector magnetic field observations, addressing this fundamental question has become tractable. In this paper, we apply the "PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal" (PDFI) electric field inversion technique of Kazachenko et al. (2014) to a 6-day HMI/SDO vector magnetogram and Doppler velocity sequence, to find the electric field and Poynting flux evolution in NOAA active region 11158, which produced an X2.2 flare early on 2011 February 15. We find photospheric electric fields ranging up to $1.5$ V/cm. The Poynting fluxes range up to $2\\times10^{10}$ ergs$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with mean values around $10^8$-$10^9$ ergs$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. Integrating the instantaneous energy flux over space and time, we find that the total magnetic energy accumulated above the photosphere from emergence to the moment before the X2.2 flare to be $E=10.6\\times10^{32}$ ergs, which is partitioned as $2.0\\times10^{32}$ er...

  4. EVOLUTION OF CURRENTS OF OPPOSITE SIGNS IN THE FLARE-PRODUCTIVE SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindra, B. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Bhattacharyya, R., E-mail: ravindra@iiap.res.in, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in, E-mail: tiwari@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: ramit@prl.res.in [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of a time series of high spatial resolution vector magnetograms of the active region NOAA 10930 available from the Solar Optical Telescope SpectroPolarimeter on board Hinode revealed that there is a mixture of upward and downward currents in the two footpoints of an emerging flux rope. The flux emergence rate is almost the same in both the polarities. We observe that along with an increase in magnetic flux, the net current in each polarity increases initially for about three days after which it decreases. This net current is characterized by having exactly opposite signs in each polarity while its magnitude remains almost the same most of the time. The decrease of the net current in both the polarities is due to the increase of current having a sign opposite to that of the net current. The dominant current, with the same sign as the net current, is seen to increase first and then decreases during the major X-class flares. Evolution of non-dominant current appears to be a necessary condition for flare initiation. The above observations can be plausibly explained in terms of the superposition of two different force-free states resulting in a non-zero Lorentz force in the corona. This Lorentz force then pushes the coronal plasma and might facilitate the magnetic reconnection required for flares. Also, the evolution of the net current is found to follow the evolution of magnetic shear at the polarity inversion line.

  5. Flux Emergence in the Solar Active Region NOAA 11158: The Evolution of Net Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vemareddy, P; Karthikreddy, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed investigation on the evolution of observed net vertical current using a time series of vector magnetograms of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 obtained from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We also discuss the relation of net current to the observed eruptive events. The AR evolved from $\\beta\\gamma$ to $\\beta\\gamma\\delta$ configuration over a period of 6 days. The AR had two sub-regions of activity with opposite chirality: one dominated by sunspot rotation producing a strong CME, the other showing large shear motions producing a strong flare. The net current in each polarity over the CME producing sub-region increased to a maximum and then decreased when the sunspots got separated. The time profile of net current in this sub-region followed the time profile of the rotation rate of the S-polarity sunspot of the same sub-region. The net current in the flaring sub-region showed a sudden increase at the time of the strong flare and remained unchanged till the end of the observation, while the ...

  6. ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs, T. Eskridge, R. Hartley, H. Pfeiffer, and C. Soderlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Roger

    ARCHITECTURE OF THE MERCURY MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL DATA FUSION C. Fields, C. Cavendish, M. Coombs mesoscale meteorological data fusion system is being developed as an intelligent interface between the U.S. Army's Integrated Meteorological System IM[ETS) mesoscale database and tactical decision aids (TDAs

  7. Using meteorological data to forecast seasonal runoff on the River Jhelum, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    Using meteorological data to forecast seasonal runoff on the River Jhelum, Pakistan D.R. Archer a of Pakistan. Seasonal forecasts of spring and summer flow provide the opportunity for planning and would of Control between In- dia and Pakistan. The Jhelum then flows through the plains of the Punjab, where

  8. Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Improvement of the European Wind Atlas Method by Spatial Interpolation of Meteorological Station. Introduction The European Wind Atlas in combination with the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAs (DEWI), EbertstraÃ?e 96, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany Abstract The practice of using the European Wind

  9. Switching Kalman Filters for Prediction and Tracking in an Adaptive Meteorological Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Switching Kalman Filters for Prediction and Tracking in an Adaptive Meteorological Sensing Network locations. While Kalman filters and their extensions are commonly used for prediction and tracking explore the advantages and limitations of using Kalman filters to track objects with nonstationary

  10. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 7690 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack covariance flux sites across China, and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and water useDirect Agricultural and Forest Meteorology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agrformet Carbon fluxes

  11. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  12. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday of the physical states and processes of clouds and precipitation as well as atmospheric electricity and optics Thunderstorm charging Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES

  13. METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 3223: Physical Meteorology II: Cloud Physics, Atmospheric Electricity and Optics CLASS: Monday as atmospheric electricity and optics. Specific topics that will be covered are as follows: Cloud physics: Review Lightening Atmospheric optics: Reflection and refraction Optical phenomena GRADES Homework problems: 20% Quiz

  14. Cloud Properties over the North Slope of Alaska: Identifying the Prevailing Meteorological Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The meteorological categories are established by ap- plying an objective k-means clustering algorithm to 11 years as inputs to the k-means clustering, are found to differ significantly between the regimes and are also well­observation comparison studies. Each category comprises an ensemble of test cases covering a representative range

  15. Abstract--Meteorological time series are characterized by important spatial and temporal variation. Model determination and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    of the meteorological time series used, which includes the use of statistical techniques to detect whether there exist for the time series using an evolutionary algorithm that adaptively adjusts some of its parameters during its and temperatures collected in a region of Romania. The results are promising for the analysis of such time series

  16. EWEC2006 Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    resource assessments, to calculate loads and wakes as well as for reliable short-term wind power forecastsEWEC2006 ­ Scientific Track Offshore Meteorology for Multi-Mega-Watt Turbines Jens Tambke1 Durante5 , Jörg-Olaf Wolff6 1 ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, University

  17. Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 8, The REVIEW computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, G.L.; Burk, K.W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Meteorological Station (HMS) routinely collects meteorological data from sources on and off the Hanford Site. The data are averaged over both 15 minutes and 1 hour and are maintained in separate databases on the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/750 at the HMS. The databases are transferred to the Emergency Management System (EMS) DEC VAX 11/750 computer. The EMS is part of the Unified Dose Assessment Center, which is located on on the ground-level floor of the Federal building in Richland and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The computer program REVIEW is used to display meteorological data in graphical and alphanumeric form from either the 15-minute or hourly database. The code is available on the HMS and EMS computer. The REVIEW program helps maintain a high level of quality assurance on the instruments that collect the data and provides a convenient mechanism for analyzing meteorological data on a routine basis and during emergency response situations.

  18. QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 134: 583593 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kossin, James P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land. This occurred in hurricane Andrew (1992) while making landfall near Homestead, Florida. As Andrew intensification. Copyright 2008 Royal Meteorological Society KEY WORDS hurricane; eyewall replacement cycle; moat fluctuations. An example of this behavior was observed in hurricane Allen (1980), which underwent repeated

  19. FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL-POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Iain B.

    FRESNEL-ZONE MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF A DUAL- POLARIZED METEOROLOGICAL RADAR ANTENNA D.B. Hayman Fresnel-zone holographic technique was used to obtain the radiation pattern for the upgraded antenna in the measurement of this antenna and the analysis of the results. Keywords: Antenna measurements, Fresnel zone

  20. ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    ATMOSPHERIC DUST AND MESOSCALE/MICROSCALE METEOROLOGY. A. Spiga1 , S.R. Lewis1 , and F. For- get2 to advances in computational resources and modeling techniques. Note also that mesoscale modeling and Large: general circulation models, mesoscale models, microscale models [Large-Eddy Simulations]. Figure 1

  1. Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hameed, Sultan

    Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1 and Sultan Hameed2 Received] Determining the rate of global sea level rise (GSLR) during the past century is critical to understanding a suite of coastal oceanographic processes. These findings reduce variability in regional sea level rise

  2. 1771DECEMBER 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | ne of the more stunning features of the images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ILLINGWORTH AND O'CONNOR--Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom of the atmosphere. By tracking movements of individual cloud elements we can also determine the wind fields (e the energy budget of the planet. They tend to cool the earth by reflecting sunlight back to space while

  3. Meteorological conditions associated with the full-span galloping oscillations of overhead transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    -span galloping of bundled conductors, and it was not possible to assess how close the critical wind speedMeteorological conditions associated with the full-span galloping oscillations of overhead,Wind ABSTRACT The recorded phase-to-phase faults associated with the full-span galloping of CEGB overhead

  4. Laser applications in meteorology and earth and atmospheric remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seevers, O.C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents information on the flow of ground currents and stray voltage. The author covers the real effects of ground currents, how they operate under the surface of the earth, and how each current affects output voltage. The author clears up the misinformation surrounding stray voltage, why it has been blamed for a variety of problems, and why utility companies have paid out millions of dollars in lawsuits. The author describes how primary neutral current returns to its source. How the current conforms to a particular path in the earth following the lines of least resistance is discussed.

  5. Meteorological teleconnections between the Sahel and the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malan, Jeffrey Earl

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    correlation, simple 11near regress1on, Data of the 700 mb height data are used to produce composite charts of seasonal circulation and for conducting circulation analyses in an effort to associate climate signals with anomalous conditions of the general... circulation. Two readily identifiable modes of large-scale spatial variability are found 1n the f1rst and second princ1pal components. The first indicates the existence of an inverse relationsh1p between precipita- tion in the Sahel and surface temperature...

  6. *Corresponding author. Tel.: 0027 21 650 3280; fax: 0027 21 650 3979; e-mail: oboebel@physci.uct.ac.za. Now at: NOAA, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL 33149, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 7700 Rondebosch, South Africa Institut fu( r Meereskunde an der Universita( t Kiel, Du( sternbrooker stability, with the mean kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy ratio being around one. Farther south-Sea Research II 46 (1999) 355--392 Kinematic elements of Antarctic Intermediate Water in the western South

  7. 1 SEPTEMBER 2001 3551S T O N E E T A L . 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada RONALD J. STOUFFER NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (Manuscript received 11 August, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6, Canada. E-mail: stone

  8. 15 DECEMBER 2004 4641A N D E R S O N E T A L . 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    ATMOSPHERIC MODEL DEVELOPMENT TEAM: JEFFREY L. ANDERSON, NOAA/GFDL, Princeton, New Jersey; V. BALAJI, U.S. Geological Survey, Princeton, New Jersey; MARY J. NATH, JEFFREY J. PLOSHAY, V. RAMASWAMY, M, known as LM2, includes soil sensible and latent heat storage, groundwater storage, and stomatal

  9. Surface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical bulk Richardson number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Von P.

    as a residual of the energy budget, temperature inversion strength, and wind shear as a function of the bulkSurface energy budget over the South Pole and turbulent heat fluxes as a function of an empirical 2009; accepted 12 August 2009; published 26 November 2009. [1] Routine radiation and meteorological

  10. Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere -- in the Metric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eihle, W. O.; Powers, R. J.; Clark, R.A.

    TR-16 1968 Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere?in the Metric System W.O. Eihle R.J. Powers R.A. Clark...

  11. Lord Julian Hunt FRS Meteorological Office 1990-1992 Professor VI Arnold Steklov Institute, Moscow 1990-1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lord Julian Hunt FRS Meteorological Office 1990-1992 Professor VI Arnold Steklov Institute, Moscow 1990-1993 Professor PG Burke FRS Queen's University, Belfast 1990-1993 Professor IG Halliday University

  12. Conference on Mountain Meteorology, 7-11 August 2000 Aspen, Colorado, Amer. Meteor. Soc., Preprint p.11-14.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    9th Conference on Mountain Meteorology, 7-11 August 2000 Aspen, Colorado, Amer. Meteor. Soc-11 August 2000 Aspen, Colorado, Amer. Meteor. Soc., Preprint p.11-14. the Osservatorio Ticinese at Locarno

  13. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanography and Meteorology Building.The Doppler weather radar on the roof of the building is a campus Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar (SMART-R).This radar is used in national and international

  14. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  15. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  16. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  17. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  18. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  19. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  20. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  1. Hanford Meteorological Station computer codes: Volume 1, The GEN computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, J.W.; Andrews, G.L.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Meteorological Station, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, issues general weather forecasts twice a day. The GEN computer code is used to archive the 24-hour forecasts and apply quality assurance checks to the forecast data. This code accesses an input file, which contains the date and hour of the previous forecast, and an output file, which contains 24-hour forecasts for the current month. As part of the program, a data entry form consisting of 14 fields that describe various weather conditions must be filled in. The information on the form is appended to the current 24-hour monthly forecast file, which provides an archive for the 24-hour general weather forecasts. This report consists of several volumes documenting the various computer codes used at the Hanford Meteorological Station. This volume describes the implementation and operation of the GEN computer code at the station.

  2. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Kalaeloa Oahu, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  3. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Milford, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  4. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); La Ola Lanai, Hawaii (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  5. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Cedar City, Utah (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  6. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Los Angeles, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  7. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Sun Spot Two; Swink, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  8. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Observed Atmospheric and Solar Information System (OASIS); Tucson, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  9. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  10. 24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

  11. NOAA Helps the Construction Sector Build for a Changing Climate The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    million, and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatt hours. Climate Information Reduces Construction Costs and Energy Consumption NOAA provides airfreezing data to the home building industry, which in annual building cost savings of $330 million and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatthours. #12

  12. The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact linwood.pendleton@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact linwood.pendleton@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version Measures of the Ocean and Coastal Economy: 1.GDP (Gross Domestic Product. The Ocean Economy 1 The ocean economy is comprised of six economic sectors that depend on the oceans

  13. The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version Measures of the Ocean and Coastal Economy: 1.GDP (Gross Domestic Product. The Coastal Economy 1 The Coastal economy is comprised of all economic activity that takes place

  14. A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics eruptions) and from human activities involving burning of fossil fuels and vegetation. Visible forms, the concerns over public health prompted researchers to study the fallout (radioactive dust) from nuclear

  15. The Puerto Rico Weather Camp 2013 is a summer experience hosted by the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences at UPR Mayagez (UPRM) and co-sponsored by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    The Puerto Rico Weather Camp 2013 is a summer experience hosted by the NOAA Center for Atmospheric forecasters and administrators, Emergency Management officers, and TV weather broadcasters. The Puerto Rico in the vicinity of La Parguera, Lajas (southwestern Puerto Rico). Applicants must be rising sophomore, junior

  16. The Puerto Rico Weather Camp 2012 is a summer experience hosted by the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences at UPR Mayagez (UPRM) and co-sponsored by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    The Puerto Rico Weather Camp 2012 is a summer experience hosted by the NOAA Center for Atmospheric forecasters and administrators, Emergency Management officers, and TV weather broadcasters. The Puerto Rico in the vicinity of La Parguera, Lajas (southwestern Puerto Rico). Applicants must be rising sophomore, junior

  17. Converted WP file edr http://www.osdpd.noaa.gov/PSB/SHARED_PROCESSING/EDR.HTML 1 of 31 1/25/2006 11:41 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Converted WP file edr http://www.osdpd.noaa.gov/PSB/SHARED_PROCESSING/EDR.HTML 1 of 31 1/25/2006 11:41 AM Orbit-by-Orbit Microwave Derived Products (EDR) Interface Control Document Revised 4 DESCRIPTION 4 EDR Product Identification Block 5 EDR Data Sequence Block 7 Rev Header Data Description Block 9

  18. NOAA Competitive Level -Codes List of changes All This document converted without change to MSWord from WordPerfect, 8/5/04.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , per John Hanson. 6/10/02 5201 Diving Equipment Worker added per Brooke Larson, WASC. 11/19/01 #12;NOAA, qualification requirements, pay schedules, and working conditions so that an agency may reassign the incumbent are familiar with qualification requirements and recruiting practices. Care and thought is needed in assigning

  19. Properties of inflow and downdraft air of tropical mesoscale convective systems and the effect of downdrafts on the surface fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Jeane Margaret

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPERTIES OF INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE FLUXES A Thesis by JEANE MARGARET GRIFFITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MAS'IER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology PROPERTIES OF THE INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE...

  20. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  1. 3892 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California E. SMALL Department considerable attention in the hydro- meteorology community. This is partially because most of the monsoon

  2. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A... for measured solar radiation data and, as a result, rely on the values from typical meteorological years. Texas, in a similar fashion as other states in the US, does not have an active network for solar radiation data and has a variety of weather conditions...

  3. Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

    ESL-PA-13-11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models... for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

  4. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedo at theSurface Soil Surface Soil

  5. AiR surface: AiR surface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    AiR surface: 1 PDA AiR surface 1 1: AiR surface () () 2 [1] [2] 3 AiR surface AiR surface surface surface surface 3.1 surface [3]( 3 ) surface 3.2 surface surface AiR surface 4 AiR surface surface AiR surface: Virtual Touch Panel

  6. Update of HB-line consequences based on new meteorological and population databases in AXAIR89Q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DelGenio, M.E.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional analyses and upgrading of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) is needed for an Environmental Assessment (EA) currently being prepared for HB-Line. Since the JCO and SAR do not include population doses for two accidents; a propagated fire and a ground level release for an earthquake, this analysis will provide these doses. Population distribution information has been updated to 1992. This analysis will analyze the onsite worker at a distance of 640 meters from the release point using 50% meteorology in accordance with more recent DOE guidance. The doses will be calculated for all the accidents reported in the JCO. This analysis will update maximum offsite individual doses using a new meteorological database based on more recent data collected from 1987-1991. The new meteorological database results in a decrease in the dose from a release from H-Area.

  7. Sources for Pu in near surface air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

  8. Abstract--The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is responsible for conducting gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    routes) and the economy (e.g. used for detecting petroleum and natural gas). The current set of gravity surveys play a vital role in the nation's regional safety and economic sustainability. Gravity surveys, the geoid model can be used to measure and evaluate elevations of the Earth's surface. B. Measurement Types

  9. THE MADISON SQUARE GARDEN DISPERSION STUDY (MSG05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSG05 was a study of atmospheric transport and dispersion in the deep urban canyons of Midtown New York City, in the area of Madison Square Garden. This downtown area is considered to be a prime target for terrorist activities, and has one of the largest commuter populations in the world. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion in such scenarios, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons. On March 10 and 14, 2005, a series of Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) tracers were released and tracked with about 30 sampling stations at radial distances of about 0.2 and 0.4 km, with vertical profiles near a 250 m tall building (One Penn Plaza). Meteorological stations collected wind data in the MSG vicinity, at street level and rooftop level. MSG05 is expected to provide useful information on rapid vertical dispersion will assist in planning for more extensive studies. This data release is being made available to a restricted group of key scientists who have worked on the project. Part of the QA program involves feedback from scientists and modelers who are working on this study. This document describes the meteorological component of the project. The file organization and metadata are detailed so that a researcher can work with the data sets.

  10. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  11. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  12. Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study 457 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) © EGU Operational hydro forecasting system in the context of the Piemonte Regions hydro-meteorological operational alert procedure

  13. Comparison of Data Quality of NOAA's ISIS and SURFRAD Networks to NREL's SRRL-BMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderberg, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analyses of broadband solar radiometric data quality for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Integrated Surface Irradiance Study and Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) solar measurement networks. The data quality of these networks is compared to that of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Baseline Measurement System (SRRL-BMS) native data resolutions and hourly averages of the data from the years 2002 through 2013. This report describes the solar radiometric data quality testing and flagging procedures and the method used to determine and tabulate data quality statistics. Monthly data quality statistics for each network were plotted by year against the statistics for the SRRL-BMS. Some of the plots are presented in the body of the report, but most are in the appendix. These plots indicate that the overall solar radiometric data quality of the SURFRAD network is superior to that of the Integrated Surface Irradiance Study network and can be comparable to SRRL-BMS.

  14. 15 MARCH 1999 829J I A N D W A N G 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pao K.

    to the flux on a stationary crystal gives the ventilation coefficient. The local flow velocity profiles around15 MARCH 1999 829J I A N D W A N G 1999 American Meteorological Society Ventilation Coefficients (Manuscript received 20 November 1997, in final form 8 May 1998) ABSTRACT The ventilation coefficients

  15. SEPTEMBER 2003 2071V A N L E E U W E N 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

    SEPTEMBER 2003 2071V A N L E E U W E N 2003 American Meteorological Society A Variance and with a multilayer quasigeostrophic model of the ocean area around South Africa. It is recalled that Kalman after analysis, without extra computations. It is based on ensemble or Monte Carlo integrations

  16. Acquisition of a Multi-Core Server for the Enhancement of the Meteorology Program at Central Michigan University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acquisition of a Multi-Core Server for the Enhancement of the Meteorology Program at Central addresses a much needed upgrade to an aging, overloaded, and in- creasingly unstable server which with fast local storage, the server will act as both an ingestion engine running the LDM and its associ

  17. 1 JULY 2002 1537W A T A N A B E E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    AND FEI-FEI JIN Department of Meteorology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University, Tokyo, Japan (Manuscript received 24 August 2001, in final form 6 December 2001) ABSTRACT by the leading principal component of the observed 300-hPa streamfunction anomalies, shows quite significant

  18. METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON VAPOR INCIDENTS IN THE 200 EAST & 200 WEST TANK FARMS FROM CY1995 TO CY2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOCKING, M.J.

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Revised for a more comprehensive overview of vapor incidents reported at the Hanford Tank Farms. Investigation into the meteorological influences on vapor incidents in the tank farm to determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases. Weather phenomena, specifically barometric pressure, and wind velocity and direction can potentially cause or exacerbate a vapor release within the farm systems. The purpose of this document is to gather and evaluate the meteorological and weather information for the Tank Farms Shift Log Vapor Incident entries and determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases such as propane. A part of the evaluation will be determining which of the incidents are related to actual ''intrusive'' work, and which are ''transient.'' Transient vapor incidents are herein defined as those vapors encountered during walkdowns, surveys, or other activities that did not require working directly with the tanks, pits, transfer lines, etc. Another part of the investigation will involve determining if there are barometric pressures or other weather related phenomena that might cause or contribute vapors being released when there are no ''intrusive'' activities. A final purpose is to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the 242-A Evaporator operations and Vapor Incidents entered on the Shift Log.

  19. 1 JUNE 2001 2443G U A N D L I O U 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    and in all seasons with a global cloud cover of about 20%­30% and more than 70% in the Tropics (Wylie et al. 1994). The effects of cirrus clouds on the radiation budget of the earth and the atmosphere, and hence1 JUNE 2001 2443G U A N D L I O U 2001 American Meteorological Society Radiation Parameterization

  20. Influence of meteorology in assessing energy externalities: application of the damage function approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.; Miller, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McIlvaine, C.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a methodology for estimating energy externalities. These externalities are environmental, health, and other damages and benefits that traditionally have not been considered as part of the cost of producing and consuming goods and services. An example of externalities is the effect on human health from exposure to ozone formed by NO{sub x} and other emissions from electric power plants. These damages are valued adversely by individuals (and by society) but are not reflected in the price of electricity. The damage function approach is a methodology which is used for developing quantitative estimates of externalities. This paper describes the five major steps in the damage function approach, focuses on the use of ozone models in that framework, and points out the effects of meteorological variables on estimates of ozone concentrations.

  1. THE APPLICATION OF AN EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHM TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF A MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; O'Steen, L.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a simple evolutionary algorithm can optimize a set of mesoscale atmospheric model parameters with respect to agreement between the mesoscale simulation and a limited set of synthetic observations. This is illustrated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). A set of 23 RAMS parameters is optimized by minimizing a cost function based on the root mean square (rms) error between the RAMS simulation and synthetic data (observations derived from a separate RAMS simulation). We find that the optimization can be efficient with relatively modest computer resources, thus operational implementation is possible. The optimization efficiency, however, is found to depend strongly on the procedure used to perturb the 'child' parameters relative to their 'parents' within the evolutionary algorithm. In addition, the meteorological variables included in the rms error and their weighting are found to be an important factor with respect to finding the global optimum.

  2. INTERPRETING ERUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN NOAA AR 11158 VIA THE REGION'S MAGNETIC ENERGY AND RELATIVE-HELICITY BUDGETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics (RCAAM) Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, Athens, GR-11527 (Greece); Liu Yang [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous works, we introduced a nonlinear force-free method that self-consistently calculates the instantaneous budgets of free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in solar active regions (ARs). Calculation is expedient and practical, using only a single vector magnetogram per computation. We apply this method to a time series of 600 high-cadence vector magnetograms of the eruptive NOAA AR 11158 acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory over a five-day observing interval. Besides testing our method extensively, we use it to interpret the dynamical evolution in the AR, including eruptions. We find that the AR builds large budgets of both free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity, sufficient to power many more eruptions than the ones it gave within the interval of interest. For each of these major eruptions, we find eruption-related decreases and subsequent free-energy and helicity budgets that are consistent with the observed eruption (flare and coronal mass ejection (CME)) sizes. In addition, we find that (1) evolution in the AR is consistent with the recently proposed (free) energy-(relative) helicity diagram of solar ARs, (2) eruption-related decreases occur before the flare and the projected CME-launch times, suggesting that CME progenitors precede flares, and (3) self terms of free energy and relative helicity most likely originate from respective mutual terms, following a progressive mutual-to-self conversion pattern that most likely stems from magnetic reconnection. This results in the non-ideal formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and instigates further research on the triggering of solar eruptions with magnetic helicity firmly placed in the eruption cadre.

  3. 1052 VOLUME 18W E A T H E R A N D F O R E C A S T I N G 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    of Meteorology, Perth, Western Australia, Australia i European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading to frontogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for precipitation, and the energy budget during ET. Finally, a summary

  4. A recent study of meteorological conditions around the Pentagon will support development of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    of a system to protect its 25,000+ occupants from chemical, biological, and radiological attack. I nFEBRUARY 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | #12;of the most likely targets for a future terrorist attack

  5. JANUARY 2003 83B A R T H E L M I E A N D P R Y O R 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    .barthelmie@risoe.dk ships and buoy networks with data from a few offshore meteorological masts (Barthelmie 1999a), marine. In the case of wind energy applications, available wind power density is related to the cube of the wind speed

  6. Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of shapes of crystals are important: (i) growth shape and (ii) equilibrium shape Surface/interface energy surfaces. The joining of two phases creates an interface. (Two orientations of the same crystalline phase

  7. Validation of the guidelines for portable meteorological instrument packages. Task IV. Development of an insolation handbook and instrumentation package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to show how the objective of developing guidelines for a solar energy related portable meteorology instrument package, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA), was carried out and preliminarily demonstrated and validated. A project to develop guidelines for such packages was initiated at IEA's Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings Program Expert's Meeting held in Norrkoping, Sweden in February 1976. An international comparison of resultant devices was conducted on behalf of the IEA at a conference held in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, in 1978. Results of the 1978 Hamburg comparison of two devices and the Swiss Mobile Solar Radiation System, using German meteorological standards, are discussed. The consensus of the IEA Task Group is that the objective of the subtask has been accomplished.

  8. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  9. Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  10. Improvement of weather analysis in isolated areas of the southern hemisphere by meteorological satellite information: a case study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Jose? Angel

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure Temperature Wind Upper-air circulation Fronts Cloudiness Cyclonic and anticyclonic activity. Weather patterns Summary of the status of available information Status of the Use of Information from Meteorological Satellites as Applied... del Fuego and South Patagonia, unpredictable most of the time except for the orographic effects, is due to the changes in the atmospheric circulation in the vicinity of the Drake Passage . Aircraft of Argentine and Chilean airlines operate...

  11. Sensitivity and uncertainty studies of the CRAC2 code for selected meteorological models and parameters. [CRAC2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.; Kocher, D.C.; Hicks, B.B.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.; Ku, J.Y.; Rao, K.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the sensitivity of results from the CRAC2 computer code, which predicts health impacts from a reactor-accident scenario, to uncertainties in selected meteorological models and parameters. The sources of uncertainty examined include the models for plume rise and wet deposition and the meteorological bin-sampling procedure. An alternative plume-rise model usually had little effect on predicted health impacts. In an alternative wet-deposition model, the scavenging rate depends only on storm type, rather than on rainfall rate and atmospheric stability class as in the CRAC2 model. Use of the alternative wet-deposition model in meteorological bin-sampling runs decreased predicted mean early injuries by as much as a factor of 2-3 and, for large release heights and sensible heat rates, decreased mean early fatalities by nearly an order of magnitude. The bin-sampling procedure in CRAC2 was expanded by dividing each rain bin into four bins that depend on rainfall rate. Use of the modified bin structure in conjunction with the CRAC2 wet-deposition model changed all predicted health impacts by less than a factor of 2. 9 references.

  12. Daily pollution forecast using optimal meteorological data at synoptic and local scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Ana; Raischel, Frank; Trigo, Ricardo; Mendes, Manuel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple framework to easily pre-select the most essential data for accurately forecasting the concentration of the pollutant PM$_{10}$, based on pollutants observations for the years 2002 until 2006 in the metropolitan region of Lisbon, Portugal. Starting from a broad panoply of different data sets collected at several meteorological stations, we apply a forward stepwise regression procedure that enables us not only to identify the most important variables for forecasting the pollutant but also to rank them in order of importance. We argue the importance of this variable ranking, showing that the ranking is very sensitive to the urban spot where measurements are taken. Having this pre-selection, we then present the potential of linear and non-linear neural network models when applied to the concentration of pollutant PM$_{10}$. Similarly to previous studies for other pollutants, our validation results show that non-linear models in average perform as well or worse as linear models for PM$_{10}$. F...

  13. Instrumentation, recording, and processing of meteorological data near Portage, Wisconsin: Wisconsin power plant impact study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearns, C.R.; Falconer, P.; Weidner, G.; Bowen, B.; Dzamba, L.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Columbia Power Plant Impact Study meteorological data were collected at a network of monitoring sites from 1972 through 1977. The data were the basis for a series of studies whose purpose was to elucidate the transport of airborne pollutants and to assess the climatic impact of the power plant. In a pilot diffusion climatology survey, local wind structure was interpreted in the context of synoptic weather patterns. A significant new low wind statistic was introduced. A case study traced the movement of an elevated level of ozone from the Southern Plains across the Midwest to the East Coast. It showed that long distance transport is necessary for elevated O3 levels to occur in most parts of the U.S. The horizontal variation of the wind field is an important factor in the transport of atmospheric pollutants from 10 to 100 km. The wind field was shown to be organized as a function of wind direction and wind speed around the Baraboo Hills. Two models for estimating concentrations of SO2 at ground level were compared. Both used the Gaussian plume equation: one estimated the required dispersion coefficients from the Hino stability model; the other was based on data for horizontal and vertical hourly wind direction range. Overall, the climatic effects of the power plant and cooling pond appear small. Fogging, condensation, and riming may occur downwind on several days each year. Temperature increases of about 1C may also be observed for a short distance downwind.

  14. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 150 (2010) 895907 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface energy balance and carbon flux estimates. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1 of snowmelt, and canopy albedoes for the land surface energy balance for general Corresponding author. E , Andrew Oliphante a Department of Geography, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park

  15. AUGUST 2001 2441H U A N G 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui Xin

    . For any given Ekman pumping field, the surface density that satisfies the a priori specified potential thickness function is calculated as part of the solution. Climate variability induced by surface cooling/heating parameter ( is the angular velocity of the earth's rotation, is the latitude), and Q f z (4) is the PV

  16. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  17. Convective Signals from Surface Measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal has been detected using observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and fractional sky cover from the ACRF TWP Manus site, and the statistical tools of wavelet and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals from surface observations spanning the period from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location. Our results indicate that the MJO convective signal has a strong seasonal-to-interannual evolution that is likely correlated with the interannual variability of El Ni ˜no Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  18. An ozone climatology of the Dallas-Fort Worth area and its relationship to meteorology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobis, Timothy Edward

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental protection agency has established a hics. National Ambient Air Quality Standard for surface ozone through the Clean Air Act and its amendments. The Dallas / Fort Worth area is in violation of these standards, and to date...

  19. Meteorol. Atmos. Phys. 80, 117129 (2002) Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) measure- ments. More attention is given to the 14 months of Julys are more or less de- termined by the distribution and types of vege- tation through the surface energy

  20. On the relationship between temperature and wind speed in the atmospheric surface layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrard, John Martin

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRAR& A AN m os??E " "" ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN T" MP. "RATURE AND WIND SPEED IN THE ATMOSPHERIC SURFACE LAYER A Thesis John Me Pierrard Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCI"NCE August 1958 Ma)or Sub)ect: Meteorology ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEMPERATURE AND WIND SP ED IN THE ATMOSPHERIC SUBRACE LAYER A Thesis John M. Pierrard Approved as to style...

  1. Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the variability across different spatial res- olutions in input data translates into variation across scales in modeled output. This issue is of prime im- portance to the remote sensing community involved in the modeling of land–atmosphere interactions...1212 VOLUME 4J O U R N A L O F H Y D R O M E T E O R O L O G Y q 2003 American Meteorological Society Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing NATHANIEL A. BRUNSELL* Department of Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology...

  2. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  3. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

  4. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Entry Criteria ....................................................... 20 4.10. Section 6 ­ TRR Exit............................................................................. 12 4.5. Section 1 ­ G4R Entry Criteria ....................................................... 12 4 ­ G4R Exit Criteria.......................................................... 19 4.9. Section 5 ­ TRR

  5. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    TITLE: DG-10.1: UNIT TEST REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 No version 1.0. 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-13.3) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon

  6. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) CRITICAL DESIGN REVIEW PEER REVIEW (PRG-11.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10/31/2007 3.0 Renamed PRG-8.1 and revised

  7. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-8.1: DETAILED DESIGN DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-11.1) adapted from CMMI practices and Raytheon practices by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen

  8. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: TD-9: PROJECT REQUIREMENTS TRAINING DOCUMENT VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon and Raytheon Systems Engineering practices by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11

  9. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    .0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version Description Revised://www.nsc.liu.se/~boein/f77to90/f77to90.html ). Adaptation by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). New Document 03/31/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). STAR standard style applied to document

  10. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    TITLE: DG-11.3: METADATA DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 New Documentation Guideline (DG-11.4) adapted from SPSRB draft guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions

  11. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    .0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PROJECT REQUIREMENTS REVIEW REPORT DOCUMENT GUIDELINE.2) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. Minor revisions to References 2 10

  12. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PRELIMINARY DESIGN REVIEW PEER REVIEW (PRG-10.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10/26/2007 3.0 Renamed PRG-7 and revised

  13. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    3.0 AUTHORS: Phil Ardanuy (Raytheon Information Solutions) Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Ardanuy (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revisions by Ken Jensen (Raytheon (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. Minor revisions to References. Removed Section 3; re

  14. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) Alward Siyyid (Raytheon Information Description Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Work Instruction (WI-12.1.1) adapted from Raytheon SOI 505 by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 03/31/2006 1.1 Revision by Alward Siyyid (Raytheon

  15. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    TITLE: SG-12: RESEARCH MANAGER GUIDELINES VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information 2 3.0 New Stakeholder Guideline adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

  16. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-9.2: TEST READINESS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 2.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 No version 1 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-12.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-9.2 and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

  17. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-11.5: SYSTEM READINESS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 No version 1 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-11.5) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-11.5 and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

  18. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-12.1: EXTERNAL USERS MANUAL DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information 06/02/2006 2.0 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). Minor revisions to Section 5

  19. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-7.1: PRELIMINARY DESIGN DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-7.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All

  20. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PROJECT REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version Description Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-9.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions

  1. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    : Alward Siyyid (formerly Raytheon Information Solutions ­ version 1) Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information SUMMARY Version Description Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Work Instruction (WI) adapted from Raytheon SOI 506 by Alward Siyyid (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken

  2. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    TITLE: SG-13: DEVELOPMENT LEAD GUIDELINES VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information 2 3.0 New Stakeholder Guideline adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

  3. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-10.4: CODE TEST REVIEW REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon, DG-13.2) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed Code Test Review Report Guideline, DG-10.4, and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon

  4. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) CRITICAL DESIGN REVIEW REPORT DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. Minor revisions to References. 2 10/31/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-8

  5. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    .0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PRELIMINARY DESIGN REVIEW REPORT DOCUMENT GUIDELINE.2) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10/26/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-7

  6. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY and Raytheon practices by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. 2 10/12/2007 3.0 Revised by Ken Jensen

  7. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-8.2: CRITICAL DESIGN DOCUMENTGUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-11.2) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10

  8. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PROJECT REQUIREMENTS REVIEW PEER REVIEW (PRG-9.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 New version by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). Minor revisions to References section. References to 9

  9. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Entry Criteria ....................................................... 20 4.10. Section 6 ­ PRR Exit............................................................................. 12 4.5. Section 1 ­ G3R Entry Criteria ....................................................... 12 4 ­ G3R Exit Criteria.......................................................... 19 4.9. Section 5 ­ PRR

  10. Meteorological monitoring sampling and analysis plan for the environmental monitoring plan at Waste Area Grouping 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that wall be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Meteorological monitoring of various climatological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

  11. 1 JANUARY 2001 5L E T T E R S 2001 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to external forcings with similar periodicities, such as solar radiation (Hoyt and Schatten 1997) and lunar cycles (Cook et al. 1997). Instrumental sea surface temperature records are mostly limited to the past'Arrigo et al. 1999; Cook et al. 2000). Here we use a network of newly developed chronologies for Southern

  12. B. MAPES et al.November 2008 175Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 86A, pp. 175-185, 2008 Predictability Aspects of Global Aqua-planet Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapes, Brian

    B. MAPES et al.November 2008 175Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan, Vol. 86A, pp. 175;Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan Vol. 86A176 1. Introduction In principle, anything Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder

  13. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  14. Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces Alberto Favaro & Friedrich W. Hehl Outline Linear media Linear media-you. Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces: geometrical optics in dispersionless linear (meta)materials and vacuum, 19­23 November 2012 Email: favaro@thp.uni-koeln.de #12;Fresnel versus Kummer surfaces Alberto Favaro

  15. SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

  16. MAY 1999 661M A T T H E W S A N D K I L A D I S 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    MAY 1999 661M A T T H E W S A N D K I L A D I S 1999 American Meteorological Society The Tropical with enhanced convection over the East Indian Ocean and Indonesia, and suppressed convection over the South and forms an integral part of the slowly varying diabatic heating field of the MJO. In the opposite phase

  17. 2078 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    2078 VOLUME 16J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2003 American Meteorological Society Long-Term Ice,* ROGER COLONY,* MARK A. JOHNSON,# VALERII P. KARKLIN, DAVID WALSH,* AND ALEXANDER V. YULIN *International patterns manifested locally by SAT and wind variability (Walsh and Johnson 1979; Overland and Pease 1982

  18. Meteorology Group, Departament de Fsica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca, Spain IMEDEA, UIB-CSIC, Palma de Mallorca, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Romu

    , Spain 2 IMEDEA, UIB-CSIC, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 3 Instituto Nacional de Meteorologõ�a, Madrid, Spain Geltru, Barcelona, Spain A Case of Convection Development over the Western Mediterranean Sea: A Study of precipitation were recorded in coastal lands of eastern Spain, and 180 mm were estimated over the sea with radar

  19. 504 VOLUME 17J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Polar Meteorology Group, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio ROBERT J Program, Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (Manuscript received 4, there is significant weakening of the midlatitude circulation and reduction of 500-hPa eddy kinetic energy

  20. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 137: 118136, January 2011 Initiation of deep convection at marginal instability in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    , Germany bNational Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, UK cDepartment of Meteorology of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany gInstitut f¨ur Physik der Atmosph¨are, Deutsches Zentrum f¨ur Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany hM´et´eo-France, Toulouse, France i Laboratoire Atmosph`eres, Milieux

  1. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 136: 333353, January 2010 Part B Modelling convective processes during the suppressed phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    NASA Langley Research Center, USA d European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, UK e, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, China iMet Office, Exeter, UK jLawrence Livermore National evolution of convection is assessed as part of a Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Study

  2. 264 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2000 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the relationship between the earth radiation budget or sur- face radiation budget and total cloud cover (see refer shortwave and longwave radiative flux- es as much as changes in total cloud cover and because264 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E 2000 American Meteorological Society Radiative Effects

  3. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  4. A meteorological experiment in the melting zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)); Vugts, H.F. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program on land ice and sea level change. Seven meteostations were operated along a transect running from the tundra well onto the ice sheet. At the ice edge, humidity, temperature, and wind profiles were obtained with a tethered balloon. On the ice sheet, 90 km from the edge, a boundary-layer research unit, including a sound detecting and ranging system (SODAR) and a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), was established. Although focusing on the relation between surface energy balance, glacier mass balance, and ice flow, the experiment has also delivered a unique dataset on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer around the warm tundra-cold ice sheet transition. Unexpected behavior was found for the surface albedo during the melt season. Lowest values are not found close to the ice edge, which is usual for glaciers, but higher on the ice sheet. Meltwater accumulation due to inefficient surface drainage was found to be the cause for this. The wind regime is dominated by katabatic flow from the ice sheet. The katabatic layer is typically 100-200 m thick. Close to the ice edge, the flow exhibits a very regular daily rhythm, with maximum wind speed in the afternoon. Farther on the ice sheet, the regime changes, and wind speed reaches maximum values in late night/early morning.

  5. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  6. Surface nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Y.R.; Chen, C.K.; de Castro, A.R.B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface electromagnetic waves are waves propagating along the interface of two media. Their existence was predicted by Sommerfield in 1909. In recent years, interesting applications have been found in the study of overlayers and molecular adsorption on surfaces, in probing of phase transitions, and in measurements of refractive indices. In the laboratory, the nonlinear interaction of surface electromagnetic waves were studied. The preliminary results of this recent venture in this area are presented.

  7. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  8. Running surface couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Odintsov; A. Wipf

    1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the renormalization group improved effective action and running surface couplings in curved spacetime with boundary. Using scalar self-interacting theory as an example, we study the influence of the boundary effects to effective equations of motion in spherical cap and the relevance of surface running couplings to quantum cosmology and symmetry breaking phenomenon. Running surface couplings in the asymptotically free SU(2) gauge theory are found.

  9. Terahertz surface plasmon polaritons on a semiconductor surface structured with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Thomas E.

    Terahertz surface plasmon polaritons on a semiconductor surface structured with periodic V-doped silicon surface, using anisotropic wet-etching of crystalline silicon, thereby forming a plasmonic surfaces. © 2013 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (240.6680) Surface plasmons; (240.6690) Surface

  10. Reconstructing Surfaces and Functions on Surfaces from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    part is a common problem in Reverse Engineering. The part might be scannedwith a device like the laser-engineeringprocesses are nowadays commonplace in the manufacturing industry. For example, a company that manufactures mechanical object and measure the location of points on its surface. Mechanical probes, used in the manufacturing

  11. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration - Vadose Zone Monitoring FY08 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE’s Office of River Protection constructed a temporary surface barrier over a portion of the T Tank Farm as part of the T Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration Project. The surface barrier is designed to minimize the infiltration of precipitation into the contaminated soil zone created by the Tank T-106 leak and minimize movement of the contamination. As part of the demonstration effort, vadose zone moisture is being monitored to assess the effectiveness of the barrier at reducing soil moisture. A solar-powered system was installed to continuously monitor soil water conditions at four locations (i.e., instrument Nests A, B, C, and D) beneath the barrier and outside the barrier footprint as well as site meteorological conditions. Nest A is placed in the area outside the barrier footprint and serves as a control, providing subsurface conditions outside the influence of the surface barrier. Nest B provides subsurface measurements to assess surface-barrier edge effects. Nests C and D are used to assess changes in soil-moisture conditions beneath the interim surface barrier.

  12. Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Broom, Belt, Carpet) Shot Peened Exposed Aggregate Porous (Pervious) Concrete Milled HMA and SurfaceImproving Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics Pooled Fund TPF-5(139) National Concrete do with this knowledge? #12;Better Design and Construction Practices for Texturing Concrete Pavement

  13. Fiscal year 1998 summary report of the NOAA Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole-Kober, E.M.; Viebrock, H.J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1998, the Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division provided meteorological and modeling assistance to the US Environmental Protection Agency. Among the significant research studies and results were the following: publication and distribution of Models-3/Community Mutliscale Air Quality system; estimation of the nitrogen deposition to Chesapeake Bay, continued evaluation and application of air quality models for mercury, dioxin, and heavy metals, continued conduct of deposition velocity field studies over various major categories of land-use; conduct of the Ozark Isoprene Experiment to investigate biogenic isoprene emissions; analysis and modeling of dust resuspension data; continued study of buoyant puff dispersion in the convective boundary layer; and development of a standard practice for an objective statistical procedure for comparing air quality model outputs with field data.

  14. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April, distributed, and cited, but please be aware that there will be visual differences and possibly some content to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds

  15. METEOROLOGICAL Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry in particular, they are used in the regulation of energy companies (including natural gas of 50 participants representing energy load forecasters, state regulators, federal climate scientists using the most recent 15 years of observations and a forecast of the next 15 years.52 * Climate Model

  16. 1406 VOLUME 61J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verhulst, Ferdinand

    Meteorological Institute, De Bilt, and Department of Mathematics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands J. D Research, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands F. VERHULST Department of Mathematics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands (Manuscript received 22 October 2002, in final form 21 November 2003

  17. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  18. Meteorological Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan for Environmental Monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses meteorological monitoring activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Meterological monitoring of various climatological parameters (eg., temperature, wind speed, humidity) will be collected by instruments installed at WAG 6. Data will be recorded electronically at frequencies varying from 5-min intervals to 1-h intervals, dependent upon parameter. The data will be downloaded every 2 weeks, evaluated, compressed, and uploaded into a WAG 6 data base for subsequent use. The meteorological data will be used in water balance calculations in support of the WAG 6 hydrogeological model.

  19. Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Southwest Solar Research Park (Formerly SolarCAT) Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Phoenix, Arizona (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

  20. Surface alloying of immiscible metals induced by surface state shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, Jingguang

    , and topography; Silver; Gold; Copper; Tungsten; Molybdenum 1. Introduction Surface alloying has been a subjectSurface alloying of immiscible metals induced by surface state shift X.K. Shu, P. Jiang, J.G. Che) surface to form the substitutional surface alloys, despite the fact that they do not like to form alloy

  1. Enhanced surface hydrophobicity by coupling of surface polarity and topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enhanced surface hydrophobicity by coupling of surface polarity and topography Nicolas organization and contact angle. We show that when the topography and polarity of the surface act in concert- ciated that the topography of a surface is important in deter- mining the degree of surface

  2. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station down-time and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data (1) includes guidelines for operating a solar measure-ment station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices hand-book as developed for the National Renewable Energy La-boratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require imme-diate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for con-centrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  3. The effect of urban canopy parameterizations on mesoscale meteorological model simulations in the Paso del Norte area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.J.; Williams, M.D.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since mesoscale numerical models do not have the spatial resolution to directly simulate the fluid dynamics and thermodynamics in and around urban structures, urban canopy parameterizations are sometimes used to approximate the drag, heating, and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy (tke) produced by the sub-grid scale urban elements. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the urban canopy parameterizations used in the HOTMAC mesoscale meteorological model by turning the parameterizations on and off. The model simulations were performed in the Paso del Norte region, which includes the cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez, the Franklin and Sierra Juarez mountains, and the Rio Grande. The metropolitan area is surrounded by relatively barren scrubland and is intersected by strips of vegetation along the Rio Grande. Results indicate that the urban canopy parameterizations do affect the mesoscale flow field, reducing the magnitude of wind speed and changing the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and tke in the metropolitan area. A nighttime heat island and a daytime cool island exist when urban canopy parameters are turned on, but associated recirculation flows are not readily apparent. Model-computed solar, net, and longwave radiation values look reasonable, agreeing for the most part with published measurements.

  4. Entropy and surfaceness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casper, James Kyle

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The layer of the Earth's atmosphere which contains clouds and weather systems is a thin thermoregulatory surface. It maintains an exact energy budget between the Earth and the Sun. Recent work in theoretical physics is ...

  5. A surface ionization source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  6. SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Y.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. de Castro, and Y. R. Shen, Optics Lett. i, 393 See, for3, 1980 SURFACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y.R. Shen, C.K. Chen, andde Janiero SURFRACE NONLINEAR OPTICS Y. R. Shen, C. K. Chen,

  7. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  8. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  9. A surface ionization source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  10. Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signals have been detected using highly sampled observations from the U.S. DOE ARM Climate Research Facility located at the Tropical Western Pacific Manus site. Using downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and derived shortwave fractional sky cover, and the statistical tools of wavelet, cross wavelet, and Fourier spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals and their phase change from surface observations spanning from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-gauge combined values of precipitation from the NASA Global Precipitation Climatology Project and the NOAA interpolated outgoing longwave radiation for the same location. We find that the Manus MJO signal is weakest during the strongest 1997-1998 El Nin˜o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) year. A significant 3-5-month lead in boreal winter is identified further between Manus MJO and NOAA NINO3.4 sea surface temperature (former leads latter). A striking inverse relationship is found also between the instantaneous synoptic and intraseasonal phenomena over Manus. To further study the interaction between intraseasonal and diurnal scale variability, we composite the diurnal cycle of cloudiness for 21-MJO events that have passed over Manus. Our diurnal composite analysis of shortwave and longwave fractional sky covers indicates that during the MJO peak (strong convection), the diurnal amplitude of cloudiness is reduced substantially, while the diurnal mean cloudiness reaches the highest value and there are no significant phase changes. We argue that the increasing diurnal mean and decreasing diurnal amplitude are caused by the systematic convective cloud formation that is associated with the wet phase of the MJO, while the diurnal phase is still regulated by the well-defined solar forcing. This confirms our previous finding of the anti-phase relationship between the synoptic and intraseasonal phenomena. The detection of theMJOover the Manus site provides further opportunities in using other ground-based remote sensing instruments to investigate the vertical distributions of clouds and radiative heatings of the MJO that currently is impossible from satellite observations.

  11. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  12. Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

  13. DOI 10.1007/s10546-006-9050-z Boundary-Layer Meteorology (2006) 120: 315351 Springer 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parametrization for the urban surface energy balance. A three-day period was modelled and evaluated against data THERMODYNAMIC ISLAND IN A COASTAL CITY ANALYSED FROM AN OPTIMIZED SURFACE NETWORK GR ´EGOIRE PIGEON,1, AUDE on the study of the urban atmosphere over the coastal city of Marseille. A methodology developed to optimize

  14. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  15. Tools for Surface Analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surface analysis - Because of the importance of clear and unambiguous communications, ISO definitions and concepts related to surface chemical analysis are now freely available....

  16. Lectures 9: Surface Plasmon Polaritons Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lectures 9: Surface Plasmon Polaritons #12;Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) Introduction and basic properties Standard textbook: - Heinz Raether, Surface Plasmons on Smooth and Rough Surfaces and on Gratings Springer Tracts in Modern Physics, Vol. 111, Springer Berlin 1988 Overview articles on Plasmonics: - A

  17. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaedel, Kenneth L. (Dublin, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Thompson, Samuel L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  18. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Childs, E.L.

    1984-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

  19. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  20. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  1. Free Boundaries and Minimal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeboundariesariseastheinterfacebetweenmaterialsinwhichthematerialsretain some energy. In contrast, the interface represented by a minimal surface lives in.

  2. Surface decontamination compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright; Karen E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cooper, David C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Demmer, Ricky L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tripp, Julia L. (Pocatello, ID); Hull, Laurence C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

  3. ON THE FLARE-INDUCED SEISMICITY IN THE ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930 AND RELATED ENHANCEMENT OF GLOBAL WAVES IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Brajesh; Venkatakrishnan, P. [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Badi Road, Udaipur 313 004 (India); Mathur, Savita [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Garcia, R. A., E-mail: brajesh@prl.res.in, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in, E-mail: savita@ucar.edu, E-mail: tiwari@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: rafael.garcia@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A major flare (of class X3.4) occurred on 2006 December 13 in the active region NOAA 10930. This flare event has remained interesting to solar researchers for studies related to particle acceleration during the flare process and the reconfiguration of magnetic fields as well as fine-scale features in the active region. The energy released during flares is also known to induce acoustic oscillations in the Sun. Here, we analyze the line-of-sight velocity patterns in this active region during the X3.4 flare using the Dopplergrams obtained by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instrument. We have also analyzed the disk-integrated velocity observations of the Sun obtained by the Global Oscillation at Low Frequency (GOLF) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft as well as full-disk collapsed velocity signals from GONG observations during this flare to study any possible connection between the flare-related changes seen in the local and global velocity oscillations in the Sun. We apply wavelet transform to the time series of the localized velocity oscillations as well as the global velocity oscillations in the Sun spanning the flare event. The line-of-sight velocity shows significant enhancement in some localized regions of the penumbra of this active region during the flare. The affected region is seen to be away from the locations of the flare ribbons and the hard X-ray footpoints. The sudden enhancement of this velocity seems to be caused by the Lorentz force driven by the 'magnetic jerk' in the localized penumbral region. Application of wavelet analysis to these flare-induced localized seismic signals shows significant enhancement in the high-frequency domain (5 <{nu} < 8 mHz) and a feeble enhancement in the p-mode oscillations (2 <{nu} < 5 mHz) during the flare. On the other hand, the wavelet analysis of GOLF velocity data and the full-disk collapsed GONG velocity data spanning the flare event indicates significant post-flare enhancements in the high-frequency global velocity oscillations in the Sun, as evident from the wavelet power spectrum and the corresponding scale-average variance. The present observations of the flare-induced seismic signals in the active region in context of the driving force are different as compared to previous reports on such cases. We also find indications of a connection between flare-induced localized seismic signals and the excitation of global high-frequency oscillations in the Sun.

  4. Areal-averaged and Spectrally-resolved Surface Albedo from Ground-based Transmission Data Alone: Toward an Operational Retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Michalsky, Joseph; Hodges, G. B.

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here a simple retrieval of the areal-averaged and spectrally resolved surface albedo using only ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission under fully overcast conditions. Our retrieval is based on a one-line equation and widely accepted assumptions regarding the weak spectral dependence of cloud optical properties in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The feasibility of our approach for the routine determinations of albedo is demonstrated for different landscapes with various degrees of heterogeneity using three sets of measurements:(1) spectrally resolved atmospheric transmission from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at wavelength 415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm, (2) tower-based measurements of local surface albedo at the same wavelengths, and (3) areal-averaged surface albedo at four wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm) from collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations. These integrated datasets cover both long (2008-2013) and short (April-May, 2010) periods at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the NOAA Table Mountain site, respectively. The calculated root mean square error (RMSE), which is defined here as the root mean squared difference between the MODIS-derived surface albedo and the retrieved area-averaged albedo, is quite small (RMSE?0.01) and comparable with that obtained previously by other investigators for the shortwave broadband albedo. Good agreement between the tower-based daily averages of surface albedo for the completely overcast and non-overcast conditions is also demonstrated. This agreement suggests that our retrieval originally developed for the overcast conditions likely will work for non-overcast conditions as well.

  5. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  6. Laser surface cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivella, E.C.; Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination of contaminated metal and material recycle, two of 31 priority needs identified by the D&D focus group, are the most promising applications for laser ablation within the DOE complex. F2 Associates has developed a robotic laser ablation system that is capable of high contamination rates, waste volume reduction, surface pore cleaning, and real-time characterization of materials. It is being demonstrated that this system will be the most cost-effective technology for metal decontamination and material recycle.

  7. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takacs, Peter Z. (P.O. Box 385, Upton, NY 11973); Qian, Shi-Nan (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and, Hefei, Anhui, CN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  8. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Drew F., E-mail: Drew.Parsons@anu.edu.au; Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  9. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-689 NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel. By Gunter R. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R C

  10. http://noaa.gov Discover Your World With NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's crater. Huge clouds of yellow-tinged smoke and yellow balls of molten sulfur surrounded our underwater of red food coloring into the vinegar to give a molten lava appearance. 7. Take your model outside before instructions.] 41 Courtesy Mel Goodwin Recipe for Homemade Modeling Dough 1 cup flour 1/2 cup salt 1 cup water

  11. Video Lab -NOAA Central Library NOAA Central Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes: Sony GV-D1000 clamshell recorders, for MiniDV tapes; Sony GV- HD700 clamshell recorders to be used with the HD MiniDV tapes; Sony DVCAM recorder/reader for both DVCAM and MiniDV tapes; Panasonic DVCPro50 - regular definition tapes reader; and Sony VHS recorder/player. The Epson color printer accepts

  12. http://noaa.gov Discover Your World With NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    center of ocean commerce and naval power, the Elizabeth River is the most polluted waterway Creek in Sonoma County, California was once alive with salmon and steelhead trout; but after years in the Tampa Bay area grow marsh grasses and seagrasses, and assist with monitoring and plant- ing to restore

  13. oceanservice.noaa.gov Discover Climate: Activities from NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An electric circuit is a path for an electric current. One way to imagine an electric current is to think is in an electric circuit, the voltage of the electric current changes when the thermistor's resistance changes. We is happening in the atmosphere over a short period of time (days or hours) at a specific place. Weather

  14. NOAA/NMFS Developments John Byrne Is New NOAA Administrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." he said. Ocean thermal energy conversion is expected to compete effectively in world energy markets

  15. Discover Your Changing World with NOAA oceanservice.noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attached to a flywheel that is mounted on a drum that can rotate on an axle. When one of the plastic strips is exposed to sunlight, it shrinks and pulls the flywheel off-center. This movement causes the drum to rotate

  16. http://noaa.gov Discover Your World With NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    made in reducing pollution from sources such as industrial facilities and sewage treatment plants; · acid drainage from abandoned mines; and · wastes from livestock, pets, and leaking septic tanks

  17. Informal Report METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No.DE-AC02- 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy .................................................................................................................................................................1 Instrument Towers .........................................................................................................................................2 85-meter Tower

  18. METEOROLOGICAL Monthly Weather Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    the lofting of supercooled water above the melting level, and an enhanced LDR "cap" above the column implied warm-cloud depths, increased ice mass observed just above the melting level, and a narrower with precipitation-sized ice extending to 15 km. In addition, the presence of ZDR columns in these cells indicated

  19. METEOROLOGICAL Monthly Weather Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    (reduced) in the CCE (LC). Less wind-driven kinetic energy was available to increase vertical shears PDF of the author-produced manuscript that has been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication. Since it is being posted so soon after acceptance, it has not yet been copyedited, formatted, or processed by AMS

  20. Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xinxin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction AEnhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction byTopological Insulator

  1. Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

  2. surface science ELSEVIER Surface Science384 (1997) 192 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surface science ELSEVIER Surface Science384 (1997) 192 200 An ab initio Hartree-Fock study Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD, UK Received 3June 1996;acceptedfor publication 27 March 1997 arrangement is found consisting of localisedspinson the surface titanium atoms. © 1997Elsevier

  3. Understanding and Evaluating Extended Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    Extended surfaces are widely used in heat transfer equipment in power and process plants. While various types of extended surfaces are used in the industry, this paper will limit the discussions to the widely used configurations in heat recovery...

  4. NOAA PMEL Station Chemistry Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Quinn, Patricia

    Submicron and supermicron samples are analyzed by ion chromatography for Cl-, NO3-, SO4-2, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca+2. The analysis of MSA-, Br-, and oxalate has been added to some stations. Samples also are analyzed for total mass by gravimetric analysis at 55 +/- 5% RH.

  5. NOAA Research Matters Learn More

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " water on the continental shelf from Canada to Mexico. 19 Ocean Acidification: Climate Change Impacts on the Marine Environment Anyone who has had fish as pets knows that changes in pH levels can destroy life. In field studies along the west coast of North America between Canada and Mexico, the PMEL team along

  6. Stability at the surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal oxides are ubiquitous as minerals in the terrestrial environment, as well as in a variety of technologically important structures such as electronic devices and heterogeneous catalysts. Within these various contexts, interfaces between oxides and gases, liquids and solids drive many critically important phenomena ranging from the uptake of contaminants in groundwater by redox-active minerals to the switching of the millions of transistors found in every cell phone and computer. Function is tied to structure. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the structure of oxide surfaces and interfaces is of crucial importance to the comprehension of a plethora of phenomena involving this broad class of materials.

  7. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  8. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugger, Michael T. (Tijeras, NM); Ohlhausen, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Asay, David B. (Boalsburg, PA); Kim, Seong H. (State College, PA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  9. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  10. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Global Ocean Meridional Overturning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division, NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, Florida KEVIN SPEER Department cell (Speer et al. 2000). At the highest densities and latitudes, intense heat loss in the Norwegian

  11. 15 FEBRUARY 2003 637B E N T A M Y E T A L . 2003 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature comes from daily analysis calculated from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR, freshwater, and energy across the air­sea interface determine oceanic circulation and its variability at all) radiometers [Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I)] on board the satellites F10­ F14. The sea surface

  12. NOVEMBER 1999 3305Y U A N D M E C H O S O 1999 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jin-Yi

    . (1996) found that the reasons for this remote cooling vary with location. The colder ocean surface are at work by which SSTs are cooled down by those marine clouds, whose existence is in turn pro- moted overcast conditions. The enhanced stratocumulus resulted in a significant local cooling of the ocean

  13. Topological Surface States of Antimony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    of the sample and keeping the tunneling current constant, one can obtain a topography of the surface (it~ | | ~ a) Topography of Cu(111) surface b) FT of the g-map c) Sketch of Brillouin Zone L. Petersen et alTopological Surface States of Antimony Masih Mehdizadeh 10.08.2012 #12;Outline Introduction

  14. 1, 351383, 2007 Greenland surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TCD 1, 351­383, 2007 Greenland surface mass balance at the end of this century G. Krinner and N-resolution simulations of the surface mass balance of Greenland at the end of this century G. Krinner and N. Julien LGGE Correspondence to: G. Krinner (krinner@ujf-grenoble.fr) 351 #12;TCD 1, 351­383, 2007 Greenland surface mass

  15. 6, 1205712120, 2006 Surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 12057­12120, 2006 Surface tension: measurement, modelling and cloud activation D. O a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Surface tensions of multi­12120, 2006 Surface tension: measurement, modelling and cloud activation D. O. Topping et al. Title Page

  16. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansur, Louis K [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhattacharya, R [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL] [ORNL; Clemons, Art [ORNL] [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans, H B [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL] [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, E H [Consultant, Milpitas, CA] [Consultant, Milpitas, CA; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL] [ORNL; Rivard, John D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  17. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  18. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Eric A. (Rio Rancho, NM); Wasserman, Daniel (Lowell, MA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  19. Daily High-Resolution-Blended Analyses for Sea Surface Temperature RICHARD W. REYNOLDS,* THOMAS M. SMITH, CHUNYING LIU,* DUDLEY B. CHELTON,#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    . SMITH, CHUNYING LIU,* DUDLEY B. CHELTON,# KENNETH S. CASEY,@ AND MICHAEL G. SCHLAX# *NOAA purposes from climate monitoring and prediction (e.g., Smith and Reynolds 2003) to fea- ture tracking (e and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as described by Reynolds and Smith (1994) and Reynolds et al. (2002

  20. Dynamic surface topography influences cell function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiang, Jennifer Deng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A) Relative surface topography of hydrogel over a wire (B)oscillating surface topography on cell morphology. In FigureSAN DIEGO Dynamic Surface Topography Influences Cell

  1. Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System - Versaprobe Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System - Versaprobe The SMSAS is a multi-technique surface...

  2. Cite as: Lundquist, J.K., F. K. Chow, J. D. Mirocha, and K.A. Lundquist, 2007: An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications. American Meteorological Society's 7 th Symposium

  3. Rigollier C., Lefvre M., Cros S., Wald L., 2003, Heliosat 2: an improved method for the mapping of the solar radiation from Meteosat imagery. In Proceedings of the 2002 EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the solar radiation from Meteosat imagery. In Proceedings of the 2002 EUMETSAT Meteorological Satellite. HELIOSAT 2: AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE MAPPING OF THE SOLAR RADIATION FROM METEOSAT IMAGERY C. Rigollier, M INTRODUCTION Mapping solar radiation at the ground level is an important issue for several applications

  4. 2072 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    2072 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society Stabilization of Climate Regimes by Noise in a Simple Model of the Thermohaline hysteresis responses to steady changes in freshwater forcing, such that the transitions between regimes

  5. VOLUME 30 1 AUGUST 2000J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2000 American Meteorological Society 1833

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Meteorological Society 1833 Ocean Radiant Heating. Part I: Optical Influences J. CARTER OHLMANN Scripps ocean. Results indicate that net irradiance at 10 cm and 5 m can vary by 23 and 34 W m 2 , respectively transmission in the upper few meters as a greater portion of the irradiance exists in the deep-penetrating

  6. 3528 VOLUME 32J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2002 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    current breaks up into a series of plumes that penetrate downslope into the deeper ocean, producing strong Meteorological Society Instability of Abyssal Currents in a Continuously Stratified Ocean with Bottom Topography. The instability manifests itself in the overlying ocean as an amplifying topographic Rossby wave. Alternating

  7. 1036 VOLUME 34J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 2004 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    or deeper in the thermocline as well. Subsurface cooling in the wind-forcing region reduces the remote Meteorological Society Remote Wind-Driven Overturning in the Absence of the Drake Passage Effect BARRY A. KLINGER winds to drive strong remote meridional overturning. Here, idealized numerical experiments examine

  8. VOLUME 27 JULY 1997J O U R N A L O F P H Y S I C A L O C E A N O G R A P H Y 1997 American Meteorological Society 1181

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Meteorological Society 1181 Sediment Resuspension and Mixing by Resonantly Generated Internal Solitary Waves D- erated in this way seem to be frequent in the record of a month-long experiment. Model results suggest and linear dispersion. They have been observed on the continental shelf (Ostrovsky and Stepanyants 1989

  9. Implementing Best Practices for Data Quality Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.; McCormack, P.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective solar radiation measurements for research and economic analyses require a strict protocol for maintenance, calibration, and documentation to minimize station downtime and data corruption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Concentrating Solar Power: Best Practices Handbook for the Collection and Use of Solar Resource Data includes guidelines for operating a solar measurement station. This paper describes a suite of automated and semi-automated routines based on the best practices handbook as developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project. These routines allow efficient inspection and data flagging to alert operators of conditions that require immediate attention. Although the handbook is targeted for concentrating solar power applications, the quality-assessment procedures described are generic and should benefit many solar measurement applications. The routines use data in one-minute measurement resolution, as suggested by the handbook, but they could be modified for other time scales.

  10. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  11. Method of modifying a surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renk, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Sorensen, Neil R. (Albuquerque, NM); Senft, Donna Cowell (Albuquerque, NM); Buchheit, Jr., Rudolph G. (Columbus, OH); Thompson, Michael O. (Ithaca, NY); Grabowski, Kenneth S. (Alexandria, VA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a surface modification method that provides beneficial changes in surface properties, can modify a surface to a greater depth than previous methods, and that is suitable for industrial application. The present method comprises applying a thin-film coating to a surface of a substrate, then subjecting the coated surface to an ion beam. The ion beam power pulse heats the coated surface, leading to alloying between the material in the coating and the material of the substrate. Rapid cooling of the alloyed layer after an ion beam pulse can lead to formation of metastable alloys and microstructures not accessible by conventional alloying methods or intense ion beam treatment of the substrate alone.

  12. Superhydrophobicity on hairy surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. Blow; J. M. Yeomans

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the wetting properties of surfaces patterned with fine elastic hairs, with an emphasis on identifying superhydrophobic states on hydrophilic hairs. We formulate a two dimensional model of a large drop in contact with a row of equispaced elastic hairs and, by minimising the free energy of the model, identify the stable and metastable states. In particular we concentrate on "partially suspended" states, where the hairs bend to support the drop -- singlet states where all hairs bend in the same direction, and doublet states where neighbouring hairs bend in opposite directions -- and find the limits of stability of these configurations in terms of material contact angle, hair flexibility, and system geometry. The drop can remain suspended in a singlet state at hydrophilic contact angles, but doublets exist only when the hairs are hydrophobic. The system is more likely to evolve into a singlet state if the hairs are inclined at the root. We discuss how, under limited circumstances, the results can be modified to describe an array of hairs in three dimensions. We find that now both singlets and doublets can exhibit superhydrophobic behaviour on hydrophilic hairs. We discuss the limitations of our approach and the directions for future work.

  13. Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain surface water quality standards, stream classifications, discussion of lakes and impounded basins, and water...

  14. Thermocapillary Flow on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid in Cassie-Baxter state above a structured superhydrophobic surface is ideally suited for surface driven transport due to its large free surface fraction in close contact to a solid. We investigate thermal Marangoni flow over a superhydrophobic array of fins oriented parallel or perpendicular to an applied temperature gradient. In the Stokes limit we derive an analytical expression for the bulk flow velocity above the surface and compare it with numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. Even for moderate temperature gradients comparatively large flow velocities are induced, suggesting to utilize this principle for microfluidic pumping.

  15. Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay Biosensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay Biosensor for Rapid Sensitive Botulinum Toxin Detection in an Automated Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay...

  16. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation Dynamics using Correalted AFM and Confocal Ultramicroscopy. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

  17. T Tank Farm Interim Surface Barrier Demonstration--Vadose Zone Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Strickland, Christopher E.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 underground single-shell tanks that store hazardous radioactive waste. Many of these tanks and their associated infrastructure (e.g., pipelines, diversion boxes) have leaked. Some of the leaked waste has entered the groundwater. The largest known leak occurred from the T-106 Tank in 1973. Many of the contaminants from that leak still reside within the vadose zone beneath the T Tank Farm. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. seeks to minimize movement of this residual contaminant plume by placing an interim barrier on the surface. Such a barrier is expected to prevent infiltrating water from reaching the plume and moving it further. A plan has been prepared to monitor and determine the effectiveness of the interim surface barrier. Soil water content and water pressure will be monitored using off-the-shelf equipment that can be installed by the hydraulic hammer technique. In fiscal year 2006, two instrument nests were installed. Each instrument nest contains a neutron probe access tube, a capacitance probe, four heat-dissipation units, and a drain gauge to measure soil water flux. A meteorological station has been installed outside of the fence. In fiscal year 2007, two additional instrument nests are planned to be installed beneath the proposed barrier.

  18. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. 3, 435470, 2006 Improved surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    related to off-shore activities require the knowledge of accurate sur- face winds and sea states on fineOSD 3, 435­470, 2006 Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract near real time surface wind resolution over the Mediterranean Sea A. Bentamy, H.-L. Ayina, P

  20. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.