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Sample records for noaa earth system

  1. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, centered on Earth System Modeling and OAR's role develop and/or can use accurate and timely predictions of the Earth system that come from modeling. The 18

  2. NOAA's Integrated Observing System SSEC 50th Anniversary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /NASA/DoD mission, is the country's first operational space weather mission providing data to NOAA's Space Weather;2 Supporting NOAA's Mission NOAA is a science-based services agency engaged with the entire Earth system science enterprise. Climate Adaptation & Mitigation Weather Ready Nation Resilient Coastal Communities

  3. NOAA MISSION To understand and predict changes in Earth's environ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's environmental information products and resource management services are essential public goods used in house and manage coastal and marine resources to meet our nation's economic, social, and environ- mental needs NOAA THE ADMINISTRATOR Every day, NOAA supplies the nation with weather forecasts and nautical charts, conserves

  4. NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Emergency Alert System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) and the Emergency Alert System · The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) manages the Emergency Alert Syste (EAS) and has defined numerous weather and non-weather EAS broadcasters. · NOAA's National Weather Service generates about 90 percent of EAS activations, primarily

  5. Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH THE UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) Earth Systems Research Center is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrative scientists and students study the Earth's ecosystems, atmosphere, water, and ice using field measurements

  6. EARTH SYSTEM MONITOR 1November 2006 Vol. 15, No. 2 November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional Ecosystem 9 - 11 News Briefs INSIDE A guide to NOAA's data and information services EARTH SYSTEM National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 2 Letter from the Director 4 Ecosystem Training Essential. To attain long-term sustainability of our resourc- es, NOAA is committed to moving toward an ecosystem

  7. Modeling the earth system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  8. Earth System Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what you wereDisclaimersMail RequestsESnet'sEarth System

  9. The Earth System John Shepherd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, John

    ? Essential Earth System Processes (on land and sea, and in the air) Plate tectonics & volcanic activity, salt, water, nutrients...) Atmospheric transport (heat, water, CO2, etc) Hydrology (evaporation

  10. Earth System Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010Mesoscopy andSaving onEarth Day Earth Day An error4

  11. SciTech Connect: "earth system models"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    earth system models" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "earth system models" Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic...

  12. Earth System Science at Cornell Earth system sciences looks at the integrated whole of the planet,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Earth System Science at Cornell Earth system sciences looks at the integrated whole of the planet for earth system science range from nm to 1000's of kilometers. Advancing earth system science requires whose work contributes to an understanding of earth system science. We think that organizing ourselves

  13. Development and application of earth system models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development and application of earth system models Ronald G. Prinn *Reprinted from Proceedings, 2011) The global environment is a complex and dynamic system. Earth system modeling is needed to help: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Development and application of earth system

  14. Modeling the Earth System, volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered fall under the following headings: critical gaps in the Earth system conceptual framework; development needs for simplified models; and validating Earth system models and their subcomponents.

  15. The Inner Solar System Characteristics of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Inner Solar System #12;The Earth #12;Characteristics of Earth A terrestrial, rocky planet floats on mantle · Crust is created and destroyed #12;Characteristics of Earth Today Surface: · 70% water · 30% land Atmosphere: ·77% N2 ·21% O2 ·0.1% H2O ·+Ar, CO2, Ne #12;The Dynamic Earth Molten Core

  16. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Monthly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with GSD's Homeland Security Project. The Earth System Research Laboratory's Global Systems Division (GSD's Homeland Security Project 2. Wildfire Smoke Forecasts 3. HYSPLIT Modifications for NOAA's Homeland Security Change Science Program (CCSP) Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 3.2 10. Air Quality Forecast Model

  17. A toolkit for building earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.

    1993-03-01

    An earth system model is a computer code designed to simulate the interrelated processes that determine the earth`s weather and climate, such as atmospheric circulation, atmospheric physics, atmospheric chemistry, oceanic circulation, and biosphere. I propose a toolkit that would support a modular, or object-oriented, approach to the implementation of such models.

  18. Development and Application of Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    The global environment is a complex and dynamic system. Earth system modeling is needed to help understand changes in interacting subsystems, elucidate the influence of human activities, and explore possible future changes. ...

  19. Data Management for Earth System Science Institute for Computational Earth System Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    imaging sensors on Earth-orbiting satellites, we find they have already populated several multi- terabyte- age on a daily or weekly basis. The advent of the advanced sensors on the Earth Observing System (EOS by some complex and incomplete encoding of semantic metadata into a file name. Most Earth system science c

  20. Rule-Based System Architecting of Earth Observing Systems: Earth Science Decadal Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva, Daniel

    This paper presents a methodology to explore the architectural trade space of Earth observing satellite systems, and applies it to the Earth Science Decadal Survey. The architecting problem is formulated as a combinatorial ...

  1. A toolkit for building earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.

    1993-03-01

    An earth system model is a computer code designed to simulate the interrelated processes that determine the earth's weather and climate, such as atmospheric circulation, atmospheric physics, atmospheric chemistry, oceanic circulation, and biosphere. I propose a toolkit that would support a modular, or object-oriented, approach to the implementation of such models.

  2. White Paper Societal Dimensions of Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Societal Dimensions of Earth System Modeling July 5, 2011 #12; 2 Executive Summary · A Societal Dimensions of Earth System Modeling workshop was held

  3. Statistically downscaling from an Earth System Model of Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Statistically downscaling from an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity to reconstruct past Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) have the advantage of allowing transient

  4. Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses Climate, Earth system project draws on science powerhouses The project will focus initially on three climate-change...

  5. Neoproterozoic crustal growth: The solid Earth system during a critical episode of Earth history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    Neoproterozoic crustal growth: The solid Earth system during a critical episode of Earth history September 2007 Abstract The behavior of the solid Earth system is often overlooked when the causes of major the continental crust during Neoproterozoic time were similar to those of the modern Earth and took place mostly

  6. GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7© GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS): Biodiversity, Ecosystems and GEO BON GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4 November 2008 Douglas M. Muchoney, Ph.D. U.S. Geological

  7. Frontline Earth Science Research @ St Andrews The Rise of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    1 Frontline Earth Science Research @ St Andrews The Rise of the Earth System: A Tale of Ice, Oxygen Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, may I extend a very warm welcome to you at this half-day symposium. This is the third such event we have hosted; the first, Insights into Earth Processes from

  8. Research in NOAA: Toward Understanding and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research in NOAA: Toward Understanding and Predicting Earth's Environment A Five-Year Plan: Fiscal Years 2008 - 2012 November 2007 #12;Research in NOAA: Toward Understanding and Predicting Earth's Environment ii Preface Preface Recognizing that research is the foundation for an innovative and productive

  9. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    systems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.a new regional earth system model to inform natural andthe Community Earth System Model (CESM; www2.cesm.ucar.edu)

  10. An Earth-system perspective of the global nitrogen cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    An Earth-system perspective of the global nitrogen cycle Nicolas Gruber & James N. Galloway cycle and climate are expected to become an increasingly important determinant of the Earth system with the cli- mate system in the presence of the ever-increasing human intervention in the Earth system1

  11. earth SyStem monitor U.s. Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for nautical charting, tidal prediction, ge- odesy, and navigation for the Nation. Each of these original to the establishment of the Pacific Tsunami Warning System, based in large part on earthquake detection and tide gauge of national needs. After the 2004 Sumatran earthquake and tsunami, NOAA upgraded our national capabilities

  12. Community Earth System Modeling Tutorial 12-16 July 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Community Earth System Modeling Tutorial 12-16 July 2010 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO APPLICATION DEADLINE: 15 April 2010 The Community Earth System Model (CESM) project

  13. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a new regional earth system model to inform natural andsystems, coupled earth system models (EaSMs) are essential.coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision

  14. Supplementary Information: The Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system modelling (GENIE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Neil

    Supplementary Information: The Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system modelling (GENIE) framework T Integrated Earth system modelling (GENIE) frame- work supports modularity (i.e. interchangeable components to produce a range of com- putationally efficient Earth system models (ESMs) that span a spectrum from

  15. Causes and implications of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    2013), The Community Earth System Model: A framework forsimu- lations from 15 Earth System Models (ESMs) • Most ESMsdioxide biases in Earth System Models, J. Geophys. Res.

  16. Florian SEITZ: Atmospheric and oceanic impacts to Earth rotations numerical studies with a dynamic Earth system model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Harald

    with a dynamic Earth system model (completed in October 2004) Variations of Earth rotation are caused Earth system model DyMEG has been developed. It is based on the balance of angular momentum

  17. PMEL contributions to the collaboration: SCALING THE EARTH SYSTEM GRID TO PETASCALE DATA for the DOE SciDACs Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hankin, Steve

    2012-06-01

    Drawing to a close after five years of funding from DOE's ASCR and BER program offices, the SciDAC-2 project called the Earth System Grid (ESG) Center for Enabling Technologies has successfully established a new capability for serving data from distributed centers. The system enables users to access, analyze, and visualize data using a globally federated collection of networks, computers and software. The ESG softwareâ??now known as the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF)â??has attracted a broad developer base and has been widely adopted so that it is now being utilized in serving the most comprehensive multi-model climate data sets in the world. The system is used to support international climate model intercomparison activities as well as high profile U.S. DOE, NOAA, NASA, and NSF projects. It currently provides more than 25,000 users access to more than half a petabyte of climate data (from models and from observations) and has enabled over a 1,000 scientific publications.

  18. Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Brandon H

    2011-01-01

    The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

  19. Help save the Earth (and pay your bills)... Specialist in Earth System Modeling at UC Irvine. Posted March 1, 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    model simulations at the newly established Earth System Modeling Facility (www System Modeling at UC Irvine. Posted March 1, 2004. The Department of Earth System Science (ESS) at UCHelp save the Earth (and pay your bills)... Scientific Programmer Needed! Specialist in Earth

  20. A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science Gent, Peter; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Conley, Andrew; Vertenstein, Mariana; Craig, Anthony 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  1. NASA's Earth Observing System CloudsandtheEarth'sRa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Gary G. Gibson, Head of the Radiation and Aerosols Branch, and Bruce A. Wielicki, CERES for improving our scientific understanding of ongoing natural and human-induced global climate change's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment is one of the highest priority sci- entific satellite instruments

  2. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Southern California 96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION Earth System Grid, data replication, system monitoring Earth System Grid, data replication, system monitoring...

  3. Proposal full title: Comprehensive Modelling of the Earth System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couvreux, Fleur

    .....................................................................................................................7 1.1.4 Earth System Model Ensemble-scale integrating project Work programme topics addressed: ENV.2008.1.1.4.1. New components in Earth System modelling for better climate projections Name of the coordinating person: Marco Giorgetta List

  4. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including Earth system monitoring, performs official assessments of the environment, and conducts related prepare for tsunami and other dangerous coastal flooding events. Weather Improved satellite data has from NOAA satellites to issue air quality warnings to residents. Millions of dollars are saved each

  5. The Bohr Model of the Earth-Sun System* Data for the earth-sun system assuming a circular earth orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    energy expression below. The potential energy of the earth-sun interaction is well the energy of the earth-sun system as a function of the quantum number, n, Planck's constant the energy of the earth-sun system. n 2.524 10 74 E 2 n 2 h 2 2 Me 3 G 2 Ms 2 E 2.65 10 33 J

  6. The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    between the solid Earth, oceans and biosphere, both full penetration across the Moho and shallow targeted1 The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System Damon Teagle1 , Natsue Abe2 formation at mid-ocean ridges, to its recycling in subduction zones, the oceanic lithosphere serves

  7. Robert Pincus and Crispian Batstone, CIRES/Univ. Colorado and NOAA Earth System Research Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100NationalquestionnairesDrought-inducedPhoto ofCharacteristic atmospheric

  8. WHERE TO FIND HABITABLE ''EARTHS'' IN CIRCUMBINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Huigen; Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin, E-mail: huigen@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-04-20

    Six P-type planets have been found thus far around five binary systems, i.e., Kepler-16b, 34b, 35b, 38b, and 47b and c, which are all Neptune- or Jupiter-like planets. The stability of planets and the habitable zones are influenced by the gravitational and radiative perturbations of binary companions. In this Letter, we check the stability of an additional habitable Earth-mass planet in each system. Based on our simulations in 10 Myr, a habitable ''Earth'' is hardly stable in Kepler-16, while a stable ''Earth'' in Kepler-47 close to the boundaries of the habitable zone is possible. In contrast, Kepler-34, 35, and 38 seem to have high probabilities of being able to tolerante a stable ''Earth'' in their habitable zones. The affects of transit time variations are quite small due to the small mass of an undetected ''Earth,'' except that of Kepler-16b. With a time precision of 10{sup -3} day ({approx}88 s), an ''Earth'' in the corotational resonance with Kepler-16b can be detected in three years, while habitable ''Earths'' in the Kepler-34 and 38 systems can be detected in 10 yr. Habitable ''Earths'' in Kepler-35 and 47 are not likely to be detected in 10 yr under this precision.

  9. Causes and implications of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    2013), The Community Earth System Model: A framework forcycle in the CMIP5 Earth System Models, J. Clim. , 26(18),feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models, J. Clim. , 26(15),

  10. Changes in soil organic carbon storage predicted by Earth system models during the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    carbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etDiscussion Paper CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  11. Changes in soil organic carbon storage predicted by Earth system models during the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    carbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown etcarbon changes in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd-Brown et

  12. Preindustrial-control and twentieth-century carbon cycle experiments with the Earth system model CESM1(BGC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth system models. J. Climate, 26,dioxide biases in Earth system models. J. Geophys. Res.2013: The Community Earth System Model: A framework for

  13. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  14. Interactive crop management in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal influences on land-atmosphere fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, S.

    2014-01-01

    will likely improve earth system model simulations withABSTRACT The Community Earth System Model, version 1 (CESM1)in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1): Seasonal

  15. System architecting of a campaign of earth observing satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, Justin M

    2008-01-01

    Given the current level of concern over anthropogenic climate change, and the ongoing debate worldwide regarding what action should be taken to reduce and reverse future warming, the ability to collect data on Earth system ...

  16. The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurrell, Jim; Holland, Marika M.; Gent, Peter R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Kay, Jennifer; Kushner, P.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Large, William G.; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Lipscomb, William; Long , Matthew; Mahowald, N.; Marsh, D.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Bader, David C.; Collins, William D.; Hack, James; Kiehl, J. T.; Marshall, Shawn

    2013-09-30

    The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a flexible and extensible community tool used to investigate a diverse set of earth system interactions across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model is a natural evolution from its predecessor, the Community Climate System Model, following the incorporation of new earth system capabilities. These include the ability to simulate biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, ice sheets, and a high-top atmosphere. These and other new model capabilities are enabling investigations into a wide range of pressing scientific questions, providing new predictive capabilities and increasing our collective knowledge about the behavior and interactions of the earth system. Simulations with numerous configurations of the CESM have been provided to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and are being analyzed by the broader community of scientists. Additionally, the model source code and associated documentation are freely available to the scientific community to use for earth system studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth modeling system, its various possible configurations, and illustrate its capabilities with a few science highlights.

  17. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  18. Building Scientific Workflows for Earth System Modelling with Windows Workflow Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Scientific Workflows for Earth System Modelling with Windows Workflow Foundation Matthew J developed a framework for the composition, execution and management of integrated Earth system models

  19. CoastWatch Data in Google Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CoastWatch Data in Google Earth: A How-to Guide Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences Consultant for NOAA/NESDIS CoastWatch Operations Managers Meeting, June, 2007 #12;Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences Consultant for NOAA/NESDISJune, 2007 Talk Outline · About Google Earth · Preparing Data

  20. The use and misuse of Vc,max in Earth System Models Alistair Rogers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Alistair

    REVIEW The use and misuse of Vc,max in Earth System Models Alistair Rogers Received: 18 November Dordrecht (outside the USA) 2013 Abstract Earth System Models (ESMs) aim to project global change. Central Á Vc,max Á Leaf nitrogen Á Earth System Models Introduction The primary goal of Earth System Models

  1. SWS4180: Earth System Analysis Catalogue Description: Analysis of global-scale interdependences between climate, biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Quantify carbon cycle climate feedback in Earth system models 13 - 14 The fate of anthropogenic greenhouse

  2. FORTRAN M AS A LANGUAGE FOR BUILDING EARTH SYSTEM MODELS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORTRAN M AS A LANGUAGE FOR BUILDING EARTH SYSTEM MODELS \\Lambda Ian Foster Mathematics as a tool for building earth system models on massively parallel computers. I hypothesize that the use to investigate this hypothe­ sis. 2. Earth System Models An earth system model is a computer code designed

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE (EESS) REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS CREDITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE (EESS) REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS CREDITS English and Liberal Arts EAS 31001: Environmental Science Seminar 1-2 EAS 33000: Geographic Information Systems 3 EAS 47200: Environmental Project EESS Design 5 CHEM 33000: Physical Chemistry I 3 Total Major Requirements 19-20 Technical

  4. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret

    2008-01-15

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  5. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  6. History of NOAA Satellite Programs--Updated October 2009 Page 1 History of the NOAA Satellite Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    soundings, atmospheric temperature and moisture data in all weather situations. During those 46 years, NOAA than four decades developing and applying space based Earth remote sensing for NOAA's National Weather have evolved from weather satellites to environmental satellites. Data is used for applications related

  7. History of NOAA Satellite Programs--Updated June 2011 Page 1 History of the NOAA Satellite Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    soundings, atmospheric temperature and moisture data in all weather situations. During those 46 years, NOAA and applying space based Earth remote sensing for NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts. The NWS from weather satellites to environmental satellites. Data is used for applications related

  8. Taiwan International Graduate Program Earth System Science Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiwan International Graduate Program Earth System Science Program Introduction Academia Sinica has established the Taiwan International Graduate Program (TIGP) in collaboration with a consortium of the key national research universities in Taiwan. The purpose of the program is to develop the research manpower

  9. The Development and Use of Conceptual Models of Complex Earth Systems for Environmental Managment and Earth Science Education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Heather

    2012-10-19

    Conceptualizations of earth's surficial systems pose challenges to scientists, novice teachers, and students alike, because they are variable, non-linear, and dynamic. Developing scientific models of these systems allow users to visualize...

  10. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements Report ofEnergyEarlyEarth

  11. The integrated Earth system model version 1: formulation and functionality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, W. D.; Craig, A. P.; Truesdale, J. E.; Di Vittorio, A. V.; Jones, A. D.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J. A.; Kim, S. H.; Thomson, A. M.; et al

    2015-07-23

    The integrated Earth system model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for projecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an integrated assessment model (IAM) and an Earth system model (ESM) into a common modeling infrastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human–Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species (SLS), land use and land cover change (LULCC), and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. Themore »iESM project integrates the economic and human-dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a single simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore-omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific understanding of the human–Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper describes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.« less

  12. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ricciuto, Daniel M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, Galen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Brian E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thornton, Peter E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Dali [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shi, Xiaoying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  13. SWS 5182: Earth System Analysis Catalogue Description: Analysis of global-scale interdependences between climate, biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    and Energy Budget Rahmstorf et al., 2006, Chapter 4 Set up Earth system model Lag in the climate system 6-atmosphere carbon balance Chapter 8 in Sarmiento and Gruber Add ocean carbon cycle to your Earth system model Friedlingstein et al., 2006 Quantify carbon cycle climate feedback in Earth system models 13 - 14 Th

  14. [10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

  15. Atmospheric component of the MPI-M Earth System Model: Bjorn Stevens,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichler, Thomas

    Atmospheric component of the MPI-M Earth System Model: ECHAM6 Bjorn Stevens,1 Marco Giorgetta,1: Stevens, B., et al. (2013), Atmospheric component of the MPI-M Earth System Model: ECHAM6, J. Adv. Model as the atmospheric component of a coupled modeling system. The present version of the coupled system, the MPI Earth

  16. FORTRAN M as a language for building earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.

    1992-01-01

    FORTRAN M is a small set of extensions to FORTRAN 77 that supports a modular or object-oriented approach to the development of parallel programs. In this paper, I discuss the use of FORTRAN M as a tool for building earth system models on massively parallel computers. I hypothesize that the use of FORTRAN M has software engineering advantages and outline experiments that we are conducting to investigate this hypothesis.

  17. FORTRAN M as a language for building earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, I.

    1992-12-31

    FORTRAN M is a small set of extensions to FORTRAN 77 that supports a modular or object-oriented approach to the development of parallel programs. In this paper, I discuss the use of FORTRAN M as a tool for building earth system models on massively parallel computers. I hypothesize that the use of FORTRAN M has software engineering advantages and outline experiments that we are conducting to investigate this hypothesis.

  18. Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winguth, Arne

    Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model Uwe earth system model con- sisting of an atmospheric general circulation model, an ocean general

  19. Historical and idealized model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical and idealized model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity M. Eby1, A. J. Weaver1, K. Alexander1, K

  20. CHAPTER 3 | NOAA PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, & CONSTRUCTION At Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the NOAA-N Prime spacecraft is set up for testing. NOAA-N Prime is the latest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,364 24,364 24,364 24,364 Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) Technology Infusion: NOAA

  1. Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretherton, Chris

    -of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR1 Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global2Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

  2. Earth System Modeling Facility: Linking Climate to Cal-(IT)2 and OptIPuter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Earth System Modeling Facility: Linking Climate to Cal-(IT)2 and OptIPuter Charlie Zender in quantitatively-based environmental planning. #12;1. Overview Present: 1. Earth System Modeling Facility (ESMF) 2 and Planning #12;2. Earth System Modeling Facility (ESMF) Background: In 2003, NSF, UCI, & IGPP awarded $1.3M

  3. INVITED REVIEW Plant functional types in Earth system models: past experiences and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INVITED REVIEW Plant functional types in Earth system models: past experiences and future Published electronically: 2 May 2014 Background Earth system models describe the physical, chemical are to overcome these and other shortcomings. Key words: Plant functional types, PFT, Earth system model, ESM

  4. Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity the Earth system in high levels of spatial and/or temporal resolu- tion and the processes that they model. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system

  5. Master of Science in Earth, Environmental, and Physical Sciences Planet Earth consists of interacting systems -the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , physics, and environmental science, and supporting fields such as biology and chemistry. The EEPS programMaster of Science in Earth, Environmental, and Physical Sciences Planet Earth consists activities. The Masters program in Earth, Environmental, and Physical Sciences (EEPS) at Wichita State

  6. Analysis of permafrost thermal dynamics and response to climate change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koven, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    coupled climate-carbon earth system models part i: PhysicalChange in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  Koven, C.D. , W.J.output from a set of Earth System Models (ESMs) (Table 1)

  7. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,and evaluation of an Earth-System model – HadGEM2, Geosci-

  8. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Variability in the Community Earth System Model: Evaluation and Transient Dynamics during the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    in the Community Earth System Model: Evaluation andpredictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparisonusing the Community Earth System Model–Biogeochemistry (

  9. An improved dust emission model - Part 2: Evaluation in the Community Earth System Model, with implications for the use of dust source functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kok, JF; Albani, S; Mahowald, NM; Ward, DS

    2014-01-01

    S. : The Community Earth System Model A Framework forin the Community Earth System Model, with implications forinto the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and comparing

  10. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Variability in the Community Earth System Model: Evaluation and Transient Dynamics during the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparisonin the Community Earth System Model: Evaluation andusing the Community Earth System Model–Biogeochemistry (

  11. IMPLEMENTING THE NOAA NEXT GENERATION STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTING THE NOAA NEXT GENERATION STRATEGIC PLAN: ANNUAL GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM DECEMBER 2010 NOAA change. - NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan This Annual Guidance Memorandum (AGM) represents the first formal step toward implementing NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan. NOAA's strategic goals

  12. NOAA Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This series is co-sponsored by the NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP), US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Water Research Foundation, Water Environment...

  13. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)/NOAA, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), and University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute (USC/ISI). All ESG-CET work is accomplished under DOE open-source guidelines and in close collaboration with the project's stakeholders, domain researchers, and scientists. Through the ESG project, the ESG-CET team has developed and delivered a production environment for climate data from multiple climate model sources (e.g., CMIP (IPCC), CESM, ocean model data (e.g., Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (e.g., Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, Microwave Limb Sounder), and analysis and visualization tools) that serves a worldwide climate research community. Data holdings are distributed across multiple sites including LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL as well as unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University (ANU) National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ), and NASA/JPL. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users who want to understand it, process it, extract value from it, visualize it, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort is extremely large and complex, but it will be incredibly valuable for building 'science gateways' to critical climate resources (such as CESM, CMIP5, ARM, NARCCAP, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), etc.) for processing the next IPCC assessment report. Continued ESG progress will result in a production-scale system that will empower scientists to attempt new and exciting data exchanges, which could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate science discoveries.

  14. Rule-based system architecting of Earth observation satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva Valero, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    System architecting is concerned with exploring the tradespace of early, high-level, system design decisions with a holistic, value-centric view. In the last few years, several tools and methods have been developed to ...

  15. Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) and availability of the data on the Earth System Grid (ESG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Scienceincluded in the new Earth System Models (ESMs) participating

  16. Campaign-level science traceability for Earth observation system architecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seher, Theodore K. (Theodore Kimball)

    2009-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Decadal Survey of 2007 presented a comprehensive vision for the evolution of space-based Earth Science resources. The practical development of the Decadal campaign, however, has highlighted four challenges ...

  17. Search Print this chapter Cite this chapter CLIMATE AND WEATHER OF THE SUN -EARTH SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Search Print this chapter Cite this chapter CLIMATE AND WEATHER OF THE SUN - EARTH SYSTEM Ilya.4. Solar Wind and Magnetospheric Disturbances 5. Sun-Earth Relations and Implications For The Earth Climate Sketches Summary The Sun is a variable star whose output, including electromagnetic radiation, magnetic

  18. On the dynamics near the Lagrangian points of the real Earth-Moon system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelona, Universitat de

    On the dynamics near the Lagrangian points of the real Earth-Moon system #3; Enric Castell#18;a particle near the equi- lateral points of the real Earth-Moon system. We use, as real system, the one hand, we can consider one of the most accurate models of the Solar system now available, which

  19. Building a Global Federation System for Climate Change Research: The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    Building a Global Federation System for Climate Change Research: The Earth System Grid Center for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [2]. Increasingly, climate change research is data intensive@mcs.anl.gov, bernholdtde@ornl.gov Abstract. The recent release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 4th

  20. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A NewExploratio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Citation Scott A. Wood. 2002. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool. () : Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection....

  1. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools,...

  2. An Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    of interoperability, shared ontologies between different systems, and mappings of a domain ontology onto a service.S. Department of Energy Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The Earth System GridAn Ontology for Scientific Information in a Grid Environment: the Earth System Grid. Line Pouchard

  3. DEFINING AND QUANTIFYING FEEDBACKS IN EARTH'S CLIMATE SYSTEM Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEFINING AND QUANTIFYING FEEDBACKS IN EARTH'S CLIMATE SYSTEM Stephen E. Schwartz For presentation.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Feedbacks in Earth's climate system are increasingly being examined to identify processes of climate models to accurately represent the actual climate system and changes due to increases

  4. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research A world leader in observing, understanding, and predicting the Earth system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Base (= FY 2015 Enacted + Inflationary Adjustments). Highlights include: · High Performance Computing Recapitalization (+ $9.0M) to begin recapitalization of the Research and Development High-Performance Computing

  5. A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model, J. Geophys System model Roman Olson,1 Ryan Sriver,1 Marlos Goes,2,3 Nathan M. Urban,4,5 H. Damon Matthews,6 MuraliA climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth

  6. NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the oceans, coastal waters, and estuaries. investigating their currents, the structure and con- toursNOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic, Atmospheric, and Environmental Activities NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, cele- brated its fifth anniversary 3

  7. www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed NOAA FY2012 Reorganization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite Service (NESS). This will allow NESS to focus on the acquisition, operations and maintenance for Operations. The NOAA Central Library will move from the National Oceanographic Data Center to the NOAA Office Marine Fisheries Service, or Office of Marine and Aviation Operations. NOAA will continue to address all

  8. Scaling the Earth System Grid to 100Gbps Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balman, Mehmet; Sim, Alex

    2012-03-02

    The SC11 demonstration, titled Scaling the Earth System Grid to 100Gbps Networks, showed the ability to use underlying infrastructure for the movement of climate data over 100Gbps network. Climate change research is one of the critical data intensive sciences, and the amount of data is continuously growing. Climate simulation data is geographically distributed over the world, and it needs to be accessed from many sources for fast and efficient analysis and inter-comparison of simulations. We used a 100Gbps link connecting National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the demo, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP-3) dataset was staged into the memory of computing nodes at ANL and ORNL from NERSC over the 100Gbps network for analysis and visualization. In general, climate simulation data consists of relatively small and large files with irregular file size distribution in each dataset. In this demo, we addressed challenges on data management in terms of high bandwidth networks, usability of existing protocols and middleware tools, and how applications can adapt and benefit from next generation networks.

  9. Data Mining in Earth System Science (DMESS 2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Larson, Jay [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Mills, Richard T [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Bjorn [ORNL] [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL] [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    From field-scale measurements to global climate simulations and remote sensing, the growing body of very large and long time series Earth science data are increasingly difficult to analyze, visualize, and interpret. Data mining, information theoretic, and machine learning techniques - such as cluster analysis, singular value decomposition, block entropy, Fourier and wavelet analysis, phase-space reconstruction, and artificial neural networks - are being applied to problems of segmentation, feature extraction, change detection, model-data comparison, and model validation. The size and complexity of Earth science data exceed the limits of most analysis tools and the capacities of desktop computers. New scalable analysis and visualization tools, running on parallel cluster computers and supercomputers, are required to analyze data of this magnitude. This workshop will demonstrate how data mining techniques are applied in the Earth sciences and describe innovative computer science methods that support analysis and discovery in the Earth sciences.

  10. Developing a geographic information system (GIS) to integrate earth science data: Hygiene Quadrangle, Boulder county, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonsung, Sawat

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a methodology using a geographic information system (GIS) to map and model the best use of earth resources in Hygiene Quadrangle, Boulder County of Colorado. The Spatial Analysis System (SPANS GIS...

  11. On the station keeping of a Solar sail in the Elliptic Sun-Earth system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelona, Universitat de

    On the station keeping of a Solar sail in the Elliptic Sun-Earth system Ariadna Farr´es and `Angel on the dynamics of a Solar sail in the Sun- Earth Elliptic Restricted Three-Body Problem with Solar radiation that the sail is perpendicular to the Sun-sail line, we find an equilibrium point in the Earth-Sun line closer

  12. Marine Ecosystem Dynamics and Biogeochemical Cycling in the Community Earth System Model [CESM1(BGC)]: Comparison of the 1990s with the 2090s under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. Keith; Lindsay, Keith; Doney, Scott C; Long, Matthew C; Misumi, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    2013: The Community Earth System Model: A Framework forcurrent system in an earth system model. Geophys. Res.global warming in an Earth System Model. Bio- geosciences,

  13. Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

  14. Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

  15. Earth System Modeling -- Director`s initiative. LDRD Program final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, M.; Penner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Science Div.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the Earth System Modeling Director`s Initiative is to develop and test a framework for interactively coupling subsystem models that represent the physical, chemical, and biological processes which determine the state of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and vegetation. Most studies of the potential for human perturbations of the climate system made previously have treated only limited components of the Earth system. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the capability of coupling all relevant components in a flexible framework that will permit a wide variety of tests to be conducted to assure realistic interactions. A representation of the Earth system is shown and its important interactions.

  16. Position: Postdoctoral Researcher Large-Scale Earth System Science Visualization Salary: $31,044 -$35,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    ,044 - $35,000 Starting Date: February 2004 The Cal-(IT)2 Center of Gravity and the Earth System Modeling, enabling the real-time visualization and steering of Earth system model simulations. Particular application

  17. A.24 ENHANCING THE CAPABILITY OF COMPUTATIONAL EARTH SYSTEM MODELS AND NASA DATA FOR OPERATION AND ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A.24-1 A.24 ENHANCING THE CAPABILITY OF COMPUTATIONAL EARTH SYSTEM MODELS AND NASA DATA) computational support of Earth system modeling. #12;A.24-2 2.1 Acceleration of Operational Use of Research Data

  18. The Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) -Challenges & Opportunities, Melbourne, 28/11-01/12 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /11-01/12 2006 Slide 3 PRISM: the goals Increase what Earth system modellers have in common Share development

  19. The Effectiveness of the Cause-MaP System in Teaching Interconnected Complex Earth Systems in a Texas Private School 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forshee, Patricia 1987-

    2012-12-12

    , with practice and encouragement from their instructor, that they recognize intersystem connections in complex Earth systems. With more integration of programs like these, students will become more proficient in recognizing system interactions....

  20. Long-term ice sheetclimate interactions under anthropogenic greenhouse forcing simulated with a complex Earth System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winguth, Arne

    with a complex Earth System Model Miren Vizcai´no Ć Uwe Mikolajewicz Ć Matthias Gro¨ger Ć Ernst Maier-Reimer Ć-millennia simulations have been performed with a complex Earth System Model (ESM) for different anthropogenic climate climate change Á Meridional overturning circulation Á Earth system modelling Á Sea level 1 Introduction

  1. GFDL's ESM2 Global Coupled ClimateCarbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittenberg, Andrew

    GFDL's ESM2 Global Coupled Climate­Carbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation coupled carbon­climate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate al. 2002; Delworth et al. 2006). Our approach has been to de- velop two Earth System Models

  2. Preindustrial-Control and Twentieth-Century Carbon Cycle Experiments with the Earth System Model CESM1(BGC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Preindustrial-Control and Twentieth-Century Carbon Cycle Experiments with the Earth System Model 31 July 2012, in final form 25 July 2014) ABSTRACT Version 1 of the Community Earth System Model to as Earth system models. While this term does not have a uniformly accepted definition, models that couple

  3. Centennial-scale interactions between the carbon cycle and anthropogenic climate change using a dynamic Earth system model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winguth, Arne

    a dynamic Earth system model A. Winguth Center for Climatic Research, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic; accepted 26 October 2005; published 15 December 2005. [1] A complex Earth system model including atmosphere and anthropogenic climate change using a dynamic Earth system model, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L23714, doi:10

  4. NOAA/NMFS Developments Tracked By Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Department of Energy to install a solar power heating and water heating system. The Grant is one of four- mitter. Electronic engineer Robert Timko of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service laboratory in Gal near Washington, D. C. , where they were processed by com- puter. Satellite tracking of turtles

  5. REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    : IS THE ENERGY FROM THE SUN THAT ACTUALLY REACHES THE EARTH'S SURFACE. The atmosphere gets its heat energy from the Sun. The flux of energy coming from the Sun is 1370 W/m2. This is the energy flux that would. · Ozone absorbs ultraviolet radiation coming from the Sun. · This absorption converts the energy of the UV

  6. Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) and availability of the data on the Earth System Grid (ESG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Scienceincluded in the new Earth System Models (ESMs) participatingof the C-LAMP model output via the Earth System Grid (ESG).

  7. Boreal lakes moderate seasonal and diurnal temperature variation and perturb atmospheric circulation: Analyses in the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Z.M.

    2013-01-01

    in the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) By ZACHARY M.into the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) to study thearea. In the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1; http://

  8. The iron budget in ocean surface waters in the 20th and 21st centuries: projections by the Community Earth System Model version 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    M. : The Community Earth System Model: A framework forexperiments with the Earth System Model CESM1- (BGC), J.in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1-BGC), J. Climate,

  9. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

  10. Analytical model and simulations of closed-loop rebreather systems for Earth and Space applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josan-Drinceanu, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Humans in extreme environments, regardless of whether in space or deep in the oceans of the Earth, rely on life support systems to be kept alive and perform their exploration missions. Diving is similar to extravehicular ...

  11. Description of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goosse, H.

    The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and ...

  12. PROGRESS REPORT 2008 A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    PROGRESS REPORT 2008 A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science Change Prediction Program (Dr. Anjuli Bamzai, program manager) #12;Progress Report for SciDAC CCSM Model...................................................................................................................2 3.1 Coupled Model Developments

  13. Lunar Science as a Window into the Early Evolution of the Solar System and Conditions on the Early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Earth In collaboration with the Geological Society of London, and the UK node of the NASA Lunar Science into the Early Evolution of the Solar System and Conditions on the Early Earth. For the last 4.5 billion years the Earth and Moon have essentially comprised a binary planet system which is unique in the inner Solar

  14. The evolution of the Earth-Moon system based on the dark matter field fluid model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongjun Pan

    2008-01-13

    The evolution of Earth-Moon system is described by the dark matter field fluid model proposed in the Meeting of Division of Particle and Field 2004, American Physical Society. The current behavior of the Earth-Moon system agrees with this model very well and the general pattern of the evolution of the Moon-Earth system described by this model agrees with geological and fossil evidence. The closest distance of the Moon to Earth was about 259000 km at 4.5 billion years ago, which is far beyond the Roche's limit. The result suggests that the tidal friction may not be the primary cause for the evolution of the Earth-Moon system. The average dark matter field fluid constant derived from Earth-Moon system data is 4.39 x 10^(-22) s^(-1)m^(-1). This model predicts that the Mars's rotation is also slowing with the angular acceleration rate about -4.38 x 10^(-22) rad s^(-2).

  15. The IAU Resolutions on Astronomical Reference Systems, Time Scales, and Earth Rotation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George H. Kaplan

    2006-02-03

    Recent resolutions passed by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) on astronomical reference systems, time scales, and Earth rotation models are the most significant set of international agreements in positional astronomy in several decades. These resolutions, the result of over ten years of international research and study, provide a coherent set of foundational standards for the treatment of astrometric data and the modeling of dynamics in the solar system. This circular explains these resolutions and provides a complete set of practical formulas for their implementation. The six main chapters cover relativity, time scales, the fundamental celestial reference system, ephemerides of solar system bodies, precession and nutation, and modeling the Earth's rotation.

  16. NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Awards $3 Million for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Awards $3 Million for Lost or Damaged Fishing Gear acts of God. Weather the past year for lost or damaged fishing gear caused by other vessels or extreme weather conditions or destroyed by Hurricane David when it passed through the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico last August. Another

  17. A Be%er Understanding of the Earth System Through Advances in CFD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    A Be%er Understanding of the Earth System Through Advances in CFD Paul Ullrich for atmospheric models that can harness these large-scale parallel systems. Higher University of California, Davis June 22nd, 2013 #12;Part 1 Atmospheric Models and the Need for Resolution #12

  18. Motivation to Contribute to the NOAA Archives NOAA Data Center, Hawaii Liaison, Patrick.Caldwell@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motivation to Contribute to the NOAA Archives NOAA Data Center, Hawaii Liaison, Patrick. Providing a copy of your data to NOAA ensures security. The copies given to NOAA are maintained at two schedule makes responding to requests for copies of your data a tedious task, then refer requestors

  19. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Systems- A New ExplorationExploitation Tool? Abstract NA Author Scott A. Wood Published Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Idaho, 2001...

  20. The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model is a natural evolution from its predecessor, the Community Climate System Model, following the...

  1. Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01

    Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models for precipitation forecasting 799 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 799811 (2003) © EGU Intercomparison of mesoscale meteorological models

  2. Improved structural systems for earth sheltered housing. Structural supplement to the design program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behr, R.

    1981-10-01

    Additional engineering information is provided with regard to the structural analysis and design of thin shell concrete structures. The design program has tentatively demonstrated the overall architectural and marketing feasibility of curved, thin shell structural systems for earth sheltered housing. This supplement will address the structural feasibility question by presenting a complete manual analysis and structural design of an earth sheltered dome/tension ring/wall structural system, and also by presenting the results of a parametric sensitivity study of the dome/ring/wall configuration with respect to variations in span and rise for a three foot soil loading condition. Double curvature dome configurations are emphasized in this structural supplement because their analysis is not extensively addressed in earth sheltered housing literature.

  3. REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    on measurements of the expansion, measurements of temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background years. (Hinshaw, G., et al. (2008). "Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations. Scientists hypothesize that the solar system formed from a huge, rotating cloud of cosmic gas (Nebular

  4. Fire in the Earth System David M. J. S. Bowman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Fire in the Earth System David M. J. S. Bowman,1 * Jennifer K. Balch,2,3,4 * Paulo Artaxo,5 William Thomas W. Swetnam,22 Guido R. van der Werf,23 Stephen J. Pyne24 Fire is a worldwide phenomenon that appears in the geological record soon after the appearance of terrestrial plants. Fire influences global

  5. Simulation of glacial Cycles with an Earth System Model of intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calov, Reinhard

    Statistical-Dynamical Atmosphere Model (POTSDAM) Surface Energy and Mass balance Interface (SEMI) annual mass circulation ·Conclusions and outlook #12;·Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 Petoukhov et of THC are important to fully complete the glacial terminations. #12;Outlook ·Close the carbon cycle

  6. A note on the solvable model of cosmology in the Earth-related coordinate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2005-06-20

    As a note for paper [physics/0505035], this is to make it more clear how we can depend upon Einstein's theory of gravitation and two assumptions of the cosmological principle and perfect fluid, in the so-called Z-approximation, to construct a solvable model of cosmology in the Earth-related coordinate system. Hence, the cosmic acceleration becomes understandable.

  7. The Public Land Renewable Energy Act of 2013 (S.279) Workshop in Applied Earth Systems Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    The Public Land Renewable Energy Act of 2013 (S.279) Workshop in Applied Earth Systems Management...........................................................................................4 3. Environmental Solutions in the Public Land Renewable Energy Development.............................................................................................................................18 #12; 3 The Public Land Renewable Energy Act of 2013 (S.279) Executive Summary

  8. Dynamics of Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroid Systems: A Study Based on Radar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    characterization of Binary Near-Earth Asteroid (185851) 20003 Near-Earth Asteroid Satellite Spins Under Spin-Orbitlibration amplitudes for synchronous near-Earth as- teroid

  9. The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative Research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACEConnect Conference:Connect

  10. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  11. The integrated Earth System Model (iESM): formulation and functionality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, W. D.; Craig, A. P.; Truesdale, J. E.; Di Vittorio, A. V.; Jones, A. D.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J. A.; Kim, S. H.; Thomson, A. M.; et al

    2015-01-21

    The integrated Earth System Model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for projecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) and an Earth System Model (ESM) into a common modeling infrastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human–Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species, land use and land cover change, and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. The iESM projectmore »integrates the economic and human dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a single simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore-omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific understanding of the human–Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper describes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.« less

  12. Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeal, Karen Sue

    2009-05-15

    Understanding complex Earth systems is challenging for scientists and students alike, because of the characteristics (e.g. bifurcations, self-organization, chaotic response) that are associated with these systems. This ...

  13. Migration and the formation of systems of hot super-Earths and Neptunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Terquem; John C. B. Papaloizou

    2006-09-28

    The existence of extrasolar planets with short orbital periods suggests that planetary migration induced by tidal interaction with the protoplanetary disk is important. Cores and terrestrial planets may undergo migration as they form. In this paper we investigate the evolution of a population of cores with initial masses in the range 0.1-1 earth mass embedded in a disk. Mutual interactions lead to orbit crossing and mergers, so that the cores grow during their evolution. Interaction with the disk leads to orbital migration, which results in the cores capturing each other in mean motion resonances. As the cores migrate inside the disk inner edge, scatterings and mergers of planets on unstable orbits together with orbital circularization causes strict commensurability to be lost. Near commensurability however is usually maintained. All the simulations end with a population of typically between two and five planets, with masses depending on the initial mass. These results indicate that if hot super-Earths or Neptunes form by mergers of inwardly migrating cores, then such planets are most likely not isolated. We would expect to always find at least one, more likely a few, companions on close and often near-commensurable orbits. To test this hypothesis, it would be of interest to look for planets of a few to about 10 earth masses in systems where hot super-Earths or Neptunes have already been found.

  14. NOAA Committee Memberships, 2004-2008 Eddie N. Bernard, Member, NOAA Tsunami Program Team, 2005-present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Koehn, Member, NOAA Science, Technology, and Infusion Program Team, 2003-2005 Mark P. Koehn, Member

  15. Development of hybrid 3-D hydrological modeling for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Xubin; Troch, Peter; Pelletier, Jon; Niu, Guo-Yue; Gochis, David

    2015-11-15

    This is the Final Report of our four-year (3-year plus one-year no cost extension) collaborative project between the University of Arizona (UA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The overall objective of our project is to develop and evaluate the first hybrid 3-D hydrological model with a horizontal grid spacing of 1 km for the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  16. Reconstructed standard model of cosmology in the Earth-related coordinate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2005-05-04

    In the Earth-related coordinate system, we reconstruct the standard model of cosmology based on the assumption of the cosmological principle and the perfect gas (or fluid). We exactly solve Einstein's field equation involved. The solution consists of three parts respectively on the line element for space-time of the Universe, the value for the cosmological constant and the equation of state for the matter of the Universe.

  17. The! Community! Earth! System! Model! (CESM)! Large! Ensemble! Project:! A! Community!3! Resource!for!Studying!Climate!Change!in!the!Presence!of!Internal!Climate!Variability!4!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jennifer

    !1! !2! The! Community! Earth! System! Model! (CESM)! Large! Ensemble! Project:! A! Community!3!Earth!System!Model!(CESM)!community!designed!the!CESM!Large!Ensemble!39! (CESMWLE)!with!the!explicit

  18. Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sea surface temperature in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR; published 5 April 2006. [1] Satellite sea surface temperature (SST) measurements from Advanced Microwave. Sprintall, and C. Gentemann (2006), Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth

  19. NOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · continuing to foster strategic management process among NOAA Line and Staff Offices, Goal Teams, Programs's Strategic Vision by Developing and evolving of NOAA's Strategic Plan Managing designated programs accordingNOAA Office of Program Planning and Integration STRATEGIC PLAN FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 U.S. Department

  20. The Voice of NOAA's National Weather Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Voice of NOAA's National Weather Service Broadcasting Continuous Weather Information on the Following Frequencies: 162.400 MHz 162.425 MHz 162.450 MHz 162.475 MHz 162 Administration National Weather Service http://www.weather.gov/nwr/ NOAA/PA 94062 Rev January 2015 #12;NOAA

  1. Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

  2. ENGR G6601 Environmental Modeling for Earth Systems Science and Engineering/Syllabus 01/29/2014 City College of New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    ENGR G6601 Environmental Modeling for Earth Systems Science and Engineering/Syllabus 01 Science and Technology ENGR G6601 Environmental Modeling for Earth Systems Science and Engineering/29/2014 City College of New York Grove School of Engineering MS Program in Earth Systems and Environmental

  3. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kvashnina, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    bombardment for twelve rare-earths metals [1] . Accord- ingal. [3] have showed that rare-earth metals such as La has aof most of the rare- earths metals, oxides, and chlorides.

  4. WIMP diffusion in the solar system including solar depletion and its effect on Earth capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Lundberg; Joakim Edsjo

    2004-01-08

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) can be captured by the Earth, where they eventually sink to the core, annihilate and produce e.g. neutrinos that can be searched for with neutrino telescopes. The Earth is believed to capture WIMPs not dominantly from the Milky Way halo directly, but instead from a distribution of WIMPs that have diffused around in the solar system due to gravitational interactions with the planets in the solar system. Recently, doubts have been raised about the lifetime of these WIMP orbits due to solar capture. We here investigate this issue by detailed numerical simulations. Compared to earlier estimates, we find that the WIMP velocity distribution is significantly suppressed below about 70 km/s which results in a suppression of the capture rates mainly for heavier WIMPs (above ~100 GeV). At 1 TeV and above the reduction is almost a factor of 10. We apply these results to the case where the WIMP is a supersymmetric neutralino and find that, within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the annihilation rates, and thus the neutrino fluxes, are reduced even more than the capture rates. At high masses (above ~1 TeV), the suppression is almost two orders of magnitude. This suppression will make the detection of neutrinos from heavy WIMP annihilations in the Earth much harder compared to earlier estimates.

  5. www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed Climate Service in NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    domestic product depends on accurate weather and climate information. Concerns from business, industry and information about climate that helps people make informed decisions in their lives, businesses, September 2010 Climate Service Example: Construction NOAA provides air-freezing data to the home building

  6. Implementation and Initial Evaluation of the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model in the Community Earth System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Andreas

    2013) ABSTRACT The Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model (Glimmer-CISM) has been implemented in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Glimmer-CISM is forced by a surface mass balance (SMB) computed

  7. Earth Sciences | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fully coupled, and intermodel comparison are underway. Moving forward, Earth system models that imbed a stochastic representation of variable Earth system behavior such...

  8. Earth Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fully coupled, and intermodel comparison are underway. Moving forward, Earth system models that imbed a stochastic representation of variable Earth system behavior such...

  9. High pressure and temperature equations of state: A tool for insight into deep Earth systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armentrout, Matthew Martin

    2012-01-01

    the deep Earth, interpretation of seismic observables, andof state allows interpretation of the seismic observations,

  10. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  11. CHAPTER 7 NOAA RESEARCH & DEvELOPMENT NOAA is the single federal agency with operational responsibility to protect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to accomplish this mission by addressing the grand environmental challenges facing our nation today, influ- ence ecosystem processes and impact our ability to manage marine ecosystems and forecast on them. This year, NOAA completed a HAB forecast system in the western Gulf of Mexico which provided

  12. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  13. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  14. Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, John B; Worley, Patrick H; Hoffman, Forrest M; Jones, Phil

    2009-01-01

    This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

  15. Quantum effects on Lagrangian points and displaced periodic orbits in the Earth-Moon system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuele Battista; Simone Dell'Agnello; Giampiero Esposito; Jules Simo

    2015-03-31

    Recent work in the literature has shown that the one-loop long distance quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential imply tiny but observable effects in the restricted three-body problem of celestial mechanics, i.e., at the Lagrangian libration points of stable equilibrium the planetoid is not exactly at equal distance from the two bodies of large mass, but the Newtonian values of its coordinates are changed by a few millimeters in the Earth-Moon system. First, we assess such a theoretical calculation by exploiting the full theory of the quintic equation, i.e., its reduction to Bring-Jerrard form and the resulting expression of roots in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions. By performing the numerical analysis of the exact formulas for the roots, we confirm and slightly improve the theoretical evaluation of quantum corrected coordinates of Lagrangian libration points of stable equilibrium. Second, we prove in detail that also for collinear Lagrangian points the quantum corrections are of the same order of magnitude in the Earth-Moon system. Third, we discuss the prospects to measure, with the help of laser ranging, the above departure from the equilateral triangle picture, which is a challenging task. On the other hand, a modern version of the planetoid is the solar sail, and much progress has been made, in recent years, on the displaced periodic orbits of solar sails at all libration points, both stable and unstable. The present paper investigates therefore, eventually, a restricted three-body problem involving Earth, Moon and a solar sail. By taking into account the one-loop quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential, displaced periodic orbits of the solar sail at libration points are again found to exist.

  16. The BS degree in Earth and Space Exploration, Concentration in Exploration Systems Design requires the following core courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Laboratory I (1) SES 104 Earth, Solar System, and Universe Laboratory II (1) SES 210 Engineering Systems (3) SES 310 Concepts of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Design (3) SES 330 Practical Electronic and Instrument Assembly (4) SES 405 Exploration Systems Engineering (3) In addition, four elective courses must

  17. NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    NOAA 2015 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook Dr. Gerry Bell Lead Seasonal Forecaster Climate Prediction Center NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Collaboration With National Hurricane Center/ NOAA/ NWS/ NCEP Hurricane Research Division/ NOAA/ OAR/ AOML/ HRD www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/hurricane #12;Outline 1. Features

  18. A modern solver framework to manage solution algorithms in the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; WhiteIII, James B [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Salinger, Andy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lemieux, Jean-Francois [New York University; Lipscomb, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Perego, Mauro [Florida State University; Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Edwards, Jim [IBM and National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2012-01-01

    Global Earth-system models (ESM) can now produce simulations that resolve ~50 km features and include finer-scale, interacting physical processes. In order to achieve these scale-length solutions, ESMs require smaller time steps, which limits parallel performance. Solution methods that overcome these bottlenecks can be quite intricate, and there is no single set of algorithms that perform well across the range of problems of interest. This creates significant implementation challenges, which is further compounded by complexity of ESMs. Therefore, prototyping and evaluating new algorithms in these models requires a software framework that is flexible, extensible, and easily introduced into the existing software. We describe our efforts to create a parallel solver framework that links the Trilinos library of solvers to Glimmer-CISM, a continental ice sheet model used in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We demonstrate this framework within both current and developmental versions of Glimmer-CISM and provide strategies for its integration into the rest of the CESM.

  19. 2014 Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Conference Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2015-01-27

    The climate and weather data science community met December 9–11, 2014, in Livermore, California, for the fourth annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Conference, hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UVCDATremain global collaborations committed to developing a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to simulated and observed data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure created under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change. In addition, the F2F conference fosters a stronger climate and weather data science community and facilitates a stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2014 F2F conference detailed the progress of ESGF, UV-CDAT, and other community efforts over the year and sets new priorities and requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects, such as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase Six. Specifically discussed at the conference were project capabilities and enhancements needs for data distribution, analysis, visualization, hardware and network infrastructure, standards, and resources.

  20. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geospatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Bell, Gavin; Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Danvil, Sebastian; Drach, Bob; Fiore, Sandro; Gonzalez, Estanislao; Harney, John F; Mattmann, Chris; Kershaw, Philip; Morgan, Mark; Pascoe, Stephen; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi

    2013-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  1. The Earth System Grid Federation: An Open Infrastructure for Access to Distributed Geo-Spatial Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinquini, Luca; Crichton, Daniel; Miller, Neill; Mattmann, Chris; Harney, John F; Shipman, Galen M; Wang, Feiyi; Bell, Gavin; Drach, Bob; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Pascoe, Stephen; Fiore, Sandro; Schweitzer, Roland; Danvil, Sebastian; Morgan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is a multi-agency, international collaboration that aims at developing the software infrastructure needed to facilitate and empower the study of climate change on a global scale. The ESGF s architecture employs a system of geographically distributed peer nodes, which are independently administered yet united by the adoption of common federation protocols and application programming interfaces (APIs). The cornerstones of its interoperability are the peer-to-peer messaging that is continuously exchanged among all nodes in the federation; a shared architecture and API for search and discovery; and a security infrastructure based on industry standards (OpenID, SSL, GSI and SAML). The ESGF software is developed collaboratively across institutional boundaries and made available to the community as open source. It has now been adopted by multiple Earth science projects and allows access to petabytes of geophysical data, including the entire model output used for the next international assessment report on climate change (IPCC-AR5) and a suite of satellite observations (obs4MIPs) and reanalysis data sets (ANA4MIPs).

  2. Highly stable evolution of Earth's future orbit despite chaotic behavior of the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeebe, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Due to the chaotic nature of the Solar System, the question of its dynamic long-term stability can only be answered in a statistical sense, e.g. based on numerical ensemble integrations of nearby orbits. Destabilization, including catastrophic encounters and/or collisions involving the Earth, has been suggested to be initiated through a large increase in Mercury's eccentricity (eM), with an estimated probability of ~1%. However, it has recently been shown that the statistics of numerical Solar System integrations are sensitive to the accuracy and type of numerical algorithm. Here I report results from computationally demanding ensemble integrations (N=1,600 with slightly different initial conditions) at unprecedented accuracy based on the full equations of motion of the eight planets and Pluto over 5Gyr, including contributions from general relativity. The standard symplectic algorithm produced spurious results for highly eccentric orbits and during close encounters, which were hence integrated with a suitabl...

  3. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-20

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a fewmore »hundred m2 s?1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  4. An earth image simulation and tracking system for the Mars Laser Communication Demonstration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balster, Stephanie Karen

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis I created an Earth-image simulation and investigated Earth-tracking algorithms for the Mars Laser Communication Demonstration (MLCD). The MLCD mission will demonstrate the feasibility of high-data-rate laser ...

  5. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    86 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society of London

  6. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    94 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint placement. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society

  7. nown as the "Voice of NOAA's National Weather Service," NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and emergency information. Saving lives is the focus of NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards by providing round that could save your life and those in your family. Make NOAA Weather Radio an essential item for every home and businesses to help protect lives and property from natural and technological hazards. NOAA Weather Radio

  8. The NOAA Central Library To efficiently and effectively provide NOAA staff with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to serve as the center in NOAA for providing NOAA staff with needed infor- mation and knowledge management on time-saving knowledge management and library resources to make research more efficient · Bibliographies and cooperation among scientists engaged in similar work. · Access, preservation, and permanent storage of NOAA

  9. Review of the Organization and Management of Research in NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research to Operations and Information Services - Research Location within NOAA - Extramural Research ....................................................................................51 - Transition of Research to Operations - Research Providing Information Services Appendix VIIi Review of the Organization and Management of Research in NOAA A Report to the NOAA Science

  10. 106 | Triennial Scientific Report EC-EARTH: goals, developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Earth'sglobalclimatesystemisstrongly affectedbytheinteractionsbetweenitsvarioussubsys- tems1) .Asaresult,attentionhasshiftedtothedevelop- mentofEarthSystemModels

  11. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    model for complex terrain. Water Resour Res 30:1665–1679systems (e.g. , land, air, or water). The interconnectednessof nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management

  12. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling...

  13. s the nation's weather and oceans agency, NOAA plays a major role before, during and after a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    real-time data from NOAA's polar orbiting and geostationary weather satellites, ocean and coastal observing systems, and land-based radars. NOAA's local National Weather Service forecast offices incorporate for inland high winds, flooding and severe weather -- including tornadoes. Data from the atmosphere are also

  14. Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Tel : +1 System Program Manager Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Formal NOAA Lead on U.S. climate bi

  15. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

  16. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models...

  17. Research recommendations to the EPA in support of earth system modeling activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosiano, J.J.; Dannevik, W.P.; Kercher, J.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Rotman, D.

    1994-05-06

    A theme which emerges from our simple considerations is that some well-planned early parametric and sensitivity studies, using current-generation coupled Earth system model components, along with simplistic proxy models of terrestrial biospheric and biogeochemical processes, could furnish valuable information to help guide the development of a longer-term plan for research supporting ESM development. This theme is rooted in the premise that the importance of various ESM component processes can be fully assessed only from the perspective of a complete coupling of that process into the ESM context. That is, the question, ``How well must a given process be modelled``? Cannot be answered in isolation, but rather requires a careful blend of process research and coupled model studies.

  18. Social Science in NOAA Weather John Gaynor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social Science in NOAA Weather Research John Gaynor Director Office of Weather and Air Quality NOAA Impacts Program #12;Vision a society that maximizes the net social benefit of weather information Mission improve the societal benefits of weather forecasting Goal national and international focal point of social

  19. NOAA Office of Education Promoting Environmental Literacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Office of Education Promoting Environmental Literacy Science On a Sphere, Orlando Science-cutting priority of promoting environmental literacy. The Office of Education directly implements and manages Center Photo: Orlando Science Center Education Strategic Plan, 2009-2029 Photo: NOAA EPP Ph.D graduate

  20. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium–heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-27

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium–heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedimore »that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s?1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi below the thermocline than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so-called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  1. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ESGF software is distinguished from other collaborative knowledge systems in the climate community by its widespread adoption, federation capabilities, and broad developer base. It is the leading source for present climate data holdings, including the most important and largest data sets in the global-climate community, and - assuming its development continues - we expect it to be the leading source for future climate data holdings as well. Recently, ESG-CET extended its services beyond data-file access and delivery to include more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis. The latter capabilities allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. The ESG-CET team also faces substantial technical challenges due to the rapidly increasing scale of climate simulation and observational data, which will grow, for example, from less than 50 terabytes for the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment to multiple Petabytes for the next IPCC assessment. In a world of exponential technological change and rapidly growing sophistication in climate data analysis, an infrastructure such as ESGF must constantly evolve if it is to remain relevant and useful. Regretfully, we submit our final report at the end of project funding. To continue to serve the climate-science community, we are

  2. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Ann

    Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research Executive Committee: · Dean N. Williams (williams13@llnl.gov), Lawrence Livermore for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national

  3. NOAA's National Weather Service Building a Weather-Ready Nation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's National Weather Service Building a Weather-Ready Nation For more information, please visit: www.noaa.gov and www.nws.noaa.gov NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) is the Nation's official source for weather and water data, forecasts, and warnings. From information accessed on your smartphone

  4. OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

  5. Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research Strategic Data Roadmap for Earth System Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Palanisamy, Giri; Shipman, Galen; Boden, Thomas A.; Voyles, Jimmy W.

    2014-04-25

    Rapid advances in experimental, sensor, and computational technologies and techniques are driving exponential growth in the volume, acquisition rate, variety, and complexity of scientific data. This wealth of scientifically meaningful data has tremendous potential to lead to scientific discovery. However, to achieve scientific breakthroughs, these data must be exploitable—they must be analyzed effectively and efficiently and the results shared and communicated easily within the wider Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) community. The explosion in data complexity and scale makes these tasks exceedingly difficult to achieve, particularly given that an increasing number of disciplines are working across techniques, integrating simulation and experimental or observational results (see Table 5 in Appendix 2). Consequently, we need new approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization that provide research teams with easy-to-use and scalable end-to-end solutions. These solutions must facilitate (and where feasible, automate and capture) every stage in the data lifecycle (shown in Figure 1), from collection to management, annotation, sharing, discovery, analysis, and visualization. In addition, the core functionalities are the same across climate science communities, but they require customization to adapt to specific needs and fit into research and analysis workflows. To this end, the mission of CESD’s Data and Informatics Program is to integrate all existing and future distributed CESD data holdings into a seamless and unified environment for the acceleration of Earth system science.

  6. CHAPTER 1 | 2008 NOAA ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PERFORMANCE RESULTS NOAA divers work to free an endangered monk seal that is entangled in marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. tsunami warning system. The experimental array in 2001 was expanded to a full operational network of 39.S. DART stations to strengthen the U.S. Tsunami Warning System - meeting full operational capability Indian Ocean Tsunami, NOAA has placed Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART II) stations

  7. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  8. The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Focusing Technologies on Climate Datasets and Resource Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-09-26

    This report discusses a project that used prototyping technology to access and analyze climate data. This project was initially funded under the DOE’s Next Generation Internet (NGI) program, with follow-on support from BER and the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) office. In this prototype, we developed Data Grid technologies for managing the movement and replication of large datasets, and applied these technologies in a practical setting (i.e., an ESG-enabled data browser based on current climate data analysis tools), achieving cross-country transfer rates of more than 500 Mb/s. Having demonstrated the potential for remotely accessing and analyzing climate data located at sites across the U.S., we won the “Hottest Infrastructure” award in the Network Challenge event. While the ESG I prototype project substantiated a proof of concept (“Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources”), the SciDAC Earth System Grid (ESG) II project made this a reality. Our efforts targeted the development of metadata technologies (standard schema, XML metadata extraction based on netCDF, and a Metadata Catalog Service), security technologies (Web-based user registration and authentication, and community authorization), data transport technologies (GridFTPenabled OPeNDAP-G for high-performance access, robust multiple file transport and integration with mass storage systems, and support for dataset aggregation and subsetting), as well as web portal technologies to provide interactive access to climate data holdings. At this point, the technology was in place and assembled, and ESG II was poised to make a substantial impact on the climate modelling community.

  9. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  10. Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

  11. Earth's Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-11-17

    Broadcast Transcript: From Mongolia, land of fermented mare's milk, comes this beguiling morsel of nomadic oral tradition. It's called yertonciin gorav or Earth's Three. Earth's three what? Well, Earth's three top things in a number of categories...

  12. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    84 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) and among the most research-intensive in Europe. Features * The Department of Earth and Environmental

  13. New model of angular momentum transfer from the rotating central body of a two-body system into the orbital motion of this system (with application to the earth-moon system)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Schmutzer

    2005-05-11

    In a previous paper we treated within the framework of our Projective Unified Field Theory (Schmutzer 2004, Schmutzer 2005a) the 2-body system (e.g. earth-moon system) with a rotating central body in a rather abstract manner. Here a concrete model of the transfer of angular momentum from the rotating central body to the orbital motion of the whole 2-body system is presented, where particularly the transfer is caused by the inhomogeneous gravitational force of the moon acting on the oceanic waters of the earth, being modeled by a spherical shell around the solid earth. The theory is numerically tested. Key words: transfer of angular momentum from earth to moon, action of the gravitational force of the moon on the waters of the earth.

  14. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  15. Variable C : N : P stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter cycling in the Community Earth System Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Letscher, R. T.; Moore, J. K.; Teng, Y. -C.; Primeau, F.

    2015-01-12

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the ocean's biological carbon pump by providing an advective/mixing pathway for ~ 20% of export production. DOM is known to have a stoichiometry depleted in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compared to the particulate organic matter pool, a fact that is often omitted from biogeochemical ocean general circulation models. However the variable C : N : P stoichiometry of DOM becomes important when quantifying carbon export from the upper ocean and linking the nutrient cycles of N and P with that of carbon. Here we utilize recent advances in DOM observationalmore »data coverage and offline tracer-modeling techniques to objectively constrain the variable production and remineralization rates of the DOM C : N : P pools in a simple biogeochemical-ocean model of DOM cycling. The optimized DOM cycling parameters are then incorporated within the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC) component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and validated against the compilation of marine DOM observations. The optimized BEC simulation including variable DOM C : N : P cycling was found to better reproduce the observed DOM spatial gradients than simulations that used the canonical Redfield ratio. Global annual average export of dissolved organic C, N, and P below 100 m was found to be 2.28 Pg C yr-1 (143 Tmol C yr-1, 16.4 Tmol N yr-1, and 1 Tmol P yr-1, respectively, with an average export C : N : P stoichiometry of 225 : 19 : 1 for the semilabile (degradable) DOM pool. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export contributed ~ 25% of the combined organic C export to depths greater than 100 m.« less

  16. Variable C : N : P stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter cycling in the Community Earth System Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Letscher, R. T.; Moore, J. K.; Teng, Y. -C.; Primeau, F.

    2014-06-16

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the ocean's biological carbon pump by providing an advective/mixing pathway for ~ 20% of export production. DOM is known to have a stoichiometry depleted in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compared to the particulate organic matter pool, a~fact that is often omitted from biogeochemical-ocean general circulation models. However the variable C : N : P stoichiometry of DOM becomes important when quantifying carbon export from the upper ocean and linking the nutrient cycles of N and P with that of carbon. Here we utilize recent advances in DOM observational data coveragemore »and offline tracer-modeling techniques to objectively constrain the variable production and remineralization rates of the DOM C / N / P pools in a simple biogeochemical-ocean model of DOM cycling. The optimized DOM cycling parameters are then incorporated within the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC) component of the Community Earth System Model and validated against the compilation of marine DOM observations. The optimized BEC simulation including variable DOM C : N : P cycling was found to better reproduce the observed DOM spatial gradients than simulations that used the canonical Redfield ratio. Global annual average export of dissolved organic C, N, and P below 100 m was found to be 2.28 Pg C yr-1 (143 Tmol C yr-1), 16.4 Tmol N yr-1, and 1 Tmol P yr-1, respectively with an average export C : N : P stoichiometry of 225 : 19 : 1 for the semilabile (degradable) DOM pool. DOC export contributed ~ 25% of the combined organic C export to depths greater than 100 m.« less

  17. Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators (CI 5540-003) a graduate-level Ecology course designed for pre-and in-service middle and high-school level science teachers and other educators who

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators (CI 5540-003) ­ a graduate for Ecology and Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators CI 5540 ­ 005 for non-degree seekers To register

  18. Simulating the Fate of an Earth-like Planet Inclined to the Ecliptic Plane to Improve Understanding of Planetary System Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Kristin

    2013-02-01

    its dynamics will continue to vary over time. For the Sun-Earth-Jupiter system simulated in this paper (run over 119,000 years), orbits inclined to the ecliptic plane greater than 50° became unstable, with Earth ejection after 62,000 years (85...

  19. NOAA/Mote Marine Laboratory Joint Publication NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 168

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Y. Cantillo NOAA National Ocean Service E. Collins NOAA Central Library S. Stover and K. Hale Mote Mote Marine Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Sarasota, FL Silver Spring, MD National Oceanic and Department of Commerce Atmospheric Administration National Ocean Service Donald L

  20. CHAPTER 6 NOAA EDuCATION NOAA's educAtiON missiON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Education and Training (B-WET) Program Environmental Literacy Grants Hollings Scholarship OED at Sea Program National Weather Service (NWS) NWS Education National Environmental Satellite, Data6-155 CHAPTER 6 NOAA EDuCATION NOAA's educAtiON missiON The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act

  1. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  2. Survey Simulations of an New Near-Earth Asteroid Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mainzer, A; Bauer, J; Conrow, T; Cutri, R M; Dailey, J; Fowler, J; Giorgini, J; Jarrett, T; Masiero, J; Spahr, T; Statler, T; Wright, E L

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out simulations to predict the performance of a new space-based telescopic survey operating at thermal infrared wavelengths that seeks to discover and characterize a large fraction of the potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population. Two potential architectures for the survey were considered: one located at the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point, and one in a Venus-trailing orbit. A sample cadence was formulated and tested, allowing for the self-follow-up necessary for objects discovered in the daytime sky on Earth. Synthetic populations of NEAs with sizes >=140 m in effective spherical diameter were simulated using recent determinations of their physical and orbital properties. Estimates of the instrumental sensitivity, integration times, and slew speeds were included for both architectures assuming the properties of new large-format 10 um detector arrays capable of operating at ~35 K. Our simulation included the creation of a preliminary version of a moving object processing pipeline ...

  3. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assessing the tropical ocean current system partly responsible for the fresh water budget. AOML will alsoAOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Administra- tor of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmo- spheric Research in January and began his new duties

  4. Disordered electronic and magnetic systems - transition metal (Mn) and rare earth (Gd) doped amorphous group IV semiconductors (C, Si, Ge)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2007-01-01

    various transition or rare-earth metals provide a rich ?eldTransition Metal (Mn) and Rare Earth (Gd) Doped AmorphousTransition Metal (Mn) and Rare Earth (Gd) Doped Amorphous

  5. Causes and Implications of Persistent Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Biases in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Arora, Vivek K. [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada] [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada; Bao, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics] [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Cadule, Patricia [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment] [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment; Ji, Duoying [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing] [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing; Jones, Chris D. [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office] [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office; Kawamiya, Michio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)] [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Khatiwala, Samar [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY] [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Obata, Atsushi [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan] [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Shevliakova, Elena [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Six, Katharina D. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany] [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany; Tjiputra, Jerry F. [Uni Climate, Uni Research] [Uni Climate, Uni Research; Volodin, Evgeny M. [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow] [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow; Wu, Tongwen [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing] [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing

    2014-01-01

    The strength of feedbacks between a changing climate and future CO2 concentrations are uncertain and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). We analyzed emission-driven simulations--in which atmospheric CO2 levels were computed prognostically--for historical (1850-2005) and future periods (RCP 8.5 for 2006-2100) produced by 15 ESMs for the Fifth Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Comparison of ESM prognostic atmospheric CO2 over the historical period with observations indicated that ESMs, on average, had a small positive bias in predictions of contemporary atmospheric CO2. Weak ocean carbon uptake in many ESMs contributed to this bias, based on comparisons with observations of ocean and atmospheric anthropogenic carbon inventories. We found a significant linear relationship between contemporary atmospheric CO2 biases and future CO2 levels for the multi-model ensemble. We used this relationship to create a contemporary CO2 tuned model (CCTM) estimate of the atmospheric CO2 trajectory for the 21st century. The CCTM yielded CO2 estimates of 600 {plus minus} 14 ppm at 2060 and 947 {plus minus} 35 ppm at 2100, which were 21 ppm and 32 ppm below the multi-model mean during these two time periods. Using this emergent constraint approach, the likely ranges of future atmospheric CO2, CO2-induced radiative forcing, and CO2-induced temperature increases for the RCP 8.5 scenario were considerably narrowed compared to estimates from the full ESM ensemble. Our analysis provided evidence that much of the model-to-model variation in projected CO2 during the 21st century was tied to biases that existed during the observational era, and that model differences in the representation of concentration-carbon feedbacks and other slowly changing carbon cycle processes appear to be the primary driver of this variability. By improving models to more closely match the long-term time series of CO2 from Mauna Loa, our analysis suggests uncertainties in future climate projections can be reduced.

  6. Coupling dry deposition to vegetation phenology in the Community Earth System Model: Implications for the simulation of surface O[subscript 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val?Martin, M.

    Dry deposition is an important removal process controlling surface ozone. We examine the representation of this ozone loss mechanism in the Community Earth System Model. We first correct the dry deposition parameterization ...

  7. Chapter 32: Beyond the earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Chapter 32: Beyond the earth Did you read chapter 32 before coming to class? A. Yes B the planets. We began our study of the history of the solar system by studying the history of the earth decreased. How about the rest of the solar system? Some stats on the Sun Time for light to reach Earth · 8

  8. NOAA Central Library July 2012 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Central Library July 2012 1 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce National Undersea Research Program Bibliography: Preliminary Statistics Compiled by Chris Belter, NOAA Central Library July 2012 #12;NOAA Central Library July 2012 2 Introduction This report presents

  9. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE SANDY Silver Spring, Maryland January 24 Report HURRICANE SANDY Colleen Fanelli, Paul Fanelli, David Wolcott January 24, 2013 noaa National, Richard Edwing #12;NOAA NOS Hurricane Sandy Water Level & Meteorological Data Report 1 Table of Contents

  10. 3rd Annual Earth System Grid Federation and 3rd Annual Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Face-to-Face Meeting Report December 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2014-02-21

    The climate and weather data science community gathered December 3–5, 2013, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in Livermore, California, for the third annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Meeting, which was hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UV-CDAT are global collaborations designed to develop a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to observed and simulated data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure developed under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change, while the F2F meetings help to build a stronger climate and weather data science community and stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2013 F2F meeting determined requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects; enhancements needed for data distribution, analysis, and visualization infrastructure; and standards and resources needed for better collaborations.

  11. Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn,Christopher FeckoJames (Jim)TimEventsEarth

  12. CHAPTER 6NOAA Research & Development NOAA research scientist Randy Johnson inpsecting an autonomous weather balloon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scieNtists develOp simple mOdel tO predict glObAl pAtterNs iN mAriNe eNergy trANsfers In 2009, NOAA Production in Marine Ecosystems - on global patterns in the transfer of energy from phytoplankton ecosystem processes and impact our ability to manage marine ecosystems and forecast their future state? NOAA

  13. A BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF CLIMATE ENGINEERING RESEARCH Christopher W. Belter (Chris.Belter@noaa.gov), NOAA Central Library, LAC Group, Silver Spring, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .Belter@noaa.gov), NOAA Central Library, LAC Group, Silver Spring, MD Dian J. Seidel, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory the publication trends, geo- graphic distribution, intellectual structure, and col- laborative network

  14. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reporting ozonesonde stations), the ozone in the 16-24 km layer of the low stratosphere decreased by aboutNOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT ­ Extreme Turbulence (ET) Probe 2. Climate Research Committee Report 3. Global

  15. Stephani Zador NOAA Alaska Fishery Sciences Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Sept Sept, Nov Dec Public input Ecosystem information added at each level #12;From Council minutes, DecemberStephani Zador NOAA Alaska Fishery Sciences Center Ecosystem-based management in Alaska: The role of seabirds as indicators of ecosystem change Seabirds Forage fish Zooplankton Climate #12;#12;Goals

  16. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 106 Marine Ranching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry through marketing seIVice and economic analysis programs and through mortage insurance and vessel the following types of reports: scientific investigations that document long-term continuing programs of NMFS, once accepted, receive professional editing before publication. Copies of NOAA Technical Reports NMFS

  17. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 102 Marine Ranching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    marketing service and economic analysis programs and through mortage insurance and vessel construction types of reports: scientific investigations that document long-term continuing programs of NMFS accepted, receive professional editing before publication. Copies of NOAA Technical Reports NMFS are avail

  18. Livermore Lab's giant laser system will bring star power to Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2010-04-08

    In the 50 years since the laser was first demonstrated in Malibu, California, on May 16, 1960, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a world leader in laser technology and the home for many of the world's most advanced laser systems. That tradition continues today at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system. NIF's completion in March 2009 not only marked the dawn of a new era of scientific research - it could also prove to be the next big step in the quest for a sustainable, carbon-free energy source for the world. NIF consists of 192 laser beams that will focus up to 1.8 million joules of energy on a bb-sized target filled with isotopes of hydrogen - forcing the hydrogen nuclei to collide and fuse in a controlled thermonuclear reaction similar to what happens in the sun and the stars. More energy will be produced by this 'ignition' reaction than the amount of laser energy required to start it. This is the long-sought goal of 'energy gain' that has eluded fusion researchers for more than half a century. Success will be a scientific breakthrough - the first demonstration of fusion ignition in a laboratory setting, duplicating on Earth the processes that power the stars. This impending success could not be achieved without the valuable partnerships forged with other national and international laboratories, private industry and universities. One of the most crucial has been between LLNL and the community in which it resides. Over 155 businesses in the local Tri-Valley area have contributed to the NIF, from industrial technology and engineering firms to tool manufacturing, electrical, storage and supply companies. More than $2.3B has been spent locally between contracts with nearby merchants and employee salaries. The Tri-Valley community has enabled the Laboratory to complete a complex and far-reaching project that will have national and global impact in the future. The first experiments were conducted on NIF last summer and fall, successfully delivering a world-record level of ultraviolet laser energy - more than 1.2 million joules - to a target. The experiments also demonstrated the target drive and target capsule conditions required to achieve fusion ignition. When ignition experiments begin later this year, NIF's lasers will create temperatures and pressures in the hydrogen target that exist only in the cores of stars and giant planets and inside thermonuclear weapons. As a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Stockpile Stewardship Program, NIF will offer the means for sustaining a safe, secure and reliable U.S. nuclear deterrent without nuclear testing. NIF is uniquely capable of providing the experimental data needed to develop and validate computer models that will enable scientists to assess the continuing viability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. Along with this vital national security mission, success at NIF also offers the possibility of groundbreaking scientific discoveries in a wide variety of disciplines ranging from hydrodynamics to astrophysics. As a unique facility in the world that can create the conditions that exist in supernovas and in the cores of giant planets, NIF will help unlock the secrets of the cosmos and inspire the next generation of scientists. It is NIF's third mission, energy security that has been generating the most excitement in the news media and the international scientific community. The reasons are obvious: global energy demand, driven by population growth and the aspirations of the developing world, already is straining the planet's existing energy resources. Global need for electricity is expected to double from its current level of about two trillion watts (TW) to four TW by 2030 and could reach eight to ten TW by the end of the century. As many as 10,000 new billion-watt power plants will have to be built to keep up with this demand. Meeting this pressing need will require a sustainable carbon-free energy technology that can supply base load electricity to the world. Successful ignition experim

  19. Dynamics of Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroid Systems: A Study Based on Radar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    Murray and S.F. Dermott. Solar System Dynamics. CambridgeMurray and S.F. Dermott. Solar System Dynamics. Cambridgea wide range of important solar system processes that shape

  20. Earth Syst. Dynam., 4, 187198, 2013 www.earth-syst-dynam.net/4/187/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuyev, Sergei

    Planck Research School for Earth System Modelling, Hamburg, Germany 2Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

  1. Behavior of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems; A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Wood

    2002-01-28

    The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; (5) Palinpion, the Philippines: (6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two.

  2. A Hubble space telescope search for a sub-Earth-sized exoplanet in the GJ 436 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Kevin B. [NASA Sagan Fellow. (United States); Bean, Jacob L.; Fabrycky, Daniel; Kreidberg, Laura, E-mail: kbs@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The detection of small planets orbiting nearby stars is an important step toward the identification of Earth twins. In previous work using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we found evidence to support at least one sub-Earth-sized exoplanet orbiting the nearby mid-M dwarf star GJ 436. As a follow up, here we used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to investigate the existence of one of these candidate planets, UCF-1.01, by searching for two transit signals as it passed in front of its host star. Interpretation of the data hinges critically on correctly modeling and removing the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument systematics from the light curves. Building on previous HST work, we demonstrate that WFC3 analyses need to explore the use of a quadratic function to fit a visit-long time-dependent systematic. This is important for establishing absolute transit and eclipse depths in the white light curves of all transiting systems. The work presented here exemplifies this point by putatively detecting the primary transit of UCF-1.01 with the use of a linear trend. However, using a quadratic trend, we achieve a better fit to the white light curves and a reduced transit depth that is inconsistent with previous Spitzer measurements. Furthermore, quadratic trends with or without a transit model component produce comparable fits to the available data. Using extant WFC3 transit light curves for GJ 436b, we further validate the quadratic model component by achieving photon-limited model fit residuals and consistent transit depths over multiple epochs. We conclude that, when we fit for a quadratic trend, our new data contradict the prediction of a sub-Earth-sized planet orbiting GJ 436 with the size, period, and ephemeris posited from the Spitzer data by a margin of 3.1?.

  3. Slide 1 Fig 7-1, p.154 Planet Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardle, Mark

    Slide 1 Fig 7-1, p.154 Planet Earth #12;Slide 2 The New Solar System ch9 #12;Slide 3 Fig 7-2, p.155 Interior Structure of the Earth #12;Slide 4 Fig 7-4, p.156 Earth!s Magnetosphere #12;Slide 5 The New Solar System ch9 #12;Slide 6 Fig 7-3, p.155 Earth!s Crust #12;Slide 7 Fig 7-6, p.157 Earth!s Continental Plates

  4. Reply to comment by Keith J. Beven and Hannah L. Cloke on â??Hyperresolution global land surface modeling: Meeting a grand challenge for monitoring Earth's terrestrial waterâ?ť

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    robust hyper-resolution Earth System Models that includedevelopment of ‘‘Earth System Climate Models’’ that include

  5. The Leo Archipelago: A System of Earth-Rings for Communications, Mass-Transport to Space, Solar Power, and Control of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Meulenberg; Karthik Balaji

    2010-09-21

    A multi-purpose low-earth-orbit system of rings circling the earth - the "LEO ARCHIPELAGO" - is proposed as a means of solving or bypassing many major problems hindering man's quest to get into space. A fiber-optic ring about the earth would be an initial testing and developmental stage for the ring systems, while providing cash-flow through a LEO-based, high-band-width, world-wide communication system. A Low-Earth-Orbit-based space-elevator system, "Sling-on-a-Ring," is proposed as the crucial developmental stage of the LEO Archipelago. Being a LEO-based heavy-mass lifter, rather than earth- or GEO-based, it is much less massive and therefore less costly than other proposed space-elevators. With the advent of lower-cost, higher-mass transport to orbit, the options for further space development (e.g., communications, space solar power, radiation dampers, sun shades, and permanent LEO habitation) are greatly expanded. This paper provides an update of the Sling-on-a-Ring concept in terms of new materials, potential applications, and trade-offs associated with an earlier model. The impact of Colossal Carbon Tubes, CCT, a material with high tensile strength, extremely-low density, and other favorable properties and new technologies (e.g., solar-powered lasers, power beaming to near-space and earth, and thermal-control systems) on the development of associated LEO-Ring systems (e.g., "Solar-Shade Rings" and "Power Rings") is also explored. The material's effect on the timeline for the system development indicates the feasibility of near-term implementation of the system (possibly within the decade). The Sling-on-a-Ring can provide a less-expensive, environment-friendly, mode of access to space. This would pave the way (via eventual operation at >1000 tonnes per day by 2050) for large scale development of space-based technologies.

  6. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET): A Data Infrastructure for Data-Intensive Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.

    2011-06-03

    For the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), the ESG-CET team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultrascale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (e.g., Couple Model Intercomparison Project, Community Earth System Model), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and so forth), and analysis and visualization tools, all of which serve a diverse community of users. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL) as well as at unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory. More recently, ESG-CET has been extending services beyond data-file access and delivery to develop more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis capabilities. These will allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. Continued ESGF progress will result in a production ultrascale data system for empowering scientists who attempt new and exciting data exchanges that could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate-science discoveries.

  7. A pre-feasibility study to assess the potential of Open Loop Ground Source Heat to heat and cool the proposed Earth Science Systems Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A pre-feasibility study to assess the potential of Open Loop Ground Source Heat to heat and cool the proposed Earth Science Systems Building at the University of British Columbia Abha Parajulee Kim Smet............................................................1 1.2. History of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems................................................3 1

  8. Eco-Hydro-Climate Science/Engineering in SESE Definition: An emerging frontier in Earth system science is the interaction of ecological,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Eco-Hydro-Climate Science/Engineering in SESE Definition: An emerging frontier in Earth system that are `retooled' to treat the coupled eco-hydro-climate system. Arid and semiarid regions (deserts) are a fruitful Southwest is thus an ideal laboratory for eco-hydro-climate studies and provides several case studies

  9. Dark matter in the solar system I: The distribution function of WIMPs at the Earth from solar capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annika H. G. Peter

    2009-02-09

    The next generation of dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments and neutrino telescopes will probe large swaths of dark matter parameter space. In order to interpret the signals in these experiments, it is necessary to have good models of both the halo DM streaming through the solar system and the population of DM bound to the solar system. In this paper, the first in a series of three on DM in the solar system, we present simulations of orbits of DM bound to the solar system by solar capture in a toy solar system consisting of only the Sun and Jupiter, assuming that DM consists of a single species of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP). We describe how the size of the bound WIMP population depends on the WIMP mass, spin-independent cross section, and spin-dependent cross section. Using a standard description of the Galactic DM halo, we find that the maximum enhancement to the direct detection event rate, consistent with current experimental constraints on the WIMP-nucleon cross section, is Earth is unlikely to meet the threshold of next-generation, km^3-sized (IceCube, KM3NeT) neutrino telescopes.

  10. The Leo Archipelago: A System of Earth-Rings for Communications, Mass-Transport to Space, Solar Power, and Control of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meulenberg, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A multi-purpose low-earth-orbit system of rings circling the earth - the "LEO ARCHIPELAGO" - is proposed as a means of solving or bypassing many major problems hindering man's quest to get into space. A fiber-optic ring about the earth would be an initial testing and developmental stage for the ring systems, while providing cash-flow through a LEO-based, high-band-width, world-wide communication system. A Low-Earth-Orbit-based space-elevator system, "Sling-on-a-Ring," is proposed as the crucial developmental stage of the LEO Archipelago. Being a LEO-based heavy-mass lifter, rather than earth- or GEO-based, it is much less massive and therefore less costly than other proposed space-elevators. With the advent of lower-cost, higher-mass transport to orbit, the options for further space development (e.g., communications, space solar power, radiation dampers, sun shades, and permanent LEO habitation) are greatly expanded. This paper provides an update of the Sling-on-a-Ring concept in terms of new materials, poten...

  11. Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

    2012-01-01

    in an efficient Earth System Model of global biogeochemicalgridded domains (121) to Earth system models of intermediate

  12. Substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: a framework for Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Schimel, Joshua; Thornton, Peter E; Song, Xia; Yuan, Fengming; Goswami, Santonu

    2014-01-01

    Microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is one of the fundamental processes of global carbon cycling and it determines the magnitude of microbial biomass in soils. Mechanistic understanding of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls is important for to improve Earth system models ability to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks. Although microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is broadly considered to be an important parameter, it really comprises two separate physiological processes: one-time assimilation efficiency and time-dependent microbial maintenance energy. Representing of these two mechanisms is crucial to more accurately simulate carbon cycling in soils. In this study, a simple modeling framework was developed to evaluate the substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon using a new term: microbial annual active period (the length of microbes remaining active in one year). Substrate quality has a positive effect on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: higher substrate quality (lower C:N ratio) leads to higher ratio of microbial carbon to soil organic carbon and vice versa. Increases in microbial annual active period from zero stimulate microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon; however, when microbial annual active period is longer than an optimal threshold, increasing this period decreases microbial biomass. The simulated ratios of soil microbial biomass to soil organic carbon are reasonably consistent with a recently compiled global dataset at the biome-level. The modeling framework of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls developed in this study offers an applicable ways to incorporate microbial contributions to the carbon cycling into Earth system models for simulating carbon-climate feedbacks and to explain global patterns of microbial biomass.

  13. Luminescent nanocrystals in the rare-earth niobate–zirconia system formed via hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori Dozono, Hayato

    2013-08-15

    Luminescent nanocrystals based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}, were hydrothermally formed as cubic phase under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. The lattice parameter of the as-prepared nanoparticles corresponding to the composition of Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7}–4ZrO{sub 2} that was estimated as a single phase of cubic gradually increased as the content of europium x increased. The existence of small absorbance peaks at 395 and 466 nm corresponding to the Eu{sup 3+7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}L{sub 6}, and {sup 7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}D{sub 2} excitation transition, respectively, was clearly observed in the diffuse reflectance spectra of the as-prepared samples containing europium. The optical band gap of the as-prepared samples was in the range from 3.5 to 3.7 eV. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium showed orange and red luminescences with main peaks at 590 and 610 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, under excitation at 395 nm Xe lamp. The emission intensity corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition increased as heat-treatment temperature rose from 800 to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract shows the excitation and emission spectra and a transmission electron microscopy image of nanocrystals (with composition based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}) formed via hydrothermal route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystals composed of 50 mol% Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2} was directly formed. • The nanocrystals were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. • The Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} showed an UV-blue and broad-band emission under excitation at 240 nm. • The emission is originated from the niobate octahedral group [NbO{sub 6}]{sup 7?}. • The nanocrystals showed orange and red luminescences ({sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} , Eu{sup 3+})

  14. NOAA/NMFS Developments John Byrne Is New NOAA Administrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pre- pared a "one-stop" licensing system for commercial development of ocean ther- mal energy in the Federal ReRisler on 31 July. The licensing program is being con- November 1981. 4]1111 An Ocean Energy on imported oil, have ready access to thermal resources. "If U.S. private industry reaches even a small

  15. 146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science ESCI 101 The Earth or ESCI 102 Evolution of the Earth or ESCI 107 Oceans and Global Change or ESCI 108 Crises of the Earth ESCI 105 Introductory Lab for Earth Geophysics I ESCI 444 Exploration Geophysics II or ESCI 446 Solid Earth Geophysics Math and Other Sciences

  16. System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Herbert W. (Oakland, CA); Porter, Terry J. (Ridgecrest, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

  17. An Alternative Model for the Tidal Evolution of the Earth-Moon-Sun System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbab I. Arbab

    2007-09-12

    We have found that the expansion of the universe has immense consequences on our local systems. We present a model based on cosmic expansion that fits well with observation. The close approach problem inflicting tidal theory is averted in this model. We have shown that the astronomical and geological changes of our local systems are of the order of Hubble constant.

  18. NOAA / AOML Thermosalinograph (TSG) M/V Explorer Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..............................8 Iridium Freeze-Up 9 AMVERSEAS Freeze-Up 10 Blackout 10 NOAA/AOML TSG Procedures Page 1 of 10 #12

  19. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  20. Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakubowski, Mariusz H.

    Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape In Brief Websites: layerscape Earth in three-dimensional space and time. Oceanographers and earth scientists are using this free set of serious illness in the hospital was pneumonia." The Earth is a vast, complicated system comprised

  1. Earth's Magnetosphere

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50 years ago - are a pair of donut shaped zones of charged particles that surround Earth and occupy the inner region of our planet's Magnetosphere. The outer belt contains...

  2. THE CITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING December 14, 2010 Earth System Science & Environmental Engineering Academic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    the list below 3 cr.. CE 36500 Hydrology & Hydraulic Engr Pre: CE 350000 (C min.) or ME 35600 or ChE 341000 Topics in RS Energy ChE59812:Energy Systems Eng EE35700: Power Engineering EE45500: Elements of Power Sys ME43300:Heat Transfer ME47100: Energy Sys Design ME53600:Energy Conversion ME54700: Env Control 6cr

  3. OFFICE OF BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH Climate and Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and their interactions with climate under conditions of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), we need to develop-analyses of terrestrial ecosystem manipulations of carbon dioxide, warming, nutrients, soil moisture, and tree cover benchmarking system that leverages a growing collection of laboratory, field, and remote sensing data

  4. THE CITY COLLEGE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING November 12, 2013 EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    ENGR 55500 Reactor Thermal Hydraulics ENGR 55600 Nuclear Reactor Design, Operation and Safety ENGR Heat Transfer ME47100 Energy Systems Design ME53600 Energy Conversion ME54700 Environmental Control ME55600 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ME 53700 Turbomachinery Design ENGR 55400 Reactor Physics and Engineering

  5. The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2004-01-01

    The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water quality: the Afon Hafren, mid-Wales 503 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 8(3), 503520 (2004) © EGU The impact of conifer harvesting on stream water Email for corresponding author: cn@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Results for long term water quality monitoring

  6. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Variability in the Community Earth System Model: Evaluation and Transient Dynamics during the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    pathways (RCPs 4.5 and 8.5) using the Community Earth System Model­Biogeochemistry (CESM1- BGC). CO2 fuel emissions and terrestrial carbon exchange. In the RCP8.5 simulation, where CO2 increased to 1150 emitted by human activities is taken up by the ocean or terrestrial ecosystems, with 45% remaining

  7. The Future of Nature: How do the views of Nature...including the living systems of Earth... differ in McKibben's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Future of Nature: How do the views of Nature...including the living systems of Earth... differ of human/Nature interaction, speculating about its future in 2050 (both books implicitly make into the future, while also speculating about `surprises'. Exploit the value of history in helping foresee

  8. Lechowicz, M.J., 2001. Phenology. In the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, Volume 2. The Earth System:biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechowicz, Martin J.

    Lechowicz, M.J., 2001. Phenology. In the Encyclopedia of Global Environmental Change, Volume 2. The Earth System:biological and ecological dimensions of global environmental change. Wiley, London. Phenology Martin J. Lechowicz Department of Biology McGill University Montréal, Québec, CANADA Phenology

  9. Mars, the Moon, and the Ends of the Earth: Autonomy for Small Reactor Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been considering deep space missions that utilize a small-reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power. Additionally, application of SRPS modules as a planetary power source is being investigated to enable a continuous human presence for nonpolar lunar sites and on Mars. A SRPS can supply high-sustained power for space and surface applications that is both reliable and mass efficient. The use of small nuclear reactors for deep space or planetary missions presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Current-generation terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a SRPS employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. While surface power systems for planetary outposts face less extreme delays and periods of isolation and may benefit from limited maintenance capabilities, considerations such as human safety, resource limitations and usage priorities, and economics favor minimizing direct, continuous human interaction with the SRPS for online, dedicated power system management. Thus, a SRPS control system for space or planetary missions must provide capabilities for operational autonomy. For terrestrial reactors, large-scale power plants remain the preferred near-term option for nuclear power generation. However, the desire to reduce reliance on carbon-emitting power sources in developing countries may lead to increased consideration of SRPS modules for local power generation in remote regions that are characterized by emerging, less established infrastructures. Additionally, many Generation IV (Gen IV) reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery and economic efficiency that promote significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance staff over current-generation nuclear power plants. To accomplish these Gen IV goals and also address the SRPS remote-siting challenges, higher levels of automation, fault tolerance, and advanced diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. Essentially, the SRPS control system for several anticipated terrestrial applications can benefit from the kind of operational autonomy that is necessary for deep space and planetary SRPS-enabled missions. Investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control confirmed that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. As an example, NASA has pursued autonomy for spacecraft and surface exploration vehicles (e.g., rovers) to reduce mission costs, increase efficiency for communications between ground control and the vehicle, and enable independent operation of the vehicle during times of communications blackout. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and fully automated control of normal SRPS operations is clearly feasible. However, the space-based and remote terrestrial applications of SRPS modules require autonomous capabilities that can accommodate nonoptimum operations when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor while immediate human intervention is not possible. The independent action provided by autonomous control, which is distinct from the more limited self action of automated control, can satisfy these conditions. Key characteristics that distinguish autonomous control i

  10. A metallurgical approach toward alloying in rare earth permanen magnet systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branagan, D. J.

    1995-02-23

    The approach was developed to allow microstructural enhancement and control during solidification and processing. Compound additions of Group IVA, VA, or VIA transition metals (TM) and carbon were added to Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (2-14-1). Transition metal carbides formed in IVA (TiC, ZrC, HfC) and Group VA (VC, NbC, TaC) systems, but not in the VIA system. The alloying ability of each TM carbide was graded using phase stability, liquid and equilibrium solid solubility, and high temperature carbide stability. Ti with C additions was chosen as the best system. The practically zero equilibrium solid solubility means that the Ti and C additions will ultimately form TiC after heat treatment which allows the development of a composite microstructure consisting of the 2-14-1 phase and TiC. Thus, the excellent intrinsic magnetic properties of the 2-14-1 phase remain unaltered and the extrinsic properties relating to the microstructure are enhanced due to the TiC stabilized microstructure which is much more resistant to grain growth. When Ti + C are dissolved in the liquid melt or solid phases, such as the glass or 2-14-1 phase, the intrinsic properties are changed; favorable changes include increased glass forming ability, reduced optimum cooling rate, increased optimum energy product, and enhanced nucleation kinetics of crystallization.

  11. Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 United States decisions regarding our resources and economic well-being. NOAA Research's FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 Strategic Plan is guided by the vision and goals expressed in the agency's Strategic Plan. We support a broad range

  12. International NOAA's Priorities to Combat Global IUU Fishing in 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Fisheries NOAA's Priorities to Combat Global IUU Fishing in 2013 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is committed to promoting the sustainable management of fish stocks and supporting the economic health of U.S. fishing communities. Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU

  13. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weather satellite and information service · Center to protect electric grids and communications assets to support operational space weather monitoring and forecasting. NOAA Satellites Serve the Nation · NOAA satellites enable timely and accurate weather forecasts, watches, and warnings used by Federal, State

  14. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES NOAA's NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 PRODUCTS AND SERVICES GUIDE NOAA's NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER ASHEVILLE, NC 2014 Edition right of the page. #12;4 NOAA's National Climatic Data Center A Message from the National Climatic Data Center's Director The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) offers a wide variety of products and services

  15. PRODUCTS AND SERVICES NOAA's NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 PRODUCTS AND SERVICES GUIDE NOAA's NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER ASHEVILLE, NC 2013 Edition...................................................................................................... 80 #12;4 NOAA's National Climatic Data Center A message from the Director, National Climatic Data Center The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) offers a wide range of products and services. Our users

  16. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS OF OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION OVER THE BIGHydrology (HYDRO) ofthe National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river and water supply, and conducts pertinent research and development NOAA Teclmical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STORM AND ANTECEDENT PRECIPITATION OVER TECHNICAL MEMORANDUMS National Weather Service. Office of Hydrology Series The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate prompt distribution of scientific

  18. 5, 28432931, 2012 The Norwegian Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    GMDD 5, 2843­2931, 2012 The Norwegian Earth System Model, NorESM1-M M. Bentsen et al. Title Page to the corresponding final paper in GMD if available. The Norwegian Earth System Model, NorESM1-M ­ Part 1: Description The Norwegian Earth System Model, NorESM1-M M. Bentsen et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  19. 4, 71397166, 2004 The Modular Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , the typical approach towards Earth System Modeling has been to couple existing models of different domains computer modeling is to pursue Earth System models. The aim is to capture feedback mechanisms between philosophy to pursue an interactively coupled Earth System model ap- proach is partly based

  20. Degree-1 Earth deformation from very long baseline interferometry measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    of the center of mass of the Earth system through satellite orbit models and the former purely on observing earth and the center of mass of the entire Earth system (Earth, oceans and atmosphere). The load momentDegree-1 Earth deformation from very long baseline interferometry measurements D. Lavalle´e and G

  1. Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and its activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) coordinates, the National Research Council`s advice to the federal government on solid-earth science issues. The board identifies opportunities for advancing basic research and understanding, reports on applications of earth sciences in such areas as disaster mitigation and resource utilization, and analyzes the scientific underpinnings and credibility of earth science information for resource, environmental and other applications and policy decision. Committees operating under the guidance of the Board conducts studies addressing specific issues within the earth sciences. The current committees are as follows: Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data; Mapping Sciences Committee; Committee on Seismology; Committee on Geodesy; Rediscovering Geography Committee; Committee on Research Programs of the US Bureau of Mines. The following recent reports are briefly described: research programs of the US Bureau of Mines, first assessment 1994; Mount Rainier, active cascade volcano; the national geomagnetic initiative; reservoir class field demonstration program; solid-earth sciences and society; data foundation for the national spatial infrastructure; promoting the national spatial data infrastructure through partnerships; toward a coordinated spatial data infrastructure for the nation; and charting a course into the digital era; guidance to the NOAA`s nautical charting mission.

  2. Quantum Effects on all Lagrangian Points and Prospects to Measure Them in the Earth-Moon System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmanuele Battista; Giampiero Esposito; Simone Dell' Agnello; Jules Simo

    2015-06-16

    The one-loop long distance quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential imply tiny but observable effects in the restricted three-body problem of celestial mechanics, i.e., both at the Lagrangian points of stable equilibrium and at those of unstable equilibrium the Newtonian values of planetoid's coordinates are changed by a few millimetres in the Earth-Moon system. First, we find that the equations governing the position of both noncollinear and collinear quantum libration points are algebraic fifth degree and ninth degree equations, respectively. Second, we discuss the prospects to measure, with the help of laser ranging, the above departure from the equilateral triangle picture, which is a challenging task. On the other hand, a modern version of the planetoid is the solar sail, and much progress has been made, in recent years, on the displaced periodic orbits of solar sails at all libration points. By taking into account the quantum corrections to the Newtonian potential, displaced periodic orbits of the solar sail at libration points are again found to exist.

  3. Earth Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements Report ofEnergyEarlyEarthEarth

  4. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Siebenlist, F.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Bell, G.; Drach, R.; Ahrens, J.; Jones, P.; Brown, D.; Chastang, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, P.; Harper, D.; Hook, N.; Nienhouse, E.; Strand, G.; West, P.; Wilcox, H.; Wilhelmi, N.; Zednik, S.; Hankin, S.; Schweitzer, R.; Bernholdt, D.; Chen, M.; Miller, R.; Shipman, G.; Wang, F.; Bharathi, S.; Chervenak, A.; Schuler, R.; Su, M.

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  5. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 1. Scandium Group (Sc, Y, La)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warsaw (Poland); Gumi?ski, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China)

    2014-03-15

    This work presents an assessment of solubility data for rare earth metal fluorides (generally of trivalent metals and of CeF{sub 4}) in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were seldom studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or binary salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. The literature has been covered through the end of 2013.

  6. MODELING THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF THE EARTH-MOON SYSTEM: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF EARTHLIKE EXTRASOLAR PLANETS AND THEIR MOONLIKE COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Tyler D., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [NASA Astrobiology Institute. (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The Moon maintains large surface temperatures on its illuminated hemisphere and can contribute significant amounts of flux to spatially unresolved thermal infrared (IR) observations of the Earth-Moon system, especially at wavelengths where Earth's atmosphere is absorbing. In this paper we investigate the effects of an unresolved companion on IR observations of Earthlike exoplanets. For an extrasolar twin Earth-Moon system observed at full phase at IR wavelengths, the Moon consistently comprises about 20% of the total signal, approaches 30% of the signal in the 9.6 {mu}m ozone band and the 15 {mu}m carbon dioxide band, makes up as much as 80% of the signal in the 6.3 {mu}m water band, and more than 90% of the signal in the 4.3 {mu}m carbon dioxide band. These excesses translate to inferred brightness temperatures for Earth that are too large by 20-40 K and demonstrate that the presence of undetected satellites can have significant impacts on the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets. The thermal flux contribution from an airless companion depends strongly on phase, implying that observations of exoplanets should be taken when the star-planet-observer angle (i.e., phase angle) is as large as feasibly possible if contributions from companions are to be minimized. We show that, by differencing IR observations of an Earth twin with a companion taken at both gibbous and crescent phases, Moonlike satellites may be detectable by future exoplanet characterization missions for a wide range of system inclinations.

  7. ENVIR 202B: Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 Essay #3, WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIR 202B: Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 Essay #3, WATER Draft version due://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tsunami-hazard/) . Use examples from Indonesia and Hawaii to explore how the shape of the depth profile affects and the ecosystem. W5 - GROUNDWATER FLOW ­ AQUIFERS AND POLLUTION Chapter 5 of McNeill discusses "The history

  8. NOAA Central Library Draft November 2012 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Central Library Draft November 2012 1 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US by Chris Belter, Sarah Davis, Jan Thomas, and Christie Wiley: NOAA Central and Regional Libraries Analysis by Chris Belter: NOAA Central Library November 2012 #12;NOAA Central Library Draft November 2012 2 About

  9. Earth System History Announcements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    provided more support than the splayed arrangement of the Amphibian legs. · The jaws became better adapted of the Amphibian legs. · The jaws became better adapted for biting and tearing. · The body of reptiles is covered usually have five toes and are variously adapted for swimming, running, climbing, although they are absent

  10. Breaking Earth Poems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Scott Mcnaul

    2012-01-01

    CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Breaking Earth Poems A Thesis submittedFestival……………………………………………………………………..…..14 Earth Against Mylittle else in their hands. Earth Against My Back I lay in

  11. Earth & Environmental Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth & Environmental Science Earth & Environmental Science1354608000000Earth & Environmental ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.No...

  12. Differences in carbon cycle and temperature projections from emission- and concentration-driven earth system model simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shao, P.; Zeng, X.; Zeng, X.

    2014-08-29

    The influence of prognostic and prescribed atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) on the carbon uptake and temperature is investigated using all eight Earth System Models (ESMs) with relevant output variables from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Under the RCP8.5 scenario, the projected [CO2] differences in 2100 vary from -19.7 to +207.3 ppm in emission-driven ESMs. Incorporation of the interactive concentrations also increases the range of global warming, computed as the 20 year average difference between 2081–2100 and 1850–1869/1861–1880, by 49% from 2.36 K (i.e. ranging from 3.11 to 5.47 K) in the concentration-driven simulations to 3.51 K inmore »the emission-driven simulations. The observed seasonal amplitude of global [CO2] from 1980–2011 is about 1.2–5.3 times as large as those from the eight emission-driven ESMs, while the [CO2] seasonality is simply neglected in concentration-driven ESMs, suggesting the urgent need of ESM improvements in this area. The temperature-concentration feedback parameter ? is more sensitive to [CO2] (e.g. during 1980–2005 versus 2075–2100) than how [CO2] is handled (i.e. prognostic versus prescribed). This sensitivity can be substantially reduced by using a more appropriate parameter ?' computed from the linear regression of temperature change versus that of the logarithm of [CO2]. However, the inter-model relative variations of both ? and ?' remain large, suggesting the need of more detailed studies to understand and hopefully reduce these discrepancies.« less

  13. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  14. Description and Evaluation of Tropospheric Chemistry and Aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Emmons, L.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Ma, Po-Lun; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Bardeen, C.; Arnold, S.; Deeter, M.; Vitt, Francis; Ryerson, T. B.; Elkins, J. W.; Moore, F.; Spackman, R.; Martin, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), version 5, is now coupled to extensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, called CAM5-chem, and is available in addition to CAM4-chem in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.2. Both configurations are well suited as tools for atmospheric-chemistry modeling studies in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, whether with internally derived “free running” (FR) meteorology, or “specified dynamics” (SD). The main focus of this paper is to compare the performance of these configurations against observations from surface, aircraft, and satellite, as well as understand the origin of the identified differences. We particularly focus on comparing present-day methane lifetime estimates within the different model configurations, which range between 7.8 years in the SD configuration of CAM5-chem and 8.8 years in the FR configuration of CAM4-chem. We find that tropospheric surface area density is an important factor in controlling the burden of the hydroxyl radical (OH), which causes differences in tropical methane lifetime of about half a year between CAM4-chem and CAM5-chem. In addition, different distributions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) produced from lightning production explain about half of the difference between SD and FR model versions in both CAM4-chem and CAM5-chem. Remaining differences in the tropical OH burden are due to enhanced tropical ozone burden in SD configurations compared to the FR versions, which are not only caused by differences in chemical production or loss, but also by transport and mixing. For future studies, we recommend the use of CAM5-chem, due to improved aerosol description and inclusion of aerosol-cloud interactions. However, smaller tropospheric surface area density in the current version of CAM5-chem compared to CAM4-chem results in larger oxidizing capacity in the troposphere and therefore a shorter methane lifetime.

  15. Description and Evaluation of Tropospheric Chemistry and Aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tilmes, S.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Emmons, L.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Ma, Po-Lun; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Bardeen, C.; Arnold, S.; Deeter, M.; et al

    2015-05-13

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), version 5, is now coupled to extensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, called CAM5-chem, and is available in addition to CAM4-chem in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.2. Both configurations are well suited as tools for atmospheric-chemistry modeling studies in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, whether with internally derived “free running” (FR) meteorology, or “specified dynamics” (SD). The main focus of this paper is to compare the performance of these configurations against observations from surface, aircraft, and satellite, as well as understand the origin of the identified differences. We particularly focus on comparing present-daymore »methane lifetime estimates within the different model configurations, which range between 7.8 years in the SD configuration of CAM5-chem and 8.8 years in the FR configuration of CAM4-chem. We find that tropospheric surface area density is an important factor in controlling the burden of the hydroxyl radical (OH), which causes differences in tropical methane lifetime of about half a year between CAM4-chem and CAM5-chem. In addition, different distributions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) produced from lightning production explain about half of the difference between SD and FR model versions in both CAM4-chem and CAM5-chem. Remaining differences in the tropical OH burden are due to enhanced tropical ozone burden in SD configurations compared to the FR versions, which are not only caused by differences in chemical production or loss, but also by transport and mixing. For future studies, we recommend the use of CAM5-chem, due to improved aerosol description and inclusion of aerosol-cloud interactions. However, smaller tropospheric surface area density in the current version of CAM5-chem compared to CAM4-chem results in larger oxidizing capacity in the troposphere and therefore a shorter methane lifetime.« less

  16. Sunspot transition region oscillations in NOAA 8156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Brynildsen; T. Leifsen; O. Kjeldseth-Moe; P. Maltby; K. Wilhelm

    1998-12-01

    Based on observations obtained with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory - SOHO joint observing program for velocity fields in sunspot regions, we have detected 3 min transition region umbral oscillations in NOAA 8156. Simultaneous recordings of O V $\\lambda$629 and N V $\\lambda$1238, $\\lambda$1242 with the SUMER instrument give the spatial distribution of power in the 3 min oscillations, both in intensity and line-of-sight velocity. Comparing loci with the same phase we find that the entire umbral transition region oscillates. The observed maxima in peak line intensity are nearly in phase with the maxima in velocity directed towards the observer. We discuss the suggestion that the waves are upward propagating acoustic waves.

  17. Earth Science The Wiess School of Natural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    143 Earth Science The Wiess School of Natural Sciences CHAIR Alan Levander PROFESSORS John B Physics I and II with lab ESCI 321 Earth System Evolution and Cycles ESCI 322 Earth Chemistry and Materials ESCI 323 Earth Structure and Deformation with lab ESCI 324 Earth's Interior ESCI Degrees Offered

  18. OMB Control No. 0648-0213 NOAA Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Transfer PRODUCT TRANSFER REPORT PRODUCTS SHIPPING Is this a TOTAL OFFLOAD or a PARTIAL OFFLOAD Mothership, Sustainable Fisheries Division, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802

  19. Learn More: www.glerl.noaa.gov economic value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : seagrant.noaa.gov23 ECONOMIC VITALITY Alternative Energy: Harvesting the Ocean's Potential One way to reduce carbon emissions is to replace carbon-based fuels with an alternative energy source. OAR's Sea the ocean for alternative energy to strengt

  20. Couplings between changes in the climate system and biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada, Kenneth L. Denman

    2008-01-01

    of an integrated Earth system model on the Earth Simulator.2006), including both Earth System Models of Intermediate

  1. Postdoctoral Researcher The Air Quality Forecasting (AQF) Lab within Department of Marine, Earth,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    -doctoral research position in Atmospheric/Earth System Modeling The position will involve the development, application, and evaluation of Earth system models such as NCAR's Community Earth System Model (CESM/CAM5-coupled atmospheric/Earth system modeling using CESM, WRF/Chem, WRF/-CAM5, and two-way coupled WRF/CMAQ Earth system

  2. Life Before Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei A. Sharov; Richard Gordon

    2013-03-28

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; there was no intelligent life in our universe prior to the origin of Earth, thus Earth could not have been deliberately seeded with life by intelligent aliens; Earth was seeded by panspermia; experimental replication of the origin of life from scratch may have to emulate many cumulative rare events; and the Drake equation for guesstimating the number of civilizations in the universe is likely wrong, as intelligent life has just begun appearing in our universe. Evolution of advanced organisms has accelerated via development of additional information-processing systems: epigenetic memory, primitive mind, multicellular brain, language, books, computers, and Internet. As a result the doubling time of complexity has reached ca. 20 years. Finally, we discuss the issue of the predicted technological singularity and give a biosemiotics perspective on the increase of complexity.

  3. GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view screen will be a view of the entire Earth from space. Navigation bar

  4. On the recent M=6.1 earthquake occurred at Kefalonia island (South-West Greece) on 26 January 2014: Manifestations of an Earth system in critical state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contoyiannis, Y; Kopanas, J; Antonopoulos, G; Koulouras, G; Eftaxias, K; Nomicos, C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show, in terms of fracture-induced electromagnetic emissions (EME) recorded two days prior to the earthquake of Kefalonia (Cephalonia), Greece [(38.22o N, 20.53oE), 26 January 2014, M=6.1] that the Earth system around the focal area came to critical condition two days before the earthquake occurence. Specifically, the MHz EME recorded by the remote telemetric stations on the island of Kefalonia and the neighboring island of Zante came simultaneously to critical conditions. The analysis was performed by means of the method of critical fluctuations (MCF) revealing critical features.

  5. DOE's NREL and LLNL team with NOAA and University of Colorado...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL and LLNL team with NOAA and University of Colorado to Study Wind Inflow Conditions DOE's NREL and LLNL team with NOAA and University of Colorado to Study Wind Inflow...

  6. Through-the-earth radio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagor, David; Vasquez-Dominguez, Jose

    2006-12-12

    A through-the-earth communication system that includes a digital signal input device; a transmitter operating at a predetermined frequency sufficiently low to effectively penetrate useful distances through-the earth; a data compression circuit that is connected to an encoding processor; an amplifier that receives encoded output from the encoding processor for amplifying the output and transmitting the data to an antenna; and a receiver with an antenna, a band pass filter, a decoding processor, and a data decompressor.

  7. Protecting Life on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01

    Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is “to explain to an intelligent

  8. Building a Weather-Ready Nation noaa.gov/wrn Weather-Ready Nation &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building a Weather-Ready Nation noaa.gov/wrn Welcome Weather-Ready Nation & America's PrepareAthon! Webinar April 1, 2015 "Whole Community Approach to Building National Resilience " #12;Building a Weather-Ready Nation A word from... noaa.gov/wrn Dr. Kathryn Sullivan NOAA Administrator #12;Building a Weather

  9. Office of Marine and Aviation Operations NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of Marine and Aviation Operations NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO) 101 2015 #12;Office of Marine and Aviation Operations For future questions and information on OMAO://www.legislative.noaa.gov/. #12;Office of Marine and Aviation Operations Director, OMAO and the NOAA Corps Rear Admiral David A

  10. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EES Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Sustainable energy, climate impacts, nuclear threat detection, and environmental management are primary focus areas of earth and...

  11. Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to today’s best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

  12. Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2005. 33:53170 doi: 10.1146/annurev.earth.33.092203.122614

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2005. 33:531­70 doi: 10.1146/annurev.earth.33.092203.122614 Copyright on February 1, 2005 THE Hf-W ISOTOPIC SYSTEM AND THE ORIGIN OF THE EARTH AND MOON Stein B. Jacobsen Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138; email: jacobsen

  13. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  14. An improved dust emission model - Part 2: Evaluation in the Community Earth System Model, with implications for the use of dust source functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kok, JF; Albani, S; Mahowald, NM; Ward, DS

    2014-01-01

    on earth, mars and venus, Sedimentology, 29, Jansen, E. ,of wind erosion, Sedimentology, 53, Rea, D. K. : The

  15. Institute for Global Environmental Strategies: Discover Earth Program Materials http://www.strategies.org/index.aspx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Systems Constancy and Change NSES Science Standards Life Science Matter, Energy, and Organization in Living Systems Earth and Space Science Energy in the Earth System #12;The Earth System The Earth System Albedo is the fraction of solar energy that is reflected back to space. The more reflective a surface

  16. CHAPTER 8NOAA Special Exhibits CHAPTER 9 SPECIAL EXHIBITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operations. These reductions are a key component of the President's Administrative Efficiency Initiative's Request, NOAA proposes consolidating climate related activities into a new line office the Climate Service AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION FY 2012 BUDGET SUMMARY 8-158 ADMINISTRATIVE COST SAVING The Administration

  17. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Circulars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from D83, Technical Information Division, Environmental Science Information Center, NOAA Station, Gulf Breeze, Fla.. fiscal year 1969. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970, iii + 33 p., 29 figs Fisheries, fiscal year 1969. By Division of Economic Research, April 1970, iii + 29 p., 12 figs., 7 tables

  18. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Circulars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from D83, Technical Information Division, Environmental Science Information Center, NOAA Breeze, Fla., fiscal year 1969. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970, iii + 33 p., 29 figs., 12 tables p., 13 figs. 337. Program of Division of Economic Research, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, fiscal

  19. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Circulars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from 083, Technical Information Division, Environmental Science Information Center, NOAA Station, Gulf Breeze, Fla.. fiscal year 1969. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970, iii + 33 p.. 29 figs Fisheries. fiscal year 1969. By Division of Economic Research, April 1970. iii + 29 p., 12 figs.. 7 tables

  20. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-705 Migration and Dispersion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-705 Migration and Dispersion of Tagged American Lobsters of recoveries Definition of lobster maturity Migration ver u di persion Compo ite tation resumes Composite Depth distribution at recapture verage monthly bottom temperatures oncJu ions ~ummary Acknowledgment

  1. NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-495 SEPTEMBER 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPRESS Annette Henry, Barbara Taylor, Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, Shannon Rankin, Armando Jaramillo Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), organized in 1970, has evolved into an agency Henry, Barbara Taylor, Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, Shannon Rankin, Armando Jaramillo-Legoretta, Tom Akamatsu

  2. Protecting Lives and Livelihoods NOAA Business Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and channels were free of obstructions to allow ship traffic to re- sume service to these areas. NOAA also an estimated 419,000 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil spilled in the Mississippi River, just north of New Orleans active aiding in responding to the spill of an estimated 58,000 gallons of intermediate fuel oil, which

  3. NOAA's National Ocean Service Responding to Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , allowing emergency fuel and other supplies to move into the affected area. Over five days, Office of Coast (NRTs) and the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson with her two survey launches, to search approximately 20 square nautical miles of shipping lanes, channels, and terminals to locate dangers to navigation. Surveys

  4. NOAA Technical Report NMFSSSRF-780 History of Scientific Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on various phases of the industry is also used as a medium for the publication of bibliographies of a specialized scientific nature. NOAA sciences. Individual copies may be obtained from D822, User Services Branch, Environ- mental Science

  5. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-781 An Annotated Checklist of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel construction subsidies. It collects, analyzes deal with applied fishery problems. The series is also used as a medium for the publication, User Services Branch, Environ- mental Science Information Center, NOAA, Rockville, MD 20852. Recent

  6. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-779 Opportunistic Feeding of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis programs, and mortgage insurance and vessel construction subsidies. It collects. analyzes deal with applied fishery problems. The series is also used as a medium for the publication, User Services Branch, Environ- mental SCience Information Center, NOAA, Rockville, MD 20852. Recent

  7. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-1 LAKE ONTARIO BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-1 LAKE ONTARIO BASIN: OVERLAND PRECIPITATION, 1972-73 David C. BASIC DATA 3. PROCEDURE 4. ACKNOWLEDGMBNTS APPENDIX. LAKE ONTARIO STATION SUMMARY Page iv 1 1 2 5 10 FIGURES 1. The United States portion of the Lake Ontario drainage basin with the precipitation stations

  8. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 100 Marine Flora and Fauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    > the fishing industry through marketing service and economic analysis programs and through mortage insurance the following types of reports: scientific investigations that document long-term continuing programs of NMFS accepted, receive professional editing before publication. Copies of NOAA Technical Reports NMFS are avail

  9. NOAA/NMFS Developments U.S. Seafood Exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA/NMFS Developments U.S. Seafood Exports and Trade Deficit Rise Table 1.-Selected U.S. fishery exports for 1981 (cumulative monthly lotals, January to December). Exports (t) Percent Value ($1 include Greek membership ladm 1/1/81). United States seafood exports in 1981 totalled a record $1

  10. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 131 November 1997 A Photographic Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NMFS 131 November 1997 A Photographic Catalog of Killer Whales, Orcinus orca Water Street Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543-1097 Editorial Conunittee Dr. Andrew E. Dizon National NMFS 131 A Technical Report of the Fishery Bulletin A Photographic Catalog of Killer Whales, Orcinus

  11. \\~;81'"TEs fit " NOAA Technical Report NMFS 144 March 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Marine Fisheries Service Penelope D. Dalton Assistant Administrator for Fisheries The NOAA business required by law ofthis Department. Use offunds for printing of this series has been approved Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, SpringfIeld, VA 22161; 1-800-553-NTIS; http://www.ntis.gov. Copyright law

  12. Hurricane Isaac, August 28, 2012/NOAA Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Isaac, August 28, 2012/NOAA Tropical Cyclones A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT, 6 of which became hurricanes East Pacific Ocean: 15 tropical storms, 8 of which became hurricanes Central Pacific Ocean: 4 tropical storms, 2 of which became hurricanes Over a typical 2-year period, the U

  13. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Earth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research. Display Options: Earth's Mineral Evolution Based on a CIW news release Mineral Kingdom Has Co

  14. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  15. Earth coupled cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T.; Boyer, L.L.; Johnston, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Earth coupled cooling is an important consideration for residential and commercial designers, owners, and builders in many regions of the country. The potential benefits which can be expected from passive earth contact cooling are reviewed. Recommendations for the design of earth sheltered structures incorporating earth coupled cooling strategies are also presented.

  16. MOA-2011-BLG-262Lb: A sub-Earth-mass moon orbiting a gas giant primary or a high velocity planetary system in the galactic Bulge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Batista, V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H. [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Bennett, C. S. [Department of Physics, Massachussets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Suzuki, D.; Koshimoto, N. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Beaulieu, J.-P. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Donatowicz, J. [Technische Universität Wien, Wieder Hauptst. 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Fukui, A., E-mail: bennett@nd.edu [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; ?FUN Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-20

    We present the first microlensing candidate for a free-floating exoplanet-exomoon system, MOA-2011-BLG-262, with a primary lens mass of M {sub host} ? 4 Jupiter masses hosting a sub-Earth mass moon. The argument for an exomoon hinges on the system being relatively close to the Sun. The data constrain the product M{sub L} ?{sub rel} where M{sub L} is the lens system mass and ?{sub rel} is the lens-source relative parallax. If the lens system is nearby (large ?{sub rel}), then M{sub L} is small (a few Jupiter masses) and the companion is a sub-Earth-mass exomoon. The best-fit solution has a large lens-source relative proper motion, ?{sub rel} = 19.6 ± 1.6 mas yr{sup –1}, which would rule out a distant lens system unless the source star has an unusually high proper motion. However, data from the OGLE collaboration nearly rule out a high source proper motion, so the exoplanet+exomoon model is the favored interpretation for the best fit model. However, there is an alternate solution that has a lower proper motion and fits the data almost as well. This solution is compatible with a distant (so stellar) host. A Bayesian analysis does not favor the exoplanet+exomoon interpretation, so Occam's razor favors a lens system in the bulge with host and companion masses of M{sub host}=0.12{sub ?0.06}{sup +0.19} M{sub ?} and m{sub comp}=18{sub ?10}{sup +28} M{sub ?}, at a projected separation of a{sub ?}=0.84{sub ?0.14}{sup +0.25} AU. The existence of this degeneracy is an unlucky accident, so current microlensing experiments are in principle sensitive to exomoons. In some circumstances, it will be possible to definitively establish the mass of such lens systems through the microlensing parallax effect. Future experiments will be sensitive to less extreme exomoons.

  17. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for Climate System Research, and the Australian National University. This period, a total of 14 national and international sites installed an ESG Data Node for testing. During this period, we also continued to provide production-level services to the community, providing researchers worldwide with access to CMIP3 (IPCC AR4), CCES, and CCSM, Parallel Climate Model (PCM), Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP), and NARCCAP data.

  18. Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss., 4, C312C312, 2013 www.earth-syst-dynam-discuss.net/4/C312/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Earth Syst. Dynam. Discuss., 4, C312­C312, 2013 www.earth-syst-dynam-discuss.net/4/C312 of the Past OpenAccess OpenAccess Climate of the Past Discussions Earth System Dynamics OpenAccess OpenAccess Earth System Dynamics Discussions Geoscientific Instrumentation Methods and Data Systems Open

  19. ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) - A possible expert-system based cooperative effort to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dominik; K. Horne; A. Allan; N. J. Rattenbury; Y. Tsapras; C. Snodgrass; M. F. Bode; M. J. Burgdorf; S. N. Fraser; E. Kerins; C. J. Mottram; I. A. Steele; R. A. Street; P. J. Wheatley; L. Wyrzykowski

    2008-01-14

    (abridged) The technique of gravitational microlensing is currently unique in its ability to provide a sample of terrestrial exoplanets around both Galactic disk and bulge stars, allowing to measure their abundance and determine their distribution with respect to mass and orbital separation. In order to achieve these goals in reasonable time, a well-coordinated effort involving a network of either 2m or 4 x 1m telescopes at each site is required. It could lead to the first detection of an Earth-mass planet outside the Solar system, and even planets less massive than Earth could be discovered. From April 2008, ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) is planned to provide a platform for a three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring. As an expert system embedded in eSTAR (e-Science Telescopes for Astronomical Research), ARTEMiS will give advice on the optimal targets to be observed at any given time, and will also alert on deviations from ordinary microlensing light curves by means of the SIGNALMEN anomaly detector. While the use of the VOEvent (Virtual Observatory Event) protocol allows a direct interaction with the telescopes that are part of the HTN (Heterogeneous Telescope Networks) consortium, additional interfaces provide means of communication with all existing microlensing campaigns that rely on human observers. The success of discovering a planet by microlensing critically depends on the availability of a telescope in a suitable location at the right time, which can mean within 10 min. Real-time modelling offers the opportunity of live discovery of extra-solar planets, thereby providing ''Science live to your home''.

  20. Cycles in the Earth System : AOS/GEOL/GEOG 346 Desired Background: Math 240 -Calculus III or higher, Phys 161 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    : 1 midterm (20%), Project (30%), Final (50%). Syllabus Date Topic Reading Week-1 Global change of solar luminosity. Ch-1 Week-2 Introduction to Systems and feedbacks: Systems, components, Daisy World. Ch-2 Week-3 Global Energy balance, Greenhouse effect: Greehouse gases, clouds, radiation balance. Ch

  1. A look at the ocean in the EC-Earth climate model Andreas Sterl Richard Bintanja Laurent Brodeau Emily Gleeson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    to the special issue on EC-Earth, a global climate and earth system model based on the seasonal forecast system-011-1239-2 #12;phytoplankton) processes are involved. To study such complex interactions, Earth System Models

  2. Improving the Representations of Human-Earth Interactions PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter E. Thornton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Earth System Models (ESMs) and Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs). The research will address five

  3. Portable broadband seismic network in Vietnam for investigating tectonic deformation, the Earth's interior, and early-warning systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    's interior, and early-warning systems for earthquakes and tsunamis Bor-Shouh Huang a,*, Tu Son Le b , Chun for upgrades to enable the real-time trans- mission of data for earthquake monitoring and tsunami warnings

  4. eArth science College of Natural Science and Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    eArth science College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 provides broad training in various aspects of earth systems science. Three concentrations are available: earth systems science, geo- logical hazards and mitigation, and secondary education. The concen

  5. A PLANETARY SYSTEM AROUND THE NEARBY M DWARF GJ 667C WITH AT LEAST ONE SUPER-EARTH IN ITS HABITABLE ZONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Haghighipour, Nader; Carter, Brad D.; Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy A.; O'Toole, Simon J.; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Jenkins, James S.

    2012-05-20

    We re-analyze 4 years of HARPS spectra of the nearby M1.5 dwarf GJ 667C available through the European Southern Observatory public archive. The new radial velocity (RV) measurements were obtained using a new data analysis technique that derives the Doppler measurement and other instrumental effects using a least-squares approach. Combining these new 143 measurements with 41 additional RVs from the Magellan/Planet Finder Spectrograph and Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer spectrometers reveals three additional signals beyond the previously reported 7.2 day candidate, with periods of 28 days, 75 days, and a secular trend consistent with the presence of a gas giant (period {approx}10 years). The 28 day signal implies a planet candidate with a minimum mass of 4.5 M{sub Circled-Plus} orbiting well within the canonical definition of the star's liquid water habitable zone (HZ), that is, the region around the star at which an Earth-like planet could sustain liquid water on its surface. Still, the ultimate water supporting capability of this candidate depends on properties that are unknown such as its albedo, atmospheric composition, and interior dynamics. The 75 day signal is less certain, being significantly affected by aliasing interactions among a potential 91 day signal, and the likely rotation period of the star at 105 days detected in two activity indices. GJ 667C is the common proper motion companion to the GJ 667AB binary, which is metal-poor compared to the Sun. The presence of a super-Earth in the HZ of a metal-poor M dwarf in a triple star system supports the evidence that such worlds should be ubiquitous in the Galaxy.

  6. Ten Multi-planet Systems from K2 Campaigns 1 & 2 and the Masses of Two Hot Super-Earths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A; Schlieder, Joshua E; Crossfield, Ian J M; Ciardi, David R; Fulton, Benjamin J; Isaacson, Howard; Aller, Kimberly M; Baranec, Christoph; Beichman, Charles A; Hansen, Brad M S; Knutson, Heather A; Law, Nicholas M; Liu, Michael C; Riddle, Reed

    2015-01-01

    We present a catalog of 10 multi-planet systems from Campaigns 1 and 2 of the K2 mission. We report the sizes and orbits of 24 planets split between six 2-planet systems and four 3-planet systems. These planets stem from a systematic search of the K2 photometry for all dwarf stars observed by K2 in these fields. We precisely characterized the host stars with adaptive optics imaging and analysis of high-resolution optical spectra from Keck/HIRES and medium-resolution spectra from IRTF/SpeX. The planets are mostly smaller than Neptune (19/24 planets) as in the Kepler mission and all have short periods ($P R_\\oplus$, a mass of $12.0 \\pm ...

  7. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  8. College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Earth history, Stratigraphy and Sedimentology, geology field methods, and graduate courses in their area through significant contributions to the fields of Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, #12;and/or Earth Systems

  9. Argonne's Earth Day 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    Argonne celebrated Earth Day on April 21, 2011 with an event that featured green activities and information booths.

  10. National K-12 Educator Conference; "Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate" (July 23-24, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flammer, Karen; O'Shaughnessy, Tam

    2013-12-11

    With the support of the Department of Energy, the National Science Teachers Association and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Imaginary Lines Inc. (dba Sally Ride Science) delivered a highly successful 2-day conference to 165 K-12 educators on climate change. The event took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD. The conference celebrated the 25th anniversary of Dr. Sally Ride’s first flight into space in 1983 and examined how our understanding of Earth has changed in those 25 years. One the first day of the conference, participants heard a keynote talk delivered by Dr. Sally Ride, followed by presentations by well-known climate change scientists: Dr. Richard Somerville, Dr. Inez Fung and Dr. Susan Solomon. These sessions were concurrently webcast and made available to educators who were unable to attend the conference. On the second day of the conference, participants attended breakout sessions where they performed climate change activities (e.g. “Neato Albedo!”, “Greenhouse in a Bottle”, “Shell-Shocked”) that they could take back to their classrooms. Additional break-out sessions on using remote sensing images to illustrate climate change effects on Earth’s surface and how to address the climate change debate, were also offered. During lunch, participants attended an Educator Street Fair and had the opportunity to interact with representatives from NOAA, NASA, the EPA, NEEF and the JASON project. A follow-up evaluation survey was administered to all conference attendees immediately following the conference to evaluate its effectiveness. The results of this survey were overwhelmingly positive. The conference materials: presentation Power Points, workshop handouts and activities were available for teachers to download after the conference from the Sally Ride Science website. In summary, the approximately $55K support for the Department of Energy was used to help plan, deliver and evaluate the “Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate”, conference which took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD.

  11. The University Libraries system on the CU-Boulder campus includes five branch libraries--Business, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Math/Physics, and Music--and Norlin Library, housing Archives, Government Publications, Special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Publications, Special Collections, East Asian, and Science libraries. Reference and Instructional ServicesThe University Libraries system on the CU-Boulder campus includes five branch libraries--Business, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Math/Physics, and Music--and Norlin Library, housing Archives, Government

  12. Earth Syst. Dynam., 3, 6378, 2012 www.earth-syst-dynam.net/3/63/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    compare the response of four state-of-the-art Earth system models to climate engineering under scenario G1 to counteract radiative forcing from a quadrupling of CO2: climate responses simulated by four earth system models H. Schmidt1, K. Alterskjćr2, D. Bou Karam3, O. Boucher4,*, A. Jones4, J. E. Kristj´ansson2, U

  13. Earth sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    The earth shelter concept has been utilized successfully around the world for thousands of years, but its use with contemporary mechanically conditioned buildings dates only from the oil embargo of the mid-1970s. This is an architectural innovation and a growing and viable response to the energy imperative. Most of the technical problems of earth shelters have been effectively addressed, but a systems design approach could further enhance overall energy savings. Although occupant lifestyle seems to be at a high level, areas that require further attention include site design, daylighting, and refined thermal design. The proper integration of passive solar heating and disaster protection represent opportunities for improved multifunctional aspects. With proper design, annual heating and cooling energy use reductions on the order of 80% can be anticipated. Research on energy design refinements and occupancy aspects necessary to achieve such levels of savings is presently under way at Oklahoma State University, the University of Minnesota, and other study centers throughout the nation and the world.

  14. Revised 3/29/20111 NOAA COOPERATIVE INSTITUTE DIRECTORS ANNUAL MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , Mauna Loa Observatory, tsunami warning system, Easy-To-Deploy® buoys, NEXRAD Radar, Unmanned Aircraft in the atmosphere, ocean, space, land surface, and cryosphere ith t i holistic, integrated Earth system approaches Systems (UAS),S ea Grant Extension, · Hurricane track and intensity forecast improvement Advanced Weather

  15. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  16. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  17. NOAA and U.S. Department of Energy Expand Efforts to Increase...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (MOU) the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Marine Sanctuary Program (NMSP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today expanded...

  18. HOW THERMAL EVOLUTION AND MASS-LOSS SCULPT POPULATIONS OF SUPER-EARTHS AND SUB-NEPTUNES: APPLICATION TO THE KEPLER-11 SYSTEM AND BEYOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Eric D.; Miller, Neil; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    We use models of thermal evolution and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven mass loss to explore the composition and history of low-mass, low-density transiting planets. We investigate the Kepler-11 system in detail and provide estimates of both the current and past planetary compositions. We find that an H/He envelope on Kepler-11b is highly vulnerable to mass loss. By comparing to formation models, we show that in situ formation of the system is extremely difficult. Instead we propose that it is a water-rich system of sub-Neptunes that migrated from beyond the snow line. For the broader population of observed planets, we show that there is a threshold in bulk planet density and incident flux above which no low-mass transiting planets have been observed. We suggest that this threshold is due to the instability of H/He envelopes to XUV-driven mass loss. Importantly, we find that this mass-loss threshold is well reproduced by our thermal evolution/contraction models that incorporate a standard mass-loss prescription. Treating the planets' contraction history is essential because the planets have significantly larger radii during the early era of high XUV fluxes. Over time low-mass planets with H/He envelopes can be transformed into water-dominated worlds with steam envelopes or rocky super-Earths. Finally, we use this threshold to provide likely minimum masses and radial-velocity amplitudes for the general population of Kepler candidates. Likewise, we use this threshold to provide constraints on the maximum radii of low-mass planets found by radial-velocity surveys.

  19. Final report on activities and findings under DOE grant “Interactive Photochemistry in Earth System Models to Assess Uncertainty in Ozone and Greenhouse Gases”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prather, Michael J.

    2014-11-07

    Atmospheric chemistry controls the abundances and hence climate forcing of important greenhouse gases including N2O, CH4, HFCs, CFCs, and O3. Attributing climate change to human activities requires, at a minimum, accurate models of the chemistry and circulation of the atmosphere that relate emissions to abundances. This DOE-funded research provided realistic, yet computationally optimized and affordable, photochemical modules to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that augment the CESM capability to explore the uncertainty in future stratospheric-tropospheric ozone, stratospheric circulation, and thus the lifetimes of chemically controlled greenhouse gases from climate simulations. To this end, we have successfully implemented Fast-J (radiation algorithm determining key chemical photolysis rates) and Linoz v3.0 (linearized photochemistry for interactive O3, N2O, NOy and CH4) packages in LLNL-CESM and for the first time demonstrated how change in O2 photolysis rate within its uncertainty range can significantly impact on the stratospheric climate and ozone abundances. From the UCI side, this proposal also helped LLNL develop a CAM-Superfast Chemistry model that was implemented for the IPCC AR5 and contributed chemical-climate simulations to CMIP5.

  20. Stellar and Planetary Properties of K2 Campaign 1 Candidates and Validation of 18 Systems, Including a Planet Receiving Earth-like Insolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montet, Benjamin T; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Johnson, John Asher; Hogg, David W; Bowler, Brendan P; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Mann, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    The extended Kepler mission, K2, is now providing photometry of new fields every three months in a search for transiting planets. In a recent study, Foreman-Mackey and collaborators presented a list of 36 planet candidates orbiting 31 stars in K2 Campaign 1. In this contribution, we present stellar and planetary properties for all systems. We combine ground-based seeing-limited survey data and adaptive optics imaging with an automated transit analysis scheme to validate 18 candidates as planets and identify 6 candidates as likely false positives. Of particular interest is EPIC 201912552, a bright (K=8.9) M2 dwarf hosting a 2.24 \\pm 0.25 Earth radius planet with an equilibrium temperature of 271 \\pm 16 K and an orbital period of 33 days. We also present two new open-source software packages that enabled this analysis: isochrones, a flexible tool for fitting theoretical stellar models to observational data to determine stellar properties, and vespa, a new general-purpose procedure to calculate false positive pr...

  1. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 30 January 2014 Prepared for: NOAA IOOS Association Coastal Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012 and ADCP assets lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality

  2. Near-Earth Asteroid Deflection Strategies Dan Mazanek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near-Earth Asteroid Deflection Strategies Dan Mazanek Senior Space Systems Engineer NASA Langley Deflection · The impact of a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) is a natural hazard that can be prevented or mitigated so it intersects the Earth's orbit earlier or later than normal. ­ Make sure that the object

  3. Detecting Earth-impacting asteroids Pan-STARRS prototype telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veres, Peter

    Detecting Earth-impacting asteroids with the Pan-STARRS prototype telescope (Based on MS. Grav #12;10/14/2008 DPS, Ithaca, NY Granvik: Earth-impacting asteroids with PS1 Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Moving Object Processing System (MOPS) #12;10/14/2008 DPS, Ithaca, NY Granvik: Earth-impacting asteroids

  4. Digital Earth as a UCGIS Grand Challenge Karl E. Grossner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Digital Earth as a UCGIS Grand Challenge Karl E. Grossner University of California, Santa Barbara' are mapped to the major components of a digital earth system, and the requisite functionality of next of suggestions put forward--reprised in a sense--by Keith Clarke, was of "a Digital Earth by 2009." That year has

  5. THE EARTH TIDE EFFECTS ON PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS Preliminary Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    THE EARTH TIDE EFFECTS ON PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS Preliminary Study A THESIS SUBMITTED ON THE STRESS-STRAIN THEORY AND THE EARTH TIDE MECHANISM 4 2.1 Stress-Strain Theory 4 2.2 General Information on Tides 14 3. THE EFFECTS OF EARTH TIDES ON OPEN WELL-AQUIFER SYSTEMS: STATE OF THE ART 22 3.1 Static

  6. lthough Earth has undergone many periods of significant environmen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, Tom

    A lthough Earth has undergone many periods of significant environmen- tal change, the planet push the Earth system outside the stable environmental state of the Holocene, with consequences occurred naturally and Earth's regu- latory capacity maintained the conditions that enabled human

  7. Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Info Sheet Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals isolated. Actually, most rare earth elements exist in the Earth's crust in higher concentrations than though most people have never heard of rare earth elements, sev- eral of them govern mankind's modern

  8. Handbook Appendices Revised 2014-04-28 Page 1 of 45 NOAA Administrative Order (NAO) 216-115

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handbook Appendices ­ Revised 2014-04-28 Page 1 of 45 NOAA Administrative Order (NAO) 216-115: Strengthening NOAA's Research and Development Enterprise Procedural Handbook Appendices Table of Contents Appendix 1.1: Glossary for NAO Procedural Handbook

  9. Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

  10. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 607614, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/607/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 607­614, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/607/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences A probabilistic approach for earthquake hazard assessment of the Province of Eskis¸ehir, Turkey A

  11. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 577586, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/577/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 577­586, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8 Hazards and Earth System Sciences Integrated approach for coastal hazards and risks in Sri Lanka M. Garcin the importance of knowledge and the taking into account of coastal hazards. Sri Lanka was one of the countries

  12. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 11431158, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1143/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1143­1158, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13 Hazards and Earth System Sciences OpenAccess G Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Atmospheric OpenAcces Time-dependent probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and its application to Hualien City

  13. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 553561, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/553/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 553­561, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/553/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Introduction Risk consists of hazard and vulnerability. We can define "hazard" like "a threatening event

  14. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 471483, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/471/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 471­483, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/471/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Integrating public risk perception into formal natural hazard risk assessment Th. Plattner1, T

  15. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 539558, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/539/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 539­558, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8 Hazards and Earth System Sciences Spatial variability and potential impacts of climate change on flood and debris flow hazard zone mapping and implications for risk management H. Staffler1, R. Pollinger2, A

  16. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 637651, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/637/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 637­651, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/637/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Hazards and Landscape (BFW), Department of Natural Hazards and Alpine Timberline, Innsbruck, Austria 3

  17. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 283288, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/283/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 283­288, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/283/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Physical vulnerability modelling in natural hazard risk assessment J. Douglas BRGM ­ ARN/RIS, 3

  18. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 19291943, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1929/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1929­1943, 2013 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/13/1929/2013/ doi:10.5194/nhess-13-1929-2013 © Author(s) 2013. CC Attribution 3.0 License. cess Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences OpenAccess A method for multi-hazard mapping in poorly known volcanic areas

  19. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 495506, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/495/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 495­506, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/495/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System as a function of the hazard, the elements at risk and the vul- nerability. From a natural sciences perspective

  20. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 293302, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/293/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 293­302, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/293/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences A conceptual approach to the use of Cost Benefit and Multi Criteria Analysis in natural hazard

  1. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779­802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System actions or events. Within the project "CEDIM ­ Risk Map Germany ­ Man-made Hazards" it is intended

  2. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 185193, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/185/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 185­193, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/185/2006/ © Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Geomorphological mapping and geophysical profiling for the evaluation of natural hazards

  3. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 185193, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/185/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 185­193, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/185/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Validation of landslide hazard assessment by means of GPS monitoring technique ­ a case study

  4. NOAA Workforce Management Office, Strategic Human Capital Division June 17, 2015 Division Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Workforce Management Office, Strategic Human Capital Division ­ June 17, 2015 Division Theresa.Berry@noaa.gov Silver Spring, MD (301) 713-6365 Program Manager for Distance Learning) 713-6379 Program Manager (Leadership Competency Development Program, Presidential Management Fellows

  5. Cylindrical Equidis LAMONT (LDEO) WOODS HOLE O.I. NOAA U.HAWAII SOEST US NAVY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOLE O.I. NOAA U.HAWAII SOEST US NAVY SCRIPPS INST.OC U RHODE ISLAND RUSSIA US COAST GUARD GERMANY US NOAA 330 415326 415326 0 0 0 0 1932257 U.HAWAII SOEST 1 5873 5319 3992 5387 0 0 69927 US NAVY 3 3486

  6. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Selected Resources in the NOAA Libraries and Information Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf Coast Hurricanes Selected Resources in the NOAA Libraries and Information Network Prepared to the rich collection of historical and current resources on Gulf Coast hurricanes held by the NOAA Libraries) chronologically by named hurricane, and 2) Topically by: Climatology, History, Storm Surge, and Other

  7. NOAA Data Report EIlL GLEIlL-9 LAKE ONTARIO CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Data Report EIlL GLEIlL-9 LAKE ONTARIO CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS DATA FOR 1972ONAL 0CfANIC AND / AlMOSPHBlIC ADMINISTRATION #12;NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-9 LAKE ONTARIO CHEMICAL. 2. 3. 4. FIGURE Station locations in Lake Ontario during 1972. TABLES Cruise schedule Station

  8. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  9. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-158 PLANNING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE LAURENTIAN GREAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop to Meet Emerging Challenges ­ Summary Report" available at: http://www. glerl -- A NOAA Needs Assessment - Final Report Dawn Nelson1 , Heather Elmer2 , and Patrick Robinson3 1 University ADMINISTRATION Jane Lubchenco Under Secretary for Oceans & Atmosphere NOAA Administrator #12;2 This report

  10. NOAA NOS CO-OPS Hurricane Wilma Preliminary Report Hurricane Wilma Preliminary Water Levels Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA NOS CO-OPS Hurricane Wilma Preliminary Report Hurricane Wilma Preliminary Water Levels Report;NOAA NOS CO-OPS Hurricane Wilma Preliminary Report Page 2 of 11 SUMMARY Water level stations operated-OPS) recorded elevated water levels during the landfall of Hurricane WILMA from Fort Myers, FL to Trident Pier

  11. NOAA Hydropower and Fish Passage webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI|Forms12StateNNG FinancialNOAA

  12. NOAA/GFDL VNC Documentation. Find the latest version at http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/access/documentation 1 12/14/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a gateway and provides no tools to do work on it. From "ssh", the only thing users can do is connect.gfdl.noaa.gov configuration. Then go to the Tunnels Category as shown to the left. Determine the SSH port forward (tunnel>.gfdl.noaa.gov:number" as the "Destination". Click the "Add" button. The Tunnels screen should now look similar to the image to the left

  13. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth Zaki Hasnain n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Shane

    Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth Zaki Hasnain n , Christopher A. Lamb, Shane D. Ross Keywords: Near-Earth asteroids Asteroid capture a b s t r a c t The list of detected near-Earth asteroids metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating

  14. Rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, A.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Kemp, A.J. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom)] [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom); Sturchio, N.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm: their chondrite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg{sup -1} ({ge}162 ppm), and {Sigma}REE concentrations in sinter are {ge}181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu{sup 2+} is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in mixing and dilution of the geothermal fluids and may have lead to changes in the extent and nature of REE complexing. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  16. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  17. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  18. optimal initial conditions for coupling ice sheet models to earth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    optimal initial conditions for coupling ice sheet models to earth system models Perego, Mauro Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories; Price, Stephen F. Dr...

  19. optimal initial conditions for coupling ice sheet models to earth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for coupling ice sheet models to earth system models Authors: Perego, Mauro 1 ; Price, Stephen F. Dr 2 ; Stadler, Georg 3 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National...

  20. Optimal Initial Conditions for Coupling Ice Sheet Models to Earth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sheet Models to Earth System Models. Abstract not provided. Authors: Perego, Mauro ; Price, Stephen ; Stadler, Georg Publication Date: 2014-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1142266 Report...

  1. Earth Day 2010: Earth Day 40th Anniversary Poster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowacka, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    EGJ Issue 30 Earth Day 2010 ISSN 1076-7975 In celebration of 40 Earth Day the Electronic GreenEconomics, Poznan, Poland. Earth image used from www.sxc.hu.

  2. Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    internal (Int) mixtures Earth System Model of IntermediatePrediction using Earth System Models ( EaSM) program. Theand impacts, requires earth system models which include full

  3. Earth Observations for rapid response to large earthquakes Supervisors: Dr Zhenhong Li and Prof Trevor Hoey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Earth Observations for rapid response to large earthquakes Supervisors: Dr Zhenhong Li and Prof Trevor Hoey School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK Earthquakes, together of the earth system; they are messengers of the fundamental processes that shape the surface of the Earth

  4. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/climate-modeling Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    importance, such as water resource management, agriculture, transportation, and urban planning system components (atmosphere, land surface, ocean, and sea ice), and their interactions. Earth's energy processes are larger than grid-scale and based on bedrock scientific principles (conservation of energy

  5. Earth-Abundant Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The sections below...

  6. Rammered Earth Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    "And Man Shall Have Dominion Over the Earth": Rhetorical Evangelical Christians are not typically associated with mainstream environmentalism. This thesis examines the mythical traditions underpinning the efforts by some Evangelicals to re...

  7. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Daughton, Bill

    2014-08-12

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  8. Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me? If you are interested in learning a Physical Earth Science degree. The skills you will gain are wide-ranging and will provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector. Are all Physical Earth Science degrees the same? Universities do not have

  9. Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids Impact Hazard to Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Throop, Henry

    Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids and the Impact Hazard to Earth Henry Throop! Physics on Earth Potchefstroom Parys Sasolburg 20 km #12;Parys 3 km #12;Vredefort Impact Crater Looking from outer Impactor? · Origin: One of several million Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) · a = 1.6 AU; e = 0.5; i = 4

  10. RARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . U.S. imports of cerium compounds and rare-earth metals and alloys decreased (table 5). YttriumRARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were, geographic information specialist. The rare earths are a moderately abundant group of 17 elements comprising

  11. RARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths are iron gray to silvery lustrous metals that are typically soft, malleable, ductile decreased as imports of rare-earth alloys, compounds, and metals declined. Production of bastnäsiteRARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were

  12. NASA Science Mission Directorate Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) -2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    , and facilitating the use of extensive data in the development of comprehensive Earth system models. Under the title

  13. NSF NCAR / NASA GSFC / DOE LANL ANL / NOAA NCEP GFDL / MIT / U MICH C. DeLuca/NCAR, J. Anderson/NCAR, V. Balaji/GFDL, B. Boville/NCAR, N. Collins/NCAR,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepner, Jeremy

    of the Earth System Modeling Framework NSIPP Seasonal Forecast NCAR/LANL CCSM NCEP Forecast GFDL FMS Suite

  14. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) User. NESDIS 114 Satellite Rainfall Estimation Over South America: Evaluation of Two Major Events. Daniel A

  15. nh phm vi, Cc Web: http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov · earlyrestorationcomments@fws.gov · U F W f ngv tHoangdăHoaK),P.O.Box2099,Fairhope,AL 36533 t hi Tŕi nguyęn Thięn nhięn

  16. BNL-67857-AB AIRBORNE FORMALDEHYDE MEASUREMENT ON A NOAA WP-3 DURING THE 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL-67857-AB AIRBORNE FORMALDEHYDE MEASUREMENT ON A NOAA WP-3 DURING THE 1999 SOS SUMMER FIELD, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 15-19, 2000. Atmospheric formaldehyde (HCHO) concentration was determined

  17. NOAA Technical Report ERL 455-PMEL 43 A Time Series of Temperature, Salinity, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory 7600 Sand Point Way NE Seattle, WA 98115 September 1999 Contribution 2134 from NOAA/Pacific Marine Sea Shelf, 1995­1999 Ronald K. Reed Abstract. CTD (conductivity/temperature/depth) casts were taken

  18. NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-24 A COMPUTERIZED ICE CONCENTRATION DATA BASE FOR THE GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-24 A COMPUTERIZED ICE CONCENTRATION DATA BASE FOR THE GREAT LAKES ......................................................................................................... 5 2. Computerized ice concentration data base .............................................................................................................................................. 5 2. BASIC DATAAND DATA REDUCTION

  19. URL: www.swpc.noaa.gov/NOAAscales April 7, 2011 NOAA Space Weather Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    with orientation, uplink/downlink and tracking satellites. Other systems: pipeline currents can reach hundreds: induced pipeline currents affect preventive measures, HF radio propagation sporadic, satellite navigation); passengers and crew in high-flying aircraft at high latitudes may be exposed to radiation risk. *** Satellite

  20. "The Voice of NOAA's National Weather Service" Supporting NOAA's Weather Ready Nation Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Warnings are broadcast for both natural (such as tsunamis and volcanoes) and man-made (such as Amber Alerts federally operated system broadcasting weather and emergency warnings to the public. Reception of NWR) warnings, watches, forecasts and other emergency information from nearby NWS offices 24 hours a day. Known

  1. Z .Earth-Science Reviews 54 2001 81114 www.elsevier.comrlocaterearscirev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    to test earth system models designed to simulate dust. Z .Records of dust can be obtained from ice cores-modelling schemes in global earth system models provides an excellent means of achieving a comprehensive picture to validate earth system model simulations of the dust cycle over the past 150,000 years. q 2001 Elsevier

  2. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS REPORT OF THE NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Laake Jeffrey E. Moore Patricia E. Rosel Barbara L. Taylor Paul R. Wade NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-507 U , Patricia E. Rosel 4 , Barbara L. Taylor 1 , Paul R. Wade 3 1 NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service., Laake, J.L., Moore, J.E., Rosel, P.E., Taylor, B.L and Wade, P.R. 2013. Report of the National Marine

  3. Earth Day 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth Day 2014 Earth Day 2014 Earth Day 2014 This year, we're celebrating Earth Day all week long. It's Earth Week on Energy.gov We're focusing on climate change, highlighting...

  4. Earth shelter goes international

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1983-06-01

    Since the mid-1970's earth sheltered buildings in the US have become more numerous and important as a contemporary passive building concept. Further, an intense international interest has now developed, as evidenced by a number of important activities. One of these events is the 1983 International Conference on Energy Efficient Buildings with Earth Shelter Protection to be conducted during 1-6 August in Sydney, Australia. A review of past activities leading up to this event, as well as a brief review of the conference program, is the subject of this discussion.

  5. Earth sheltered housing phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L.

    1981-06-21

    Both national and international attention has recently been focused on earth sheltered construction as an emerging energy alternative. This is especially true for the High Plains region of the central United States. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. However, the dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the burgeoning construction activity in what is now viewed as a contemporary dwelling concept. The typical characteristics of such dwellings are reviewed as well as the educational challenge awaiting professional input to this developing boom in earth sheltered construction. 12 refs.

  6. Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS)-Modular Ocean Model v4 (MOM4) coupled model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Sun, Rui; Han, J.; Pan, H. L.; Park, S.; Hannay, Cecile; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-07-25

    We present a diagnostic analysis of the marine low cloud climatology simulated by two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). In both models, the shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence parameterizations have been recently updated: both models now use a mass-flux scheme for the parameterization of shallow convection, and a turbulence parameterization capable of handling Stratocumulus (Sc)-topped Planetary Boundary Layers (PBLs). For shallow convection, both models employ a convective trigger function based on the concept of convective inhibition and both include explicit convective overshooting/penetrative entrainment formulation. For Sc-topped PBL, both models treat explicitly turbulence mixing and cloud-top entrainment driven by cloud-top radiative cooling. Our focus is on the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cumulus (Cu)-topped PBL in the subtropical eastern oceans. We show that in the CESM the coastal Sc-topped PBLs in the subtropical Eastern Pacific are well-simulated but the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cu is too abrupt and happens too close to the coast. By contrast, in the GFS coupled simulation the coastal Sc amount and PBL depth are severely underestimated while the transition from Sc to shallow Cu is łdelayed˛ and offshore Sc cover is too extensive in the subtropical Eastern Pacific. We discuss the possible connections between such differences in the simulations and differences in the parameterizations of shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence in the two models.

  7. Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-04-14

    Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

  8. Dynamic Precursors of Flares in Active Region NOAA 10486

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korsos, M B; Baranyi, T; Ludmany, A

    2015-01-01

    Four different methods are applied here to study the precursors of flare activity in the Active Region NOAA 10486. Two approaches track the temporal behaviour of suitably chosen features (one, the weighted horizontal gradient WGM, is generalised form the horizontal gradient of the magnetic field, GM; another is the sum of the horizontal gradient of the magnetic field, GS, for all sunspot pairs). WGM is a photospheric indicator that is a proxy measure of magnetic non-potentiality of a specific area of the active region, i.e. it captures the temporal variation of the weighted horizontal gradient of magnetic flux summed up for the region where opposite magnetic polarities are highly mixed. The third one, referred to as the separateness parameter, S(lf), considers the overall morphology. Further, GS and S(lf) are photospheric newly defined quick-look indicators of the polarity mix of the entire active region. The fourth method is tracking the temporal variation of small x-ray flares, their times of succession and...

  9. NOAA's Proposed Climate Service Background updated 7/13/11 NOAA's shortterm weather forecasts of conditions out to about twoweeks are critical to saving lives and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts of conditions out to about twoweeks are critical to saving lives and property. Similarly, NOAA to saving lives and property. For example: o firefighters in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona used industry estimates it saved $300 million per year in construction costs alone by using temperature trends

  10. The Sun-Earth Connection The Temperature of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Sun-Earth Connection #12;The Temperature of the Earth The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun absorbed from the Sun with ­the heat radiated by the Earth. Heat in = heat out #12; 4R 2T 4 (1-a) R 2 (L / 4 d2) Energy Balance #12;Heat In · Energy input comes from the Sun (internal heat is negligible

  11. Exotic Earths: Forming Habitable Worlds with Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-08

    Close-in giant planets (e.g. ``Hot Jupiters'') are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth mass planets also form interior to the migrating Jovian planet, analogous to recently-discovered ``Hot Earths''. Very water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the Habitable Zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

  12. Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and Peace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Review: Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and PeaceUniversity, USA Vandana Shiva. Earth Democracy: Justice,Acid-free, recycled paper. Earth Democracy is a movement

  13. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    8erkeley Laboratory (LBL), the Earth Sciences Division, wasactivation analysis: rare earth element distribution (D)can be used to generate earth- quake records for use in

  14. Rare?Earth?Free Permanent Magnets for Electrical Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn?Bi and M?type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Yang-Ki; Haskew, Timothy; Myryasov, Oleg; Jin, Sungho; Berkowitz, Ami

    2014-06-05

    The research we conducted focuses on the rare-earth (RE)-free permanent magnet by modeling, simulating, and synthesizing exchange coupled two-phase (hard/soft) RE-free core-shell nano-structured magnet. The RE-free magnets are made of magnetically hard core materials (high anisotropy materials including Mn-Bi-X and M-type hexaferrite) coated by soft shell materials (high magnetization materials including Fe-Co or Co). Therefore, our research helps understand the exchange coupling conditions of the core/shell magnets, interface exchange behavior between core and shell materials, formation mechanism of core/shell structures, stability conditions of core and shell materials, etc.

  15. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  16. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  17. Earth Planets Space, 57, 895902, 2005 Short time-scale heating of the Earth's mantle by ice-sheet dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    -scale energy transfer from the ice sheet loading and unloading processes to the Earth's interior via viscous flow can represent a non-negligible mantle energy source with cryogenic origins. Volumetric heating rebound. 1. Introduction The Earth is a nonlinear dynamical system with a fluid atmosphere and oceans

  18. Superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, John T.; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2012-07-10

    A superhydrophobic powder is prepared by coating diatomaceous earth (DE) with a hydrophobic coating on the particle surface such that the coating conforms to the topography of the DE particles. The hydrophobic coating can be a self assembly monolayer of a perfluorinated silane coupling agent. The DE is preferably natural-grade DE where organic impurities have been removed. The superhydrophobic powder can be applied as a suspension in a binder solution to a substrate to produce a superhydrophobic surface on the substrate.

  19. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  20. ICUSESS '92: 5th Int. Conference on Underground Space and Earth Sheltered. Structures. August 2--7, 1992 The use of rock mass classification systems in assessing the long term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    ICUSESS '92: 5th Int. Conference on Underground Space and Earth Sheltered. Structures. August 2;ICUSESS '92: 5th Int. Conference on Underground Space and Earth Sheltered. Structures. August 2--7, 1992 2 openings. H.R.G.K. Hack and R.F. Bekendam1 ITC (Int. Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences

  1. Equatorial Magnetosonic Waves in the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Qianli

    2015-01-01

    The Earth’s magnetosphere . . . . . . . . .properties of magnetosonic wave events in the Earth’sviii List of Figures The Earth’s dipole magnetic field. R 0

  2. Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Strategic Plan Water is a key component of the earth and human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    , and subsurface processes, as well as climate and earth system modeling and integrated assessment modeling and plan the development of next- generation human-earth system models for improving long-term predictions

  3. Configuring PuTTY for use with ssh.gfdl.noaa.gov 1. Start PuTTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forwarding". Enter "localhost:0" in the X display location "textbox". 9. Click on the "Tunnels" in the sub other hosts". Click the "Add" button. #12;5 The Tunnels screen should now look like the image: Remember: "ssh.gfdl.noaa.gov" is only a gateway. ssh.gfdl.noaa.gov does not have tools to enable you

  4. THE NOAA HAZARDOUS WEATHER TESTBED: COLLABORATIVE TESTING OF ENSEMBLE AND CONVECTION-ALLOWING WRF MODELS AND SUBSEQUENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    THE NOAA HAZARDOUS WEATHER TESTBED: COLLABORATIVE TESTING OF ENSEMBLE AND CONVECTION-ALLOWING WRF NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) is a joint facility managed by the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), the Storm Prediction Center (SPC), and the NWS Oklahoma City/Norman Weather Forecast

  5. LamontDoherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth Institute at Columbia Univ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 12 Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth-DOHERTYEARTHOBSERVATORYTHEEARTHINSTITUTEATCOLUMBIAUNIVERSITYBIENNIALREPORT2000­2002 #12;Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is renowned in the internationLamont-Doherty Earth suc- cess and innovation in advancing understanding of Earth, for itcess and innovation in advancing

  6. 1934 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 6, NO. 4, AUGUST 2013 A Web-Based System for Classification of Remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    in many different fields. This paper describes a web-based system (available online: http://hypergim.ceta-ciemat

  7. Earth's extensive entropy bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Lisewski

    2012-12-20

    The possibility of planetary mass black hole production by crossing entropy limits is addressed. Such a possibility is given by pointing out that two geophysical quantities have comparable values: first, Earth's total negative entropy flux integrated over geological time and, second, its extensive entropy bound, which follows as a tighter bound to the Bekenstein limit when entropy is an extensive function. The similarity between both numbers suggests that the formation of black holes from planets may be possible through a strong fluctuation toward thermodynamic equilibrium which results in gravothermal instability and final collapse. Briefly discussed are implications for the astronomical observation of low mass black holes and for Fermi's paradox.

  8. Earth-sheltered apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germer, J.

    1984-12-01

    Earth-sheltered apartments for students at St. Johns University, Collegeville, MN are described. The intent was to provide energy-efficient, low maintenance housing in a neighborhood environment for the students. Students would learn about energy-conscious architecture from living in the buildings. The buildings have had few problems, but energy performance has not been up to expectations. The consumption of electricity exceeded predictions by 49%. The most likely answer to the problem is deviation from design. Several items of energy-efficient design were specified but deleted in order to cut costs.

  9. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-06-06

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  10. A Star on Earth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-03-05

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  11. Computational Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following commentsMethodsCompositional6 Computational Earth Science We

  12. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements ReportEES Division Earth and

  13. Earth, Space Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what you wereDisclaimersMail RequestsESnet'sEarth

  14. Two earth sheltered passive solar residences with photovoltaic electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong, S.J.; Osten, R.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The design and construction of two earth sheltered passive solar residence with photovoltaic electricity are described. The sizing and design of the P.V. system as well as the module fabrication and array integration are also discussed.

  15. Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What does this mean for me? Rare earth elements -- dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium -- are essential to a...

  16. Institute for Global Environmental Strategies: Discover Earth Program Materials http://www.strategies.org/index.aspx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Science Standards Physical Science Transfer of Energy Earth and Space Science Structure of the Earth, Hyde Park, New York Additional Materials Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center is the fraction of solar energy that is reflected back to space. The more reflective a surface, the higher

  17. Preprint: Nature, 387, 685686. June 12 1997. An asteroidal companion to the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegert, Paul

    Preprint: Nature, 387, 685­686. June 12 1997. An asteroidal companion to the Earth Paul A. Wiegert Near­Earth asteroids (or NEAs) are our closest neighbours in the Solar System--- some of these objects have been known to pass closer to the Earth than the Moon 1 . These objects, which range in size from

  18. Earth Research Institute Self-Assessment Five Year Review October, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 Earth Research Institute Self-Assessment Five Year Review ­ October, 2014 This self was again provided to the ERI Advisory Committee and ERI PIs. I. Introduction: The Earth Research Institute: the Institute for Crustal Studies (ICS) and the Institute for Computational Earth System Science (ICESS

  19. THE QUASI-BICIRCULAR PROBLEM FOR THE EARTH-MOON-SUN PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcelona, Universitat de

    THE QUASI-BICIRCULAR PROBLEM FOR THE EARTH-MOON-SUN PARAMETERS M.A. ANDREU and C. SIM #19; O Dept-bicircular solution of the three body problem is computed for the Earth-Moon-Sun parameters. Then, the Hamiltonian. Keywords: Three body problem, four body problem, quasi-bicircular problem, Earth-Moon-Sun system. 1

  20. Design Guidelines for Test Level 3 (TL-3) Through Test Level 5 (TL-5) Roadside Barrier Systems Placed on Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Retaining Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez Barrios, Deeyvid 1980-

    2012-12-05

    impact loads. The full-scale impact simulations were used to develop the recommendation for designing and sizing the barrier-moment slab system. In a second part, the barrier-moment slab systems defined to contain heavy vehicle impact loads were placed...

  1. Energy Department Earth Week 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To celebrate Earth Week and Earth Day, the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is participating in several Energy Department activities! Look for us inside the lobby of the U.S. Department of Energy Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C., from April 13–17. Then, on Earth Day, April 22, everyone is welcome to join us outside on the Forrestal West Plaza for Community Day!

  2. Earth is a dynamic, living oasis in the desolation of space. The land, oceans, and air interact in complex ways to give our planet a unique set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth is a dynamic, living oasis in the desolation of space. The land, oceans, and air interact in this process. In the mid 1980s, NASA developed a systems-based approach to studying the Earth and called it "Earth System Science" to advance the knowledge of Earth as a planet. Space-based observations

  3. Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven - NOAA elicited concern by fishery managers and commercial fishermen. We propose to use bioenergetics modeling that are contributing to declines in fish growth is bioenergetics modeling. We recently evaluated and modified

  4. NOAA Technical Report NMFS CIRC-391 aTanoid Copepods of the Genera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from D83. Technical Information Division. Environ- mental Science Information Center. NOAA,50. Re.search in fiscal year 1969 at the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory. Beaufort.. fiscal year 1%9. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970. iii + 33 pp.. 29 figs., 12 tables. 3

  5. NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling hurricanes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory Global warming and U.S. landfalling worldwide (plus many TV & radio shows). An AOML's paper "Global warming and United States landfalling & Meteorological Laboratory Warming Occurs Almost Everywhere over the Global Ocean The first EOF mode from

  6. September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and ecological consequences. The U.S. spends tens of billions of dollars each year to reduce air pollution in order to protect public? Air quality is determined by the quantities and types of gaseous and particle pollutants found

  7. Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the nutritional and medical effects oflong chain omega-3 fatty acids offish oils are also discussed. is largelyFish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA MAURICE E. STANSBY fatty acids (which occur almost exclusively in the oil of fish) may have beneficial effects in re ducing

  8. a Strategic Plan for NOAA's National Ocean Service FY 2003-2008 and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Strategic Plan for NOAA's National Ocean Service FY 2003-2008 and Beyond U.S. Department pleased to present the National Ocean Service (NOS) Strategic Plan, which charts our course for preserving on the great strides we have made during the past 30 years. This Strategic Plan outlines NOS's framework

  9. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Fins, Tails and Scales: Identifying Great Lakes Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hands ­ On Science with NOAA TITLE: Fins, Tails and Scales: Identifying Great Lakes Fish OVERVIEW: Working with a set of illustrated Great Lakes fish cards, students identify distinguishing characteristics of fish and learn to identify 10 common fish families and how why dichotomous keys are used. MATERIALS

  10. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Temperature time series from a 1 m Seacat, NX Modules at 1 m and 10 m, and downwelling solar values for a given day. . 6 #12;iv Contents #12;ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A

  11. Sediment Resuspension and Transport in Lake Michigan Primary Investigator: Nathan Hawley -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment Resuspension and Transport in Lake Michigan Primary Investigator: Nathan Hawley - NOAA to establish the conditions necessary for the resuspension of fine-grained bottom sediments in Lake Michigan and to assess the relative importance of local resuspension versus advective processes in the deeper parts

  12. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 72 December 1988 Age Determination Methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries, by Edward P. Myers, Donald E. Hoss, Walter M. MatsumotoNOAA Technical Report NMFS 72 December 1988 Age Determination Methods for Northwest Atlantic. Butler. November 1985, 9 p. 36. An egg production method for estimating spawning biomass of pelagic fish

  13. HIPPO_NOAA_Flask_Data_Users_Guide_20121130 1 Revision Date: November 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sample GHG, Halocarbon, and Hydrocarbon Data (R_20121129) Summary: This data set provides a NOAA flask sample oriented data product of meteorological, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol measurements from all atmospheric concentrations of CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, halocarbon, hydrocarbon, and sulfur-containing trace

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERl GLERL-13 ON THE USE OF MICROWAVE RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERl GLERL-13 ON THE USE OF MICROWAVE RADIATION FOR GREAT LAKES ICE.2 Federally Sponsored Studies 3.2.1 Ground Parameters 3.2.2 Using Radar to Classify Ice 4. FUTURE MICROWAVE THE USE OF MICROWAVE RADIATION* FOR GREAT LAKES ICE SURVEILLANCE Brenda Blanton Hagman With the desire

  15. ontinuing the legacy of Dr. Charles D. Keeling in monitoring carbon dioxide, NOAA's Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C ontinuing the legacy of Dr. Charles D. Keeling in monitoring carbon dioxide, NOAA's Office provides funding to Charles D. Keeling to begin monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) at the South Pole and Mauna-seasonal data on carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, and other gases in a region where rapid climate

  16. Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel (TIP) Report M. J. McPhaden, NOAA/PMEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel (TIP) Report M. J. McPhaden, NOAA/PMEL Prepared of physical, chemical and biological parameters made on repeat routine buoy serving cruises. These cruises a convenient platform for buoy, drifter and weather balloon launches and other measurement activities

  17. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-118 CLIMATE-CORRECTED STORM-FREQUENCY EXAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , made in September 1999 for September 1999--August 2000 (35.31 cfs = 1 m3 s-1 ) ....... 8 Figure 2 for September 1999--August 2000 (35.31 cfs = 1 m3 s-1 ) ....... 8 Figure 3.--NOAA Outlook of Meteorology Event

  18. FEBRUARY 14, 2011 NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson approaches the Deepwater Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the successful implementation of NOAA's satellite program. Energy is everyone's business. Solar, wind, and wave the country need climate information to make choices about what crops to plant and when to plant them. City energy generation are closely tied to weather and climate trends ­ and therefore new research

  19. NSFFunding body NOAA NASA DOE Other World Data Center for Paleoclimatology Data Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Title NSFFunding body NOAA NASA DOE Other World Data Center for Paleoclimatology Data No World Data center for Paleoclimatology archive Other If Other Explain Who will be involved Management Plan Data Description Proxies Volume of data to be produced 1-100 MB 100-1000 MB > 1000MB Borehole

  20. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-570 ESTIMATION OF EFFORT, MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD, AND MAXIMUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , AND MAXIMUM ECONOMIC YIELD IN THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO BY JAMES NANCE, WALTER KEITHLY, JR YIELD, AND MAXIMUM ECONOMIC YIELD IN THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO BY JAMES NANCE, WALTER in the shrimp fishery of the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-570, 71P. Copies may

  1. pecially equipped NOAA aircraft play an integral role in hurricane forecasting. Data collected during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used to study air chemistry over the United States and Gulf of Mexico, verify weather satellite data around every Atlantic-based hurricane that has posed a potential threat to the United States. The jet Radiometers to NOAA's P-3s. SFMRs measure over-ocean wind speed and rain rate in hurricanes and tropical

  2. Providing scientific stewardship of marine data and information NOAA's Ocean Data Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Scientific journals, rare books, historical photo collections and maps through the NOAA Central Library for residents. NODC archives various types of weather data including air temperature, marine weather, cloud's Central Library preserves, digitizes, and makes accessible the National Weather Service Technical Reports

  3. FINAL CRUISE INSTRUCTIONS NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN, Cruise MF-06-10 Leg II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moorings at several locations in the Bering Sea. To complete CTD casts and plankton tows at sampling Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) 7600 Sand Point Way N.E., Seattle, Washington 98115-6439 #12;NOAA - Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) 7600 Sand Point Way N.E., Seattle, Washington 98115-0070 University

  4. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-14 DETROIT AND ST. CLAIR RIVER TRANSIENT MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-14 DETROIT AND ST. CLAIR RIVER TRANSIENT MODELS Frank H. Quinn.2 Example 3 3. DETROIT RIVER MODELS 6 3.1 Model Scope 6 3.2 Hydraulic Parameters 6 3.3 Model Calibration 6 3. RECOMMENDATIONS 17 6. REFERENCES 18 Appendix A. DETROIT RIVER TRANSIENT MODEL AND OUTPUT 19 Appendix B. ST. CLAIR

  5. Vegetation and temperature condition indices from NOAA AVHRR data for drought monitoring over India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    Vegetation and temperature condition indices from NOAA AVHRR data for drought monitoring over India. The present study shows the application of vegetation and temperature condition indices for drought monitoring and converting brightness temperature into the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and Temperature Condition Index

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-17 ON THE USE OF MULTISPECTRAL RADAR TO DEFINE CERTAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Lakes. The Great Lakes Environ- mental Research Laboratory, NOAA, and its predecessor organization.S. Coast Guard for several years. Charts of the extent of the ice cover at various times during each winter States agencies on the composition of ice charts. The limitations of visual or photographic observations

  7. NOAA is committed to helping governments, businesses, and communities manage climate risks, adapt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    detect small regional changes over long periods and provide maps of global and local distribution fundamental building blocks for studying climate change. NOAA and international scientists use this data to analyze and model short- and long-term variability in global wind patterns and ocean circulation. Long

  8. Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series ONMS-15-01 NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series ONMS-15-01 NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries Lionfish Response Plan (2015-2018) Responding, Controlling, and Adapting to an Active Marine Invasion U of National Marine Sanctuaries February 2015 #12;About the Marine Sanctuaries Conservation Series The Office

  9. Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa - NOAA of dreissenid biomass but there are no current, accurate estimates of biomass in this portion of the lake. Biomass is calculated from abundances, size- frequencies, and length-weights. The goal of this project

  10. Creating a Star on Earth

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: creating a star on Earth.

  11. Evolution of stable and metastable phases and coercivity in rare-earth-rich alloys of the Fe-Nd and Fe-Pr systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, F.A.O. ); Gama, S. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have studied eutectic alloys of the Fe-Nd and Fe-Pr systems regarding their magnetic behavior in the as-cast state and heat-treated at 600 C for different periods. In both systems the initial precipitation of a metastable phase is observed. This phase transforms into Fe{sub 17}Nd{sub 2} and this finally into a second phase with Fe{sub 17}Nd{sub 5} stoichiometry that is stable. For the Fe-Pr system the precipitation of two metastable phases that transform into the stable Fe{sub 17}Pr{sub 2} is observed. The authors have also measured the influence of these transformations on the coercivity of these alloys.

  12. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  13. White Earth Biomass/Biogas Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triplett, Michael

    2015-03-12

    The White Earth Nation examined the feasibility of cost savings and fossil energy reduction through the installation of biogas/biomass boiler at the tribal casino. The study rejected biogas options due to availability and site constraints, but found a favorable environment for technical and financial feasibility of installing a 5 MMBtu hot water boiler system to offset 60-70 percent of current fuel oil and propane usage.

  14. The influence of Cr on the garnetspinel transition in the Earth's mantle: experiments in the system MgOCr2O3SiO2 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the garnet-in reaction to much higher pressures than previously anticipated. Moreover, in Cr-bearing systems main minerals such as olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyrox- ene and spinel. At higher pressures, however, the spinel bearing assemblage converts into a garnet bearing mineral assemblage. Among others, the tran

  15. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  16. Earth and Sustainability 1. General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Earth and Sustainability 1. General Information Deans: Prof. dr. G.J. van der Zwaan (Faculty of Geosciences) Prof. dr. ir. A. Bliek (Faculty of Science) Constituting faculty focus areas: Solid Earth (Dept. Earth Sciences), Earth Surface Analysis (Depts. Earth Sciences, Physical Geography), Climate and Global

  17. RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), a wholly earths are iron gray to silvery lustrous metals; rare-earth tariffs for Canada and Mexico were1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick The rare earths are a relatively abundant enacted on November 30, 1993, and covered of rare earths for the second consecutive year. group of elements that range

  18. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  19. IMAGES OF THE EARTH Description of the course: This is an introduction to the new, rapidly evolving, and interdisciplinary field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    GEOL 3105 IMAGES OF THE EARTH Description of the course: This is an introduction to the new, rapidly evolving, and interdisciplinary field of Earth System Science. This course emphasizes the ideas of Earth as a planet within the solar system; the interactions among the components of the geosphere

  20. Connecting Changing Ocean Circulation with Changing Climate MICHAEL WINTON, STEPHEN M. GRIFFIES, AND BONITA L. SAMUELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodgers, Keith

    currents on climate change is evaluated by comparing an earth system model's response to increased CO2 with a fully coupled earth system model. In Corresponding author address: Michael Winton, NOAA/GFDL, Princeton