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1

PROJECT SCIENTIST II NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT SCIENTIST II NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) College Park Visiting Scientist Programs is seeking a Project Scientist II to work at the NOAA NESDIS Center design and implementation and the development of common tools and procedures for STAR researchers

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

2

Charles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change Impacts on Living Marine Resources", 2012 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Salt Lake City 2012-13 MemberCharles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton-mail: Charles.Stock@noaa.gov Education 2005 Ph.D., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/MIT Joint Program Civil

3

1. Title Page Research grant proposal to NOAA's ESS Program Atlantic Meridional Overturning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1. Title Page Research grant proposal to NOAA's ESS Program ­ Atlantic Meridional Overturning.swingedouw@lsce.fr; Dr. S. Drijfhout, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Netherlands, phone: 31 30 220

Schmittner, Andreas

4

Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA MAURICE E. STANSBY fatty acids (which occur almost exclusively in the oil of fish) may have beneficial effects in re ducing research has also been carried out by laboratories of this agency on other aspects of fish oils which have

5

The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories do not approve. recommend, or endorse any proprietary product or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Research Laboratories. in any advertising or sales promotion which would indicate or imply the advertised product to be used or purchased because of this NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories collected in Lake Huron during 1966 by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration. Most

6

anemone ar noaa: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

modeling A NOAA, Physical Sciences Division Michael Fiorino and Steven E. Koch NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Global of NOAA's global forecast model. Unfortunately, our...

7

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December 2009 Volume 13, Number 6 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research located on Virginia KeyAtlantic With an estimated 40% of the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) from fossil fuels having entered the oceans since the start studies in the Atlantic and equatorial Pacific performed by NOAA researchers and their affiliates. Carbon

8

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interface Control Document IPT Integrated Product Team NESDIS National Environmental Satellite, DataHardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS CENTER for SATELLITE APPLICATIONS and RESEARCH DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-9.2 TEST READINESS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE Version 3.0 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-9

Kuligowski, Bob

9

NOAA AND ENERGY NOAA's involvement with the energy sector is wide-ranging. NOAA has an interest or is actively engaged in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power; biomass and biofuel. NOAA provides data, scientific research, technical products, management, ocean buoys, ships and aircraft, and seafloor observatories. NOAA can help advance the renewable energy

10

PISCES FY11 Research Highlight Tritium accumulation within the ITER vessel is expected to be dominated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PISCES FY11 Research Highlight Tritium accumulation within the ITER vessel is expected injected into the vessel. ITER has focused considerable effort into the ability to thermally remove tritium vessel. Another possible technique to mitigate tritium accumulation in these codeposited surfaces

11

Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin 2009 NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research ......................................................................................................................................... 6 Sensor Physics Branch

Kuligowski, Bob

12

AFFILIATIONS: EBERT--Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia; JANOWIAK--NOAA/Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--NOAA/Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, Maryland; KIDD--School of Geography, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, but also to a wide range of decision makers, including hydrologists, agriculturalists, emergency managers and the distribution of the Earth's latent heating, which has direct effects on the planetary circulation

Ebert, Beth

13

NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48108. Email: jia.wang@noaa.gov Jia Wang and Haoguo Hu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, JGR). It is coupled ice dynamic and thermodynamic model (Hibler 1980, MWR) to the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with two improvements: a) wave mixing effect and b) tidal mixing. Since the tidal current. Email: jia.wang@noaa.gov Jia Wang and Haoguo Hu A modeling study of sea ice and plankton in the Bering

14

LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER TELECONNECTIONS Raymond Assel, NOAA, Great lakes EnvironmentalResearch Laboratory,Ann Arbor, MI 48105-1593  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they were estimated using an electronic digitizer and ice charts produced by the U.S. Department of CommerceLAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER TELECONNECTIONS Raymond Assel, NOAA, Great lakes Environmental research on Great Lakes ice coverteleconnections.Here, annualmaximalice coverfor winters 1963

15

Index of /research/alcator/facility/Procedures/IN-VESSEL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348ASSEMBLY [ICO] Name Last modified SizeIN-VESSEL

16

AFFILIATIONS: HULTQUIST--NOAA/National Weather Service, Marquette, Michigan; DUTTER--NOAA/National Weather Service,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with modern numerical weather prediction models to provide detailed hindcasts of conditions throughoutAFFILIATIONS: HULTQUIST--NOAA/National Weather Service, Marquette, Michigan; DUTTER--NOAA/National Weather Service, Cleveland, Ohio; SCHWAB--NOAA/Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor

17

OWAQ supports social science research that enables NOAA to test research results that improve communication during dangerous weather situations. For example, researchers from University of Oklahoma are using social  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the adverse effects on humans, surface transportation and aviation. The Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 President's budget request for OWAQ through NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) is $10.2M. The FY 2014 Omnibus funding for OWAQ is $7.1M and the FY 2013 actual budget was $3.9M. The Office of Weather

18

Great Lakes CoastWatch Research and Product Development Primary Investigator: George Leshkevich -NOAA/GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imagery from new satellite sensors such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for ice classification SWA calibration software, the collaboration with researchers at the German Aerospace Center (DLR at the University of Toledo to develop an improved turbidity product and data base: 1. SAR research and field

19

Use of Polycarbonate Vacuum Vessels in High-Temperature Fusion-Plasma Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic fusion energy (MFE) research requires ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, primarily to reduce plasma contamination by impurities. For radiofrequency (RF)-heated plasmas, a great benefit may accrue from a non-conducting vacuum vessel, allowing external RF antennas which avoids the complications and cost of internal antennas and high-voltage high-current feedthroughs. In this paper we describe these and other criteria, e.g., safety, availability, design flexibility, structural integrity, access, outgassing, transparency, and fabrication techniques that led to the selection and use of 25.4-cm OD, 1.6-cm wall polycarbonate pipe as the main vacuum vessel for an MFE research device whose plasmas are expected to reach keV energies for durations exceeding 0.1 s

B. Berlinger, A. Brooks, H. Feder, J. Gumbas, T. Franckowiak and S.A. Cohen

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address these research needs, the MAaD Pathway supported a series of workshops in the summer of 2012 for the purpose of developing R&D roadmaps for enhancing the use of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies and methodologies for detecting aging and degradation of materials and predicting the remaining useful life. The workshops were conducted to assess requirements and technical gaps related to applications of NDE for cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessels (RPV), and piping fatigue for extended reactor life. An overview of the outcomes of the workshops is presented here. Details of the workshop outcomes and proposed R&D also are available in the R&D roadmap documents cited in the bibliography and are available on the LWRS Program website (http://www.inl.gov/lwrs).

Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL] [ORNL; Simmons, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Coble, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brenchley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Meyer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMay-June 2010 Volume 14, Number 3 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicator that 2010 will be an active year is NOAA's accumulated cycle energy (ACE) index, which measures factors that favor tropical cyclone activity. This probability is one of the highest ever issued by NOAA total seasonal activity based on the strength and duration of named storms and hurricanes. The ACE range

24

In the Nation's Best Interest: Making the Most of NOAA's Science Enterprise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...........................................................................................................7 Research Priorities for NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan...............................................................................24 Appendix IV: List of individuals and groups interviewed by Task Force and SAB Working Groups....................................................................25 Appendix V: Overview of the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan

25

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NOAA Professional Paper NMFS 4 U.S.Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 NOAA Professional Paper NMFS 14 An atlas of reproductive development in rockfishes, genus Sebastes Islands Fisheries Science Center Aiea Heights Research Facility 99-193 Aiea Heights Drive,Suite 417 Aiea by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. #12;NOAA Professional Paper NMFS 14 An atlas

28

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS OF OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION OVER THE BIGHydrology (HYDRO) ofthe National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river and water supply, and conducts pertinent research and development NOAA Teclmical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate

29

NOAAlNMFS Developments NOAA Reorganizes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the organization function," Byrne said. "I think the reorganization will im- prove the management efficiency of our Utilization Research Fishenes Cenlers (4) Figure I.-NOAA organizational chart. April-May-June 1983,45(4-6) 49 #12;Figure 1.-NMFS organizational chart. National Marine Fisheries Service Deputy Assistant

30

tunahistory@noaa.gov Page 1 of 4 Tuna Industry Pioneers of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Reefer" refers to a cold storage vessel that receives fish from many fishing vessels and transshipstunahistory@noaa.gov Page 1 of 4 Tuna Industry Pioneers of San Pedro and Terminal Island 22, 2012 Nick Danelovich was recognized by many in the industry as one of the most respected tuna

31

NOAA ARL Monthly Activities Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activities Report April 2005 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory. The fourth meeting will be held at the Patuxent Research Refuge National Wildlife Visitor Center in Laurel

32

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report April 2003 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory of New York at Albany which he held for the past 11 years. Before that Joe worked as a research scientist

33

Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

world's top five most powerful computers - the Argonne National Laboratory's 557 TF IBM Blue GeneP and Oak Ridge National Laboratory's 263 TF Cray XT4. NOAA researchers will also...

34

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Raytheon Information Solutions) TEST READINESS REVIEW REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-9.3 and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 3. All 10/1/2009 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR

Kuligowski, Bob

35

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: DG-10.3: CODE TEST DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 No version 1 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-10.3, Code Test Document) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 3. All 10/1/2009 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-10

Kuligowski, Bob

36

NOAA Data Report ERL PMEL-2 LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS (C1 -c4),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or imply that the NOAA Environ- mental Research Laboratories approves, recommends, or endorses any pro) variations in the dissolved gaseous hydrocarbon fraction composed of methane, ethane, ethene, propane

37

Index of /research/alcator/documentation/6.10.09 vessel close up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270Energyradsafe/files [ICO] Name6.10.09 vessel

38

NOAA implements annual catch limits for all managed fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continental Shelf SEPT NOAA completes construction of supercomputers Stratus and Cirrus that improve weather NOAA releases Scientific Integrity Policy NOAA launches GOES-15 NOAA launches Suomi-NPP satellite NOAA

39

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

IMPLEMENTING THE NOAA NEXT GENERATION STRATEGIC PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate modeling using NOAA's high performance computing abilities; · Expand the Climate Portal through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-20 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling Phase 3.2.2 Ice Formation and Breakup Phases 3.2.3 The Ice Cycle on Lake Superior 3.2.4 The IceNOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-20 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS, WINTER of this NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories publication. ii #12;LANDSAT fake color image of ice cover

42

TEMPLATE for project inclusion in the NOAA OGP Climate Change Data and Detection (C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPLATE for project inclusion in the NOAA OGP Climate Change Data and Detection (C 2 D 2 ) Applied Research Center (ARC) for Data Set Development Sydney Levitus NODC/NOAA Project: Ocean Data Archaeology of the Climate-Quality Data Set A- quality control procedures, including ongoing improvements QC procedures

43

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

44

NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE USING SATELLITE Research Laboratories #12;NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE USING Appendix A: The observed and interpolated Lake Erie 1984 ice conditions.. 9 Appendix B: Buoy and wind

45

Protecting Lives and Livelihoods NOAA Business Report 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Atmospheric Research 66 National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service 74 Office of Marine to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration #12;2 Message from the Acting Under Secretary 6 NOAA

46

NOAA/NMFS Developments Financial Assistance to Tuna Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Atmosp heric Admin- istration. Eac h yea r between December a nd " arch gray wha les. £.lc hriCl i// .I

47

NOAA Committee Memberships, 2004-2008 Eddie N. Bernard, Member, NOAA Tsunami Program Team, 2005-present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Koehn, Member, NOAA Science, Technology, and Infusion Program Team, 2003-2005 Mark P. Koehn, Member

48

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 56 RUSSIAN MARINE EXPEDITIONARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 56 RUSSIAN MARINE EXPEDITIONARY INVESTIGATIONS OF THE WORLD OCEAN Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 5 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 56 #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series

49

NOAA NESDIS Cooperative Institutes (CI) Program August 24, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Corvallis, OR 973315503 5417373015 5417372064 Fax tstrub@coas.oregonstate.edu Dr. Graeme Stephens Director stephens@cira.colostate.edu Dr. Reza Khanbilvardi Director, CREST NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science Fax tom.achtor@ssec.wisc.edu Admin. Contact Ms. Rosalie Jones Research Coordinator 3014058291

Kuligowski, Bob

50

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report September 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report September 2005 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Seidel has agreed to serve as co-chair of the 2007 AMS Annual Meeting, to be held in San Antonio, Texas in a quasi- operational setting. (will.pendergrass@noaa.gov; bruce.hicks@noaa.gov) Silver Spring 4. A Warm

51

Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Tec / Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft L. M. McMillin D. Q. Wark J. M. Siomkajlo P. G. Abel A. Werbowetzki. E. Bittner C. M. Hayden #12;UDC 551.507.362.2:551.508.2:551.501.7:535-1 Physics Infrared radiation

52

www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed Climate Service in NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and partners. The reorganization is budget neutral, does not change staffing levels, require employee, September 2010 Climate Service Example: Construction NOAA provides air-freezing data to the home building. This resulted in annual building cost savings of $330 million and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatt

53

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: SG-12: RESEARCH MANAGER GUIDELINES VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information 2 3.0 New Stakeholder Guideline adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

Kuligowski, Bob

54

Captain Debora R. Barr, NOAA Director, NOAA Homeland Security Program Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the Acting Deputy Director, National Environmental Satellite and Information Service (NESDIS) OfficeCaptain Debora R. Barr, NOAA Director, NOAA Homeland Security Program Office Captain (CAPT) Debora R. Barr is the Director of NOAA's Homeland Security Program Office. She is responsible

55

NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

56

CIOSS Executive Board Greg Withee: NOAA, Assistant Administrator for NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20746-4304 Phone: 301-763-8231 x168 Fax: 301-763-8020 pablo.clemente-colon@noaa.gov James Coakley Phone.coas.oregonstate.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=faculty.detail&id=464 David Foley NESDIS/CoastWatch Environmental Research Division Southwest Fisheries Science Center 1352 Lighthouse Avenue Pacific Grove, CA 93950-2097 Phone: (831) 648-0632 Fax: (831) 648-8440 dave.foley

Kurapov, Alexander

57

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hawaii Meteorological Grids for NCEP Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division 18. Climate 19. Air for Europe convention on Long-Range Transport of Air Pollution. o.russell.bullock@noaa.gov 3. CarbonNOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report (January ­ March 2008) Contents Highlights

58

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Resources Airsheds & Watersheds workshop was held in Dewey Beach, Delaware. The workshop focused and farmers, advocacy groups, etc. (bruce.hicks@noaa.gov, Kerchner, Silver Spring) 2. Canaan Valley

59

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2003 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory and Washington, DC. Discussions have been held with personnel from DHSregarding anatmospheric tracerstudy.clawson@noaa.gov and Bruce Hicks) Silver Spring 3. New Turbulence Parameterizations for HYSPLIT. The HYSPLIT dispersion

60

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report February 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT - ARL-NCEP coordination 2. HIGHLIGHT - C02 and Energy Balance network expansion 3.draxler@noaa.gov, barbara.stunder@noaa.gov) 2. CO2 and Energy Balance network expansion. Finalapproval was given. HIGHLIGHT - Salt Lake City dispersion results now available 4. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) MM5 forecasts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

Torn, Margaret

62

Pressure Vessel Burst Program: Automated hazard analysis for pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, development, and use of a Windows based software tool, PVHAZARD, for pressure vessel hazard analysis is presented. The program draws on previous efforts in pressure vessel research and results of a Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study. Prior papers on the Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study have been presented to the ASME, AIAA, JANNAF, NASA Pressure Systems Seminar, and to a DOD Explosives Safety Board subcommittee meeting. Development and validation is described for simplified blast (overpressure/impulse) and fragment (velocity and travel distance) hazard models. The use of PVHAZARD in making structural damage and personnel injury estimates is discussed. Efforts in-progress are reviewed including the addition of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hydrodynamic code analyses to supplement the simplified models, and the ability to assess barrier designs for protection from fragmentation.

Langley, D.R. [Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Chrostowski, J.D. [ACTA Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Goldstein, S. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States); Cain, M. [General Physics Corp., Titusville, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Program(UAS) Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FisheriesPartners: NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service / Southwest Fisheries Science Center Enerdyne

Kuligowski, Bob

64

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 1: Temperature Silver Spring, MD March 2010 U. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68, U URL: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ #12;NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 1: Temperature

65

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-689 NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel. By Gunter R. Seckel. June 1970, iii + 66 pp., 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake Island from the tanker R C

66

CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Development of the RCRV Design: Top Level Requirements The Top Level Requirements (TLR) for the Regional Class Research Vessel (RCRV) are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

underwater vehicles (AUVs) Deployment and recovery of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) and weather balloons. The vessel's Underwater Radiated Noise (URN) will be minimized through treatments and vibration dampening, monitoring, and servicing of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) (appropriate for vessel size) and autonomous

68

NOAA in Your Backyard The Gulf of Mexico Region NOAA in Your State State by State Listings of NOAA Facilities and Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.srh.noaa.gov/mob/?n=education Contact: Jeff Garmon (Warning Coordination Meteorologist): Jeff.Garmon@noaa.gov · Lake Charles Weather Forecast Office ­ Lake Charles, LA: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lch/?n=tours Contact: Roger Erickson (Warning, TX; Baton Rouge, LA; Panama City, FL; Charleston, SC; Beaufort, NC; St. Augustine, FL; West Palm

69

2013 Accomplishments Report NOAA Satellite and Information Service | www.nesdis.noaa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellites and other sources to promote, protect and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environment2013 Accomplishments Report NOAA Satellite and Information Service | www.nesdis.noaa.gov #12;1 From the Assistant Administrator 2 Satellites 4 Climate 6 Weather 8 Oceans 10 Coasts 12 Partnerships & Outreach 13

70

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2013 Timothy P. Boyer, John I. Antonov, Olga K. Baranova, World Ocean Database 2013. Sydney Levitus, Ed.; Alexey Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72........................................................................................................... 14 1.1.1. History

72

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 6: Chlorophyll Margarita E. Conkright Todd D. O.I. Antonov , 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 6: Chlorophyll. Ed. S. Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54, U

73

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 1: Temperature Cathy Stephens John I. Antonov.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49, U

74

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 2: Salinity Timothy P. Boyer Cathy Stephens John.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 1: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50, U

75

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 5: Plankton Todd D. O'Brien Margarita E.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 5: Plankton. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53, U

76

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 4: Nutrients Margarita E. Conkright Hernan E.I. Antonov , 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 4: Nutrients. Ed. S. Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52, U

77

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 3: Oxygen Ricardo A. Locarnini Todd D. O. Stephens, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 3: Oxygen. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51, U

78

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) National Climatic DataNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet AGRICULTURE Overview A wide

79

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COASTAL HAZARDS OVERVIEW Global

80

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used most effectively. #12;NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite Insurance Litigation Marine and Coastal Ecosystems National Security TOURISM Transportation WaterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet TOURISM Overview Tourism

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the national Fire Plan. (pendergrass@atdd.noaa.gov, Herwehe, Eckman) Work on the Program to Address ASEAN

82

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-42 A NUMERICAL MODEL OF CORgSIW SUSPENDED SEDIMENT DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an endorsement by NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories. Use for publicity or advertising purposes that many toxic pollutants (PAH's, PCB's, heavy metals) have a strong tendency to adsorb onto suspended pathways followed by the pollutants are as yet little known since determining them is complicated

83

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 2: Salinity Silver Spring, MD March 2010 U Atlas 2009 Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus Ed. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69, U.S. Gov. Printing Office.html. National Oceanographic Data Center #12;NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 2: Salinity John

84

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 76 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 76 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 4: Dissolved Inorganic Nutrients (phosphate. Antonov, O. K. Baranova, M. M. Zweng, J.R. Reagan, D. R. Johnson, 2013. World Ocean Atlas 2013. Vol. 4. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 76, 25 pp. This document is available on-line at http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/indprod

85

Interoperable Documentation Ted Habermann, NOAA/NESDIS/NGDC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Documentation Ted Habermann, NOAA/NESDIS/NGDC NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory, June.ngdc.noaa.gov/eds/tds/oceanSITESMetadataAssessment.html Spirals: https://www.nosc.noaa.gov/dmc/swg/wiki/index.php?title=Creating_Good_Documentation Questions Documentation Life Cycle: OAIS Mandatory Archive Responsibility: Ensure that the information to be preserved

86

NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction NOAA Center for Weather and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for better insulation and protection. Rainwater bio-retention areas and a storm water cistern collect water for irrigation, and a four-story rainwater waterfall efficiently drains the non-green portion of the roof. NOAA

87

URL: www.swpc.noaa.gov/NOAAscales April 7, 2011 NOAA Space Weather Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

noise in image data, star-trackers may be unable to locate sources; permanent damage to solar panels the globe, use geomagnetic latitude to determine likely sightings (see www.swpc.noaa.gov/Aurora) Solar

88

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stories appeared in each of these newspapers. The story was also picked up by the Baltimore Sun Forecasting system. rick.saylor@noaa.gov 4. NRC Postdoctoral Associate Investigating the Climatology with degrees in Electronic Engineering and Space Physics, she is developing a global climatology of the stable

89

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report August 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT ­ Hurricane P3 Turbulence Studies 2. HIGHLIGHT ­ Smart Balloon Sets Distance Record ­ The Las Vegas Urban Test Bed 5. HIGHLIGHT ­ Urban Dispersion ­ New York City 6. Global Umkehr-Ozone Data as the '04 season gets into full swing. jeff.french@noaa.gov #12;2. Highlight ­ Smart Balloon Sets Distance

90

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report January 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling 19. Dioxin Modeling 20. Community Modeling and Analysis System Center 21. Fugitive Dust Considerable Advance. Several ARL groups are working on aspects of pollution by mercury. The geographical range@atdd.noaa.gov Mercury and the Community MultiscaleAir QualityModels System, Analysis of thenon-linear sensitivity tests

91

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a two-way coupling using CMAQ 14. Urban Dispersion Program (New York City 15. Smart Balloon 16 planning by meteorologists at the Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. barbara.stunder@noaa.gov 2 for relating sources to downwind effects. The latter takes a gridded view, with sources combined across grid

92

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report August 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Contents 1. Highlight -- UrbaNet 2. Highlight -- TEXAQSII Smart Balloon Deployment 3. New WRF. Highlight -- UrbaNet. Upon discovery of an unexpected release of hazardous material to the atmosphere.carter@noaa.gov 2. Highlight -- TEXAQSII Smart Balloon Deployment. The FRD smart balloon team participated

93

A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA Documentation: It's not just discovery... 50% change this settles the issue.. #12;New Documentation Needs For skeptics, the 1,000 or so e-mails and documents hacked Communities - Users Documentation: communicating with the future #12;Geoffrey Moore has attributed the S

94

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories, in any advertising or sales promotion which would indicate or indirectly the advertised product to be used or purchased because of this NOAA Environmental Research and dispersion of pollutants; surface waves and oscillation5-critical to lake transportation, boating

95

NOAA's Arctic Science Days Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA's Arctic Science Days 1 Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships 1 Observing Networks [IASOA, RUSALCA, PAG, CBMP & SAON] 2. Ed Farley (NOAA/AFSC, remote): Implications of sea ice loss on NOAA trust resources: NOAA's Loss of Sea Ice (LOSI) Program 3. Sue Moore (NOAA

96

Neutrino Factory Target Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Cooling Channel in both walls for draining · Downstream end can be shortened, assuming the window cooling is adequate #12;11 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Target Vessel Update 26 June 2012 Remote Handling

McDonald, Kirk

97

Vacuum Vessel Remote Handling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Remote Handling 4 Vacuum vessel functions · Plasma vacuum environment · Primary tritium confinement, incl ports 65 tonnes - Weight of torus shielding 100 tonnes · Coolant - Normal Operation Water, Handling 12 Vessel octant subassembly fab. (3) · Octant-to-octant splice joint requires double wall weld

98

July 30, 2012 All listed individuals nmfs.fis@noaa.gov PMT + PSG Chairs & Vice Chairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July 30, 2012 All listed individuals nmfs.fis@noaa.gov PMT + PSG Chairs & Vice Chairs Cahall, Mike Program Management Team Members fis.pmt.extended@noaa.gov fis.pmt@noaa.gov Per

99

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

active region noaa: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NWS, Allan Darling, Paula Davidson 23 NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report Geosciences Websites Summary: and Hawaii Meteorological Grids for NCEP Atmospheric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories, in any advertising or sales promotion which would indicate directly or indirectly the advertised product to be used or purchased because of this NOAA Environmental of the transport and dispersion of pollutants; surface waves and oscillations-critical to lake transportation

102

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 75 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 75 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 3: Dissolved Oxygen, Apparent Oxygen Utilization. Antonov, A. V. Mishonov, O. K. Baranova, M. M. Zweng, J. R. Reagan, D. R. Johnson, 2013. World Ocean Atlas. Mishonov, Technical Ed. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 75, 27 pp. This document is available on-line at http

103

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 73 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 73 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 1: Temperature Silver Spring, MD September 2013. M. Zweng, C. R. Paver, J. R. Reagan, D. R. Johnson, M. Hamilton, D. Seidov, 2013. World Ocean Atlas 2013, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 73, 40 pp

104

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 71 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 71 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 4: Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, silicate. Baranova, and D. R. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009, Volume 4: Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, and silicate). S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 71, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 398 pp

105

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 70 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 70 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 3: Dissolved Oxygen, Apparent Oxygen Utilization. Antonov, O. K. Baranova, M. M. Zweng, and D. R. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009 Volume 3: Dissolved Oxygen, Apparent Oxygen Utilization, and Oxygen Saturation. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 70, U

106

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 74 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 74 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 2: Salinity Silver Spring, MD September 2013 U.K. Baranova, D.R. Johnson, D. Seidov, M.M. Biddle, 2013. World Ocean Atlas 2013, Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 74, 39 pp. This document is available on line

107

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STORM AND ANTECEDENT PRECIPITATION OVER TECHNICAL MEMORANDUMS National Weather Service. Office of Hydrology Series The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate prompt distribution of scientific

108

NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COAStAl HAzArDS Overview Global

109

Serving NOAA's Most Valuable Asset People Eduardo J. Ribas, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management and Compensation Workforce Planning Leadership & Management Development Future Retirement Services Division Human Capital Planning Division Learning Resources Division B&R Team 9NOAA Workforce Director January 08, 2010 - jta #12;Summary of Content (in order of appearance) NOAA Workforce Demographics

110

Reactor vessel annealing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Katz, Leonoard R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Tatch, Michael D. (Randolph, NJ); Kordalski, Frank J. (White Oak, PA); Wykstra, Donald T. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kavalkovich, William M. (Monroeville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA. This year, for example, climate data have been immensely valuable to the construction industry on Oahu October that the winter season would be much wetter than usual, his firm went into mitigation mode. PVT

112

Sapphire tube pressure vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

Outwater, John O. (Cambridge, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

114

Lakes in General Circulation Models Primary Investigator: Brent Lofgren -NOAA GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Investigators: Chris Milly, Isaac Held, Bruce Wyman - NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Overview The use

115

A Xenon Condenser with a Remote Liquid Storage Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the design and operation of a system for xenon liquefaction in which the condenser is separated from the liquid storage vessel. The condenser is cooled by a pulse tube cryocooler, while the vessel is cooled only by the liquid xenon itself. This arrangement facilitates liquid particle detector research by allowing easy access to the upper and lower flanges of the vessel. We find that an external xenon gas pump is useful for increasing the rate at which cooling power is delivered to the vessel, and we present measurements of the power and efficiency of the apparatus.

S. Slutsky; Y. -R. Yen; H. Breuer; A. Dobi; C. Hall; T. Langford; D. S. Leonard; L. J. Kaufman; V. Strickland; N. Voskanian

2009-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel: Initial Cooling Calculations V. Graves Target Studies Nov 15, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cooling Calculations 15 Nov 2012 Target · Separates functionality, provides double mercury containment, simplifies design and remote handling · Each

McDonald, Kirk

117

Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, movin...

Suprijadi,; Subekti, Petrus; Viridi, Sparisoma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, moving particle semi implicit.

Suprijadi; Mohamad Rendi; Petrus Subekti; Sparisoma Viridi

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

GORDON GUNTER NOAA Ship GORDON GUNTER conducts fishery and marine resource research supporting NOAA's National Marine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manufacturer: Markey o Model: COM-7 o Drive: Electric, 7.5 HP o Drum Capacity: 2000 m of .322 EM Cable o Model: DESH-5 o Drive: Electric o Drum Capacity: 10,000 m of .322 EM cable o Location: Aft winch Deck Location: Aft winch Deck, Port · Oceanographic Winch (primarily for CTD casts) o Manufacturer: Markey o

120

HEART AND BLOOD VESSELS CARDIOVASCULARCARDIOVASCULAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEART AND BLOOD VESSELS CARDIOVASCULARCARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEMSYSTEM SYSTEM COMPONENTS · Heart pumps blood though blood vessels where exchanges can take place with the interstitial fluid (between cells) · Heart and blood vessels regulate blood flow according to the needs of the body

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NOAA Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to 2:30PM EDT Hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this webinar will demonstrate the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit. Register for this webinar...

122

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report May 1999 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Planetary Boundary Layer held on 21 to 24 October 1997 at Lövånger in Sweden, have been published

123

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report May 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory TechnicalMeeting (ITM) on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, was held in Boulder, CO, during May 15

124

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report March 2003 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory, held 24-27 March 2003 in Geneva, Switzerland, examined the underrepresentation of women in these fields

125

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report May 2002 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory for Climate Studies: Methods, Products, and Challenges," held May 30, 2002 in Washington DC. Talks

126

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report July 2001 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory ­ Canaan Valley. Meetings were held among ATDD staff concerning an upgrade to the Canaan Valley Air

127

NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE ISAAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services Photo Credit: NOAA National high tide cycle was not measured due to station/sensor damage (Appendix 3). Individual time series

128

NOAA Technical Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;450 NOAA Technical Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental Osteology in Taxonomic Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental Osteology in Taxonomic and Systematic Studies .................................................................. .... 13 Scales and lateral line pores

129

Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Division Stephen J. Lord Director, NWS NCEP Environmental Modeling Center 19 July 2010 (303) 4973060 tom.hamill@noaa.gov #12; 2 Executive Summary The accuracy of many

Hamill, Tom

130

NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

131

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reactor pressure vessel nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

Vessel structural support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Vessel structural support system for laterally and vertically supporting a vessel, such as a nuclear steam generator having an exterior bottom surface and a side surface thereon. The system includes a bracket connected to the bottom surface. A support column is pivotally connected to the bracket for vertically supporting the steam generator. The system also includes a base pad assembly connected pivotally to the support column for supporting the support column and the steam generator. The base pad assembly, which is capable of being brought to a level position by turning leveling nuts, is anchored to a floor. The system further includes a male key member attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a female stop member attached to an adjacent wall. The male key member and the female stop member coact to laterally support the steam generator. Moreover, the system includes a snubber assembly connected to the side surface of the steam generator and also attached to the adjacent wall for dampening lateral movement of the steam generator. In addition, the system includes a restraining member of "flat" attached to the side surface of the steam generator and a bumper attached to the adjacent wall. The flat and the bumper coact to further laterally support the steam generator.

Jenko, James X. (N. Versailles, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Twp., Allegheny County, PA); Wilson, Robert M. (Plum Boro, PA); Wepfer, Robert M. (Murrysville, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Amendment 80 vessel replacement 1 Implementation and of Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Provisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amendment 80 vessel replacement 1 Implementation and of Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Provisions vessels to use non-qualifying vessels in the sector, thus allowing replacement of a lost qualifying vessel of the CRP ambiguous as to whether replacement of qualifying vessels with non-qualifying vessels

135

Albatrosses Following Fishing Vessels: How Badly Hooked Are They on an Easy Meal?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources, Fisheries Department, Stanley, Falkland Islands, 4 Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA, Lisboa effort was spent near ships. Nevertheless, a few individuals repeatedly visited fishing vessels, which

136

R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed...

137

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration noaa Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Peter Tatro Director, Center for Ocean Exploration... Exploration Program ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

139

NOAA Fisheries Promote and Develop Fishery Products and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Republic of Palau, or the Federated States of Micronesia · You represent an entity that is a citizen

140

Nondestructive Technique Survey for Assessing Integrity of Composite Firing Vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repeated use and limited lifetime of a composite tiring vessel compel a need to survey techniques for monitoring the structural integrity of the vessel in order to determine when it should be retired. Various nondestructive techniques were researched and evaluated based on their applicability to the vessel. The methods were visual inspection, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, surface mounted strain gauges, thermal inspection, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing, radiography, eddy current testing, and embedded fiber optic sensors. It was determined that embedded fiber optic sensor is the most promising technique due to their ability to be embedded within layers of composites and their immunity to electromagnetic interference.

Tran, A.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

US Department of Commerce NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) A CPH is required when a vessel that has been issued a limited access permit has sunk, been destroyed

142

The construction of the Browns Bay Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES. 10 19 The Site. National Historic Sites Service Excavation and Raising of the Vessel Vessel on Display. The Vessel in 1985. 19 20 27 28 Method of Recording III THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE VESSEL 31 36 The Keel 36 The Stem... A flat-bottomed boat being built. 17 9 Forelocked eye-bolts from the midship beam of the Browne Bay Vessel 21 10 Broad arrow stamped in an eye-bolt from the Browns Bay Vessel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 11 Pulley...

Amer, Christopher Francis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report June 2004 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Bay 3. HIGHLIGHT ­ Air Quality Forecast System - Start of 2004 Operational Season 4. Reactions Atmosphere 7. SURFRAD/ISIS 8. Errors in Radiation Instrumentation 9. ARL Umkehr Developments Adopted 10

144

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009 Timothy P. Boyer John I. Antonov Olga K. Baranova. Mishonov, T. D. O'Brien, D. Seidov, I. V. Smolyar, M. M. Zweng, 2009. World Ocean Database 2009. S. Levitus ................................................................................................. 18 1.1.1. History

145

NOAA/NMFS Developments Initial Assessment of Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their conclusions, Robert E, Burns, the Deep Ocean Mining Environmental Study project manager for NOAA, said,600 km) southeast of Hawaii, in water about 15,000 feet (5,000 m) deep, The monitoring included samples- tions that the plume moved horizon- tally, carried on slowly moving, deep-water currents. Considerable

146

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report April 2002 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory and Hydrology, to be held in March 2003 in Geneva. An international group of 7 women met in Silver Spring April's participation in meteorology and hydrology, which was held in December 1997 in Bangkok, and will focus on women

147

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF CAPT. JOHN E. LOWELL, JR., NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

safety, maritime security, and environmental protection. NOAA's geospatial services are also fundamental with sea ice retreat, we are seeing a corresponding potential for growth in international and domestic Arctic interests. Oil and gas companies are investing more in energy exploration, as evidenced most

148

NOAA Technical Report NMFS 67 Index Numbers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries, by Edward P. Myers, Donald E. Hoss, Walter M. Matsumoto Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service #12;NOAA TECHNICAL REPORT NMFS, by George A. Swan, Tommy G. Withrow, and Donn L. Park. April 1986, 34 p. 40. Potential impact of ocean

149

NOAA Technical Report NMFS 40 The Potential Impact of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Report NMFS 40 The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC. Uchida John D. Ditmars Robert A. Paddock June 1986 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic Pacific Ocean, by Arthur W. Kendall, Jr., and Beverly Vinter. March 1984,44 p. 3. Configurations

150

NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Information System (FIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Information System (FIS) Program Management Plan Working Drafts Draft fis program management plan_4.doc 10/31/2007 1:15 PM #12;#12;Change History Subject: Change history for the FIS Program Management Plan Comments: Comments regarding this version of the FIS

151

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents 1. Highlight -- Smart Balloon Test Success 2. NADP Interactions 3. Changes in Cloud Properties 4. New York City Study 18. Extreme Turbulence Probe 19. NOAA CIASTA - Urban Air Quality Study 20. Ozone Data from Upwind of Las Vegas 21. IMPROVE Steering Committee Highlights 1. Smart Balloon Test Success

152

NOAA Satellite and Information Service Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as the commercial airline, electric power and GPS industries. Our national security and economic well-being, whichNOAA Satellite and Information Service Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) Background: DSCOVR will maintain the Nation's solar wind observations, which are critical to maintaining the accuracy and lead time

153

December 2012 NOAA Response ... Before, During and After  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with FEMA, National Security Staff, and at the Department of Homeland Security Operations Center went: geostationary and polar-orbiting weather satellites; ocean- observing and coastal water-level monitoring systems teams worked 24/7 to help ensure that our nation prepared for the worst of Sandy. NOAA is now working

154

Learn More: www.aoml.noaa.gov/themes/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.nssl.noaa.gov13 WEATHER FORECASTS Tornadoes: Heroic Technology Advances Weather Forecasting When killer tornadoes (GPS) dropsondes, an innovative technology developed by AOML, provide key data in real time System (UAS) through hurricane-force winds and at record low altitudes into Tropical Cyclone Noel. Using

155

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

156

A Survey of Pressure Vessel Code Compliance for Superconducting RF Cryomodules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made from niobium and cooled with liquid helium are becoming key components of many particle accelerators. The helium vessels surrounding the RF cavities, portions of the niobium cavities themselves, and also possibly the vacuum vessels containing these assemblies, generally fall under the scope of local and national pressure vessel codes. In the U.S., Department of Energy rules require national laboratories to follow national consensus pressure vessel standards or to show ''a level of safety greater than or equal to'' that of the applicable standard. Thus, while used for its superconducting properties, niobium ends up being treated as a low-temperature pressure vessel material. Niobium material is not a code listed material and therefore requires the designer to understand the mechanical properties for material used in each pressure vessel fabrication; compliance with pressure vessel codes therefore becomes a problem. This report summarizes the approaches that various institutions have taken in order to bring superconducting RF cryomodules into compliance with pressure vessel codes. In Japan, Germany, and the U.S., institutions building superconducting RF cavities integrated in helium vessels or procuring them from vendors have had to deal with pressure vessel requirements being applied to SRF vessels, including the niobium and niobium-titanium components of the vessels. While niobium is not an approved pressure vessel material, data from tests of material samples provide information to set allowable stresses. By means of procedures which include adherence to code welding procedures, maintaining material and fabrication records, and detailed analyses of peak stresses in the vessels, or treatment of the vacuum vessel as the pressure boundary, research laboratories around the world have found methods to demonstrate and document a level of safety equivalent to the applicable pressure vessel codes.

Peterson, Thomas; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Nicol, Tom; Theilacker, Jay; /Fermilab; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kako, Eiji; Nakai, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Akira; /KEK, Tsukuba; Jensch, Kay; Matheisen, Axel; /DESY; Mammosser, John; /Jefferson Lab

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Predicting Stenosis in Blood Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of plaque Plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium, and other blood components that stick to the vessel-flow loop is function of degree of stenosis, even at low degrees of stenosis So, stenosis may be detected

Petta, Jason

158

NOAA FORM 88-13 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (REV 10/95) NOAA-NMFS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: PROCESSOR WHOLESALER (Does Not Process) COLD STORAGE OTHER ____________MAIL ADDRESS (Does Not Process) COLD STORAGE OTHER 2009 9 99 9997 999 2 2Page: of UNITFOR NMFS USE OUNCES VALUE FOB or INDUSTRIAL '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' 2 #12;NOAA FORM 88-13 U

159

Tailoring Topology Optimization to Composite Pressure Vessel Design with Simultaneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Introduction ­ CNG Pressure Vessels Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Pressure Vessels CNG Cargo Containment System

Paulino, Glaucio H.

160

NOAA PA 200455 Datos relacionados con la resaca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de sus oficinas transmiten un Surf Zone Forecast (Pronóstico para las zonas de oleaje). Cuando.ripcurrents.noaa.gov www.usla.org Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje indica la presencia de la resaca. De acuerdo con adentro. Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje. ¿ Qué debo hacer si la resaca me atrapa? Mantenga la

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions 27. Spatial Modeling 28. Smart Balloon Research 29. New York City Tracer Experiment 30. INEEL(EML),and theNewYork City Office of Emergency Management (OEM). A study of the dispersion (transport and diffusion) of airborne material in the deep urban canyons of New York City is being planned for Spring 2004

162

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report January 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Emergency Management/Homeland Security 18. Italian National Research Council Sky Arrow 19. Mercury. Diurnal Upper-Air Temperature Variations 8. Comparison of Radiosonde and Satellite Temperature Trends 9. Radiometer Diffuser Degradation 10. Security 11. Terrestrial Carbon Program 12. Urban Dispersion 13

163

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research efforts and the utility of the resulting science. The agenda for the workshop is at http, and the federal government. The NWS will provide standard forecasts and model output. The University of Utah is concerned. The various downhill, bobsled and luge runs want clear, sunny weather. They will make their own

164

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Beijing, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

challenges in harmonizing test protocols and requirements for compressed natural gas (CNG), hydrogen, and CNGInternational Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Beijing, China September 27-29, 2010 Background The China Association for Hydrogen Energy, the Engineering Research Center of High Pressure

165

PPPL-3458 PPPL-3458 Visual Tritium Imaging Of In-Vessel Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PPPL-3458 PPPL-3458 UC-70 Visual Tritium Imaging Of In-Vessel Surfaces by C. A. Gentile, S. J: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm #12;1 Visual Tritium Imaging Of In-Vessel Surfaces C. A. Gentile, S. J Energy Research Institute, Tritium Engineering Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195, Japan Abstract

166

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Volume 35, Summer 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Glen Liston. 1 CIRA Director 2 Researcher Spotlight 4 Solar Irradiance Forecasting 6 CIRA Founder. of Atmospheric Science with the Carbon Tracker activity led by Pieter Tans at NOAA. Linking the academic research

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

167

Light Sources on the Nylon Vessels' Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the buffer thickness between the vessels could enhance -ray background in the corresponding region inside;Chapter 7: Light Sources on the Nylon Vessels' Surfaces 185 or laser). The illuminated spots can be seen the fiber's end to penetrate through the vessel membrane into the scintillator volume. A laser of a specific

168

UNITED STATES Our Ocean Priorities Are Changing, NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Albacor e Fis hing South of San Francisco 4 NMFS Inspects Area Affected by Cannikin Nuclear Test 6 1972 Salmon Quotas 51 U,S, - Brazil Agree on Shrimp Fishing 52 FAO Ferro-Cement Fishing Vessel Seminar in New

169

0 20 4010 Miles NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 20 4010 Miles NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System Texas Forecast Region Maps to Sargent BCH NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System Texas Forecast Region Maps 0 5 102 Bloom Operational Forecast System Texas Forecast Region Maps 0 5 102.5 Miles West Bay #12;Aransas Bay

170

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

171

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara, and Information Service #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 2004: I

172

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 59 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE SEA OF AZOV 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 59 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE SEA OF AZOV 2006 Silver Spring, MD July 2006 U, I. Smolyar 2006. Climatic Atlas of the Sea of Azov 2006. G. Matishov, S. Levitus, Eds., NOAA Atlas-2004 Number of stations: 14,289 , , CD , . The Atlas and associated data are being

173

NOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate data available from NOAA's various climate observing systems as well as the output data from state range of solar, geophysical, environmental, and human dimensions data. As an example of dataNOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

174

*Digital copy of this document available at: NOAA in Your Backyard The Northeast Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://seagrant.mit.edu/education.php Contact: Rachel VanCott (Marine Science Educator) - vancott@mit.edu · New Hampshire Sea Grant ­ http Listings of NOAA Facilities and Programs · http://www.legislative.noaa.gov/NIYS/ National Weather Service Forecasting Office - http://weather.gov/ (click on map and look at side bar) · New York City Office (Student

175

Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co-Investigators: Thomas Croley - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover affects mass and energy exchange between the planetary boundary layer and the waters of the Great Lakes. The improved ice

176

Sign singularity and flares in solar active region NOAA 11158  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares, and the presence of correlation with EUV and X-ray flux, suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small scale properties of the current structures.

Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kazachenko, Maria D; Krucker, Sam; Primavera, Leonardo; Servidio, Sergio; Vecchio, Antonio; Welsch, Brian T; Fisher, George H; Lepreti, Fabio; Carbone, Vincenzo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tow Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd JumpOperations JumpTooele County, Utah:JumpVessel Jump to:

179

Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NOAA/NASA Global Hawk Collaboration By Michael Black NOAA/AOML/HRD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scientists collaborated in the effort to conduct a first ever high-altitude flyover of a tropical cyclone were at their assigned stations in a specially designed operations room at the NASA Dryden Research, and scientific instrument status. They were prepared to staff, conduct, and monitor this flight for up to 18

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or to this publication furnished by the NOAA Environmen- tal Research Laboratories, in any advertising or sales promotion an intent to cause directly or indirectly the advertised product to be used or purchased because-critical to eco- systems analysis and an understanding of the transport and dispersion of pollutants; surface

182

NOAAINMFS Developments NOAA Raises Coastal Zone Management Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attention on the coastal zone for deepwater ports, floating nuclear power plants, and offshore oil and gas to eight vessels supplying three processing plants, with a total output of around 1.2 million pounds of the deep-sea red crab, and declining consumer buying power, make the fu- ture for the red crab market

183

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Device for inspecting vessel surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, remotely-controlled inspection crawler for use along the walls of tanks, vessels, piping and the like. The crawler can be configured to use a vacuum chamber for supporting itself on the inspected surface by suction or a plurality of magnetic wheels for moving the crawler along the inspected surface. The crawler is adapted to be equipped with an ultrasonic probe for mapping the structural integrity or other characteristics of the surface being inspected. Navigation of the crawler is achieved by triangulation techniques between a signal transmitter on the crawler and a pair of microphones attached to a fixed, remote location, such as the crawler's deployment unit. The necessary communications are established between the crawler and computers external to the inspection environment for position control and storage and/or monitoring of data acquisition.

Appel, D. Keith (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES ........................................................................................................ 2 2.2 Net Basin Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table lb.--Lag-Zero Cross Covariances and Cross Correlations Among Great Lakes Annual Connecting

186

NOAA is committed to helping governments, businesses, and communities manage climate risks, adapt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Ka'imimoana, collect oceanic and atmospheric data such as solar radiation, carbon dioxide, and other-stop monitoring required for effective climate models, forecasts, and projections. NOAA's Carbon Tracker is widely

187

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission Mission The NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE (NESDIS to promote, protect and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environment and quality of life. To fulfill

188

Final report for confinement vessel analysis. Task 2, Safety vessel impact analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two sets of finite element analyses performed under Task 2 of the Confinement Vessel Analysis Program. In each set of analyses, a charge is assumed to have detonated inside the confinement vessel, causing the confinement vessel to fail in either of two ways; locally around the weld line of a nozzle, or catastrophically into two hemispheres. High pressure gases from the internal detonation pressurize the inside of the safety vessel and accelerate the fractured nozzle or hemisphere into the safety vessel. The first set of analyses examines the structural integrity of the safety vessel when impacted by the fractured nozzle. The objective of these calculations is to determine if the high strength bolt heads attached to the nozzle penetrate or fracture the lower strength safety vessel, thus allowing gaseous detonation products to escape to the atmosphere. The two dimensional analyses predict partial penetration of the safety vessel beneath the tip of the penetrator. The analyses also predict maximum principal strains in the safety vessel which exceed the measured ultimate strain of steel. The second set of analyses examines the containment capability of the safety vessel closure when impacted by half a confinement vessel (hemisphere). The predicted response is the formation of a 0.6-inch gap, caused by relative sliding and separation between the two halves of the safety vessel. Additional analyses with closure designs that prevent the gap formation are recommended.

Murray, Y.D. [APTEK, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Vulnerability of Xylem Vessels to Cavitation in Sugar Maple. Scaling from Individual Vessels to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vulnerability of Xylem Vessels to Cavitation in Sugar Maple. Scaling from Individual Vessels 02318 (M.A.Z., N.M.H.) The relation between xylem vessel age and vulnerability to cavitation of sugar-related changes in vulnerability to the overall resistance to cavitation, we combined data on the pressure

Melcher, Peter

190

Ceramic vessel production, use and distribution in Northern Mesopotamia and Syria during the Middle Bronze Age II (c. 1800-1600 BC). A functional analysis of vessels from Tell Ahmar, North Syria.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ceramic production at a local and regional level are further investigated. Since there is no one-to-one relation between vessel type and vessel function, the research adopts a multi-dimensional approach formed by the following hierarchical investigations...

Perini, Silvia

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

191

Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fabrication of Separator Demonstration Facility process vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process vessel system is the central element in the Separator Development Facility (SDF). It houses the two major process components, i.e., the laser-beam folding optics and the separators pods. This major subsystem is the critical-path procurement for the SDF project. Details of the vaious parts of the process vessel are given.

Oberst, E.F.

1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Application for Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application for Amendment 80 Vessel Replacement Page 1 of 6 Revised: 12/23/2013 OMB Control No. 0648-0565 Expiration Date: 01/31/2016 APPLICATION FOR AMENDMENT 80 VESSEL REPLACEMENT United States OF THE AMENDMENT 80 VESSEL BEING REPLACED 1. Vessel Name: 2. ADF&G Vessel Registration No.: 3. USCG Documentation

194

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Radiation embrittlement of PWR vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several studies pertaining to radiation damage of PWR vessel supports were conducted between 1978 and 1987. During this period, apparently there was no reason to believe that low-temperature (<100/degree/C) MTR embrittlement data were not appropriate for evaluating embrittlement of PWR vessel supports. However, late in 1986, data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel surveillance program indicated that the embrittlement rates of the several HFIR vessel materials (A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II) were substantially greater than anticipated on the basis of MTR data. Further evaluation of the HFIR data suggested that a fluence-rate effect was responsible for the apparent discrepancy, and shortly thereafter it became apparent that this rate effect was applicable to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports. As a result, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) evaluate the impact of the apparent embrittlement rate effect on the integrity of light-water-reactor (LWR) vessel supports. The purpose of the study was to provide an indication of whether the integrity of reactor vessel supports is likely to be challenged by radiation-induced embrittlement. The scope of the evaluation included correlation of the HFIR data for application to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports; a survey and cursory evaluation of all US LWR vessel support designs, selection of two plants for specific-plant evaluation, and a specific-plant evaluation of both plants to determine critical flaw sizes for their vessel supports. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Robinson, G.C.; Pennell, W.E.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Reactor pressure vessel. Status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

Mitlitsky, Fred (1125 Canton Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550); Magnotta, Frank (1206 Bacon Way, Lafayette, CA 94549)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Thermal wake/vessel detection technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

HFIR vessel probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel is limited by a radiation induced reduction in the material`s fracture toughness. Hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are being used to meet the intent of the ASME Code, while extending the life of the vessel well beyond its original design value. The most recent probabilistic evaluation is more precise and accounts for the effects of gamma as well as neutron radiation embrittlement. This analysis confirms the earlier estimates of a permissible vessel lifetime of at least 50 EFPY (100 MW).

Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

203

Future characteristics of Offshore Support Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to examine trends in Offshore Support Vessel (OSV) design and determine the future characteristics of OSVs based on industry insight and supply chain models. Specifically, this thesis focuses ...

Rose, Robin Sebastian Koske

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

NOAA Satellite and Information Service The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is dedicated to providing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellites and other sources to promote, protect, and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environmentNOAA Satellite and Information Service Mission The National Environmental Satellite, Data the Nation's operational environmental satellites, · operates the NOAA National Data Centers, · provides data

206

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: February 18, 2014 Jess Beck, Jess.Beck@noaa.gov FB14-012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill on offshore aquaculture in federal waters in the Gulf of Mexico barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. After 85 days, the well was successfully capped. In 2011, NOAA Offshore Marine Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico NOAA Fisheries is seeking public comment on a draft

207

In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CIRES /NGDC Professional Research Assistant The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado at Boulder conducts collaborative research with NOAA of NGDC, David Skaggs Research Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado. Primary Duties Work with data of format standards for environmental data; CSV, netCDF, HDF5 Familiarity with Spring, Jakarta projects

Colorado at Boulder, University of

209

EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

Rudolphi, John Joseph

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Development, implementation, and skill assessment of the NOAA/NOS Great Lakes Operational Forecast System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development, implementation, and skill assessment of the NOAA/NOS Great Lakes Operational Forecast Lakes Operational Forecast System (GLOFS) uses near-real-time atmospheric observa- tions and numerical weather prediction forecast guidance to produce three-dimensional forecasts of water temperature

211

Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa - NOAA of dreissenid biomass but there are no current, accurate estimates of biomass in this portion of the lake. Biomass is calculated from abundances, size- frequencies, and length-weights. The goal of this project

212

NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Temperature time series from a 1 m Seacat, NX Modules at 1 m and 10 m, and downwelling solar values for a given day. . 6 #12;iv Contents #12;ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A

213

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National on farmland, farmers and farming in the U.S. are presently creating undesirable results affecting future security of existing and potential regional and local food systems and other values by adversely affecting

Miami, University of

214

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate variability and climate change effect on the potential for growing crops for biofuel in GeorgiaNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National, miscanthus, and other, are already being evaluated due to their large biomass productivity. The local farmers

Miami, University of

215

Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cooling water intakes, and damaging shoreline structures. The ice cover also has an impact on the waterGreat Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co Board The formation, duration, and extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes has a major impact

216

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-26 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1.3 Satellite Imagery 3.2 General Description 3.2.1 Fall Cooling Phase 3.2.2 Ice Formation and Breakup Phases 3NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-26 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS, WINTER Degree-Days 2.3 Comparison With Previous Winters 3. SIJNNARY OF ICE CONDITIONS 3.1 Data Collection

217

NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Salt Marsh Oiling Conditions, evaluating, and responding to threats to coastal environments, including oil and chemical spills, releases to prepare for and respond to oil and chemical releases. Determines damage to natural resources from

218

September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and ecological consequences. The U.S. spends tens of billions of dollars each year to reduce air pollution in order to protect public health and the environment. For more than 50 years, industrial nations have been reducing harmful air

219

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 67 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE NORTH PACIFIC SEAS 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 67 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE NORTH PACIFIC SEAS 2009: Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service #12;International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 12 Climatic Atlas of North Pacific Seas 2009 Additional copies

220

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Science | Service | Stewardship Understand the earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World With NOAA 74 What You Will Need r Two empty two-liter plastic soda bottles r Tornado Tube plastic to help make the vortex more visible. 2. Screw the plastic connector onto the bottle containing the water washer between them. Use plastic electrical tape or duct tape. 3. Turn the two-bottle assembly over

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NOAA GREAT LAKES COASTAL FORECASTING SYSTEM Forecasts (up to 5 days in the future)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions for up to 5 days in the future. These forecasts are run twice daily, and you can step through are generated every 6 hours and you can step backward in hourly increments to view conditions over the previousNOAA GREAT LAKES COASTAL FORECASTING SYSTEM Forecasts (up to 5 days in the future) and Nowcasts

222

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

223

Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to fishery stock assessment modeling? What is the suitability of the stock assessment models employed, taking1 Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014 Stock Assessment of this review is to examine and evaluate the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's (SEFSC) fishery stock

224

Technical Notes NOAA/NESDIS LSA CryoSat Interim Geophysical Data Record (IGDR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 2014 Orbit 92° inclination, reaches latitudes of 88°; 369-day exact repeat with 85-day, 29-day.grdl.noaa.gov/SAT/NearRealTime/presentations/AGU2011-WHFSmith_NRT_CS2.pdf) Near-Real-Time Wave, Wind, and Sea Surface Height from CryoSat FDM/L1B data

225

Contact: Monica Allen (NOAA) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 202-379-6693 July 22, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.I.) 401-783-7886 NOAA approves Rhode Island plan for offshore energy development, job creation and ocean projects that could lead to the creation of hundreds of wind energy jobs and balance energy development resources to create and sustain jobs, help our state build renewable energy, and continue to preserve

226

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: March 11, 2014 Jess.Beck@noaa.gov FB14-012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

submitted the Aquaculture Plan which included a final programmatic environmental impact statement possible environmental impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill on offshore aquaculture in federal, to be considered by NOAA Fisheries. Electronic copies of the Aquaculture Plan and final programmatic environmental

227

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts on National Security Using Satellite Data Authors: Dr. Sara Graves, Todd Berendes in the state of Alabama on critical infrastructure and assets with national security implications. The changeNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National

Miami, University of

228

Learn More: sos.noaa.gov 24 Science On a Sphere: Seeing the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they have ever seen before. Called "Science On a Sphere®" (SOS), this wrap-around cinema system ­ inventedLearn More: sos.noaa.gov 24 EDUCATION Science On a Sphere®: Seeing the Dynamics of a Changing Earth of the sphere. Today, the SOS team has worked with science centers and museums to place SOS displays at more

229

FY 2013 Appropriations for the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration NOAA's FY 2013 "Blue Book"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 Cooperative Observer Network 1.9 1.0 -47.4% 1.9 1.0 NOAA Profiler Network 4.2 1.8 -57.1% 4.2 1.8 Advanced as a conference--at least, not before the November elections. Further complicating this process is the fact

230

Defining success in climate adaptation support Moderator: Adam Parris, NOAA Climate Program Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand from the decision making communities. Recommendations from the community of practice are often and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is conducting an evaluation designed to identify best practices for using interactions with decision makers (i.e. co-production), owning the responsibility for working with decision

Miami, University of

231

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER USING LANDSAT the group means for snow- covered ice (group 15). 4. Comparison of LANDSAT 1 band 4 and band 7 to illustrate the influence of water on the tone of ice cover. 5. Mean digital counts of training sets--bands 4, 5, 6, and 7

232

Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover is an important environmental factor affecting physical and biological processes in the coastal region of the Great Lakes. However, computerized ice thickness data along the shores of the Great

233

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS R.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Observation density Average regional ice cover Percentage exceedance from average regional ice cover for discrete ice cover values Contour analysis of percentage ice cover exceedance

234

NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-v30 Surface Circulation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Washmgton, l> C 20402. 6!;3. The use of electricity in conjunction with a 1~.'j-meter (Headropel Gulf·of-Mexicov30 NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-v30 Surface Circulation in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington D.C 20402. 6.54. An electric detector

235

Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Plate Tectonics and Lava Lamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and geological events?" Answer = heat from radioactive decay · Compare the light bulb in lava to Earth's internal in the lava lamp. · Plot recent earthquakes and volcanic activity on a world map and compare to the location.education.noaa.gov/Ocean_and_Coasts/Ocean_Floor_Features.html USGS Earthquake Hazards - http

236

Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL NANOPARTICLES AND

237

Initial conditioning of the TFTR vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the initial conditioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel prior to the initiation of first plasma discharges, and during subsequent operation with high power ohmically-heated plasmas. Following evacuation of the 86 m/sup 3/ vessel with the 10/sup 4/ 1/s high vacuum pumping system, the vessel was conditioned by a 15 A dc glow discharge in H/sub 2/ at a pressure of 5 mTorr. Rapid-pulse discharge cleaning was used subsequently to preferentially condition the graphite plasma limiters. The effectiveness of the discharge cleaning was monitored by measuring the exhaust rates of the primary discharge products (CO/C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, CH/sub 4/, and H/sub 2/O). After 175 hours of glow discharge treatment, the equivalent of 50 monolayers of C and O was removed from the vessel, and the partial pressures of impurity gases were reduced to the range of 10/sup -9/-10/sup -10/ Torr.

Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Owens, D.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

Desai, Dilip R. (Fremont, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan Funds Revolving LoanA l i c e Land

240

Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

Bucholz, J.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind October 1,...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent vessel sign Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Maximum Intensity Summary: three-dimensional (3-D) data, which are vessel voxel projection probability, vessel detection... probability, false vessel probability, and...

243

In-Vessel Coil Material Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design for construction of this large tokamak fusion experiment. One of the design issues is ensuring proper control of the fusion plasma. In-vessel magnet coils may be needed for plasma control, especially the control of edge localized modes (ELMs) and plasma vertical stabilization (VS). These coils will be lifetime components that reside inside the ITER vacuum vessel behind the blanket modules. As such, their reliability is an important design issue since access will be time consuming if any type of repair were necessary. The following chapters give the research results and estimates of failure rates for the coil conductor and jacket materials to be used for the in-vessel coils. Copper and CuCrZr conductors, and stainless steel and Inconel jackets are examined.

L. C. Cadwallader

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use advanced instrument and communication technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use- grams. This paper traces the innovations in design and gains in capability of the autonomous Lagrangian

Businger, Steven

245

CORRELATION OF DNA METHYLATION WITH MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN MARINE ORGANISMS: A CASE STUDY OF NOAA MUSSEL WATCH TISSUE SAMPLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) obtained from the NOAA Mussel Watch program were screened for DNA methylation, a type of epigenetic response to stressors. Oysters were collected from sites in the Gulf of Mexico having high mercury...

Brinkmeyer, Robin; Taylor, Robert; Germ, Kaylyn E.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Learn More: www.glerl.noaa.gov economic value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant. Researchers also are exploring use of a wave energy device cur- rently used off the coast Grant completed a survey look- ing at Delaware residents' opinions on offshore wind power. Ninety

247

NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Richard S. Artz, Acting Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preparations -- Smart Balloon 19. DIVINE STRAKE 20. Urban Air Quality Study (UrbaNet) 21. IMPROVE Network Plans.8 of HYSPLIT now supports the staggered meteorological data grids of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting

248

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

From Cold War to cold vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a former Soviet weapons plant which is converted to produce cryogenic vessels and other peaceful cylinders. In 1995, Byelocorp Scientific Inc. (BSI), a New York-based firm that specializes in transferring technologies developed in the former Soviet Union, began converting a huge military defense plant in Kazakhstan into civilian-industrial use. The nearly 750,000-square-foot factory in Almaty, the capital of the former Soviet republic, was previously used to manufacture torpedo shells and ballistic rocket casings. The old defense plant, which was known as Gidromash, will now manufacture cylinders of a kinder, gentler variety--cryogenic vessels. The Kazakhstan operation is being managed jointly with Supco Srl., an Italian manufacturing, engineering, and construction company. With financing from the US Department of Defense, BSI, Supco, and the Kazakhstan government, a new joint venture called Byelkamit (a combination of Byelocorp, Kazakhstan, America, and Italy) was established.

Melrath, C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM describes the status of the configuration development and the integration of the major subsystem components vessel structural stiffness, this configuration makes use of the cooling jacket as nuclear shielding

253

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76 George A. Leshkevich.2 Data Analysis 2 3. DATA PRESENTATION 4 3.1 Freezing Degree-Days 4 3.2 Composite Ice Charts 4 4. DISCUSSION 4 4.1 Winter Characteristics 4 4.2 General Seasonal Trends in Ice-Cover Distribution 5 4.3 Lake

254

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-52 CAPABILITIES OF VARIOUS RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROBLEM 3. A CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 4. THE EUTROPHICATION PROBLEM 4.1 What is cultural eutrophication? 4.2 What have governments done to control eutrophication? 4.3 What are the status and trends of Great Lakes eutrophication? 5. THE TOXIC ORGANICS PROBLEM 5.1 What

255

NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-PIFSC-40 Forty Years of Research: Recovery Records  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turtles Observed or Originally Tagged at French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 1973 peer- reviewed literature. The contents are of broad scope, including technical workshop proceedings of green turtles observed or originally tagged at French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian

256

NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Extended Continental Shelf (ECS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and oil and gas reserves. They recommended exploring creative ways, such as partnerships, to leverage model #12;simulations to make an economic and societal case that some small investment in ECS mapping will provide a large return on investment in the future. Governance of the Interagency Process The participants

257

Robert Pincus and Crispian Batstone, CIRES/Univ. Colorado and NOAA Earth System Research Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program SeptemberRobert B. Laughlin,RobertRobert

258

NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 Imitating Mother Nature 14 An International Affair 16 Instruments of Change 19 Unconventional the remarkable research being generated today at the SNS. This issue of the ORNL Review provides a snapshot array of instruments at the SNS. Some 200 papers have already been submitted for publication in fields

259

NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-PIFSC-43 November 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service. #12;Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center National Marine Fisheries Service National Oceanic and Industrial Research Organization GPO Box 1538 Hobart Tasmania 7001, Australia 5 Pacific Islands Fisheries Ecosystem Model for Guam Mariska Weijerman, Isaac Kaplan, Elizabeth Fulton, Bec Gordon, Shanna Grafeld

260

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CIRES/GSD Professional Research Assistant Sr. HPC Systems Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts. ESRL/GSD is a part of NOAA's Research and Development High Performance Computing Systems Program of GSD is looking for a temporary (12 mo) full-time Sr. High Performance Computing (HPC) System Engineer to support multiple state-of-the-art High Performance Computers in Boulder, CO and Fairmont, WV. The Sr

Colorado at Boulder, University of

262

NOAA National Water Center on UA Campus http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2012/20120221_nwc.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resource management, accelerate the transition of research-to-operations, establish a Common Operating and management have formed a partnership to unify their commitment to address the nation's water resources information and management needs through the Integrated Water Resources Science and Services (IWRSS) strategy

Zheng, Chunmiao

263

Effects of 50/degree/C surveillance and test reactor irradiations on ferritic pressure vessel steel embrittlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of surveillance tests on the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory revealed that a greater than expected embrittlement had taken place after about 17.5 effective full-power years of operation and an operational assessment program was undertaken to fully evaluate the vessel condition and recommend conditions under which operation could be resumed. A research program was undertaken that included irradiating specimens in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Specimens of the A212 grade B vessel shell material were included, along with specimens from a nozzle qualification weld and a submerged-arc weld fabricated at ORNL to reproduce the vessel seam weld. The results of the surveillance program and the materials research program performed in support of the evaluation of the HFIR pressure vessel are presented and show the welds to be more radiation resistant than the A212B. Results of irradiated tensile and annealing experiments are described as well as a discussion of mechanisms which may be responsible for enhanced hardening at low damage rates. 20 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Corwin, W.R.; Odette, G.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Case Study: Innovative Energy Efficiency Approaches in NOAA's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy-ChevronSeveral salesCarolyn L.in a TextileEnvironmental

265

Autonomous Radiation Monitoring of Small Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the terrestrial approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. They require vehicles to pass at slow speeds between two closely-spaced radiation sensors, relying on the uniformity of vehicle sizes to space the detectors, and on proximity to link an individual vehicle to its radiation signature. In contrast to roadways where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. We have developed a unique solution to this problem based on our portal-less portal monitor instrument that is designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. It was recently tested in a maritime setting. In this paper we present the instrument, how it functions, and the results of the recent tests.

Fabris, Lorenzo [ORNL; Hornback, Donald Eric [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

Simonen, Fredric A.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Webinar: Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the webinar titled, Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts, originally presented on August 14, 2012.

268

Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Workshop Agenda: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels, Lesssons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles...

269

asme pressure vessels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program & Sensors Hydrogen Delivery Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Pipeline for Off-Board Hydrogen: L-C Atmosphere: 1500 psi H2, ambient pressure Air...

270

asme pressure vessel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program & Sensors Hydrogen Delivery Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Pipeline for Off-Board Hydrogen: L-C Atmosphere: 1500 psi H2, ambient pressure Air...

271

alloy pressure vessels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program & Sensors Hydrogen Delivery Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Pipeline for Off-Board Hydrogen: L-C Atmosphere: 1500 psi H2, ambient pressure Air...

272

alloy pressure vessel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program & Sensors Hydrogen Delivery Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Pipeline for Off-Board Hydrogen: L-C Atmosphere: 1500 psi H2, ambient pressure Air...

273

aged pressure vessel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program & Sensors Hydrogen Delivery Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Pipeline for Off-Board Hydrogen: L-C Atmosphere: 1500 psi H2, ambient pressure Air...

274

Research Administration Forum October 6, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

issuance #12;Who is getting what? ·NIH $10.4B ·NSF $3.0B ·DOE $2.0B ·NOAA $830M ·NIST $600M ·NASA $400M ·DOD $200M #12;Proposal Submissions April 1 ­ September 30 NIH Total 107 NIH Challenge Grants 32 NIH Grand Opportunities 8 NIH Summer Research Opportunities 4 NSF 3 DOE 28 NIST 3 To

275

http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet See Report By GR1938 HISTORY - 1957 MONUMENTED CGS #12;DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl

Ahmad, Sajjad

276

Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of Mexico near the spill site. At the time it was called on for this mission, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and extensive survey of atmospheric loadings of hydrocarbon and other organic species air pollution in the Gulf

277

Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution in the Gulf of Mexico. During May, one of NOAA WP-3D aircraft, equipped with an extensive suite1 Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory within and above the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the Gulf of Mexico on 8 and 10 June 2010

278

HAWAI`I UNDERSEA RESEARCH LABORATORY NOAA's Undersea Research Center for Hawai`i and the Western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in nearly 1900 dives representing 9300 hours underwater, and a benthic ecology database derived from in-house with the Coral Reef Conservation Program. Pisces IV and Pisces V are three-person, battery-powered, one

279

HAWAI`I UNDERSEA RESEARCH LABORATORY NOAA's Undersea Research Center for Hawai`i and the Western Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resources of the Pa- cific and renewable energy from the sea, HURL's contributions will continue to play accepts funded requests from private, state, or federal agencies and participates in international Region Hawai`i Northwestern Hawaiian Islands American SamoaAustralia Japan CNMI Guam Marshall IslandsFederated

280

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Sensible heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient models for sensible heat were developed to assess the thermal performance of agitated vessels with coils and jackets. Performance is quantified with the computation of heat-transfer coefficients by introducing vessel heating and cooling data into model equations. Of the two model categories studied, differential and macroscopic, the latter is preferred due to mathematical simplicity and lower sensitivity to experimental data variability.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Austenite Grain Growth in a Nuclear Pressure Vessel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cogswellb , H. K. D. H. Bhadeshiaa aDepartment of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge vessels, partly because the qualifica- tion of such materials requires an enormous amount of time-consuming work. The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) in particular have demanding requirements for tensile strength

Cambridge, University of

282

Coalesced Martensite in Pressure Vessel Steels Hector Pous-Romero  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalesced Martensite in Pressure Vessel Steels Hector Pous-Romero Department of Materials Science.ac.uk Harry Bhadeshia Department of Materials Science & Metallurgy University of Cambridge Cambridge RPV Reactor pressure vessels. SEM Scanning electron microscopy. HAZ Heat affected zone. Bs Bainite

Cambridge, University of

283

Simultaneous Irradiation and Imaging of Blood Vessels During Pulsed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy produced hemorrhage. In larger vessels, coagula often were attached to the superficial vessel wall; port wine stains INTRODUCTION Previous studies examining the effect of la- ser irradiation on cutaneous preparation. The short pulse duration illus- trated an extreme; energy was deposited quickly Contract grant

Barton, Jennifer K.

284

Commercial marine vessel contributions to emission inventories. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to conduct a survey of emissions from combustion engines associates with non-road vehicles and stationary sources. Among the emission source categories under scrutiny of the EPA are commercial marine vessels. This group of sources includes revenue vessels operated on US ports and waterways in such diverse pursuits as international and domestic trade, port and ship service, offshore and coastal industry, and passenger transport. For the purposes of the study, EPA is assessing commercial marine vessel operations at selected ports around the country which are characterized by a high level of commercial marine vessel activity. Booz-Allen has been retained by the EPA to assist in developing emission inventories from marine vessels for up to six ports, based on vessel arrival/departure data, are believed to exhibit high levels of marine generated emissions. Booz-Allen developed a listing of the top 20 major ports in terms of total vessel activity (as measured by annual tonnage of cargo and annual vessel calls).

Not Available

1991-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

INTERPRETING ERUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN NOAA AR 11158 VIA THE REGION'S MAGNETIC ENERGY AND RELATIVE-HELICITY BUDGETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous works, we introduced a nonlinear force-free method that self-consistently calculates the instantaneous budgets of free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in solar active regions (ARs). Calculation is expedient and practical, using only a single vector magnetogram per computation. We apply this method to a time series of 600 high-cadence vector magnetograms of the eruptive NOAA AR 11158 acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory over a five-day observing interval. Besides testing our method extensively, we use it to interpret the dynamical evolution in the AR, including eruptions. We find that the AR builds large budgets of both free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity, sufficient to power many more eruptions than the ones it gave within the interval of interest. For each of these major eruptions, we find eruption-related decreases and subsequent free-energy and helicity budgets that are consistent with the observed eruption (flare and coronal mass ejection (CME)) sizes. In addition, we find that (1) evolution in the AR is consistent with the recently proposed (free) energy-(relative) helicity diagram of solar ARs, (2) eruption-related decreases occur before the flare and the projected CME-launch times, suggesting that CME progenitors precede flares, and (3) self terms of free energy and relative helicity most likely originate from respective mutual terms, following a progressive mutual-to-self conversion pattern that most likely stems from magnetic reconnection. This results in the non-ideal formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and instigates further research on the triggering of solar eruptions with magnetic helicity firmly placed in the eruption cadre.

Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics (RCAAM) Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, Athens, GR-11527 (Greece); Liu Yang [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Validation of GOES-Derived Surface Radiation Using NOAA's Physical Retrieval Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was part of a multiyear collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to produce high-quality, satellite-based, solar resource datasets for the United States. High-quality, solar resource assessment accelerates technology deployment by making a positive impact on decision making and reducing uncertainty in investment decisions. Satellite-based solar resource datasets are used as a primary source in solar resource assessment. This is mainly because satellites provide larger areal coverage and longer periods of record than ground-based measurements. With the advent of newer satellites with increased information content and faster computers that can process increasingly higher data volumes, methods that were considered too computationally intensive are now feasible. One class of sophisticated methods for retrieving solar resource information from satellites is a two-step, physics-based method that computes cloud properties and uses the information in a radiative transfer model to compute solar radiation. This method has the advantage of adding additional information as satellites with newer channels come on board. This report evaluates the two-step method developed at NOAA and adapted for solar resource assessment for renewable energy with the goal of identifying areas that can be improved in the future.

Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/20/2007 OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy Purpose: The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other support computers used by OCAO staff. To facilitate adequate capital planning and clarify acquisition policies, the following Computer Refreshment Policy

292

Applied Climate Information System -NOAA Regional Climate Centers 727 Hardin Hall, 3310 Holdrege Street, Lincoln, NE 68583-0997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Climate Information System - NOAA Regional Climate Centers ACIS 727 Hardin Hall, 3310-8763 High Plains Regional Climate Center Climate Services HPRCC provides the public with several ways to access climate data and information. Whether via direct contact, website access, or through

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

293

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT of such products is not authorized. ii #12;CONTENTS Abstract 1. INTRODUCTION 2. THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF THE ICE GROWTH EQUATION 3. THE INFLUENCE OF SNOW COVER 4. THE DEGREE-DAY LINEAR MODEL 5. THE DATA SETS 5.1 Ice

294

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-85 AN ATTEMPT TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF AN ANTI-TURBIDITY SYSTEM ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Pollution and Resources Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan Yoshikuni Okayama of such products for publicity or advertising purposes is not authorized. Contribution No. 1060 from NOAA of phytoplankton, adsorb and concentrate some pollutants such as toxic chemicals, promote the consumption of great

295

Start-up control system and vessel for LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reflux condensing start-up system includes a steam generator, a start-up vessel connected parallel to the steam generator, a main steam line connecting steam outlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel to a steam turbine, a condenser connected to an outlet of the turbine and a feedwater return line connected between the condenser and inlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel. The start-up vessel has one or more heaters at the bottom thereof for heating feedwater which is supplied over a start-up line to the start-up vessel. Steam is thus generated to pressurize the steam generator before the steam generator is supplied with a heat transfer medium, for example liquid sodium, in the case of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The start-up vessel includes upper and lower bulbs with a smaller diameter mid-section to act as water and steam reservoirs. The start-up vessel can thus be used not only in a start-up operation but as a mixing tank, a water storage tank and a level control at low loads for controlling feedwater flow.

Durrant, Oliver W. (Akron, OH); Kakarala, Chandrasekhara R. (Clinton, OH); Mandel, Sheldon W. (Galesburg, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Start-up control system and vessel for LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reflux condensing start-up system comprises a steam generator, a start-up vessel connected parallel to the steam generator, a main steam line connecting steam outlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel to a steam turbine, a condenser connected to an outlet of the turbine and a feedwater return line connected between the condenser and inlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel. The start-up vessel has one or more heaters at the bottom thereof for heating feedwater which is supplied over a start-up line to the start-up vessel. Steam is thus generated to pressurize the steam generator before the steam generator is supplied with a heat transfer medium, for example liquid sodium, in the case of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The start-up vessel includes upper and lower bulbs with a smaller diameter mid-section to act as water and steam reservoirs. The start-up vessel can thus be used not only in a start-up operation but as a mixing tank, a water storage tank and a level control at low loads for controlling feedwater flow.

Durrant, Oliver W. (Akron, OH); Kakarala, Chandrasekhara R. (Clinton, OH); Mandel, Sheldon W. (Galesburg, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to the Baffle Former Plates. The FaST is designed to remove the Baffle Former Plates from the Core Barrel. The VRS further volume reduces segmented components using multiple configurations of the 38i and horizontal reciprocating saws. After the successful removal and volume reduction of the Internals, the RV will be segmented using a 'First in the US' thermal cutting process through a co-operative effort with Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH using their experience at the Stade NPP and Karlsruhe in Germany. SNS mobilized in the fall of 2011 to commence execution of the project in order to complete the RVI segmentation, removal and packaging activities for the first unit (Unit 2) by end of the 2012/beginning 2013 and then mobilize to the second unit, Unit 1. Parallel to the completion of the segmentation of the reactor vessel internals at Unit 1, SNS will segment the Unit 2 pressure vessel and at completion move to Unit 1. (authors)

Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)] [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

299

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

Powell, J.G.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Sector: Executive Summary Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector: Executive Summary Executive summary of the Assessment of Vessel Requirements for...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vessel identification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review Regulatory Revisions to Summary: .S.C. 971 et seq.) authorize the Secretary to station observers aboard commercial fishing vessels in order... Service). Vessels fishing...

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial blood vessel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

blood vessel without obstructing normal blood flow. Their work takes advantage of microfluidics... by the reactions that prevent clotting (inhibition). When a blood vessel is...

306

Partial Support for the Federal Committee for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE E-link Report Number DOE/ER62778 1999-2012 Please see attached Final Technical Report (size too large to post here). Annual Products Provided to DOE: Federal Plan for Meteorological Services and Supporting Research; National Hurricane Operations Plan; Interdepartmental Hurricane Conference Summary Report. All reports and publications can be found on the OFCM website, www.ofcm.noaa.gov.

Williamson, Samuel P

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Yoon et al. 1 Research Article: Tertiary Endosymbiosis Driven Genome Evolution in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apoprotein; PsbD, photosystem II D2 reaction center protein; PsbO, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 1 MBE, 2 and Debashish Bhattacharya 1 * 1 Department of Biological Sciences and Roy J. Carver Center, NOAA National Ocean Service, Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research

Bhattacharya, Debashish

308

PMEL Science Review Aug.26-28, 2008 PMEL Ecosystem Research Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Protect, Restore, and Manage Use of Coastal and Ocean Resources Through Ecosystem Approaches To Management leadership at the national and international levels Understanding and supporting NOAA's research objectives Investment and development of new technologies Accomplished through: Pubs Proposals Indicators of NCTR 34 8

309

Hydrodynamic evaluation of high-speed semi-SWATH vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-speed semi-displacement vessels have enjoyed rapid development and widespread use over the past 25 years. Concurrent with their growth as viable commercial and naval platforms, has been the advancement of three-dimensional ...

Guttenplan, Adam (Adam David)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DESIGN OF THE ITER IN-VESSEL COILS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ITER project is considering the inclusion of two sets of in-vessel coils, one to mitigate the effect of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and another to provide vertical stabilization (VS). The in-vessel location (behind the blanket shield modules, mounted to the vacuum vessel inner wall) presents special challenges in terms of nuclear radiation (~3000 MGy) and temperature (100oC vessel during operations, 200oC during bakeout). Mineral insulated conductors are well suited to this environment but are not commercially available in the large cross section required. An R&D program is underway to demonstrate the production of mineral insulated (MgO or Spinel) hollow copper conductor with stainless steel jacketing needed for these coils. A preliminary design based on this conductor technology has been developed and is presented herein.

Neumeyer, C; Bryant, L; Chrzanowski, J; Feder, R; Gomez, M; Heitzenroeder, P; Kalish, M; Lipski, A; Mardenfeld, M; Simmons, R; Titus, P; Zatz, I; Daly, E; Martin, A; Nakahira, M; Pillsbury, R; Feng, J; Bohm, T; Sawan, M; Stone, H; Griffiths, I

2010-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

aging blood vessels: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Japan is one 302 VESSEL TRAFFIC RISK ASSESSMENT (VTRA) 2010 Engineering Websites Summary: Oil Loss Dr. J. Rene van Dorp and Dr. Jason R.W Merrick 12132013 1 GW-VCU December 2013...

312

Microsoft Word - 911118_a Vessel_Alternatives-Judy1.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the oil and gas industry. As with other RPV and IHX Pressure Vessel Alternatives Study Report 9111180 6 MOC, more data are needed on compatibility with impure He gas. This...

313

Vessel Segmentation with Automatic Centerline Extraction Using Tubular Tree Segmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deaths in the United States per year. Vessel Segmentation from CTA data is challenging because of non Mohan1 , Ganesh Sundaramoorthi1,2 , Arthur Stillman3 , and Allen Tannenbaum1 1 School of Electrical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Using SA508/533 for the HTGR Vessel Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the influence of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) module power rating and normal operating temperatures on the use of SA508/533 material for the HTGR vessel system with emphasis on the calculated times at elevated temperatures approaching or exceeding ASME Code Service Limits (Levels B&C) to which the reactor pressure vessel could be exposed during postulated pressurized and depressurized conduction cooldown events over its design lifetime.

Larry Demick

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A cog-like vessel from the Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, more than thirty iconographic representations, mostly medieval city seals, have been discovered. 4 They show that cogs were compact and tubby vessels with a sharply built lower hull, combining a large cargo capacity with good sailing qualities.... The broad central part of the vessel immedistelv suaaested it had been a merchantman, but no trace of cargo was found. The onlv contents were some fraaments of bricks and ceramics. a Few iron serape' some smail cattle bones, and, under the ceiling...

Van de Moortel, Aleydis Maria P. A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Planning, Licensing, Modifications, and Use of a Russian Vessel for Shipping Spent Nuclear Fuel by Sea in Support of the DOE RRRFR Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program, under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative, began returning Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia in January 2006. During the first years of making HEU SNF shipments, it became clear that the modes of transportation needed to be expanded from highway and railroad to include sea and air to meet the extremely aggressive commitment of completing the first series of shipments by the end of 2010. The first shipment using sea transport was made in October 2008 and used a non-Russian flagged vessel. The Russian government reluctantly allowed a one-time use of the foreign-owned vessel into their highly secured seaport, with the understanding that any future shipments would be made using a vessel owned and operated by a Russian company. ASPOL-Baltic of St. Petersburg, Russia, owns and operates a small fleet of vessels and has a history of shipping nuclear materials. ASPOL-Baltic’s vessels were licensed for shipping nuclear materials; however, they were not licensed to transport SNF materials. After a thorough review of ASPOL Baltic’s capabilities and detailed negotiations, it was agreed that a contract would be let with ASPOL-Baltic to license and refit their MCL Trader vessel for hauling SNF in support of the RRRFR Program. This effort was funded through a contract between the RRRFR Program, Idaho National Laboratory, and Radioactive Waste Management Plant of Swierk, Poland. This paper discusses planning, Russian and international maritime regulations and requirements, Russian authorities’ reviews and approvals, licensing, design, and modifications made to the vessel in preparation for SNF shipments. A brief summary of actual shipments using this vessel, experiences, and lessons learned also are described.

Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Wlodzimierz Tomczak; Sergey Naletov; Oleg Pichugin

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Standard practice for evaluation of surveillance capsules from light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard practice for evaluation of surveillance capsules from light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for a HLMC reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small (300 MWt) reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100%+ natural circulation heat removal from the low power density/low pressure drop ultra-long lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the Reactor Exterior Cooling System (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

Sienicki, J. J.; Spencer, B. W.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

Investigation of vessel exterior air cooling for an HLMC reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The secure transportable autonomous reactor (STAR) concept under development at Argonne National Laboratory provides a small [300-MW(thermal)] reactor module for steam supply that incorporates design features to attain proliferation resistance, heightened passive safety, and improved cost competitiveness through extreme simplification. Examples are the achievement of 100% + natural-circulation heat removal from the low-power-density/low-pressure-drop ultralong lifetime core and utilization of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant enabling elimination of main coolant pumps as well as the need for an intermediate heat transport circuit. It is required to provide a passive means of removing decay heat and effecting reactor cooldown in the event that the normal steam generator heat sink, including its normal shutdown heat removal mode, is postulated to be unavailable. In the present approach, denoted as the reactor exterior cooling system (RECS), passive decay heat removal is provided by cooling the outside of the containment/guard vessel with air. RECS is similar to the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) incorporated into the PRISM design. However, to enhance the heat removal, RECS incorporates fins on the containment vessel exterior to enhance heat transfer to air as well as removable steel venetian conductors that provide a conduction heat transfer path across the reactor vessel-containment vessel gap to enhance heat transfer between the vessels. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of air cooling in removing heat from the vessel and limiting the coolant temperature increase following a sudden complete loss of the steam generator heat sink.

Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Margin for In-Vessel Retention in the APR1400 - VESTA and SCDAP/RELAP5-3D Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If cooling is inadequate during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the lower head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with such plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR) (AP600), which relied upon external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR), resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing light water reactors (LWRs). IVR of core melt is therefore a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed ERVC without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a three-year, United States (U.S.) -Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was initiated in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) explored options, such as enhanced ERVC performance and an enhanced in-vessel core catcher (IVCC), that have the potential to ensure that IVR is feasible for higher power reactors.

Joy Rempe; D. Knudson

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

McCabe, D.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Retrospective dosimetry analyses of reactor vessel cladding samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor pressure vessel cladding samples for Ringhals Units 3 and 4 in Sweden were analyzed using retrospective reactor dosimetry techniques. The objective was to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluence for comparison with neutron transport calculations. A total of 51 stainless steel samples consisting of chips weighing approximately 100 to 200 mg were removed from selected locations around the pressure vessel and were sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for analysis. The samples were fully characterized and analyzed for radioactive isotopes, with special interest in the presence of Nb-93m. The RPV cladding retrospective dosimetry results will be combined with a re-evaluation of the surveillance capsule dosimetry and with ex-vessel neutron dosimetry results to form a comprehensive 3D comparison of measurements to calculations performed with 3D deterministic transport code. (authors)

Greenwood, L. R.; Soderquist, C. Z. [Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Fero, A. H. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Twp., PA 16066 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sterilization of fermentation vessels by ethanol/water mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for sterilizing process fermentation vessels with a concentrated alcohol and water mixture integrated in a fuel alcohol or other alcohol production facility. Hot, concentrated alcohol is drawn from a distillation or other purification stage and sprayed into the empty fermentation vessels. This sterilizing alcohol/water mixture should be of a sufficient concentration, preferably higher than 12% alcohol by volume, to be toxic to undesirable microorganisms. Following sterilization, this sterilizing alcohol/water mixture can be recovered back into the same distillation or other purification stage from which it was withdrawn. The process of this invention has its best application in, but is not limited to, batch fermentation processes, wherein the fermentation vessels must be emptied, cleaned, and sterilized following completion of each batch fermentation process.

Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Sterilization of fermentation vessels by ethanol/water mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for sterilizing process fermentation vessels with a concentrated alcohol and water mixture integrated in a fuel alcohol or other alcohol production facility. Hot, concentrated alcohol is drawn from a distillation or other purification stage and sprayed into the empty fermentation vessels. This sterilizing alcohol/water mixture should be of a sufficient concentration, preferably higher than 12% alcohol by volume, to be toxic to undesirable microorganisms. Following sterilization, this sterilizing alcohol/water mixture can be recovered back into the same distillation or other purification stage from which it was withdrawn. The process of this invention has its best application in, but is not limited to, batch fermentation processes, wherein the fermentation vessels must be emptied, cleaned, and sterilized following completion of each batch fermentation process. 2 figs.

Wyman, C.E.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Report of the terawatt laser pressure vessel committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1995 the ATF project sent out an RFP for a CO2 Laser System having a TeraWatt output. Eight foreign and US firms responded. The Proposal Evaluation Panel on the second round selected Optoel, a Russian firm based in St. Petersburg, on the basis of the technical criteria and cost. Prior to the award, BNL representatives including the principal scientist, cognizant engineer and a QA representative visited the Optoel facilities to assess the company's capability to do the job. The contract required Optoel to provide a x-ray preionized high pressure amplifier that included: a high pressure cell, x-ray tube, internal optics and a HV pulse forming network for the main discharge and preionizer. The high-pressure cell consists of a stainless steel pressure vessel with various ports and windows that is filled with a gas mixture operating at 10 atmospheres. In accordance with BNL Standard ESH 1.4.1 ''Pressurized Systems For Experimental Use'', the pressure vessel design criteria is required to comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code In 1996 a Preliminary Design Review was held at BNL. The vendor was requested to furnish drawings so that we could confirm that the design met the above criteria. The vendor furnished drawings did not have all dimensions necessary to completely analyze the cell. Never the less, we performed an analysis on as much of the vessel as we could with the available information. The calculations concluded that there were twelve areas of concern that had to be addressed to assure that the pressure vessel complied with the requirements of the ASME code. This information was forwarded to the vendor with the understanding that they would resolve these concerns as they continued with the vessel design and fabrication. The assembled amplifier pressure vessel was later hydro tested to 220 psi (15 Atm) as well as pneumatically to 181 psi (12.5 Atm) at the fabricator's Russian facility and was witnessed by a BNL engineer. The unit was shipped to the US and installed at the ATF. As part of the commissioning of the device the amplifier pressure vessel was disassembled several times at which time it became apparent that the vendor had not addressed 7 of the 12 issues previously identified. Closer examination of the vessel revealed some additional concerns including quality of workmanship. Although not required by the contract, the vendor furnished radiographs of a number of pressure vessel welds. A review of the Russian X-rays revealed radiographs of both poor and unreadable quality. However, a number of internal weld imperfections could be observed. All welds in question were excavated and then visually and dye penetrant inspected. These additional inspections confirmed that the weld techniques used to make some of these original welds were substandard. The applicable BNL standard, ESH 1.4.1, addresses the problem of pressure vessel non-compliance by having a committee appointed by the Department Chairman review the design and provide engineering solutions to assure equivalent safety. On January 24, 2000 Dr. M. Hart, the NSLS Chairman, appointed this committee with this charge. This report details the engineering investigations, deliberations, solutions and calculations which were developed by members of this committee to determine that with repairs, new components, appropriate NDE, and lowering the design pressure, the vessel can be considered safe to use.

Woodle, M.H.; Beauman, R.; Czajkowski, C.; Dickinson, T.; Lynch, D.; Pogorelsky, I.; Skjaritka, J.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

326

MELCOR ex-vessel LOCA simulations for ITER{sup +}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ex-vessel Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) simulations for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were performed using the MELCOR code. The main goals of this work were to estimate the ultimate pressurization of the heat transport system (HTS) vault in order to gauge the potential for stack releases and to estimate the total amount of hydrogen generated during a design basis ex-vessel LOCA. Simulation results indicated that the amount of hydrogen produced in each transient was below the flammability limit for the plasma chamber. In addition, only moderate pressurization of the HTS vault indicated a very small potential for releases through the stack.

Gaeta, M.J.; Merrill, B.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bartels, H.W. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Lightweight cryogenic-compatible pressure vessels for vehicular fuel storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, cryogenic-compatible pressure vessel for flexibly storing cryogenic liquid fuels or compressed gas fuels at cryogenic or ambient temperatures. The pressure vessel has an inner pressure container enclosing a fuel storage volume, an outer container surrounding the inner pressure container to form an evacuated space therebetween, and a thermal insulator surrounding the inner pressure container in the evacuated space to inhibit heat transfer. Additionally, vacuum loss from fuel permeation is substantially inhibited in the evacuated space by, for example, lining the container liner with a layer of fuel-impermeable material, capturing the permeated fuel in the evacuated space, or purging the permeated fuel from the evacuated space.

Aceves, Salvador; Berry, Gene; Weisberg, Andrew H.

2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulation of Diffusive Lithium Evaporation Onto the NSTX Vessel Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for simulating the diffusive evaporation of lithium into a helium filled NSTX vacuum vessel is described and validated against an initial set of deposition experiments. The DEGAS 2 based model consists of a three-dimensional representation of the vacuum vessel, the elastic scattering process, and a kinetic description of the evaporated atoms. Additional assumptions are required to account for deuterium out-gassing during the validation experiments. The model agrees with the data over a range of pressures to within the estimated uncertainties. Suggestions are made for more discriminating experiments that will lead to an improved model.

Stotler, D. P.; Skinner, C. H.; Blanchard, W. R.; Krstic, P. S.; Kugel, H. W.; Schneider, H.; Zakharov, L. E.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ex-vessel demand by size for the Gulf shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR THE GULF SHRIMP A Thesis by MARGARET RAM-TOO CHUI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major... Subject: Agricultural Economics EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR SHRIMP IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by MARGARET KAM-TOO CHUI Approved as to style and content by: ai an of Committee) (Hea f ep tment) (Member) (Member) August 1980 ABSTRACT Ex...

Chui, Margaret Kam-Too

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Flux Emergence in the Solar Active Region NOAA 11158: The Evolution of Net Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed investigation on the evolution of observed net vertical current using a time series of vector magnetograms of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 obtained from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We also discuss the relation of net current to the observed eruptive events. The AR evolved from $\\beta\\gamma$ to $\\beta\\gamma\\delta$ configuration over a period of 6 days. The AR had two sub-regions of activity with opposite chirality: one dominated by sunspot rotation producing a strong CME, the other showing large shear motions producing a strong flare. The net current in each polarity over the CME producing sub-region increased to a maximum and then decreased when the sunspots got separated. The time profile of net current in this sub-region followed the time profile of the rotation rate of the S-polarity sunspot of the same sub-region. The net current in the flaring sub-region showed a sudden increase at the time of the strong flare and remained unchanged till the end of the observation, while the ...

Vemareddy, P; Karthikreddy, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

Holmes, Michael Jerome (Thompson, ND); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh (Allentown, PA)

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world-wide. The main benefits of diesel-electric propulsion and thrusters are reduced power consumptionThrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels Aleksander to assist the power management system on dynamically positioned ships is proposed in this paper. Its main

Johansen, Tor Arne

334

Modelling the Induced Magnetic Signature of Naval Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vessels stealth is an important design feature. With recent advances in electromagnetic sensor technology with the magnetic signature resulting from the magnetisation of the ferromagnetic material of the ship, under is constructed from non-magnetic materials, but arises from the combined e#11;ect of the individual items

Low, Robert

335

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed: preliminary full scale experiments By: Kim Klaka of experiment were conducted ­ free roll decay tests and irregular wave tests. An inclining test was also with and without the mainsail hoisted, in very light winds. The irregular wave tests were conducted again in very

337

Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available.

Neef, W.S.

1990-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 the VeSSeL WILL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel. The hybrid system will provide energy for low-speed maneuvering and stationPublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 THE 1st the VeSSeL WILL Be the WORLD'S FIRSt PLUG-IN hYBRID's first plug-in hybrid "green ship" powered by electricity, hydrogen fuel cells and low- emission diesel

Pedersen, Tom

339

Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303.

Villalobos, C.N.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Cramer Fisheries Service Contract Number: 500-02-004 Prepared

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility...

342

Pulmonary Hypertension and Computed Tomography Measurement of Small Pulmonary Vessels in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pulmonary Hypertension and Computed Tomography Measurement of Small Pulmonary Vessels in Severe alteration of small pulmonary vessels is one of the characteristic features of pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstruc- tive pulmonary disease. The in vivo relationship between pulmonary hypertension

343

Effects of ionizing radiation on normal and tumor-associated lymphatic vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lymphatic vessels play a crucial role in both the pathophysiology of tumors and in the spread cancer cells to lymph nodes. The effects of radiation on these vessels, however, are largely unknown. Here, we seek to describe ...

Lobo, Jennifer D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch vessel transposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the effect of applying local vacuum pressure on the temperatures of the epidermis and small vessels during... of skin and blood vessels with different diameters (10-60 mm) at...

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vessel control Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the vessel boundary, we can ob- tain an automatic computation method... by the fixed-scale GVF snake. In turn, the success of automated vessel ... Source: Acton, Scott -...

346

Radiation damage characterization in reactor pressure vessel steels with nonlinear ultrasound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear generation currently accounts for roughly 20% of the US baseload power generation. Yet, many US nuclear plants are entering their first period of life extension and older plants are currently undergoing assessment of technical basis to operate beyond 60 years. This means that critical components, such as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), will be exposed to higher levels of radiation than they were originally intended to withstand. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels causes microstructural changes such as vacancy clusters, precipitates, dislocations, and interstitial loops that leave the material in an embrittled state. The development of a nondestructive evaluation technique to characterize the effect of radiation exposure on the properties of the RPV would allow estimation of the remaining integrity of the RPV with time. Recent research has shown that nonlinear ultrasound is sensitive to radiation damage. The physical effect monitored by nonlinear ultrasonic techniques is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave, arising from the interaction of the ultrasonic wave with microstructural features such as dislocations, precipitates, and their combinations. Current findings relating the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing levels of neutron fluence for different representative RPV materials are presented.

Matlack, K. H. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Kim, J.-Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Wall, J. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 and Nuclear Sector, The Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Qu, J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jacobs, L. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME-vessel steels. We irradiated samples ofASTM A508 nuclear reactor pressure-vessel steel to fast neutron 17 2 (PALS) to study the effects of neutron damage in the steels on positron lifetimes. Non

Motta, Arthur T.

348

RIS-M-2186 INTERPRETATIOM OF STRAIN HBASUREMEMTS ON NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RISÃ?-M- 2186 INTERPRETATIOM OF STRAIN HBASUREMEMTS ON NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS Svend Ib Andersen Preben Engbzk Abstract. Selected results from strain measurements on 4 nuclear pressure vessels, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, GRAPHS, MECHANICAL TESTS, PERFORMANCE TESTING, PRESSURE VESSELS, tMR TYPE REACTORS, STEELS

349

Superheat effects on localized vessel breach enlargement during corium ejection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaluation of the consequences of hypothetical severe accident sequences in light water reactors includes those sequences in which molten corium is postulated to melt through the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head and enter the region beneath the RPV. An important issue is the mode by which the lower head is breached and molten corium introduced into the reactor cavity (PWR) or pedestal (BWR). Reported here are the results of an investigation into the dependency of ablation-induced enlargement on the initial corium temperature, or more specifically, the initial corium superheat (i.e., excess temperature above the freezing temperature). A model is introduced here to predict the vessel erosion and is employed to scope the effects of variations in the superheat.

Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

PRESSURIZATION OF CONTAINMENT VESSELS FROM PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation and storage of plutonium oxide is typically done using a convenience container to hold the oxide powder which is then placed inside a containment vessel. Intermediate containers which act as uncredited confinement barriers may also be used. The containment vessel is subject to an internal pressure due to several sources including; (1) plutonium oxide provides a heat source which raises the temperature of the gas space, (2) helium generation due to alpha decay of the plutonium, (3) hydrogen generation due to radiolysis of the water which has been adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide, and (4) degradation of plastic bags which may be used to bag out the convenience can from a glove box. The contributions of these sources are evaluated in a reasonably conservative manner.

Hensel, S.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL ISSUES FOR THE LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Plan is a collaborative program between the U.S. Department of Energy and the private sector directed at extending the life of the present generation of nuclear power plants to enable operation to at least 80 years. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the primary components requiring significant research to enable such long-term operation. There are significant issues that need to be addressed to reduce the uncertainties in regulatory application, such as, 1) high neutron fluence/long irradiation times, and flux effects, 2) material variability, 3) high-nickel materials, 4)specimen size effects and the fracture toughness master curve, etc. The first issue is the highest priority to obtain the data and mechanistic understanding to enable accurate, reliable embrittlement predictions at high fluences. This paper discusses the major issues associated with long-time operation of existing RPVs and the LWRSP plans to address those issues.

Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Odette, George Robert [UCSB

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Measurements for the JASPER program In-Vessel Fuel Storage experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-Vessel-Fuel-Storage (IVFS) experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) during the first nine months of 1991 as part of the continuing series of eight experiments planned for the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER) that was started in 1986. This is the fourth in a series of eight experiments that were planned, all of which are intended to provide support in the development of current reactor shield designs proposed for liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems both in Japan and the United States. The program is a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) and the Japanese Power Reactor and Nuclear Development Corporation (PNC). This document provides a description of the instrumentation and experimental configuration, test data, and data analysis.

Muckenthaler, F.J.; Spencer, R.R.; Hunter, H.T.; Hull, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shono, A. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)] [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

NOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON The ship is named after the Alaskan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

designed to conduct both fisheries and oceanographic research. Fishing operations and capabilities match those of the commercial trawler fleet. The ship is capable of conducting trawling operations to depths-of-the art research ship capable of conducting a wide variety of fisheries and oceanographic research

358

Russ S. Schumacher, John M. Haynes, Robert B. Seigel Daniel T. Lindsey Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB, Fort Collins, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of understanding the transport of chemical species by deep convective storms" · The project focused on three, Fort Collins, CO NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB, Fort Collins, CO " ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! " INTRODUCTION! · In May-June 2012, the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment was conducted, with the goals

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

359

The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact linwood.pendleton@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact linwood.pendleton@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version Measures of the Ocean and Coastal Economy: 1.GDP (Gross Domestic Product. The Ocean Economy 1 The ocean economy is comprised of six economic sectors that depend on the oceans

360

The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version Measures of the Ocean and Coastal Economy: 1.GDP (Gross Domestic Product. The Coastal Economy 1 The Coastal economy is comprised of all economic activity that takes place

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NOAA Competitive Level -Codes List of changes All This document converted without change to MSWord from WordPerfect, 8/5/04.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, per John Hanson. 6/10/02 5201 Diving Equipment Worker added per Brooke Larson, WASC. 11/19/01 #12;NOAA, qualification requirements, pay schedules, and working conditions so that an agency may reassign the incumbent are familiar with qualification requirements and recruiting practices. Care and thought is needed in assigning

362

Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: • Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions. • Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process. • Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens. • Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds. • Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life . • Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates. • Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses. • Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage. • Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength. • Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads. • Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fast neutron fluxes in pressure vessels using Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of calculating the fast neutron flux in the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor by Monte Carlo methods. Neutron reactions reduce the ductility of the steel and thus limit the useful life of this important reactor component. This work was performed for Virginia Power (VEPCO). VIM is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code which provides a versatile geometrical capability and a neutron physics data base closely representing the EDNF/B-IV data from which it was derived.

Edlund, M.C.; Thomas, J.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gamma ray-induced embrittlement of pressure vessel alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays emitted from the core of a nuclear reactor produce displacement damage in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The contribution of gamma damage to RPV embrittlement has in the past been largely ignored. However, in certain reactor designs the gamma flux at the RPV is sufficiently large that its contribution to displacement damage can be substantial. For example, gamma rays have been implicated in the accelerated RPV embrittlement observed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In the present study, mechanical property changes induced by 10-MeV electron irradiation of a model Fe alloy and an RPV alloy of interest to the HFIR were examined. Mini-tensile specimens were irradiated with high-energy electrons to reproduce damage characteristic of the Compton recoil-electrons induced by gamma bombardment. Substantial increases in yield and ultimate stress were observed in the alloys after irradiation to doses up to 5.3x10{sup {minus}3} dpa at temperatures ({approximately}50{degrees}C) characteristic of the HFIR pressure vessel. These measured increases were similar to those previously obtained following neutron irradiation, despite the highly disparate nature of the damage generated during electron and neutron irradiation.

Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Farrell, K.; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Re-evaluation of total and Umkehr ozone data from NOAA-CMDL Dobson spectrophotometer observatories. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to improve the quality of total ozone and Umkehr data obtained in the past at the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory and the Dobson spectrophotometer ozone observatories. The authors present results of total ozone data re-evaluations for ten stations: Byrd, Antarctica; Fairbanks, Alaska; Hallett, Antarctica; Huancayo, Peru; Haute Provence, France; Lauder, New Zealand; Perth, Australia; Poker Flat, Alaska; Puerto Montt, Chile; and South Pole, Antarctica. The improved data will be submitted in early 1996 to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Ozone Data Center (WODC), and the Atmospheric Environment Service for archiving. Considerable work has been accomplished, also, in reevaluating Umkehr data from seven of the stations, viz., Huancayo, Haute Provence, Lauder, Perth, Poker Flat, Boulder, Colorado; and Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

Komhyr, W.D.; Quincy, D.M.; Grass, R.D.; Koenig, G.L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)] [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Advanced Models of LWR Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for Low Flux-HighFluence Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is an unresolved issue for light water reactor life extension, especially since transition temperature shifts (TTS) must be predicted for high 80-year fluence levels up to approximately 1,020 n/cm{sup 2}, far beyond the current surveillance database. Unfortunately, TTS may accelerate at high fluence, and may be further amplified by the formation of late blooming phases that result in severe embrittlement even in low-copper (Cu) steels. Embrittlement by this mechanism is a potentially significant degradation phenomenon that is not predicted by current regulatory models. This project will focus on accurately predicting transition temperature shifts at high fluence using advanced physically based, empirically validated and calibrated models. A major challenge is to develop models that can adjust test reactor data to account for flux effects. Since transition temperature shifts depend on synergistic combinations of many variables, flux-effects cannot be treated in isolation. The best current models systematically and significantly under-predict transition temperature at high fluence, although predominantly for irradiations at much higher flux than actual RPV service. This project will integrate surveillance, test reactor and mechanism data with advanced models to address a number of outstanding RPV embrittlement issues. The effort will include developing new databases and preliminary models of flux effects for irradiation conditions ranging from very low (e.g., boiling water reactor) to high (e.g., accelerated test reactor). The team will also develop a database and physical models to help predict the conditions for the formation of Mn-Ni-Si late blooming phases and to guide future efforts to fully resolve this issue. Researchers will carry out other tasks on a best-effort basis, including prediction of transition temperature shift attenuation through the vessel wall, remediation of embrittlement by annealing, and fracture toughness master curve issues.

Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - axicell vacuum vessel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Theory Department Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 34 LET: a cold neutron chopper spectrometer on ISIS TS2 Summary: Jaws Vacuum Vessel...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal blood vessels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Summary: ) the blood vessels, which also helps to lower blood pressure. Commonly used brand names in the United States... to treat high blood pressure, heart disease and...

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing blood vessel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vascular tortuosity Lambda William E. Hart Summary: as the retinal blood vessel net- work. To assess the relative utility of these mea- sures, they were used... . Nelson Data...

374

Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas andHydrogen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Gas and Blends - Materials Testing and Design Requirements for Hydrogen Components and Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Hydrogen...

376

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2007 Volume11,Number2 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

miles, to ensure total coverage of the global ocean and to calibrate the satellites. AOML contributes, FloridaMiami, Florida Global Drifter 1250 Retrieved After Crossing North Atlantic Global drifter 1250 and the Global Telecommunications System. In fact, its sensors were still operational when retrieved

377

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMay-June 2006 Volume10,Number3 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which have led to more accurate forecasts. Advances in technology and computer modeling capabilities of tropical cyclones but also contribute to forecast improvements. The Project has continued was an Aerosonde aircraft that successfully completed the first unmanned flight into a tropical cyclone during

378

ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cell’s secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatigue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation Pathway is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting long-term environmental degradation behavior of materials in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on systems, structures, and components is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e., service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enabled by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of systems, structures, and components degradation.

Clayton, Dwight A.; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Smith, Cyrus M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Brenchley, David L.; Meyer, Ryan M.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Gas Helium Storage Tank Pressure Vessel Engineering Note  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is to certify that Beaird Industries, Inc. has done a white metal blast per SSPC-SP5 as required per specifications on the vessel internal. Following the blast, a black light inspection was performed by Beaird Quality Control personnel to assure that all debris, grease, etc. was removed and interior was clean prior to closing vessel for helium test.

Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

1996-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Conceptual Design of a Reactor Pressure Vessel and its Internals for a HPLWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design for the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and its internals for a HPLWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor) is presented. The RPV has been dimensioned using the pressure vessel code for nuclear power plants in Germany. In order to use conventional vessel materials such as 20 MnMoNi 5 5 (United States: SA 508), the vessel inner wall has to be kept only in contact with coolant at inlet temperature. Therefore, the hot coolant pipe connection from the steam plenum to the outlet is separated from the RPV inner wall using a thermal sleeve. The core inside the vessel rests on a support plate which is connected to the core barrel. The steam plenum is fixed on top of the core using support brackets which are attached to the adjustable steam outlet pipes. This way, the steam plenum rests on the outlet flanges of the lower vessel, while the core barrel is suspended at the closure head flange of the vessel to control thermal expansions between the internals and the RPV and to minimize thermal stresses. Both, inlet and outlet mass flows are separated via C-ring seals to prevent mixing. The control rod guides in the upper plenum are also suspended at the vessel flange and aligned inside the core barrel using centering pins. (authors)

Fischer, Kai [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg, Rheinschanzinsel D-76661 Philippsburg (Germany); Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A critical contraction frequency in lymphatic vessels: transition to a state of partial summation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with increasing diameter, and total contraction time (vessel twitch length, 11.08 ± 1.54 s) slightly increases with increasing diameter. At the intersection of these relationships, there is a critical period, below which the vessel does not have time to fully...

Meisner, Joshua Keith

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

384

RESIDUAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR MULTI-PASS WELDS IN PRESSURE VESSEL AND PIPING COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR MULTI-PASS WELDS IN PRESSURE VESSEL AND PIPING COMPONENTS distributions in common pressure vessel and piping components is generated by using the multi-pass finite-walled pipes with various radius to thickness ratios. Both single- and double-V weld joints are investigated

Michaleris, Panagiotis

385

Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pipeline and Pressure Vessel R&D under the Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania Kevin L. Klug, Ph.D. 25 September 2007 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Meeting, Aiken, SC & Sensors Hydrogen Delivery Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) Pipeline for Off-Board Hydrogen

386

Effect of the Young modulus variability on the mechanical behaviour of a nuclear containment vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of the Young modulus variability on the mechanical behaviour of a nuclear containment vessel on the mechanical behaviour of a nuclear containment vessel in case of a loss of cooling agent accident and under values are observed. Preprint submitted to Nuclear Engineering and Design April 19, 2010 hal-00542640

387

Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts as In Vitro Blood Vessel Mimics for the Evaluation of Endothelialization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional in vitro blood vessel mimic (BVM) would be ideal for device testing before animal or clinicalTissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts as In Vitro Blood Vessel Mimics for the Evaluation nuclear staining and optical coherence tomography (OCT). En face and cross-sectional evaluation

Barton, Jennifer K.

388

Modelling the Electron Beam Welding of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling the Electron Beam Welding of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Christopher J. Duffy fabrication of thick-section steel for critical components such as reactor pressure vessels. Electron beam weld tests performed by Rolls-Royce and The Welding Institute of SA 508 Grade 3 and SA 508 Grade 4N

Cambridge, University of

389

1 Copyright 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to safety structures (ITS) such as pressure vessels and piping (PVP) in a nuclear reactor. Technologies been tested before. However the irradiation effects, pertinent to nuclear facilities for PWAS, have1 Copyright © 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division

Giurgiutiu, Victor

390

Sustainable What Federal permits are required for charter/party vessels?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fish is lying on its size (see Figure 1 on page 2). For black sea bass, the total length measurement flounder, scup, and black sea bass are among the most popular recreationally caught fish along the Atlantic types of summer flounder, scup, and black sea bass vessel permits-- one for vessels for hire (charter

391

Nitrous Oxide Fluxes from the Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone" Primary Investigator: Craig Stow -NOAA GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forecasts require accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. Currently, there are few measurements Management Research Laboratory Overview Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming oxide is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential ~300 times that of carbon dioxide

392

Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

393

Rogue Waves and Explorations of Coastal Wave Characteristics Primary Investigator: Paul C. Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practice of wave measurement, instituted perhaps over four decades ago, is based on the universal waves renders even the best formulated theories remain unverified. Research Plans We have acquired six years of wind and wave measurement from South Indian Ocean from an offshore oil drilling platform near

394

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-45 THE CYCLING OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or advertising purposes of information from this publication concerning proprietary products or the tests Research Program to Marine Pollution Problems 2.6 Current State of Knowledge and Summary of Work Metal Contaminants 81 8.4 Directions 86 ROLE OF BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES IN THE FATE OF POLLUTANTS

395

NOAA/NMFS Developments Magnetite Is Magnetic Material in Tuna Skulls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addressed-are brine disposal, sand and gravel mining, deep seabed mining, and ocean- thermal energy Seeks Ocean Dumping Studies As waste increases and places to put it decrease, research into possible effects of more ocean dumping becomes urgent. So recommends the Commerce Depart- ment's National Oceanic

396

Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are allowed by Code Case N-499-2 (now incorporated as an appendix to Section III Division 5 of the Code). This Code Case was developed with a rather sparse data set and focused primarily on rolled plate material (A533 specification). Confirmatory tests of creep behavior of both A508 and A533 are described here that are designed to extend the database in order to build higher confidence in ensuring the structural integrity of the VHTR RPV during off-normal conditions. A number of creep-rupture tests were carried out at temperatures above the 371°C (700°F) Code limit; longer term tests designed to evaluate minimum creep behavior are ongoing. A limited amount of rupture testing was also carried out on welded material. All of the rupture data from the current experiments is compared to historical values from the testing carried out to develop Code Case N-499-2. It is shown that the A508/533 basemetal tested here fits well with the rupture behavior reported from the historical testing. The presence of weldments significantly reduces the time to rupture. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize and record the experimental results in a single document.

Richard Wright

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The readers point vessel: hull analysis of an eighteenth century merchant sloop excavated in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Bay, Jamaica in 1994. Excavators removed overburden and the ballast pile, recovering over 600 artifacts associated with the vessel-After exposing well-preserved hull remains, divers recorded the ship's structure. The vessel is preserved from the base...

Cook, Gregory D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part I: The JET In-vessel Cryopump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part I: The JET In-vessel Cryopump

400

Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Method for forming a bladder for fluid storage vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Myers, Blake (Livermore, CA); Magnotta, Frank (Lafayette, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Three-dimensional Magnetic Restructuring in Two Homologous Solar Flares in the Seismically Active NOAA AR 11283  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We carry out a comprehensive investigation comparing the three-dimensional magnetic field restructuring, flare energy release, and the helioseismic response, of two homologous flares, the 2011 September 6 X2.1 (FL1) and September 7 X1.8 (FL2) flares in NOAA AR 11283. In our analysis, (1) a twisted flux rope (FR) collapses onto the surface at a speed of 1.5 km/s after a partial eruption in FL1. The FR then gradually grows to reach a higher altitude and collapses again at 3 km/s after a fuller eruption in FL2. Also, FL2 shows a larger decrease of the flux-weighted centroid separation of opposite magnetic polarities and a greater change of the horizontal field on the surface. These imply a more violent coronal implosion with corresponding more intense surface signatures in FL2. (2) The FR is inclined northward, and together with the ambient fields, it undergoes a southward turning after both events. This agrees with the asymmetric decay of the penumbra observed in the peripheral regions. (3) The amounts of free ...

Liu, Chang; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Jiang, Chaowei; Dennis, Brian R; Su, Yang; Donea, Alina; Wang, Haimin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

Schreiber, Roger B. (Penn Twp., PA); Fero, Arnold H. (New Kensington, PA); Sejvar, James (Murrysville, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor. 8 figs.

Schreiber, R.B.; Fero, A.H.; Sejvar, J.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Potential market for LNG-fueled marine vessels in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growing global concern over ship emissions in recent years has driven policy change at the international level toward more stringent vessel emissions standards. The policy change has also been an impetus for innovation ...

Brett, Bridget C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Unlimited Release Printed February 2013 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility Joseph W. Pratt and Aaron P. Harris Prepared by...

408

Blood vessel detection in retinal images and its application in diabetic retinopathy screening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transform (RCT) algorithm, which converts the intensity information in spatial domain to a high dimensional radial contrast domain. Different feature descriptors are designed to improve the speed, sensitivity, and expandability of the vessel detection system...

Zhang, Ming

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

ITER vacuum vessel design (D201 subtask 1.3 and subtask 3). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ITER Task No. D201, Vacuum Vessel Design (Subtask 1.3 and Subtask 3), was initiated to propose and evaluate local vacuum vessel reinforcement alternatives in proximity to the Neutral Beam, Radial Mid-Plane, Top, and Divertor Ports. These areas were reported to be highly stressed regions based on the results of preliminary stress analyses performed by the USHT (US Home Team) and the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) at the Garching JWS (Joint Work Site). Initial design activities focused on the divertor port region which was reported to experience the highest stress intensities. Existing stress analysis models and results were reviewed with the USHT stress analysts to obtain an overall understanding of the vessel response to the various applied loads. These reviews indicated that the reported stress intensities in the divertor port region were significantly affected by the loads applied to the vessel in adjacent regions.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

hydrogen accelerates crack propagation rate of the material and leads to brittle fracture. International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010Beijing, P.R. China R&D...

411

Metallic Pressure Vessels Failures M. Mosnier, B. Daudonnet, J. Renard and G. Mavrothalassitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to store or to transport gas or pressurized liquid (such as LPG or LNG), to dry, or as steam boiler... etc of thé vessel is usually achieved with thé help of handbooks, that sometimes overestimate effects

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, and Wave Modeling in Stented Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arterial hypertension (PAH), to identify the hemodynamic attributes which could be altered to ameliorate the progression of these diseases. We then simulated blood flow through five, simple finite element vessel models to determine the effects of stents...

Peters, Andrew

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

INAA and distribution patterns of Classic Mimbres Black-on-white vessels during the Classic period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution patterns of Classic Mimbres Black-on-white (Style III) bowls and jars were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to identify vessel movement between geographically defined regions and between villages within...

Dahlin, Eleanor Sherlock

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hydrogen degradation and microstructural effects of the near-threshold fatigue resistance of pressure vessel steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety of pressure vessels for applications such as coal conversion reactors requires understanding of the mechanism of environmentally-induced crack propagation and the mechanism by which process-induced microstructures ...

Fuquen-Molano, Rosendo

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comparison of Data Quality of NOAA's ISIS and SURFRAD Networks to NREL's SRRL-BMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides analyses of broadband solar radiometric data quality for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Integrated Surface Irradiance Study and Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) solar measurement networks. The data quality of these networks is compared to that of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Baseline Measurement System (SRRL-BMS) native data resolutions and hourly averages of the data from the years 2002 through 2013. This report describes the solar radiometric data quality testing and flagging procedures and the method used to determine and tabulate data quality statistics. Monthly data quality statistics for each network were plotted by year against the statistics for the SRRL-BMS. Some of the plots are presented in the body of the report, but most are in the appendix. These plots indicate that the overall solar radiometric data quality of the SURFRAD network is superior to that of the Integrated Surface Irradiance Study network and can be comparable to SRRL-BMS.

Anderberg, M.; Sengupta, M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Information Fusion Embrittlement Models for U.S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex nonlinear dependencies observed in typical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material embrittlement data, as well as the inherent large uncertainties and scatter in the radiation embrittlement data, make prediction of radiation embrittlement a difficult task. Conventional statistical and deterministic approaches have only resulted in rather large uncertainties, in part because they do not fully exploit domain-specific mechanisms. The domain models built by researchers in the field, on the other hand, do not fully exploit the statistical and information content of the data. As evidenced in previous studies, it is unlikely that a single method, whether statistical, nonlinear, or domain model, will outperform all others. More generally, considering the complexity of the embrittlement prediction problem, it is highly unlikely that a single best method exists and is tractable, even in theory. In this paper, we propose to combine a number of complementary methods including domain models, neural networks, and nearest neighbor regressions (NNRs). Such a combination of methods has become possible because of recent developments in measurement-based optimal fusers in the area of information fusion. The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor RPV steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation-parameters are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results-temperature indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Konduri, Savanthi [AOL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics THERMAL components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel such as support posts and an insulation vacuum barrier aluminium thermal shield. The recent commissioning and operation of two SSS prototypes in the LHC Test

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Videos of Experiments from ORNL Gas Hydrate Research  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Gas hydrate research performed by the Environmental Sciences Division utilizes the ORNL Seafloor Process Simulator, the Parr Vessel, the Sapphire Cell, a fiber optic distributed sensing system, and Raman spectroscopy. The group studies carbon sequestration in the ocean, desalination, gas hydrates in the solar system, and nucleation and dissociation kinetics. The videos available at the gas hydrates website are very short clips from experiments.

422

Embolization of Collateral Vessels Using Mechanically Detachable Coils in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F catheter was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management.

Sato, Y.; Ogino, H.; Hara, M.; Satake, M.; Oshima, H.; Banno, T. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Nagoya) (Japan); Mizuno, K. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Pediatrics (Nagoya) (Japan); Mishima, A. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Nagoya) (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Nagoya) (Japan)

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Modular Inspection System for a Complete IN-Service Examination of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel, Including Beltline Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report for a DOE Phase II Contract Describing the design and fabrication of a reactor inspection modular rover prototype for reactor vessel inspection.

David H. Bothell

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIan KalinResearch, Development,CoP)Builders'

428

Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

The chemistry of tributyl phosphate at elevated temperatures in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Process Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potentially violent chemical reactions of the tributyl phosphate solvent used by the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site were investigated. There is a small probability that a significant quantity of this solvent could be accidental transferred to heated process vessels and react there with nitric acid or plutonium nitrate also present in the solvent extraction process. The results of laboratory studies of the reactions show that exothermic oxidation of tributyl phosphate by either nitric acid or actinide nitrates is slow at temperatures expected in the heated vessels. Less than four percent of the tributyl phosphate will be oxidized in these vented vessels at temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 250{degrees}C because the oxidant will be lost from the vessels by vaporization or decomposition before the tributyl phosphate can be extensively oxidized. The net amounts of heat generated by oxidation with concentrated nitric acid and with thorium nitrate (a stand-in for plutonium nitrate) were determined to be about -150 and -220 joules per gram of tributyl phosphate initially present, respectively. This is not enough heat to cause violent reactions in the vessels. Pyrolysis of the tributyl phosphate occurred in these mixtures at temperatures of 110{degrees}C to 270{degrees}C and produced mainly 1-butene gas, water, and pyrophosphoric acid. Butene gas generation is slow at expected process vessel temperatures, but the rate is faster at higher temperatures. At 252{degrees}C the rate of butene gas generated was 0.33 g butene/min/g of tributyl phosphate present. The measured heat absorbed by the pyrolysis reaction was 228 J/g of tributyl phosphate initially present (or 14.5 kcal/mole of tributyl phosphate). Release of flammable butene gas into process areas where it could ignite appears to be the most serious safety consideration for the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

An evaluation of life extension of the HFIR pressure vessel. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses were performed in 1994 to determine the remaining useful life of the HFIR pressure vessel. The estimated total permissible life was {approximately} 50 EFPY (100 MW). More recently, the analyses have been updated, including a more precise treatment of uncertainties in the calculation of the hydrostatic-proof-test conditions and also including the contribution of gammas to the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness. These and other refinements had essentially no effect on the predicted useful life of the vessel or on the specified hydrostatic proof-test conditions.

Cheverton, R.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: DG-10.1: UNIT TEST REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 No version 1.0. 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-13.3) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon

Kuligowski, Bob

432

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) CRITICAL DESIGN REVIEW PEER REVIEW (PRG-11.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10/31/2007 3.0 Renamed PRG-8.1 and revised

Kuligowski, Bob

433

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-8.1: DETAILED DESIGN DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-11.1) adapted from CMMI practices and Raytheon practices by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen

Kuligowski, Bob

434

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: TD-9: PROJECT REQUIREMENTS TRAINING DOCUMENT VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon and Raytheon Systems Engineering practices by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11

Kuligowski, Bob

435

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version Description Revised://www.nsc.liu.se/~boein/f77to90/f77to90.html ). Adaptation by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). New Document 03/31/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). STAR standard style applied to document

Kuligowski, Bob

436

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: DG-11.3: METADATA DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 New Documentation Guideline (DG-11.4) adapted from SPSRB draft guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions

Kuligowski, Bob

437

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PROJECT REQUIREMENTS REVIEW REPORT DOCUMENT GUIDELINE.2) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. Minor revisions to References 2 10

Kuligowski, Bob

438

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PRELIMINARY DESIGN REVIEW PEER REVIEW (PRG-10.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10/26/2007 3.0 Renamed PRG-7 and revised

Kuligowski, Bob

439

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.0 AUTHORS: Phil Ardanuy (Raytheon Information Solutions) Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Ardanuy (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revisions by Ken Jensen (Raytheon (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. Minor revisions to References. Removed Section 3; re

Kuligowski, Bob

440

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) Alward Siyyid (Raytheon Information Description Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Work Instruction (WI-12.1.1) adapted from Raytheon SOI 505 by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 03/31/2006 1.1 Revision by Alward Siyyid (Raytheon

Kuligowski, Bob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-11.5: SYSTEM READINESS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 No version 1 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-11.5) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-11.5 and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

Kuligowski, Bob

442

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-12.1: EXTERNAL USERS MANUAL DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information 06/02/2006 2.0 Revision by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). Minor revisions to Section 5

Kuligowski, Bob

443

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-7.1: PRELIMINARY DESIGN DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-7.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All

Kuligowski, Bob

444

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PROJECT REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version Description Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-9.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions

Kuligowski, Bob

445

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Alward Siyyid (formerly Raytheon Information Solutions ­ version 1) Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information SUMMARY Version Description Revised Sections Date 1.0 New Work Instruction (WI) adapted from Raytheon SOI 506 by Alward Siyyid (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 05/05/2006 1.1 Revision by Ken

Kuligowski, Bob

446

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: SG-13: DEVELOPMENT LEAD GUIDELINES VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information 2 3.0 New Stakeholder Guideline adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information

Kuligowski, Bob

447

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-10.4: CODE TEST REVIEW REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon, DG-13.2) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed Code Test Review Report Guideline, DG-10.4, and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon

Kuligowski, Bob

448

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) CRITICAL DESIGN REVIEW REPORT DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. Minor revisions to References. 2 10/31/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-8

Kuligowski, Bob

449

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PRELIMINARY DESIGN REVIEW REPORT DOCUMENT GUIDELINE.2) adapted from CMMI guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10/26/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-7

Kuligowski, Bob

450

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY and Raytheon practices by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. 2 10/12/2007 3.0 Revised by Ken Jensen

Kuligowski, Bob

451

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncontrolled TITLE: DG-8.2: CRITICAL DESIGN DOCUMENTGUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Sections Date 1.0 New Document Guideline (DG-11.2) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 Revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 2. All 10

Kuligowski, Bob

452

Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) PROJECT REQUIREMENTS REVIEW PEER REVIEW (PRG-9.1) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 12/29/2006 2.0 New version by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions). Minor revisions to References section. References to 9

Kuligowski, Bob

453

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJuly-August 2009 Volume13,Number4 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hurricanes with winds above 110 mph (categories 3, 4, and 5 on the Saffir- Simpon hurricane scale). In May been shown to curb hurricane activity in the Atlantic basin by increasing vertical wind shear, which of the Lesser Antilles. Ocean Surface Wind Product Derived from Satellite Data A new ocean surface wind product

454

Walking and Climbing Service Robots for Safety Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Walking and Climbing Service Robots for Safety Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels B of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Abstract: Nuclear reactor and the usefulness of these robots for improving safety inspection of nuclear reactors in general are discussed

Chen, Sheng

455

First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010 HydroPêche: a way to improve energy efficiency of fishing devices Grégory Germain 1 , Philippe Druault 2 should provide a substantial gain on the fuel consumed of actual fishing devices while maintaining

Lewandowski, Roger

456

J. Fluid Mech. (in press) 1 Shallow-water sloshing in vessels undergoing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Fluid Mech. (in press) 1 Shallow-water sloshing in vessels undergoing prescribed rigid the predominant types of solution are the standing wave and travelling hydraulic jump. But in 3D shallow-dimensional hydraulic jumps and analytical methods are very effective for identifying parameter regimes for these basic

Bridges, Tom

457

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

An Integrated View on Plasma Power Exhaust and In-vessel Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

divertor plates able to remove 10 MW/m2 have been produced (ITER water cooled) or are under developmentAn Integrated View on Plasma Power Exhaust and In-vessel Components 20% of the energy produced generated during these transition phases. In addition, instabilities of plasma will produce off

459

Measurements of the hydrogenic recombination coefficient for the TFTR vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristic values of the recombination rate coefficient for hydrogen and deuterium in stainless steel have been measured for the inner wall of the TFTR vacuum vessel for vessel temperatures of 25 to 100 C. In situ measurements of k/sub r/ are important for predicting the hydrogen isotope retention in the wall as a function of time, temperature, and discharge exposure, particularly because existing laboratory measurements of k/sub r/ for stainless steel span a range of four orders of magnitude. The measurement technique involved the observation of the decrease in hydrogen pressure during a glow discharge in the TFTR vacuum vessel with an initial static gas fill. The resulting values of k/sub r/ at 25 C are in the range of (0.4 to 4) x 10/sup -27/cm/sup 4/-s/sup -1/ assuming a value of the hydrogenic diffusivity of 2 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 2/-s/sup -1/ at room temperature. No significant isotopic dependence was observed and the temperature dependence of k/sub r/ is consistent with the literature value (0.5 eV) of the activation energy. The implications of this range of values of k/sub r/, for the estimation of the in-vessel tritium inventory following D-T operation in TFTR are discussed.

Dylla, H.F.; Cecchi, J.L.; Knize, R.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

ITER vacuum vessel fabrication plan and cost study (D 68) for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ITER Task No. 8, Vacuum Vessel Fabrication Plan and Cost Study (D68), was initiated to assess ITER vacuum vessel fabrication, assembly, and cost. The industrial team of Raytheon Engineers & Constructors and Chicago Bridge & Iron (Raytheon/CB&I) reviewed the current vessel basis and prepared a manufacturing plan, assembly plan, and cost estimate commensurate with the present design. The guidance for the Raytheon/CB&I assessment activities was prepared by the ITER Garching Work Site. This guidance provided in the form of work descriptions, sketches, drawings, and costing guidelines for each of the presently identified vacuum vessel Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) elements was compiled in ITER Garching Joint Work Site Memo (Draft No. 9 - G 15 MD 01 94-17-05 W 1). A copy of this document is provided as Appendix 1 to this report. Additional information and clarifications required for the Raytheon/CB&I assessments were coordinated through the US Home Team (USHT) and its technical representative. Design details considered essential to the Task 8 assessments but not available from the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) were generated by Raytheon/CB&I and documented accordingly.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

1 Copyright 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Copyright © 2012 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 2012 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division - DOUBLE PIPE - ORIFICE SYSTEM Arris S. TIJSSELING Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Eindhoven Acoustic resonance in a two-pipe system is simulated with four different models for the periodic excitation

Tijsseling, A.S.

462

V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Designing A Pattern Stabilization Method Using Scleral Blood Vessels For Laser Eye Surgery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing A Pattern Stabilization Method Using Scleral Blood Vessels For Laser Eye Surgery Aydin,abc}@cs.hacettepe.edu.tr, hbcakmak@gmail.com Abstract-- In laser eye surgery, the accuracy of operation depends on coherent eye tracking and registration techniques. Main approach used in image processing based eye trackers

Erdem, Erkut

464

Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning * W of the torus, a three tier system was developed for the outage in order to reduce and control the free tritium. The first phase of the program to reduce the free tritium consisted of direct flowthrough of room air

465

Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tritium Reduction and Control in the Vacuum Vessel During TFTR Outage and Decommissioning* W, a three tier system was developed for the outage in order to reduce and control the free tritium. The first phase of the program to reduce the free tritium consisted of direct flowthrough of room air

466

CALCULATIONS OF TRITIUM FLOW BETWEEN THE BUFFER VESSEL UP TO THE FIRST VACUUM SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATIONS OF TRITIUM FLOW BETWEEN THE BUFFER VESSEL UP TO THE FIRST VACUUM SYSTEM Felix Sharipov diff., Eq.(32) µ viscosity of tritium Pa s 1 Introduction The present work is a continuation of the previous report [1], where the preliminary results were obtained for the tritium flow through the source

Sharipov, Felix

467

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

468

Scaling Theory for Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels, Sparging, and Cyclic Feed Transport Systems for Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a previously unpublished work based on a draft report prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in 2012. Work on the report stopped when WTP’s approach to testing changed. PNNL is issuing a modified version of the document a year later to preserve and disseminate the valuable technical work that was completed. This document establishes technical bases for evaluating the mixing performance of Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment process tanks based on data from less-than-full-scale testing, relative to specified mixing requirements. The technical bases include the fluid mechanics affecting mixing for specified vessel configurations, operating parameters, and simulant properties. They address scaling vessel physical performance, simulant physical performance, and “scaling down” the operating conditions at full scale to define test conditions at reduced scale and “scaling up” the test results at reduced scale to predict the performance at full scale. Essentially, this document addresses the following questions: • Why and how can the mixing behaviors in a smaller vessel represent those in a larger vessel? • What information is needed to address the first question? • How should the information be used to predict mixing performance in WTP? The design of Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being addressed in other, complementary documents.

Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Rassat, Scot D.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Josephson, Gary B.; Wells, Beric E.; Berglin, Eric J.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

469

Integrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a number of product fractions in a single batch column whereas, in continuous distillation several columnsIntegrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel E. K distillation for separating homogeneous minimum-boiling azeotropic mixtures, where the extractive agent

Skogestad, Sigurd

470

Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods: Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51-81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease-related symptoms during the last 2-6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results: The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 {+-} 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2-14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion: The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

Massmann, Alexander, E-mail: Alexander.Massmann@uks.eu; Katoh, Marcus [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Shayesteh-Kheslat, Roushanak [Saarland University Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Visceral, Vascular, and Pediatric Surgery (Germany); Buecker, Arno [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

DOE H2 Program Annual Review, 5-20-2003 Insulated Pressure Vessels for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions, increasing the infrastructure flexibility and saving energy #12;DOE H2 Program Annual Review, 5 the infrastructure flexibility and saving energy Liquid hydrogen compressed hydrogen #12;DOE H2 Program Annual ReviewDOE H2 Program Annual Review, 5-20-2003 Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

472

Proceedings of PVP2006-ICPVT-11 2006 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of PVP2006-ICPVT-11 2006 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference July 23 response leading to large deformations. Some issues in measurement technique and validation testing of scientific investigation. It is a hazard that is occasion- ally encountered in the chemical [1,2], nuclear [3

Barr, Al

473

A Novel Methodology for Robust Dynamic Positioning of Marine Vessels: Theory and Experiments*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in the offshore, oil, and gas industries many applications are only possible with the use of DP systems operated ship, the Cybership III, under different sea conditions in a towing tank equipped with a hydraulic of the Shell Oil Company. Nowadays, DP systems are used with a wide range of vessel types and in different

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

474

HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

DEVELOPMENT OF ASME SECTION X CODE RULES FOR HIGH PRESSURE COMPOSITE HYDROGEN PRESSURE VESSELS WITH NON-LOAD SHARING LINERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boiler and Pressure Vessel Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks was formed in 2004 to develop Code rules to address the various needs that had been identified for the design and construction of up to 15000 psi hydrogen storage vessel. One of these needs was the development of Code rules for high pressure composite vessels with non-load sharing liners for stationary applications. In 2009, ASME approved new Appendix 8, for Section X Code which contains the rules for these vessels. These vessels are designated as Class III vessels with design pressure ranging from 20.7 MPa (3,000 ps)i to 103.4 MPa (15,000 psi) and maximum allowable outside liner diameter of 2.54 m (100 inches). The maximum design life of these vessels is limited to 20 years. Design, fabrication, and examination requirements have been specified, included Acoustic Emission testing at time of manufacture. The Code rules include the design qualification testing of prototype vessels. Qualification includes proof, expansion, burst, cyclic fatigue, creep, flaw, permeability, torque, penetration, and environmental testing.

Rawls, G.; Newhouse, N.; Rana, M.; Shelley, B.; Gorman, M.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

476

Research Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entries in the natural numbers, into an undergraduate research project. ..... and developing the undergraduate research project described at the end of Section 2,

2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

477

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

478

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

479

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bechtel-NV IARC INL NSTEC Pantex SNLA DOE-ALB Allied Signal KCP SRS NREL DOE NETL NNSA ARM ORAU OSTI NOAA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "noaa research vessel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Safety Evaluation Report: Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage, Lincoln Composites, Lincoln, NE, May 25, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lincoln Composites operates a facility for designing, testing, and manufacturing composite pressure vessels. Lincoln Composites also has a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to develop composite tanks for high-pressure hydrogen storage. The initial stage of this project involves testing the permeation of high-pressure hydrogen through polymer liners. The company recently moved and is constructing a dedicated research/testing laboratory at their new location. In the meantime, permeation tests are being performed in a corner of a large manufacturing facility. The safety review team visited the Lincoln Composites site on May 25, 2010. The project team presented an overview of the company and project and took the safety review team on a tour of the facility. The safety review team saw the entire process of winding a carbon fiber/resin tank on a liner, installing the boss and valves, and curing and painting the tank. The review team also saw the new laboratory that is being built for the DOE project and the temporary arrangement for the hydrogen permeation tests.

Fort, III, William C.; Kallman, Richard A.; Maes, Miguel; Skolnik, Edward G.; Weiner, Steven C.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

482

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-62 A Method for Using a CalComp 9480 Digitizer Coupled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Quigley Great Lakes Enviromental Research Laboratory Ann Arbor, Michigan March 1987 UNITED STATES NATIONAL. Quigley ABSTRACT. A method for measuring amphipod body length and gut fullness, using a CalComp 9480

483

Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo`s structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated. 5 figures.

Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

484

Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo's structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments investigating cavity interactions following postulated vessel meltthrough  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of hydrodynamic phenomena in simulant experiments examining aspects of ex-vessel material interactions in a PWR reactor cavity following postulated core meltdown and localized breaching of the reactor vessel has been carried out. While previous analyses of the tests examined thresholds for the onset of sweepout of fluid from the cavity, the present analysis considers the progression of specific hydrodynamic phenomena involved in the dispersal process: crater formation due to gas jet impingement, radial wave motion and growth, entrainment and transport of liquid droplets, liquid layer formation due to droplet recombination, fluidization of liquid remaining in the cavity, removal of fluidized liquid droplets from the cavity, and the ultimate removal of the remaining liquid layer within the tunnel passageway. Phenomenological models which may be used to predict the phenomena are presented.

Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

USING A CONTAINMENT VESSEL LIFTING APPARATUS FOR REMOTE OPERATIONS OF SHIPPING PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 9977 and the 9975 shipping packages are used in various nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy. These shipping packages are often loaded in designated areas with designs using overhead cranes or A-frames with lifting winches. However, there are cases where loading operations must be performed in remote locations where these facility infrastructures do not exist. For these locations, a lifting apparatus has been designed to lift the containment vessels partially out of the package for unloading operations to take place. Additionally, the apparatus allows for loading and closure of the containment vessel and subsequent pre-shipment testing. This paper will address the design of the apparatus and the challenges associated with the design, and it will describe the use of the apparatus.

Loftin, Bradley [Savannah River National Laboratory; Koenig, Richard [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

489

Dosimetry assessments for the reactor pressure vessel and core barrel in UK PWR plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specimens for the Sizewell B reactor pressure vessel (RPV) inservice steels surveillance program are irradiated inside eight capsules located within the reactor pressure vessel and loaded prior to commissioning. The periodic removal of these capsules and testing of their contents provides material properties data at intervals during the lifetime of the plant. Neutron activation measurements and radiation transport calculations play an essential role in assessing the neutron exposure of the specimens and RPV. Following the most recent withdrawal, seven capsules have now been removed covering nine cycles of reactor operation. This paper summarizes the dosimetry results of the Sizewell B surveillance program obtained to date. In addition to an overview of the calculational methodology it includes a review of the measurements. Finally, it describes an extension of the methodology to provide dosimetry recommendations for the core barrel and briefly discusses the results that were obtained. (authors)

Thornton, D.A.; Allen, D.A.; Huggon, A.P.; Picton, D.J.; Robinson, A.T.; Steadman, R.J. [Serco, Rutherford House, Quedgeley, Gloucester, Gl2 4NF (United Kingdom); Seren, T.; Lipponen, M.; Kekki, T. [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, Otakaari 3 K, P.O. BOX 1000, Espoo, FI-02044 (Finland)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Peristaltic Pumping of Blood Through Small Vessels of Varying Cross-section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper is devoted to a study of the peristaltic motion of blood in the micro-circulatory system. The vessel is considered to be of varying cross-section. The progressive peristaltic waves are taken to be of sinusoidal nature. Blood is considered to be a Herschel-Bulkley fluid. Of particular concern here is to investigate the effects of amplitude ratio, mean pressure gradient, yield stress and the power law index on the velocity distribution, streamline pattern and wall shear stress. On the basis of the derived analytical expression, extensive numerical calculations have been made. The study reveals that velocity of blood and wall shear stress are appreciably affected due to the non-uniform geometry of blood vessels. They are also highly sensitive to the magnitude of the amplitude ratio and the value of the fluid index.

J. C. Misra; S. Maiti

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

Weld Repair of a Stamped Pressure Vessel in a Radiologically Controlled Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 2012 an ASME B&PVC Section VIII stamped pressure vessel located at the DOE Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) developed a through-wall leak. The vessel, a steam/brine heat exchanger, operated in a radiologically controlled zone (by the CH2MHill PRC or CHPRC), had been in service for approximately 17 years. The heat exchanger is part of a single train evaporator process and its failure caused the entire system to be shut down, significantly impacting facility operations. This paper describes the activities associated with failure characterization, technical decision making/planning for repair by welding, logistical challenges associated with performing work in a radiologically controlled zone, performing the repair, and administrative considerations related to ASME code requirements.

Cannell, Gary L. [Fluor Enterprises, Inc.; Huth, Ralph J. [CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company; Hallum, Randall T. [Fluor Government Group

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

492

Design Analysis and Manufacturing Studies for ITER In-Vessel Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ITER is incorporating two types of In Vessel Coils (IVCs): ELM Coils to mitigate Edge Localized Modes and VS Coils to provide Vertical Stabilization of the plasma. Strong coupling with the plasma is required so that the ELM and VS Coils can meet their performance requirements. Accordingly, the IVCs are in close proximity to the plasma, mounted just behind the Blanket Shield Modules. This location results in a radiation and temperature environment that is severe necessitating new solutions for material selection as well as challenging analysis and design solutions. Fitting the coil systems in between the blanket shield modules and the vacuum vessel leads to difficult integration with diagnostic cabling and cooling water manifolds.

Kalish, M.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Neumeyer, C.; Titus, P.; Zhai, Y.; Zatz, I.; Messineo, M.; Gomez, M.; Hause, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); Daly, E.; Martin, A. [ITER Organization, St. Paul-lez-Duranace (France); Wu, Y.; Jin, J.; Long, F.; Song, Y.; Wang, Z.; Yun, Zan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China). Institute of Plasma Physics; Hsiao, J. [Vector Resources, Annandale, VA (United States); Pillsbury, J. R. [Sherbrooke Consulting, Arlington, VA (United States); Bohm, T.; Sawan, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States). Fustion Technology Institute; Jiang, NFN [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Standard Guide for Conducting Supplemental Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels, E 706 (IH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide discusses test procedures that can be used in conjunction with, but not as alternatives to, those required by Practices E185 and E2215 for the surveillance of nuclear reactor vessels. The supplemental mechanical property tests outlined permit the acquisition of additional information on radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness, notch ductility, and yield strength properties of the reactor vessel steels. 1.2 This guide provides recommendations for the preparation of test specimens for irradiation, and identifies special precautions and requirements for reactor surveillance operations and postirradiation test planning. Guidance on data reduction and computational procedures is also given. Reference is made to other ASTM test methods for the physical conduct of specimen tests and for raw data acquisition.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A barge-mounted hydrogen-fueled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system has the potential to reduce emissions and fossil fuel use of maritime vessels in and around ports. This study determines the technical feasibility of this concept and examines specific options on the U.S. West Coast for deployment practicality and potential for commercialization.The conceptual design of the system is found to be straightforward and technically feasible in several configurations corresponding to various power levels and run times.The most technically viable and commercially attractive deployment options were found to be powering container ships at berth at the Port of Tacoma and/or Seattle, powering tugs at anchorage near the Port of Oakland, and powering refrigerated containers on-board Hawaiian inter-island transport barges. Other attractive demonstration options were found at the Port of Seattle, the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, the California Maritime Academy, and an excursion vessel on the Ohio River.

Pratt, Joseph William; Harris, Aaron P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel contained significantly less aluminum surface area that the P-reactor vessel based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations.

Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

496

Application of Negligible Creep Criteria to Candidate Materials for HTGR Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the proposed High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) under consideration for a demonstration plant have the design object of avoiding creep effects in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during normal operation. This work addresses the criteria for negligible creep in Subsection NH, Division 1 of the ASME B&PV (Boiler and Pressure Vessel) Code, Section III, other international design codes and some currently suggested criteria modifications and their impact on permissible operating temperatures for various reactor pressure vessel materials. The goal of negligible creep could have different interpretations depending upon what failure modes are considered and associated criteria for avoiding the effects of creep. It is shown that for the materials of this study, consideration of localized damage due to cycling of peak stresses results in a lower temperature for negligible creep than consideration of the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties. In assessing the effect of localized cyclic stresses it is also shown that consideration of cyclic softening is an important effect that results in a higher estimated temperature for the onset of significant creep effects than would be the case if the material were cyclically hardening. There are other considerations for the selection of vessel material besides avoiding creep effects. Of interest for this review are (1) the material s allowable stress level and impact on wall thickness (the goal being to minimize required wall thickness) and (2) ASME Code approval (inclusion as a permitted material in the relevant Section and Subsection of interest) to expedite regulatory review and approval. The application of negligible creep criteria to two of the candidate materials, SA533 and Mod 9Cr-1Mo (also referred to as Grade 91), and to a potential alternate, normalized and tempered 2 Cr-1Mo, is illustrated and the relative advantages and disadvantages of the materials are discussed.

Jetter, Robert I [Consultant; Sham, Sam [ORNL; Swindeman, Robert W [Consultant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Analysis of the ANL Test Method for 6CVS Containment Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the fall of 2010, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) contracted with vendors to design and build 6CVS containment vessels as part of their effort to ship Fuel Derived Mixed Fission Product material. The 6CVS design is based on the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) design for 9975 and 9977 six inch diameter containment vessels. The main difference between the designs is that the 6CVS credits the inner O-ring seal as the containment boundary while the SRNL design credits the outer O-ring seal. Since the leak test must be done with the inner O-ring in place, the containment vessel does not have a pathway for getting the helium into the vessel during the leak test. The leak testing contractor was not able to get acceptable leak rates with the specified O-ring, but they were able to pass the leak test with a slightly larger O-ring. ANL asked the SRNL to duplicate the leak test vendor's method to determine the cause of the high leak rates. The SRNL testing showed that the helium leak indications were caused by residual helium left within the 6CVS Closure Assembly by the leak test technique, and by helium permeation through the Viton O-ring seals. After SRNL completed their tests, the leak testing contractor was able to measure acceptable leak rates by using the slightly larger O-ring size, by purging helium from the lid threads, and by being very quick in getting the bell jar under a full vacuum. This paper describes the leak test vendor's test technique, and other techniques that could be have been used to successfully leak test the 6CVS's.

Trapp, D.; Crow, G.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

498

Pressure vessel sliding support unit and system using the sliding support unit  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided is a sliding support and a system using the sliding support unit. The sliding support unit may include a fulcrum capture configured to attach to a support flange, a fulcrum support configured to attach to the fulcrum capture, and a baseplate block configured to support the fulcrum support. The system using the sliding support unit may include a pressure vessel, a pedestal bracket, and a plurality of sliding support units.

Breach, Michael R.; Keck, David J.; Deaver, Gerald A.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Decommissioning experience: One-piece removal and transport of a LWR pressure vessel and internals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After a brief historical perspective, this document describes several key events which took place during the decommissioning of a commercial nuclear power plant. The scope of decommissioning work included: (a) the reactor building, the reactor vessel and the contents of the reactor building; (b) the fuel handling building and its contents; (c) the fuel transfer vault between the reactor building and the fuel handling building.

Closs, J.W. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

500

Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z