Sample records for noaa climate prediction

  1. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    climate variability and climate change effect on the potential for growing crops for biofuel in GeorgiaNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National, miscanthus, and other, are already being evaluated due to their large biomass productivity. The local farmers

  2. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National on farmland, farmers and farming in the U.S. are presently creating undesirable results affecting future security of existing and potential regional and local food systems and other values by adversely affecting

  3. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Environmental Impacts on National Security Using Satellite Data Authors: Dr. Sara Graves, Todd Berendes in the state of Alabama on critical infrastructure and assets with national security implications. The changeNOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National

  4. NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, a part of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Climate Data Prepares Oahu Construction Industry for Wet Season Each year NOAA. This year, for example, climate data have been immensely valuable to the construction industry on Oahu October that the winter season would be much wetter than usual, his firm went into mitigation mode. PVT

  5. NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction NOAA Center for Weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for better insulation and protection. Rainwater bio-retention areas and a storm water cistern collect water for irrigation, and a four-story rainwater waterfall efficiently drains the non-green portion of the roof. NOAA

  6. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop, Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Challenges: Abstract Submission Presentation Title: Real-time Energy and Climate Simulations: Tools Lynmar Ave., Asheville NC 28804, apjones@climateinteractive.org Presentation Abstract: Under the United.org. #12;Two journal articles are currently under review on this work, one (on the model) at "Climatic

  7. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    , drought effects have gained attention. The Agricultural Reference Index for Drought (ARID) was developed in order to quantify drought and better understand its effect on agriculture. ARID values range from 0 to 1 Security Challenges: Abstract Submission Presentation Title: An AgroClimate web tool for ARID (Agricultural

  8. www.noaa.gov/climate Proposed Climate Service in NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and partners. The reorganization is budget neutral, does not change staffing levels, require employee, September 2010 Climate Service Example: Construction NOAA provides air-freezing data to the home building. This resulted in annual building cost savings of $330 million and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatt

  9. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) National Climatic DataNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet AGRICULTURE Overview A wide

  10. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COASTAL HAZARDS OVERVIEW Global

  11. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be used most effectively. #12;NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite Insurance Litigation Marine and Coastal Ecosystems National Security TOURISM Transportation WaterNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet TOURISM Overview Tourism

  12. Climate Prediction Center Products in Support of National Security Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Climate Prediction Center Products in Support of National Security Mike Halpert, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Center 5200 Auth Rd. Camp Springs, MD 20746 301-763-8000 x7535 Mike.Halpert@noaa.gov The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) delivers climate prediction, monitoring, and diagnostic products

  13. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 NOAA Satellite and Information Service National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Ecosystems National Security Tourism Transportation Water Resources Climate information can be usedNOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet COAStAl HAzArDS Overview Global

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 46 A CLIMATIC ANALYSIS OF OROGRAPHIC PRECIPITATION OVER THE BIGHydrology (HYDRO) ofthe National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river and water supply, and conducts pertinent research and development NOAA Teclmical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate

  15. NOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate data available from NOAA's various climate observing systems as well as the output data from state range of solar, geophysical, environmental, and human dimensions data. As an example of dataNOAA/National Climatic Data Center Open Access to Physical Climate Data Policy December 2009

  16. NOAA Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to 2:30PM EDT Hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this webinar will demonstrate the U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit. Register for this webinar...

  17. AFFILIATIONS: EBERT--Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, Australia; JANOWIAK--NOAA/Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Beth

    --NOAA/Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, Maryland; KIDD--School of Geography, Earth, and Environmental Sciences, but also to a wide range of decision makers, including hydrologists, agriculturalists, emergency managers and the distribution of the Earth's latent heating, which has direct effects on the planetary circulation

  18. NOAA Satellite and Information Service Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as the commercial airline, electric power and GPS industries. Our national security and economic well-being, whichNOAA Satellite and Information Service Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) Background: DSCOVR will maintain the Nation's solar wind observations, which are critical to maintaining the accuracy and lead time

  19. National Climate Plan Published by NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the extent to which solar and earth radiation modify climatic conditions, and 4) Gathering more data probably will rely on leased aircraft, an antenna system that will mount on any type of aircraft would

  20. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database. INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 33 2. HISTORY

  1. TEMPLATE for project inclusion in the NOAA OGP Climate Change Data and Detection (C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEMPLATE for project inclusion in the NOAA OGP Climate Change Data and Detection (C 2 D 2 ) Applied Research Center (ARC) for Data Set Development Sydney Levitus NODC/NOAA Project: Ocean Data Archaeology of the Climate-Quality Data Set A- quality control procedures, including ongoing improvements QC procedures

  2. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 59 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE SEA OF AZOV 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 59 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE SEA OF AZOV 2006 Silver Spring, MD July 2006 U, I. Smolyar 2006. Climatic Atlas of the Sea of Azov 2006. G. Matishov, S. Levitus, Eds., NOAA Atlas-2004 Number of stations: 14,289 , , CD , . The Atlas and associated data are being

  3. Applied Climate Information System -NOAA Regional Climate Centers 727 Hardin Hall, 3310 Holdrege Street, Lincoln, NE 68583-0997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Applied Climate Information System - NOAA Regional Climate Centers ACIS 727 Hardin Hall, 3310-8763 High Plains Regional Climate Center Climate Services HPRCC provides the public with several ways to access climate data and information. Whether via direct contact, website access, or through

  4. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE ARCTIC SEAS 2004: Part I. Database of the Barents, Kara, and Information Service #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 9 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 58 2004: I

  5. NOAA is committed to helping governments, businesses, and communities manage climate risks, adapt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Ka'imimoana, collect oceanic and atmospheric data such as solar radiation, carbon dioxide, and other-stop monitoring required for effective climate models, forecasts, and projections. NOAA's Carbon Tracker is widely

  6. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 67 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE NORTH PACIFIC SEAS 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 67 CLIMATIC ATLAS OF THE NORTH PACIFIC SEAS 2009: Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk Administration National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service #12;International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 12 Climatic Atlas of North Pacific Seas 2009 Additional copies

  7. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas, heightens the need for additional weather and climate data for improved decision making. Having climate and weather- related information. Some major groups include: · Insurance and reinsurance companies to translate climate data into accessible, useful, and accurate products; and to leverage NCDC's climate

  8. Information theory and climate prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Lai-yung

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFORMATION THEORY AND CLIMATE PREDICTION A Thesis by LAI-YUNG LEUNG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject...: Meteorology INFORMATION THEORY AND CLIMATE PREDICTION A Thesis by LAI-YUNG LEUNG Approved as to style and content by: Gerald R. North (Chairman) George L. Huebner (Member) Robert O. Reid (Member) James R. Scoggins (Head of Department) May 19BB...

  9. IMPLEMENTING THE NOAA NEXT GENERATION STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    climate modeling using NOAA's high performance computing abilities; · Expand the Climate Portal through

  10. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

  11. Defining success in climate adaptation support Moderator: Adam Parris, NOAA Climate Program Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    demand from the decision making communities. Recommendations from the community of practice are often and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is conducting an evaluation designed to identify best practices for using interactions with decision makers (i.e. co-production), owning the responsibility for working with decision

  12. Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

  13. Developing Models for Predictive Climate Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, John B [ORNL; Jones, Philip W [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Climate System Model results from a multi-agency collaboration designed to construct cutting-edge climate science simulation models for a broad research community. Predictive climate simulations are currently being prepared for the petascale computers of the near future. Modeling capabilities are continuously being improved in order to provide better answers to critical questions about Earth's climate. Climate change and its implications are front page news in today's world. Could global warming be responsible for the July 2006 heat waves in Europe and the United States? Should more resources be devoted to preparing for an increase in the frequency of strong tropical storms and hurricanes like Katrina? Will coastal cities be flooded due to a rise in sea level? The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), which archives all weather data for the nation, reports that global surface temperatures have increased over the last century, and that the rate of increase is three times greater since 1976. Will temperatures continue to climb at this rate, will they decline again, or will the rate of increase become even steeper? To address such a flurry of questions, scientists must adopt a systematic approach and develop a predictive framework. With responsibility for advising on energy and technology strategies, the DOE is dedicated to advancing climate research in order to elucidate the causes of climate change, including the role of carbon loading from fossil fuel use. Thus, climate science--which by nature involves advanced computing technology and methods--has been the focus of a number of DOE's SciDAC research projects. Dr. John Drake (ORNL) and Dr. Philip Jones (LANL) served as principal investigators on the SciDAC project, 'Collaborative Design and Development of the Community Climate System Model for Terascale Computers.' The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a fully-coupled global system that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. The collaborative SciDAC team--including over a dozen researchers at institutions around the country--developed, validated, documented, and optimized the performance of CCSM using the latest software engineering approaches, computational technology, and scientific knowledge. Many of the factors that must be accounted for in a comprehensive model of the climate system are illustrated in figure 1.

  14. The rapidly evolving field of decadal climate prediction, using initialized climate models to produce time-evolving predictions of regional climate, is producing new results for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and it is on those time scales of interest to water managers that decadal climate prediction is being appliedThe rapidly evolving field of decadal climate prediction, using initialized climate models to produce time-evolving predictions of regional climate, is producing new results for predictions

  15. Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

  16. SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY AND RESPONSES TO GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY AND RESPONSES TO GLOBAL WARMING Mxolisi Excellent Shongwe #12;ISBN : 978-90-902-5046-5 #12;SEASONAL CLIMATE EXTREMES: MECHANISMS, PREDICTABILITY;. . . Dedicated to my late father John Mabhensa Shongwe #12;ABSTRACT Climate extremes are rarely occurring natural

  17. NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    -scaled tools to support risk-based decision making at the installation level are virtually nonexistent. While inundation models. These models provide robust scientific input to an innovative risk assessment analysis to mission impairment in a real-time, decision-relevant manner given these scenarios. Ultimately, these risks

  18. Protecting Lives and Livelihoods NOAA Business Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Atmospheric Research 66 National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service 74 Office of Marine to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration #12;2 Message from the Acting Under Secretary 6 NOAA

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Climate change model predicts 33 % rice yield decrease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Climate change model predicts 33 % rice yield decrease in 2100 in Bangladesh parameters on rice. The effects of climate change on yield of a popular winter rice cultivar in Bangladesh online: 12 June 2012 # INRA and Springer-Verlag, France 2012 Abstract In Bangladesh, projected climate

  20. NOAA's Proposed Climate Service Background updated 7/13/11 NOAA's shortterm weather forecasts of conditions out to about twoweeks are critical to saving lives and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anticipated power demands for winter heating and summer cooling and to set electricity prices. o farmers use it to determine what crops to plant and when, as well as their irrigation needs. o Part of the military mission is to anticipate threats and changes to national security. Climate variability and change, and its interaction

  1. Climate Engineering with Aerosols --Predictable Consequences?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    ice extent 2. There are regions of the world where climate engineering will produce knowable changes within the troposphere (different spatial forcing) ­ Regional cancellation due to enhanced sea ice in engineered world · No ocean dynamic feedback or no sea ice dynamics -- both of which greatly affect high

  2. The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Peter [Meteorology and Climate Centre, School of Mathematical Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield (Ireland)], E-mail: Peter.Lynch@ucd.ie

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed.

  3. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  4. AFFILIATIONS: HULTQUIST--NOAA/National Weather Service, Marquette, Michigan; DUTTER--NOAA/National Weather Service,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with modern numerical weather prediction models to provide detailed hindcasts of conditions throughoutAFFILIATIONS: HULTQUIST--NOAA/National Weather Service, Marquette, Michigan; DUTTER--NOAA/National Weather Service, Cleveland, Ohio; SCHWAB--NOAA/Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor

  5. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Hawaii Meteorological Grids for NCEP Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division 18. Climate 19. Air for Europe convention on Long-Range Transport of Air Pollution. o.russell.bullock@noaa.gov 3. CarbonNOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report (January ­ March 2008) Contents Highlights

  6. NCCR CLIMATE: CONTENT The overall aims of the proposed NCCR Climate relate to the understanding and prediction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    1 NCCR CLIMATE: CONTENT 1. SUMMARY The overall aims of the proposed NCCR Climate relate to the understanding and prediction of climate variation, the assessment of its impact upon the natural environment, challenging and significant. Understanding of the climate system and its change was accorded highest priority

  7. 2013 Accomplishments Report NOAA Satellite and Information Service | www.nesdis.noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    satellites and other sources to promote, protect and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environment2013 Accomplishments Report NOAA Satellite and Information Service | www.nesdis.noaa.gov #12;1 From the Assistant Administrator 2 Satellites 4 Climate 6 Weather 8 Oceans 10 Coasts 12 Partnerships & Outreach 13

  8. Predictability and Diagnosis of Low-Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Arthur J. Miller

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the climate for the coming decades requires understanding both natural and anthropogenically forced climate variability. This variability is important because it has major societal impacts, for example by causing floods or droughts on land or altering fishery stocks in the ocean. Our results fall broadly into three topics: evaluating global climate model predictions; regional impacts of climate changes over western North America; and regional impacts of climate changes over the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

  9. Predicting future climate change for the UK and East AngliaPredicting future climate change for the UK and East Anglia Climatic Research Unit (CRU), University of East Anglia, Norwich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    Predicting future climate change for the UK and East AngliaPredicting future climate change confidence in the following future changes in UK climate: Average temperature increases Summer temperature part in farming, so we might expect these changes to have an impact on agriculture ­ affecting both

  10. Seasonal Climate Extremes : Mechanism, Predictability and Responses to Global Warming.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shongwe, M.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Climate extremes are rarely occurring natural phenomena in the climate system. They often pose one of the greatest environmental threats to human and natural systems.… (more)

  11. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  12. Climate Change Policies for the XXIst Century: Mechanisms, Predictions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khmelinskii, Igor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental works demonstrated that the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) hypothesis, embodied in a series of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) global climate models, is erroneous. These works prove that atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes only very moderately to the observed warming, and that there is no climatic catastrophe in the making, independent on whether or not carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced. In view of these developments, we discuss climate predictions for the XXIst century. Based on the solar activity tendencies, a new Little Ice Age is predicted by the middle of this century, with significantly lower global temperatures. We also show that IPCC climate models can't produce any information regarding future climate, due to essential physical phenomena lacking in those, and that the current budget deficit in many EU countries is mainly caused by the policies promoting renewable energies and other AGW-motivated measures. In absence of any predictable adverse climate...

  13. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report May 2002 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory for Climate Studies: Methods, Products, and Challenges," held May 30, 2002 in Washington DC. Talks

  14. Estimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models through parameterisation. For parameterisation, data. The effect of lakes should be parameterised in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate modellingEstimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate

  15. Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz., 2008, 27 (2), 00-00 Predicted climate changes for the years to come

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz., 2008, 27 (2), 00-00 Predicted climate changes for the years 3PU, United Kingdom. E-mail: stoned@atm.ox.ac.uk (2) Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research community to produce predictions of future climate change. Predictions for the next few decades

  16. Subtask 2.4 - Integration and Synthesis in Climate Change Predictive Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaroslav Solc

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a brief evaluation of the existing status of predictive modeling to assess options for integration of our previous paleohydrologic reconstructions and their synthesis with current global climate scenarios. Results of our research indicate that short-term data series available from modern instrumental records are not sufficient to reconstruct past hydrologic events or predict future ones. On the contrary, reconstruction of paleoclimate phenomena provided credible information on past climate cycles and confirmed their integration in the context of regional climate history is possible. Similarly to ice cores and other paleo proxies, acquired data represent an objective, credible tool for model calibration and validation of currently observed trends. It remains a subject of future research whether further refinement of our results and synthesis with regional and global climate observations could contribute to improvement and credibility of climate predictions on a regional and global scale.

  17. Hamiltonian-based numerical methods for forced-dissipative climate prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Hamiltonian-based numerical methods for forced-dissipative climate prediction Bob Peeters1 , Onno long-term weather forecast models fail at this point. But the question remains, however: Question: Is it advantageous to use numerical schemes with a Hamil- tonian core for realistic climate modeling? The primitive

  18. Descriptive and Predictive Analysis of Climate Data Advisor: Nitesh V. Chawla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Descriptive and Predictive Analysis of Climate Data Advisor: Nitesh V. Chawla DepartmentNSA) University of Notre Dame Co-Advisor: Auroop R. Ganguly Geographic Information Science and Technology Group

  19. Evaluation of short-term climate change prediction in multi-model CMIP5 decadal hindcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    events such as trop- ical cyclone activity. On decadal timescales, some aspects of internal climate skill of individual models have been analyzed separately for multi-year prediction horizons over

  20. Climate Change Policies for the XXIst Century: Mechanisms, Predictions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Khmelinskii; Peter Stallinga

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental works demonstrated that the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) hypothesis, embodied in a series of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) global climate models, is erroneous. These works prove that atmospheric carbon dioxide contributes only very moderately to the observed warming, and that there is no climatic catastrophe in the making, independent on whether or not carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced. In view of these developments, we discuss climate predictions for the XXIst century. Based on the solar activity tendencies, a new Little Ice Age is predicted by the middle of this century, with significantly lower global temperatures. We also show that IPCC climate models can't produce any information regarding future climate, due to essential physical phenomena lacking in those, and that the current budget deficit in many EU countries is mainly caused by the policies promoting renewable energies and other AGW-motivated measures. In absence of any predictable adverse climate consequences of carbon dioxide emissions, and with no predictable shortage of fossil fuels, we argue for recalling of all policies aimed at reducing carbon dioxide emissions and usage of expensive renewable energy sources. The concepts of carbon credits, green energy and green fuels should be abandoned in favor of productive, economically viable and morally acceptable solutions.

  1. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Interface Control Document IPT Integrated Product Team NESDIS National Environmental Satellite, DataHardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS CENTER for SATELLITE APPLICATIONS and RESEARCH DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-9.2 TEST READINESS DOCUMENT GUIDELINE Version 3.0 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-9

  2. IMPROVING PREDICTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE: OBSERVATIONAL AND MODELING REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmosphere, largely because of emissions from fossil fuel combustion. An increase in atmospheric CO2 would, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA (ses@bnl.gov) Carbon dioxide (CO2) is building up is the extent of climate change that will result from future increases in atmospheric CO2. Confident knowledge

  3. Toward understanding predictability of climate: a linear stochastic modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Faming

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (E?) ? ; (2.29) which represents the predictable information(Schneider and Gri?es, 1999). In our case here, it is convenient to work with a derived quantity which we call predictive power loss (PPL) PPL(?) = e? 2nI(?x; x) = det ?E?C?1?1=n (2.30) after... the predictive power (PP) of Schneider and Gri?es (1999). Using the properties of positive de?nite matrix, one can show 0 6 PPL 6 1. It is consistent with ?(?) in the sense that PPL(0) = 0 and PPL(?1) = 1. The predictive power loss has some nice mathematical...

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

  5. Bayesian methods for discontinuity detection in climate model predictions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safta, Cosmin; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.; Sargsyan, Khachik

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discontinuity detection is an important component in many fields: Image recognition, Digital signal processing, and Climate change research. Current methods shortcomings are: Restricted to one- or two-dimensional setting, Require uniformly spaced and/or dense input data, and Give deterministic answers without quantifying the uncertainty. Spectral methods for Uncertainty Quantification with global, smooth bases are challenged by discontinuities in model simulation results. Domain decomposition reduces the impact of nonlinearities and discontinuities. However, while gaining more smoothness in each subdomain, the current domain refinement methods require prohibitively many simulations. Therefore, detecting discontinuities up front and refining accordingly provides huge improvement to the current methodologies.

  6. arm program climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center is leading NOAA Center Veach-Baley Federal Building 151 Patton Avenue Asheville, North Carolina Climate Data Record 11 AWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference...

  7. Predicting the future of forests in the Mediterranean under climate change, with niche-and process-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keenan, Trevor

    Predicting the future of forests in the Mediterranean under climate change, with niche- and process important future climatic changes are expected. Here, we assess and compare two commonly used modeling, 2004), and the potential response of these distributions to future climatic change (e.g. Thomas et al

  8. Predictability and Diagnosis of Low Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niklas Schneider

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarized recent findings with respect to Predictability and Diagnosis of Low Frequency Climate Processes in the Pacific, with focus on the dynamics of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, oceanic adjustments and the coupled feedback in the western boundary current of the North and South Pacific, decadal dynamics of oceanic salinity, and tropical processes with emphasis on the Indonesian Throughflow.

  9. ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Climate Modeling and Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    between the familiar seven-day weather forecast and the century-long global-warming projection, Maryland-Rabinovitz's work is leading to improved predictions of extreme weather events such as monsoons, intense storms-use patterns and their contribution to climate change. Ning Zeng investigates how ice sheets store carbon

  10. Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John

    2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

  11. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  12. A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmosphere, where they reside typically for days to weeks before settling to the ground or being washed out of atmospheric aerosol plumes include dust, smoke, smog and haze. Aerosol particles are small, but numerous, and thus are regulated as air pollutants. As an integral component of the Earth's climate system, aerosols

  13. N AA Knows Climate "The climate challenge before us is real. Climate change impacts will touch nearly every aspect of our lives. Meeting the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and NOAA Administrator National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service NOAA's National users. Access to these data products promote, protect, and enhance the nation's economy, security Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) provides critical climate data derived through

  14. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    (Raytheon Information Solutions) TEST READINESS REVIEW REPORT GUIDELINE VERSION HISTORY SUMMARY Version guidelines by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) New Document 11/16/2007 3.0 Renamed DG-9.3 and revised by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 3. All 10/1/2009 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR

  15. Hardcopy Uncontrolled NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    TITLE: DG-10.3: CODE TEST DOCUMENT GUIDELINE VERSION 3.0 AUTHORS: Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information.0 No version 1 2.0 New Document Guideline (DG-10.3, Code Test Document) by Ken Jensen (Raytheon Information (Raytheon Information Solutions) for version 3. All 10/1/2009 #12;NOAA NESDIS STAR DOCUMENT GUIDELINE DG-10

  16. Building High-Quality Climate Data Records from Operational Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ;Implications to Construction of Satellite Climate Data Record · Well characterize the errors of satellite-A ATMS NOAA6-14 NOAA15-19 Suomi NPP MetOp-A/B FY

  17. Drought Update Colorado Climate Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drought Update Colorado Climate Center Roger Pielke, Sr., Director Prepared by Tara Green and Odie Bliss http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 2 http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2003/mar/st005dv00pcp200303.html #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 3 #12;© 2003

  18. Thomas Karl is the Director of NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina, and leads NOAA's Climate Services. He has served and continues to serve on a variety of National Research Council Committees. Karl is a fellow of the America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    and Petroleum Engineering, and Economics. Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy Union Outstanding Young Scientist Award 2006. Lenton's efforts to quantify and evaluate different on the capture and storage of CO2, the technology and implications of global climate engineering, the economics

  19. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration to changes in climate and emissions is investigated using a coupled global atmosphere-land model driven by the year 2100 IPCC A1B scenario predictions. The ...

  20. Spatial and temporal climate variations influencing medium-range temperature predictions over south-central European Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeffrey Edward

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL CLIMATE VARIATIONS INFLUENCING MEDIUM-RANGE TEMPERATURE PREDICTIONS OVER SOUTH-CENTRAL EUROPEAN RUSSIA A Thesis by JEFFREY EDWARD JOHNSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Meteorology SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL CLIMATE VARIATIONS INFLUENCING MEDIUM-RANGE TEMPERATURE PREDICTIONS OVER SOUTH-CENTRAL EUROPEAN RUSSIA A Thesis JEFFREY EDWARD...

  1. NOAA implements annual catch limits for all managed fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continental Shelf SEPT NOAA completes construction of supercomputers Stratus and Cirrus that improve weather NOAA releases Scientific Integrity Policy NOAA launches GOES-15 NOAA launches Suomi-NPP satellite NOAA

  2. Long-Term Predictions of Global Climate Using the Ocean Conveyor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, P.; Wilson, J.R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many have attributed the Great Ocean Conveyor as a major driver of global climate change over millennia as well as a possible explanation for shorter (multidecadal) oscillations. The conveyor is thought to have a cycle time on the order of 1000 years, however recent research has suggested that it is much faster than previously believed (about 100 years). A faster conveyor leads to the possibility of the conveyor's role in even shorter oscillations such as the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The conveyor is primarily density driven. In this study the salty outflow of the Red Sea is used to predict its behavior ten years into the future. A successful model could lead to a long-term prediction (ten years) of El Ninos, Atlantic hurricane season intensity, as well as global temperature and precipitation patterns.

  3. *Corresponding author: Email: tlakhankar@ccny.cuny.edu; British Journal of Environment & Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    (4): .........., 2013 1. INTRODUCTION Snow is a key component of Earth's energy balance, climate, environment and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST), City College of New York, 160 Convent Ave, NY 10031.USA. 2 NOAA

  4. anemone ar noaa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling A NOAA, Physical Sciences Division Michael Fiorino and Steven E. Koch NOAA Earth System Research Lab, Global of NOAA's global forecast model. Unfortunately, our...

  5. Population differentiation in tree-ring growth response of white fir (Abies concolor) to climate: Implications for predicting forest responses to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, D.B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest succession models and correlative models have predicted 200--650 kilometer shifts in the geographic range of temperate forests and forest species as one response to global climate change. Few studies have investigated whether population differences may effect the response of forest species to climate change. This study examines differences in tree-ring growth, and in the phenotypic plasticity of tree-ring growth in 16-year old white fir, Abies concolor, from ten populations grown in four common gardens in the Sierra Nevada of California. For each population, tree-ring growth was modelled as a function of precipitation and degree-day sums. Tree-ring growth under three scenarios of doubled C0{sub 2} climates was estimated.

  6. NOAA Committee Memberships, 2004-2008 Eddie N. Bernard, Member, NOAA Tsunami Program Team, 2005-present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Koehn, Member, NOAA Science, Technology, and Infusion Program Team, 2003-2005 Mark P. Koehn, Member

  7. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 56 RUSSIAN MARINE EXPEDITIONARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 56 RUSSIAN MARINE EXPEDITIONARY INVESTIGATIONS OF THE WORLD OCEAN Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series, Volume 5 NOAA Atlas NESDIS 56 #12;World Data Center for Oceanography, Silver Spring International Ocean Atlas and Information Series

  8. Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin NOAA NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin 2009 NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research ......................................................................................................................................... 6 Sensor Physics Branch

  9. Scientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit that they cannot predict how global warming will affect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    that they cannot predict how global warming will affect individual countries, a leading physicist has said-of-deaths-from-ozone-predicted.html) Antarctic sea floor gives clues about effects of future global warming (/earth/environment/climatechange /5279223/Antarctic-sea-floor-gives-clues-about-affects-of-future-global-warming.html) The Vanishing Face

  10. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report September 2005 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Seidel has agreed to serve as co-chair of the 2007 AMS Annual Meeting, to be held in San Antonio, Texas in a quasi- operational setting. (will.pendergrass@noaa.gov; bruce.hicks@noaa.gov) Silver Spring 4. A Warm

  11. Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Tec / Satellite Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Infrared Soundings From NOAA Spacecraft L. M. McMillin D. Q. Wark J. M. Siomkajlo P. G. Abel A. Werbowetzki. E. Bittner C. M. Hayden #12;UDC 551.507.362.2:551.508.2:551.501.7:535-1 Physics Infrared radiation

  12. NOAA AND ENERGY NOAA's involvement with the energy sector is wide-ranging. NOAA has an interest or is actively engaged in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power; biomass and biofuel. NOAA provides data, scientific research, technical products, management, ocean buoys, ships and aircraft, and seafloor observatories. NOAA can help advance the renewable energy

  13. us CLIVARU.S. CLIVAR U.S. CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND PREDICTABILITY (CLIVAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Yonghong

    and Earth system model simulations, predictions, and projections to identify- ing and tracking the evolution

  14. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  15. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  16. Pathogen-Host Associations and Predicted Range Shifts of Human Monkeypox in Response to Climate Change in Central Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security.Agriculture (http://ccafs-climate.org/ Ac- cessed September 2010) [44]. As the confidence intervals around climate change

  17. Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outreach and Adaptive Strategies for Climate Change: The Role of NOAA Sea Grant Extension years and generations about how to adapt to a changing climate. Effective preparation for possible effects of climate change includes engagement of resource managers, planners, public works officials

  18. COLORADO CLIMATE PREPAREDNESS PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    COLORADO CLIMATE PREPAREDNESS PROJECT FINAL REPORT Prepared by the Western Water Assessment for the State of Colorado #12;#12;Authors Kristen Averyt University of Colorado Boulder, CU-NOAA Western Water Assessment Kelsey Cody University of Colorado Boulder, Environmental Studies Program Eric Gordon University

  19. Captain Debora R. Barr, NOAA Director, NOAA Homeland Security Program Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the Acting Deputy Director, National Environmental Satellite and Information Service (NESDIS) OfficeCaptain Debora R. Barr, NOAA Director, NOAA Homeland Security Program Office Captain (CAPT) Debora R. Barr is the Director of NOAA's Homeland Security Program Office. She is responsible

  20. Final Report on Hierarchical Coupled Modeling and Prediction of Regional Climate Change in the Atlantic Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A& M University

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: a) Carried out studies of climate changes in the past using a hierarchy of intermediate coupled models (Chang et al., 2008; Wan et al 2009; Wen et al., 2010a,b) b) Completed the development of a Coupled Regional Climate Model (CRCM; Patricola et al., 2011a,b) c) Carried out studies testing hypotheses testing the origin of systematic errors in the CRCM (Patricola et al., 2011a,b) d) Carried out studies of the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, in the context of barrier layer interactions (Balaguru et al)

  1. Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

  2. WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL CLIMATES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The sensations of thermal discomfort in these buildings have increased the energy consumption by the use. This development needs precise information about the effect of climate patterns on buildings. For energy find three types of database for the energy buildings simulations: - Simulations can be made by using

  3. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

  4. The NOAA National Operational Model Archive and Distribution System -NOMADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for access to real-time and retrospective high volume numerical weather prediction and climate models been on weather and reanalysis. Plans to support climate models and associated observational data a unified climate and weather model archive providing format independent access to retrospective models

  5. Bayesian merging of multiple climate model forecasts for seasonal hydrological predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    manage- ment, and energy and transportation sectors are a few among many others that will benefit through, such as the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) [Kanamitsu et al., 2002], International Research predictions of soil moisture and streamflow, can have great values to our society. Agriculture, water resource

  6. Predicting the effect of climate change on wildfire behavior and initial attack success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, William; Fried, Jeremy S.; Gilless, J. Keith; Riley, William J.; Moody, Tadashi J.; Simon de Blas, Clara; Hayhoe, Katharine; Moritz, Max; Stephens, Scott; Torn, Margaret

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on how climate change-induced effects on weather will translate into changes in wildland fire severity and outcomes in California, particularly on the effectiveness of initial attack at limiting the number of fires that escape initial attack. The results indicate that subtle shifts in fire behavior of the sort that might be induced by the climate changes anticipated for the next century are of sufficient magnitude to generate an appreciable increase in the number of fires that escape initial attack. Such escapes are of considerable importance in wildland fire protection planning, given the high cost to society of a catastrophic escape like those experienced in recent decades in the Berkeley-Oakland, Santa Barbara, San Diego, or Los Angeles areas. However, at least for the three study areas considered, it would appear that relatively modest augmentations to existing firefighting resources might be sufficient to compensate for change-induced changes in wildland fire outcomes.

  7. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Resources Airsheds & Watersheds workshop was held in Dewey Beach, Delaware. The workshop focused and farmers, advocacy groups, etc. (bruce.hicks@noaa.gov, Kerchner, Silver Spring) 2. Canaan Valley

  8. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report November 2003 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory and Washington, DC. Discussions have been held with personnel from DHSregarding anatmospheric tracerstudy.clawson@noaa.gov and Bruce Hicks) Silver Spring 3. New Turbulence Parameterizations for HYSPLIT. The HYSPLIT dispersion

  9. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report February 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT - ARL-NCEP coordination 2. HIGHLIGHT - C02 and Energy Balance network expansion 3.draxler@noaa.gov, barbara.stunder@noaa.gov) 2. CO2 and Energy Balance network expansion. Finalapproval was given. HIGHLIGHT - Salt Lake City dispersion results now available 4. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) MM5 forecasts

  10. PMEL Ocean Climate Station Program Meghan Cronin, Chris Sabine, Chris Meinig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Papa HOT MBARI Cold dry air blowing over warm Kuroshio Extension causes large sensible and latent heat for climate reference) Net Surface Heat Flux = TurbPMEL Ocean Climate Station Program Meghan Cronin, Chris Sabine, Chris Meinig NOAA Pacific Marine

  11. Report of the CLIVAR VACS Southern and Eastern African Climate Predictability Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Meteorological Agency, Dar es Salaam 10-13th July 2006 ICPO Publication Series no: 109 WCRP Informal Report no (TMA) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during 10-13 July 2006. The workshop was entitled Predictability

  12. STATE OF THE CLIMATE Jessica Blunden Derek S. Arndt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Chip" Guard, NOAA/NWS/Guam Weather Forecast Office is thanked for his contributions to and assistance Society for their professionalism and assistance. Speci cally, Lesley Williams and Melissa Fernau provided Overland acknowledges the support of the Arctic Research O ce of the NOAA Climate Program O ce. Chris

  13. NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Program(UAS) Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    FisheriesPartners: NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service / Southwest Fisheries Science Center Enerdyne

  14. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 1: Temperature Silver Spring, MD March 2010 U. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68, U URL: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ #12;NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 1: Temperature

  15. Prediction of Barrier-Island Inundation and Overwash: Application to the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Prediction of Barrier-Island Inundation and Overwash: Application to the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill 0 10.5 Kilometers 0 0.25 0.5 Miles Photo: NOAA Photo: NOAA Low Risk: No inundation

  16. Limitations of Seasonal Predictability for Summer Climate over East Asia and the Northwestern Pacific*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    (PASH). The Pacific­Japan (PJ) teleconnection pattern, a meridional dipole of sea level pressure their ability to reproduce its spatial structure as the leading mode of atmospheric internal variability. Thus, the pattern is rather unpredictable at monthly to seasonal lead, limiting the seasonal predictability

  17. Invited Presentation, 10ICSHMO, 23 April 2012 Intra-seasonal prediction of remote drivers of Australian climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Andrew

    of Australian climate variability using POAMA-2 Andrew Marshall Debbie Hudson, Matthew Wheeler Harry Hendon

  18. Climate Service -Questions and Answers Updated: February 15, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................7 Federal Agency Coordination innovation, and to be competitive in national and global marketplaces. For example: o electricity producers office in NOAA that will bring together many of the agency's existing climate assets including research

  19. Development, implementation, and skill assessment of the NOAA/NOS Great Lakes Operational Forecast System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development, implementation, and skill assessment of the NOAA/NOS Great Lakes Operational Forecast Lakes Operational Forecast System (GLOFS) uses near-real-time atmospheric observa- tions and numerical weather prediction forecast guidance to produce three-dimensional forecasts of water temperature

  20. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

  1. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettenmaier, Dennis P

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

  2. NOAA in Your Backyard The Gulf of Mexico Region NOAA in Your State State by State Listings of NOAA Facilities and Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.srh.noaa.gov/mob/?n=education Contact: Jeff Garmon (Warning Coordination Meteorologist): Jeff.Garmon@noaa.gov · Lake Charles Weather Forecast Office ­ Lake Charles, LA: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/lch/?n=tours Contact: Roger Erickson (Warning, TX; Baton Rouge, LA; Panama City, FL; Charleston, SC; Beaufort, NC; St. Augustine, FL; West Palm

  3. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  4. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalcontext of predicted climate change. Madrońo 54(3):234–248.MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to climate-change

  5. A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. McFarlane, Y. Shi, C.N. Long

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the second quarter metrics are reported in Evaluation of Simulated Precipitation in CCSM3: Annual Cycle Performance Metrics at Watershed Scales. For ARM, the metrics will produce and make available new continuous time series of radiative fluxes based on one year of observations from Barrow, Alaska, during the International Polar Year and report on comparisons of observations with baseline simulations of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM).

  6. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2013 Timothy P. Boyer, John I. Antonov, Olga K. Baranova, World Ocean Database 2013. Sydney Levitus, Ed.; Alexey Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72........................................................................................................... 14 1.1.1. History

  7. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 6: Chlorophyll Margarita E. Conkright Todd D. O.I. Antonov , 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 6: Chlorophyll. Ed. S. Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54, U

  8. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 1: Temperature Cathy Stephens John I. Antonov.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49, U

  9. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 2: Salinity Timothy P. Boyer Cathy Stephens John.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 1: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50, U

  10. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 5: Plankton Todd D. O'Brien Margarita E.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 5: Plankton. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53, U

  11. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 4: Nutrients Margarita E. Conkright Hernan E.I. Antonov , 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 4: Nutrients. Ed. S. Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52, U

  12. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 3: Oxygen Ricardo A. Locarnini Todd D. O. Stephens, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 3: Oxygen. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51, U

  13. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  14. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the national Fire Plan. (pendergrass@atdd.noaa.gov, Herwehe, Eckman) Work on the Program to Address ASEAN

  15. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 2: Salinity Silver Spring, MD March 2010 U Atlas 2009 Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus Ed. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69, U.S. Gov. Printing Office.html. National Oceanographic Data Center #12;NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 2: Salinity John

  16. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 76 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 76 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 4: Dissolved Inorganic Nutrients (phosphate. Antonov, O. K. Baranova, M. M. Zweng, J.R. Reagan, D. R. Johnson, 2013. World Ocean Atlas 2013. Vol. 4. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 76, 25 pp. This document is available on-line at http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/indprod

  17. Interoperable Documentation Ted Habermann, NOAA/NESDIS/NGDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interoperable Documentation Ted Habermann, NOAA/NESDIS/NGDC NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory, June.ngdc.noaa.gov/eds/tds/oceanSITESMetadataAssessment.html Spirals: https://www.nosc.noaa.gov/dmc/swg/wiki/index.php?title=Creating_Good_Documentation Questions Documentation Life Cycle: OAIS Mandatory Archive Responsibility: Ensure that the information to be preserved

  18. Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic Using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassano, John [Principal Investigator

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary research task completed for this project was the development of the Regional Arctic Climate Model (RACM). This involved coupling existing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land models using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) coupler (CPL7). RACM is based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) ocean model, the CICE sea ice model, and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land model. A secondary research task for this project was testing and evaluation of WRF for climate-scale simulations on the large pan-Arctic model domain used in RACM. This involved identification of a preferred set of model physical parameterizations for use in our coupled RACM simulations and documenting any atmospheric biases present in RACM.

  19. STATE OF THE CLIMATE IN 2007 D. H. LEVINSON AND J. H. LAWRIMORE, EDS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In the Atlantic, the PIRATA array was 1 Drifter data are distributed by NOAA/AOML (www.aoml. noaa.gov/phod/dac/gdp as part of the Environmental and Climate EU EN- ACT project and with support of CNES. expanded and now for 2007 were calculated from a synthesis of in situ observations, near-real-time AVISO grid- ded altimetry

  20. URL: www.swpc.noaa.gov/NOAAscales April 7, 2011 NOAA Space Weather Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    noise in image data, star-trackers may be unable to locate sources; permanent damage to solar panels the globe, use geomagnetic latitude to determine likely sightings (see www.swpc.noaa.gov/Aurora) Solar

  1. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stories appeared in each of these newspapers. The story was also picked up by the Baltimore Sun Forecasting system. rick.saylor@noaa.gov 4. NRC Postdoctoral Associate Investigating the Climatology with degrees in Electronic Engineering and Space Physics, she is developing a global climatology of the stable

  2. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report August 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1. HIGHLIGHT ­ Hurricane P3 Turbulence Studies 2. HIGHLIGHT ­ Smart Balloon Sets Distance Record ­ The Las Vegas Urban Test Bed 5. HIGHLIGHT ­ Urban Dispersion ­ New York City 6. Global Umkehr-Ozone Data as the '04 season gets into full swing. jeff.french@noaa.gov #12;2. Highlight ­ Smart Balloon Sets Distance

  3. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report January 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling 19. Dioxin Modeling 20. Community Modeling and Analysis System Center 21. Fugitive Dust Considerable Advance. Several ARL groups are working on aspects of pollution by mercury. The geographical range@atdd.noaa.gov Mercury and the Community MultiscaleAir QualityModels System, Analysis of thenon-linear sensitivity tests

  4. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report December 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a two-way coupling using CMAQ 14. Urban Dispersion Program (New York City 15. Smart Balloon 16 planning by meteorologists at the Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center. barbara.stunder@noaa.gov 2 for relating sources to downwind effects. The latter takes a gridded view, with sources combined across grid

  5. NOAAlNMFS Developments NOAA Reorganizes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the organization function," Byrne said. "I think the reorganization will im- prove the management efficiency of our Utilization Research Fishenes Cenlers (4) Figure I.-NOAA organizational chart. April-May-June 1983,45(4-6) 49 #12;Figure 1.-NMFS organizational chart. National Marine Fisheries Service Deputy Assistant

  6. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory Contents 1. Highlight -- UrbaNet 2. Highlight -- TEXAQSII Smart Balloon Deployment 3. New WRF. Highlight -- UrbaNet. Upon discovery of an unexpected release of hazardous material to the atmosphere.carter@noaa.gov 2. Highlight -- TEXAQSII Smart Balloon Deployment. The FRD smart balloon team participated

  7. A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Documentation Consortium Ted Habermann, NOAA Documentation: It's not just discovery... 50% change this settles the issue.. #12;New Documentation Needs For skeptics, the 1,000 or so e-mails and documents hacked Communities - Users Documentation: communicating with the future #12;Geoffrey Moore has attributed the S

  8. Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds represent a critical component of the Earth’s atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

  9. Generated using V3.2 of the official AMS LATEX templatejournal page layout FOR AUTHOR USE ONLY, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on global-mean outgoing radiation is that an at- 1 #12;mosphere/ocean climate model with a poor simulation, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Can Top Of Atmosphere Radiation Measurements Constrain Climate Predictions? Part 1: Tuning. Simon. Rowlands Atmospheric, Oceanic & Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road

  10. NOAA-OakRidgeExpandClimate ORNL,GECollaborateonHigh-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 Imitating Mother Nature 14 An International Affair 16 Instruments of Change 19 Unconventional the remarkable research being generated today at the SNS. This issue of the ORNL Review provides a snapshot array of instruments at the SNS. Some 200 papers have already been submitted for publication in fields

  11. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a heavy precipitation event to define the magnitude of a storm in order to assess and estimate property Asheville, NC 28801-5001 U.S.A. 828-271-4800 · TDD 828-271-4010 Fax 828-271-4876 E-mail: ncdc.orders include: · Using short-duration rainfall values and rain gauge charts to design retarding basins

  12. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a heavy precipitation event to define the magnitude of a storm in order to assess and estimate property include: · Using short-duration rainfall values and rain gauge charts to design retarding basins

  13. Connecting Changing Ocean Circulation with Changing Climate MICHAEL WINTON, STEPHEN M. GRIFFIES, AND BONITA L. SAMUELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodgers, Keith

    currents on climate change is evaluated by comparing an earth system model's response to increased CO2 with a fully coupled earth system model. In Corresponding author address: Michael Winton, NOAA/GFDL, Princeton

  14. NOAA's Arctic Science Days Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's Arctic Science Days 1 Day 1: Science, Weather and Sea Ice, and International Partnerships 1 Observing Networks [IASOA, RUSALCA, PAG, CBMP & SAON] 2. Ed Farley (NOAA/AFSC, remote): Implications of sea ice loss on NOAA trust resources: NOAA's Loss of Sea Ice (LOSI) Program 3. Sue Moore (NOAA

  15. Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

  16. July 30, 2012 All listed individuals nmfs.fis@noaa.gov PMT + PSG Chairs & Vice Chairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 30, 2012 All listed individuals nmfs.fis@noaa.gov PMT + PSG Chairs & Vice Chairs Cahall, Mike Program Management Team Members fis.pmt.extended@noaa.gov fis.pmt@noaa.gov Per

  17. active region noaa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NWS, Allan Darling, Paula Davidson 23 NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report Geosciences Websites Summary: and Hawaii Meteorological Grids for NCEP Atmospheric...

  18. THE APPLICATION OF A STATISTICAL DOWNSCALING PROCESS TO DERIVE 21{sup ST} CENTURY RIVER FLOW PREDICTIONS USING A GLOBAL CLIMATE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; Chen, K. F.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in coming decades depends, in part, on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to alter river flows from their current values, possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. Reliable climate projections are therefore critical to predicting the future water supply for the United States. These projections cannot be provided solely by global climate models (GCMs), however, as their resolution is too coarse to resolve the small-scale climate changes that can affect hydrology, and hence water supply, at regional to local scales. A process is needed to ‘downscale’ the GCM results to the smaller scales and feed this into a surface hydrology model to help determine the ability of rivers to provide adequate flow to meet future needs. We apply a statistical downscaling to GCM projections of precipitation and temperature through the use of a scaling method. This technique involves the correction of the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the GCM-derived temperature and precipitation results for the 20{sup th} century, and the application of the same correction to 21{sup st} century GCM projections. This is done for three meteorological stations located within the Coosa River basin in northern Georgia, and is used to calculate future river flow statistics for the upper Coosa River. Results are compared to the historical Coosa River flow upstream from Georgia Power Company’s Hammond coal-fired power plant and to flows calculated with the original, unscaled GCM results to determine the impact of potential changes in meteorology on future flows.

  19. Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant response of species to climate change, but our experiments suggest that other processes may act in some species that reduce the likelihood of geographic range change. In the first part of our DOE grant (ending 2008) we argued that the process of local adaptation of populations within a species range, followed by climatic changes that occur too quickly for adaptive evolution, is an underappreciated mechanism by which climate change could affect biodiversity. When this process acts, species ranges may not shift readily toward the poles, slowing the rate of species and biome change. To test this claim, we performed an experiment comparing core and peripheral populations in a series of field observations, translocation experiments, and genetic analyses. The papers in Appendix A were generated from 2005-2008 funding. In the second part of the DOE grant (ending 2011) we studied which traits promote population differentiation and local adaptation by building genomic resources for our study species and using these resources to reveal differences in gene expression in peripheral and core populations. The papers in Appendix B were generated from 2008-2011 funding. This work was pursued with two butterfly species that have contrasting life history traits (body size and resource specialization) and occupy a common ecosystem and a latitudinal range. These species enabled us to test the following hypotheses using a single phylogenetic group.

  20. Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalthe context of predicted climate change. Madrońo 54(3):234–18–20. Dettinger MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to

  1. NOAA Professional Paper NMFS 4 U.S.Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 NOAA Professional Paper NMFS 14 An atlas of reproductive development in rockfishes, genus Sebastes Islands Fisheries Science Center Aiea Heights Research Facility 99-193 Aiea Heights Drive,Suite 417 Aiea by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. #12;NOAA Professional Paper NMFS 14 An atlas

  2. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 75 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 75 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 3: Dissolved Oxygen, Apparent Oxygen Utilization. Antonov, A. V. Mishonov, O. K. Baranova, M. M. Zweng, J. R. Reagan, D. R. Johnson, 2013. World Ocean Atlas. Mishonov, Technical Ed. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 75, 27 pp. This document is available on-line at http

  3. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 73 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 73 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 1: Temperature Silver Spring, MD September 2013. M. Zweng, C. R. Paver, J. R. Reagan, D. R. Johnson, M. Hamilton, D. Seidov, 2013. World Ocean Atlas 2013, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 73, 40 pp

  4. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 71 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 71 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 4: Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, silicate. Baranova, and D. R. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009, Volume 4: Nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, and silicate). S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 71, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 398 pp

  5. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 70 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 70 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 3: Dissolved Oxygen, Apparent Oxygen Utilization. Antonov, O. K. Baranova, M. M. Zweng, and D. R. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009 Volume 3: Dissolved Oxygen, Apparent Oxygen Utilization, and Oxygen Saturation. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 70, U

  6. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 74 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 74 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Volume 2: Salinity Silver Spring, MD September 2013 U.K. Baranova, D.R. Johnson, D. Seidov, M.M. Biddle, 2013. World Ocean Atlas 2013, Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 74, 39 pp. This document is available on line

  7. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 45 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STORM AND ANTECEDENT PRECIPITATION OVER TECHNICAL MEMORANDUMS National Weather Service. Office of Hydrology Series The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO series facilitate prompt distribution of scientific

  8. Serving NOAA's Most Valuable Asset People Eduardo J. Ribas, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management and Compensation Workforce Planning Leadership & Management Development Future Retirement Services Division Human Capital Planning Division Learning Resources Division B&R Team 9NOAA Workforce Director January 08, 2010 - jta #12;Summary of Content (in order of appearance) NOAA Workforce Demographics

  9. Climate and weather events can impact human health in many ways. Climate trends, such as warming temperatures and changes in precipitation patterns, can affect the distribution of waterborne and vector-borne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and mortality. Providing access to relevant climate information is essential to understanding how climate trends. · Using relative humidity and wind speed data to study the relationship between fine particulate air pollution and daily mortality counts. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Sectoral Engagement Fact Sheet

  10. An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

  11. Lakes in General Circulation Models Primary Investigator: Brent Lofgren -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Investigators: Chris Milly, Isaac Held, Bruce Wyman - NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Overview The use

  12. Changing Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these data with predictions from the IPCC. Professor of geography at Texas State University, Dr. David Butler, does climate change research mainly in the Rocky Moun- tains with U.S. Geological Survey funding. He has also done research on how climate...://wiid.twdb.state.tx.us Detailed information about individual water wells. This system uses a geographic information system-based tool to show locations of water wells and download data on water levels and water quality. Reports that were developed about on-site conditions...

  13. Climate Change Major information sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ipcc.ch/ Vital Climate Graphics, at http://www.grida.no/climate/vital/ Climate Change Impacts on US, at http://www.gcrio.org/NationalAssessment/ Greenhouse Warming Prediction #12;Energy Predictions 2 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA); International Energy Agency (IEA) 2% growth per year, or doubling in 35 years (shortcut: 70/%=doubling) Fossil

  14. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report May 1999 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Planetary Boundary Layer held on 21 to 24 October 1997 at Lövånger in Sweden, have been published

  15. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report May 2000 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory TechnicalMeeting (ITM) on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, was held in Boulder, CO, during May 15

  16. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report March 2003 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory, held 24-27 March 2003 in Geneva, Switzerland, examined the underrepresentation of women in these fields

  17. NOAA ARL Monthly Activities Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activities Report April 2005 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory. The fourth meeting will be held at the Patuxent Research Refuge National Wildlife Visitor Center in Laurel

  18. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report April 2003 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory of New York at Albany which he held for the past 11 years. Before that Joe worked as a research scientist

  19. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report July 2001 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory ­ Canaan Valley. Meetings were held among ATDD staff concerning an upgrade to the Canaan Valley Air

  20. NOAA Water Level and Meteorological Data Report HURRICANE ISAAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services Photo Credit: NOAA National high tide cycle was not measured due to station/sensor damage (Appendix 3). Individual time series

  1. NOAA Technical Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;450 NOAA Technical Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental Osteology in Taxonomic Report NMFS Circular 450 The Utility of Developmental Osteology in Taxonomic and Systematic Studies .................................................................. .... 13 Scales and lateral line pores

  2. Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamill, Tom

    Systems Division Stephen J. Lord Director, NWS NCEP Environmental Modeling Center 19 July 2010 (303) 4973060 tom.hamill@noaa.gov #12; 2 Executive Summary The accuracy of many

  3. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    world's top five most powerful computers - the Argonne National Laboratory's 557 TF IBM Blue GeneP and Oak Ridge National Laboratory's 263 TF Cray XT4. NOAA researchers will also...

  4. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

  5. Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant) - NOAA GLERL Overview This work is based on previous projects titled "Great Lakes Ice Cycle" conducted and climate GCM products along with historical sea ice observations including recent satellite measurements

  6. Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Climate models predict significant increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfalls.  However, climate model projections of precipitation vary greatly across models.  For communities...

  7. P1.29 CLIMATE PERSPECTIVE OF THE 1997-98 LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER Raymond A.Assel'. ,John E. Janowia~, David C. Norton', and Chris O'Connors3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P1.29 CLIMATE PERSPECTIVE OF THE 1997-98 LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER Raymond A.Assel'. ,John E/NCEPINWSlNOAA, Camp Springs, Maryland 3 NIC/NWSlNOAA, Suitland. Maryland 1. INTRODUCTION Great Lakes ice cover affects. 1). Ice can also cause flooding, shore property damage and damage to hydro

  8. NOAA Social Science Resources & Tools Cheat Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for fishing- related industries. Also: the economic impact of commercial and recreational fishing activities (living resources, marine construction, marine transportation, offshore mineral resources, ship and boat, nutrient pollution and hypoxia, chemical contaminants, wetlands, shoreline #12;2 types), and climate

  9. In the near future, Switzerland is predicted to be affected by climate change, that is bound to impact both water demand and water supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and agriculture increases, water supply decreases (ProClim and OcCC, 2007) as climate change alters the hydrologic of the economic impact of climate change and different adaptation strategies in the water sector is essential in Switzerland, mandated by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN). 4) Climate change and water resources

  10. SOUTHEASTERN CLIMATE CONSORTIUM http://secc.coaps.fsu.edu/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    and weather variability. Vulnerability of southeastern agriculture to climate fluctuations and weather with ENSO. Our work is performed as a partnership between NOAA's Office of Global Programs, USDA - complexities of agricultural systems, decision aids and technical assistance are needed to bridge the gap

  11. In the Nation's Best Interest: Making the Most of NOAA's Science Enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...........................................................................................................7 Research Priorities for NOAA's Next Generation Strategic Plan...............................................................................24 Appendix IV: List of individuals and groups interviewed by Task Force and SAB Working Groups....................................................................25 Appendix V: Overview of the NOAA Next Generation Strategic Plan

  12. NOAA Annual Guidance Memorandum August 5, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of new jobs and industries, revive our fisheries and the economies and communities they support, improve weather forecasting and disaster warnings, provide credible information about climate change and ocean acidification to Americans, and protect and restore our coastal waters [and] ecosystems." Dr. Jane Lubchenco

  13. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report January 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . SURFRAD/ISIS 9. DHS Model Evaluation Planning 10. U.S. Climate Reference 11. Community Multiscale Air. Tracer Analysis Facility (TAF) Adaptation for Perfluorocarbon Tracer Analysis 19. Smart Balloon" Method for DCNet added to READY. A routine that inserts DCNet tower observations into the Eta gridded

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration noaa Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Peter Tatro Director, Center for Ocean Exploration... Exploration Program ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  15. Richard P. Allan1 | Norman G. Loeb2 | John M. Lyman3 | Gregory C. Johnson3 | Brian J. Soden4 (1. University of Reading/NCAS Climate; 2. NASA Langley Research Center; 3. NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; 4. University of Miami) Department of Me

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? To explore this question, net radiation from satellite observations are combined with in situ ocean data)2: Is there "missing energy" 2 in the climate system? We combine the most recent ocean heat content data4 and radiation Further analysis of CMIP5 simulations of net radiation variation (Fig. 4) and ocean heat content

  16. ARM - Predictions of Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP AnalysesListPossible

  17. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report June 2004 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory Bay 3. HIGHLIGHT ­ Air Quality Forecast System - Start of 2004 Operational Season 4. Reactions Atmosphere 7. SURFRAD/ISIS 8. Errors in Radiation Instrumentation 9. ARL Umkehr Developments Adopted 10

  18. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009 Timothy P. Boyer John I. Antonov Olga K. Baranova. Mishonov, T. D. O'Brien, D. Seidov, I. V. Smolyar, M. M. Zweng, 2009. World Ocean Database 2009. S. Levitus ................................................................................................. 18 1.1.1. History

  19. NOAA/NMFS Developments Initial Assessment of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of their conclusions, Robert E, Burns, the Deep Ocean Mining Environmental Study project manager for NOAA, said,600 km) southeast of Hawaii, in water about 15,000 feet (5,000 m) deep, The monitoring included samples- tions that the plume moved horizon- tally, carried on slowly moving, deep-water currents. Considerable

  20. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report April 2002 Bruce B. Hicks, Director Air Resources Laboratory and Hydrology, to be held in March 2003 in Geneva. An international group of 7 women met in Silver Spring April's participation in meteorology and hydrology, which was held in December 1997 in Bangkok, and will focus on women

  1. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF CAPT. JOHN E. LOWELL, JR., NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    safety, maritime security, and environmental protection. NOAA's geospatial services are also fundamental with sea ice retreat, we are seeing a corresponding potential for growth in international and domestic Arctic interests. Oil and gas companies are investing more in energy exploration, as evidenced most

  2. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 67 Index Numbers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries, by Edward P. Myers, Donald E. Hoss, Walter M. Matsumoto Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service #12;NOAA TECHNICAL REPORT NMFS, by George A. Swan, Tommy G. Withrow, and Donn L. Park. April 1986, 34 p. 40. Potential impact of ocean

  3. NOAA Technical Report NMFS 40 The Potential Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NMFS 40 The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC. Uchida John D. Ditmars Robert A. Paddock June 1986 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic Pacific Ocean, by Arthur W. Kendall, Jr., and Beverly Vinter. March 1984,44 p. 3. Configurations

  4. NOAA NESDIS Cooperative Institutes (CI) Program August 24, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    . Corvallis, OR 973315503 5417373015 5417372064 Fax tstrub@coas.oregonstate.edu Dr. Graeme Stephens Director stephens@cira.colostate.edu Dr. Reza Khanbilvardi Director, CREST NOAA Cooperative Remote Sensing Science Fax tom.achtor@ssec.wisc.edu Admin. Contact Ms. Rosalie Jones Research Coordinator 3014058291

  5. NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Information System (FIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Information System (FIS) Program Management Plan Working Drafts Draft fis program management plan_4.doc 10/31/2007 1:15 PM #12;#12;Change History Subject: Change history for the FIS Program Management Plan Comments: Comments regarding this version of the FIS

  6. NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report Bruce B. Hicks, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1. Highlight -- Smart Balloon Test Success 2. NADP Interactions 3. Changes in Cloud Properties 4. New York City Study 18. Extreme Turbulence Probe 19. NOAA CIASTA - Urban Air Quality Study 20. Ozone Data from Upwind of Las Vegas 21. IMPROVE Steering Committee Highlights 1. Smart Balloon Test Success

  7. December 2012 NOAA Response ... Before, During and After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with FEMA, National Security Staff, and at the Department of Homeland Security Operations Center went: geostationary and polar-orbiting weather satellites; ocean- observing and coastal water-level monitoring systems teams worked 24/7 to help ensure that our nation prepared for the worst of Sandy. NOAA is now working

  8. Learn More: www.aoml.noaa.gov/themes/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .nssl.noaa.gov13 WEATHER FORECASTS Tornadoes: Heroic Technology Advances Weather Forecasting When killer tornadoes (GPS) dropsondes, an innovative technology developed by AOML, provide key data in real time System (UAS) through hurricane-force winds and at record low altitudes into Tropical Cyclone Noel. Using

  9. Tropical and Subtropical Cloud Transitions in Weather and Climate Prediction Models: The GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, David A.

    , Paris, France e Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada f, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia i Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia j Department of Earth for the season June­July­August

  10. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

  11. NOAA FORM 88-13 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (REV 10/95) NOAA-NMFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : PROCESSOR WHOLESALER (Does Not Process) COLD STORAGE OTHER ____________MAIL ADDRESS (Does Not Process) COLD STORAGE OTHER 2009 9 99 9997 999 2 2Page: of UNITFOR NMFS USE OUNCES VALUE FOB or INDUSTRIAL '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' 2 #12;NOAA FORM 88-13 U

  12. Winter climate response to continental snow anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Gavin, 1969-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate variability has emerged in recent decades as an important field of geoscience research. A thorough understanding of the patterns and causes of climate variability is required to predict and prepare for upcoming ...

  13. ARM-LBNL-NOAA Flask Sampler for Carbon Cycle Gases

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Torn, Margaret

    Data from ccg-flasks are sampled at the ARM SGP site and analyzed by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) as part of the NOAA Cooperative Global Air Sampling Network. Surface samples are collected from a 60m tower at the SGP Central Facility, usually once per week on one afternoon. The aircraft samples are collected approximately weekly from a chartered aircraft, and the collection flight path is centered over the tower where the surface samples are collected. Samples are collected by the ARM/LBNL Carbon Project. CO2 flask data contains measurements of CO2 concentration and CO2 stable isotope ratios (13CO2 and C18OO) from flasks collected at the SGP site. The flask samples are collected at 2m, 4m, 25m, and 60m along the 60m tower.

  14. Simulations of Forest Response To Climatic Change Must Learn from Experimental Accurate predictions for the response of the eastern deciduous hardwood forest to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulations of Forest Response To Climatic Change Must Learn from Experimental Results Accurate effects from precipitation change or ozone exposure. Multi-factor simulations that ignored experimentally pattern (a 20% increase) was obtained when `lessons-learned' from experimental studies were included

  15. CIOSS Executive Board Greg Withee: NOAA, Assistant Administrator for NESDIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    20746-4304 Phone: 301-763-8231 x168 Fax: 301-763-8020 pablo.clemente-colon@noaa.gov James Coakley Phone.coas.oregonstate.edu/index.cfm?fuseaction=faculty.detail&id=464 David Foley NESDIS/CoastWatch Environmental Research Division Southwest Fisheries Science Center 1352 Lighthouse Avenue Pacific Grove, CA 93950-2097 Phone: (831) 648-0632 Fax: (831) 648-8440 dave.foley

  16. NOAA PA 200455 Datos relacionados con la resaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de sus oficinas transmiten un Surf Zone Forecast (Pronóstico para las zonas de oleaje). Cuando.ripcurrents.noaa.gov www.usla.org Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje indica la presencia de la resaca. De acuerdo con adentro. Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje. ¿ Qué debo hacer si la resaca me atrapa? Mantenga la

  17. Colorado Climate Spring 2000 Vol. 1, No. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Climate Spring 2000 Vol. 1, No. 2 Inside: · Growing Season Trends · Urban Heat Islands · Where Do Climate Data Come From · Climate Prediction in the 21st Century #12;22 ColoradoClimate Colorado Climate Center Atmospheric Science Department Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-1371 ISSN

  18. NOAA Data Report ERL PMEL-2 LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS (C1 -c4),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or imply that the NOAA Environ- mental Research Laboratories approves, recommends, or endorses any pro) variations in the dissolved gaseous hydrocarbon fraction composed of methane, ethane, ethene, propane

  19. WAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    parcel dynamics, linear modes, balan- ced models, gravity waves, weather and climate prediction Introduction Numerical weather and climate prediction is complicated because only the flow scales larger thanWAVE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE, AND CLIMATE PREDICTION Onno Bokhove Numerical Analysis

  20. Re-evaluation of total and Umkehr ozone data from NOAA-CMDL Dobson spectrophotometer observatories. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komhyr, W.D.; Quincy, D.M.; Grass, R.D.; Koenig, G.L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)] [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to improve the quality of total ozone and Umkehr data obtained in the past at the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory and the Dobson spectrophotometer ozone observatories. The authors present results of total ozone data re-evaluations for ten stations: Byrd, Antarctica; Fairbanks, Alaska; Hallett, Antarctica; Huancayo, Peru; Haute Provence, France; Lauder, New Zealand; Perth, Australia; Poker Flat, Alaska; Puerto Montt, Chile; and South Pole, Antarctica. The improved data will be submitted in early 1996 to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Ozone Data Center (WODC), and the Atmospheric Environment Service for archiving. Considerable work has been accomplished, also, in reevaluating Umkehr data from seven of the stations, viz., Huancayo, Haute Provence, Lauder, Perth, Poker Flat, Boulder, Colorado; and Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

  1. Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

  2. An improved lake model for climate simulations: Model structure, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses in CESM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Z.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into the numerical weather prediction model COSMO, BorealCurrent numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, regionalof lakes in numerical weather prediction and climate models:

  3. 0 20 4010 Miles NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    0 20 4010 Miles NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System Texas Forecast Region Maps to Sargent BCH NOAA Harmful Algal Bloom Operational Forecast System Texas Forecast Region Maps 0 5 102 Bloom Operational Forecast System Texas Forecast Region Maps 0 5 102.5 Miles West Bay #12;Aransas Bay

  4. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-20 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooling Phase 3.2.2 Ice Formation and Breakup Phases 3.2.3 The Ice Cycle on Lake Superior 3.2.4 The IceNOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-20 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS, WINTER of this NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories publication. ii #12;LANDSAT fake color image of ice cover

  5. PROJECT SCIENTIST II NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    PROJECT SCIENTIST II NOAA NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) College Park Visiting Scientist Programs is seeking a Project Scientist II to work at the NOAA NESDIS Center design and implementation and the development of common tools and procedures for STAR researchers

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  7. *Digital copy of this document available at: NOAA in Your Backyard The Northeast Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://seagrant.mit.edu/education.php Contact: Rachel VanCott (Marine Science Educator) - vancott@mit.edu · New Hampshire Sea Grant ­ http Listings of NOAA Facilities and Programs · http://www.legislative.noaa.gov/NIYS/ National Weather Service Forecasting Office - http://weather.gov/ (click on map and look at side bar) · New York City Office (Student

  8. Charles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Change Impacts on Living Marine Resources", 2012 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Salt Lake City 2012-13 MemberCharles A. Stock Research Oceanographer, NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton-mail: Charles.Stock@noaa.gov Education 2005 Ph.D., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/MIT Joint Program Civil

  9. Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co-Investigators: Thomas Croley - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover affects mass and energy exchange between the planetary boundary layer and the waters of the Great Lakes. The improved ice

  10. NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE USING SATELLITE Research Laboratories #12;NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-30 MEASUREMENTS OF ICE MOTION IN LAKE ERIE USING Appendix A: The observed and interpolated Lake Erie 1984 ice conditions.. 9 Appendix B: Buoy and wind

  11. Sign singularity and flares in solar active region NOAA 11158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kazachenko, Maria D; Krucker, Sam; Primavera, Leonardo; Servidio, Sergio; Vecchio, Antonio; Welsch, Brian T; Fisher, George H; Lepreti, Fabio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares, and the presence of correlation with EUV and X-ray flux, suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small scale properties of the current structures.

  12. The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

  13. UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

  14. Visit to Darwin Regional Forecasting Centre, 11 April 2012 Drivers of tropical intra-seasonal climate variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Andrew

    -seasonal climate variability: simulation and prediction using POAMA-2 Andrew Marshall Debbie Hudson, Matthew

  15. Climate Change Impacts in the Amazon. Review of scientific literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Amazon's hydrological cycle is a key driver of global climate, and global climate is therefore sensitive to changes in the Amazon. Climate change threatens to substantially affect the Amazon region, which in turn is expected to alter global climate and increase the risk of biodiversity loss. In this literature review the following subjects can be distinguished: Observed Climatic Change and Variability, Predicted Climatic Change, Impacts, Forests, Freshwater, Agriculture, Health, and Sea Level Rise.

  16. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for numerical weather prediction and climate models.   Abstract:  Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are Model output statistics (MOS), Numerical Weather Prediction (

  17. administration noaa center: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POES 1 12;GOES POES Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) support global long-range forecasting (e.g., drought, climate, wildfires). They are positioned in...

  18. Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

  19. Understanding Climate Change: A Data-Driven Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Understanding Climate Change: A Data-Driven Approach Alok Choudhary Northwestern University Use Cases: Extreme Events Prediction Climate-Meningitis OutlookNH Tropical Cyclone (TC) Activity West Forecasting NA Hurricane Tracks Slide 3 #12;Climate System Complexity Climate systems are complex

  20. NOAA Webinar: The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined HeatInformationDepartment of EnergyMultimediaServices »

  1. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit ReportNextConditionalDepartment of

  2. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopmentReport and7 MAYofCommercial Production

  3. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center M A Y 2 0 1 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and refining cross-NCDC processes, standards, and governance, as well as strengthening the dialog with our, and biodiversity are sustained within healthy and productive ecosystems Resilient Coastal Communities and Economies

  4. The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations in Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschenes, Olivier; Greenstone, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1989): “Global Climate Change and Agriculture: An Economicpart of climate change for agriculture. These predictedAgriculture,” in Robert Mendelsohn and James E. Neumann (editors), The Impact of Climate Change

  5. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-85 COVARIANCE PROPERTIES OF ANNUAL NET BASIN SUPPLIES ........................................................................................................ 2 2.2 Net Basin Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Table lb.--Lag-Zero Cross Covariances and Cross Correlations Among Great Lakes Annual Connecting

  7. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission Mission The NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE (NESDIS to promote, protect and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environment and quality of life. To fulfill

  8. 1. Title Page Research grant proposal to NOAA's ESS Program Atlantic Meridional Overturning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    1 1. Title Page Research grant proposal to NOAA's ESS Program ­ Atlantic Meridional Overturning.swingedouw@lsce.fr; Dr. S. Drijfhout, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Netherlands, phone: 31 30 220

  9. Climate Change Assessment for Urban Water Resource Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Ramiro

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two decades, scientific evidence has predicted a significant change in the earth’s climatic atmosphere. Although there are many studies that demonstrate changes in the atmospheric temperatures, there are few studies that show how climate...

  10. NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 4840 South State Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48108. Email: jia.wang@noaa.gov Jia Wang and Haoguo Hu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , JGR). It is coupled ice dynamic and thermodynamic model (Hibler 1980, MWR) to the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with two improvements: a) wave mixing effect and b) tidal mixing. Since the tidal current. Email: jia.wang@noaa.gov Jia Wang and Haoguo Hu A modeling study of sea ice and plankton in the Bering

  11. Hydrologic Response to Climate Variability, Climate Change, and Climate Extreme in the U.S.: Climate Model Evaluation and Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result of a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.

  12. Extreme events in solutions of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbon, J. D.

    the assumptions made in applying them to operational numerical weather prediction (NWP), climate modelling-hydrostatic (NPE) primitive equations that have been used extensively in numerical weather prediction and climate weather, climate and global ocean circulation predictions for many decades. The HPE govern incompressible

  13. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  14. arm climate research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Iron meteorites and confirm this prediction. We then check the hypothesis that climate, and in particular the temperature, is affected by the CRF to the extent that...

  15. Nonlinear dependence and extremes in hydrology and climate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shiraj

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The presence of nonlinear dependence and chaos has strong implications for predictive modeling and the analysis of dominant processes in hydrology and climate. Analysis of… (more)

  16. Initial Value Predictability of Intrinsic Oceanic Modes and Implications for Decadal Prediction over North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branstator, Grant

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of our project was to quantify and characterize predictability of the climate as it pertains to decadal time scale predictions. By predictability we mean the degree to which a climate forecast can be distinguished from the climate that exists at initial forecast time, taking into consideration the growth of uncertainty that occurs as a result of the climate system being chaotic. In our project we were especially interested in predictability that arises from initializing forecasts from some specific state though we also contrast this predictability with predictability arising from forecasting the reaction of the system to external forcing – for example changes in greenhouse gas concentration. Also, we put special emphasis on the predictability of prominent intrinsic patterns of the system because they often dominate system behavior. Highlights from this work include: • Development of novel methods for estimating the predictability of climate forecast models. • Quantification of the initial value predictability limits of ocean heat content and the overturning circulation in the Atlantic as they are represented in various state of the artclimate models. These limits varied substantially from model to model but on average were about a decade with North Atlantic heat content tending to be more predictable than North Pacific heat content. • Comparison of predictability resulting from knowledge of the current state of the climate system with predictability resulting from estimates of how the climate system will react to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations. It turned out that knowledge of the initial state produces a larger impact on forecasts for the first 5 to 10 years of projections. • Estimation of tbe predictability of dominant patterns of ocean variability including well-known patterns of variability in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. For the most part these patterns were predictable for 5 to 10 years. • Determination of especially predictable patterns in the North Atlantic. The most predictable of these retain predictability substantially longer than generic patterns, with some being predictable for two decades.

  17. Statistics and Climate Models Cari Kaufman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Climate System · Atmosphere · Ocean · Cryosphere · Land surface, biosphere · Atmospheric chemistry SAMSI Components of climate models: · Radiation - input, absorption, and emission · Dynamics - movement of energy's planetary radiation budget · Can run on a desktop computer · Predict surface temperature · Usually are 0-D

  18. Perspective Climate change and the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    in climate model predictions. Several energy flows that powerfully affect our climate come to a confluence the cycle works. In thinking about oceanic heat trans- ports, 1 PW (1015 W) is a convenient number to keep in mind. The Atlantic THC accounts for roughly 1 PW of trans- port into the North Atlantic and domi- nates

  19. Predicting Climate Change When Data Fails Us

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    #12;Global Warming Ice Age: as a Consequence of Global Warming? Global warming is a contemporary fact #12;Global Warming Ice Age: as a Consequence of Global Warming? Global warming is a contemporary fact #12;Global Warming Ice Age: as a Consequence of Global Warming? Global warming is a contemporary fact

  20. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  1. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  2. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  3. NOAA Satellite and Information Service The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is dedicated to providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    satellites and other sources to promote, protect, and enhance the Nation's economy, security, environmentNOAA Satellite and Information Service Mission The National Environmental Satellite, Data the Nation's operational environmental satellites, · operates the NOAA National Data Centers, · provides data

  4. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: February 18, 2014 Jess Beck, Jess.Beck@noaa.gov FB14-012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill on offshore aquaculture in federal waters in the Gulf of Mexico barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. After 85 days, the well was successfully capped. In 2011, NOAA Offshore Marine Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico NOAA Fisheries is seeking public comment on a draft

  5. Framework to analyze Risk of Climate Change on Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    to translate the uncertainty of climate change predictions to long-term physical or regulatory water shortage climate- related physical or regulatory water shortage risks for power generation · Technology development al. Western Energy-Water Forum, Santa Barbara, March 2007 Long-term Water shortage risk : Climate

  6. Will Climate Change Mathematics (?) Christopher K.R.T. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Will Climate Change Mathematics (?) Christopher K.R.T. Jones Warwick Mathematics Institute to climate change facing us are enormous and we will almost certainly have to harness all of our scienti complex calculations and predictions as are undertaken by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

  7. Climate change and British woodland: what does the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change and British woodland: what does the future hold? Mark Broadmeadow, Duncan Ray, Louise Sing and Liz Poulsom There is now convincing evidence that the climate is changing the last ice-age. The potentially serious consequences of predicted climate change for British woodland

  8. Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    prediction of surface water and groundwater dynamics under projected climate change scenarios Thunderstorms in a changing climate: A cloudresolving modeling study Joseph Galewsky@unm.edu One of the potential impacts of a changing climate is an increase in the severity of thunderstorms

  9. Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo Eicken2, Yanling Yu3, X. Bai4, Jinlun Zhang3, H. Hu4, Moto Ikeda5, Kohei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    and Ecosystems Research (CILER), School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 4840 South1 Model-Data Fusion Studies of Pacific Arctic Climate and Ice-Ocean Processes Jia Wang1, Hajo. Tel: 734-741-2281; Email: Jia.Wang@noaa.gov 2. University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute

  10. Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirin, A A

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

  11. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  12. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations (½CO2atm) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of ½CO2atm

  13. Prediction versus Projection: How weather forecasting and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Prediction versus Projection: How weather forecasting and climate models differ. Aaron B. Wilson Context: Global http://data.giss.nasa.gov/ #12;Numerical Weather Prediction Collect Observations alters associated weather patterns. Models used to predict weather depend on the current observed state

  14. Media Inquiries Ben Sherman, ben.sherman@noaa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , underwater robotic vehicles to increase understanding of hurricane intensity. In addition, High Frequency and predictions ahead of hurricanes. For example, the IOOS regions collect data inside the hurricane with unmanned

  15. Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass, Condition of Western Lake Erie Dreissenids Primary Investigator: Thomas Nalepa - NOAA of dreissenid biomass but there are no current, accurate estimates of biomass in this portion of the lake. Biomass is calculated from abundances, size- frequencies, and length-weights. The goal of this project

  16. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-121 ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Temperature time series from a 1 m Seacat, NX Modules at 1 m and 10 m, and downwelling solar values for a given day. . 6 #12;iv Contents #12;ATLAS Module Temperature Bias Due to Solar Heating P.N. A

  17. Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and cooling water intakes, and damaging shoreline structures. The ice cover also has an impact on the waterGreat Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co Board The formation, duration, and extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes has a major impact

  18. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-26 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1.3 Satellite Imagery 3.2 General Description 3.2.1 Fall Cooling Phase 3.2.2 Ice Formation and Breakup Phases 3NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-26 SUMMARY OF GREAT LAKES WEATHER AND ICE CONDITIONS, WINTER Degree-Days 2.3 Comparison With Previous Winters 3. SIJNNARY OF ICE CONDITIONS 3.1 Data Collection

  19. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Salt Marsh Oiling Conditions, evaluating, and responding to threats to coastal environments, including oil and chemical spills, releases to prepare for and respond to oil and chemical releases. Determines damage to natural resources from

  20. September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 2012 NOAA.gov Air pollution has significant health, economic and ecological consequences. The U.S. spends tens of billions of dollars each year to reduce air pollution in order to protect public health and the environment. For more than 50 years, industrial nations have been reducing harmful air

  1. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Science | Service | Stewardship Understand the earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World With NOAA 74 What You Will Need r Two empty two-liter plastic soda bottles r Tornado Tube plastic to help make the vortex more visible. 2. Screw the plastic connector onto the bottle containing the water washer between them. Use plastic electrical tape or duct tape. 3. Turn the two-bottle assembly over

  2. Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA MAURICE E. STANSBY fatty acids (which occur almost exclusively in the oil of fish) may have beneficial effects in re ducing research has also been carried out by laboratories of this agency on other aspects of fish oils which have

  3. tunahistory@noaa.gov Page 1 of 4 Tuna Industry Pioneers of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Reefer" refers to a cold storage vessel that receives fish from many fishing vessels and transshipstunahistory@noaa.gov Page 1 of 4 Tuna Industry Pioneers of San Pedro and Terminal Island 22, 2012 Nick Danelovich was recognized by many in the industry as one of the most respected tuna

  4. NOAA GREAT LAKES COASTAL FORECASTING SYSTEM Forecasts (up to 5 days in the future)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions for up to 5 days in the future. These forecasts are run twice daily, and you can step through are generated every 6 hours and you can step backward in hourly increments to view conditions over the previousNOAA GREAT LAKES COASTAL FORECASTING SYSTEM Forecasts (up to 5 days in the future) and Nowcasts

  5. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

  6. Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to fishery stock assessment modeling? What is the suitability of the stock assessment models employed, taking1 Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014 Stock Assessment of this review is to examine and evaluate the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's (SEFSC) fishery stock

  7. Technical Notes NOAA/NESDIS LSA CryoSat Interim Geophysical Data Record (IGDR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2014 Orbit 92° inclination, reaches latitudes of 88°; 369-day exact repeat with 85-day, 29-day.grdl.noaa.gov/SAT/NearRealTime/presentations/AGU2011-WHFSmith_NRT_CS2.pdf) Near-Real-Time Wave, Wind, and Sea Surface Height from CryoSat FDM/L1B data

  8. Contact: Monica Allen (NOAA) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 202-379-6693 July 22, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .I.) 401-783-7886 NOAA approves Rhode Island plan for offshore energy development, job creation and ocean projects that could lead to the creation of hundreds of wind energy jobs and balance energy development resources to create and sustain jobs, help our state build renewable energy, and continue to preserve

  9. FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: March 11, 2014 Jess.Beck@noaa.gov FB14-012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    submitted the Aquaculture Plan which included a final programmatic environmental impact statement possible environmental impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill on offshore aquaculture in federal, to be considered by NOAA Fisheries. Electronic copies of the Aquaculture Plan and final programmatic environmental

  10. Learn More: sos.noaa.gov 24 Science On a Sphere: Seeing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they have ever seen before. Called "Science On a Sphere®" (SOS), this wrap-around cinema system ­ inventedLearn More: sos.noaa.gov 24 EDUCATION Science On a Sphere®: Seeing the Dynamics of a Changing Earth of the sphere. Today, the SOS team has worked with science centers and museums to place SOS displays at more

  11. FY 2013 Appropriations for the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration NOAA's FY 2013 "Blue Book"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 Cooperative Observer Network 1.9 1.0 -47.4% 1.9 1.0 NOAA Profiler Network 4.2 1.8 -57.1% 4.2 1.8 Advanced as a conference--at least, not before the November elections. Further complicating this process is the fact

  12. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER USING LANDSAT the group means for snow- covered ice (group 15). 4. Comparison of LANDSAT 1 band 4 and band 7 to illustrate the influence of water on the tone of ice cover. 5. Mean digital counts of training sets--bands 4, 5, 6, and 7

  13. Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover is an important environmental factor affecting physical and biological processes in the coastal region of the Great Lakes. However, computerized ice thickness data along the shores of the Great

  14. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS R.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Observation density Average regional ice cover Percentage exceedance from average regional ice cover for discrete ice cover values Contour analysis of percentage ice cover exceedance

  15. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-v30 Surface Circulation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Washmgton, l> C 20402. 6!;3. The use of electricity in conjunction with a 1~.'j-meter (Headropel Gulf·of-Mexicov30 NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-v30 Surface Circulation in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington D.C 20402. 6.54. An electric detector

  16. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-42 A NUMERICAL MODEL OF CORgSIW SUSPENDED SEDIMENT DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an endorsement by NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories. Use for publicity or advertising purposes that many toxic pollutants (PAH's, PCB's, heavy metals) have a strong tendency to adsorb onto suspended pathways followed by the pollutants are as yet little known since determining them is complicated

  17. The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories do not approve. recommend, or endorse any proprietary product or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Research Laboratories. in any advertising or sales promotion which would indicate or imply the advertised product to be used or purchased because of this NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories collected in Lake Huron during 1966 by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration. Most

  18. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Plate Tectonics and Lava Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and geological events?" Answer = heat from radioactive decay · Compare the light bulb in lava to Earth's internal in the lava lamp. · Plot recent earthquakes and volcanic activity on a world map and compare to the location.education.noaa.gov/Ocean_and_Coasts/Ocean_Floor_Features.html USGS Earthquake Hazards - http

  19. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  20. Puget Sound Operational Forecast System - A Real-time Predictive Tool for Marine Resource Management and Emergency Responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Chase, Jared M.; Wang, Taiping

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support marine ecological resource management and emergency response and to enhance scientific understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes in Puget Sound, a real-time Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OFS) was developed by the Coastal Ocean Dynamics & Ecosystem Modeling group (CODEM) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PS-OFS employs the state-of-the-art three-dimensional coastal ocean model and closely follows the standards and procedures established by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS). PS-OFS consists of four key components supporting the Puget Sound Circulation and Transport Model (PS-CTM): data acquisition, model execution and product archive, model skill assessment, and model results dissemination. This paper provides an overview of PS-OFS and its ability to provide vital real-time oceanographic information to the Puget Sound community. PS-OFS supports pacific northwest region’s growing need for a predictive tool to assist water quality management, fish stock recovery efforts, maritime emergency response, nearshore land-use planning, and the challenge of climate change and sea level rise impacts. The structure of PS-OFS and examples of the system inputs and outputs, forecast results are presented in details.

  1. Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

  2. NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 4 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 153 opinion & comment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    . 1). Greater collective action, but also policy changes and effective communication of climateNATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 4 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 153 opinion in climate predictions, and especially in tipping- points towards dangerous climate change, is not only

  3. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  4. The 2006 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001 1995 1992 1980 1983 1989 1986 ACE(%ofMedian) NOAA's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Index 75 117 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 2006 May August 2006NOAA Outlooks Fig.2.NOAA'sAccumulatedCycloneEnergy(ACENational OceanicandAtmospheric Administration's(NOAA's)Accu- mulatedCycloneEnergy(ACE) index (Bell et al. 2000).TheACE

  5. Introduction. Stochastic physics and climate modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    become a backbone of numerical weather prediction and is used not only by weather forecasters but also. Stochastic physics schemes within weather and climate models have the potential to represent the dynamical history, the present era, whereby predictions are made from numerical solutions of the underlying dynamic

  6. 9A.2 FORECAST CHALLENGES AT THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER RELATING TO THE FREQUENCY OF FAVORABLE SEVERE STORM ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the performance of convective watches issued by the NOAA Storm Prediction Center (SPC layer bulk wind shear, are linked to SPC convective watches and verification metrics forecast performance. 2. SPC CONVECTIVE WATCHES A convective watch is issued by the SPC

  7. AUGUST 1999 507C O R F I D I The Birth and Early Years of the Storm Prediction Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . CORFIDI NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma (Manuscript received 12 August 1998 tornado to strike Tinker Air Force Base in one week on 25 March 1948. The success of this and later's Weather Radar Laboratory to form the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) in Norman, Oklahoma, in 1964

  8. P2.3 DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE SEVERE WEATHER FORECAST VERIFICATION SYSTEM AT THE STORM PREDICTION CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Andrew R. Dean, CIMMS, Univ. of Oklahoma, National Weather Center, Suite 2300, Norman, OK 73072-7268; e PREDICTION CENTER Andrew R. Dean*1,2 , Russell S. Schneider 2 , and Joseph T. Schaefer 2 1 Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 2 NOAA/NWS Storm

  9. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  10. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS NHC 2 Property of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) grid nested within the coarser NMC fixed grid primitive equation (PE) model. It is capable an island or made landfall when predicted to remain offshore the error was designated as the distance from the landfall point to the nearest point on the forecast track 2 #12;A summary of 1975 North Atlantic tropical

  11. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  12. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  13. Climate Past, Climate Present, Climate Future Douglas Nychka,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    series and an energy balance model. 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 -1.5-1.0-0.50.00.5 Year Degree. Supported by US NSF 7th World Congress Prob. and Stat., Singapore July 2008 #12;What is climate? Climate will use statistics to talk about the "known un- knowns" for the Earth's climate Statistics uses

  14. NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use advanced instrument and communication technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use- grams. This paper traces the innovations in design and gains in capability of the autonomous Lagrangian

  15. CORRELATION OF DNA METHYLATION WITH MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN MARINE ORGANISMS: A CASE STUDY OF NOAA MUSSEL WATCH TISSUE SAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmeyer, Robin; Taylor, Robert; Germ, Kaylyn E.

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) obtained from the NOAA Mussel Watch program were screened for DNA methylation, a type of epigenetic response to stressors. Oysters were collected from sites in the Gulf of Mexico having high mercury...

  16. Dr. William J. Gutowski will be hosting a science-team meeting of a DOE-sponsored project, "Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Dr. William J. Gutowski will be hosting a science-team meeting of a DOE-sponsored project, "Towards Regional Arctic Climate System Model". This is a collaborative project to: (i) develop a state change in the northern polar regions. The project involves PIs from four institutions: Naval Postgraduate

  17. Future Climate Engineering Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions ­ A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

  18. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  19. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  20. Climate Engineering with Stratospheric Aerosols and Associated Engineering Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate engineering with stratospheric aerosols, an idea inspired by large volcaniceruptions, could cool the Earth’s surface and thus alleviate some of the predicted dangerous impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, the effectiveness of climate engineering to achieve a particular climate goal, and any associated side effects, depend on certain aerosol parameters and how the aerosols are deployed in the stratosphere. Through the examples of sulfate and black carbon aerosols, this paper examines "engineering" parameters-aerosol composition, aerosol size, and spatial and temporal variations in deployment-for stratospheric climate engineering. The effects of climate engineering are sensitive to these parameters, suggesting that a particle could be found ordesigned to achieve specific desired climate outcomes. This prospect opens the possibility for discussion of societal goals for climate engineering.

  1. Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbertsson, Nicole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and… (more)

  2. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural...

  3. Climate Action Plan (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky established the Kentucky Climate Action Plan Council (KCAPC) process to identify opportunities for Kentucky to respond to the challenge of global climate change while...

  4. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76 George A. Leshkevich.2 Data Analysis 2 3. DATA PRESENTATION 4 3.1 Freezing Degree-Days 4 3.2 Composite Ice Charts 4 4. DISCUSSION 4 4.1 Winter Characteristics 4 4.2 General Seasonal Trends in Ice-Cover Distribution 5 4.3 Lake

  5. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  6. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  7. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  8. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  9. Climate controls on coral growth in the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosshart, Sara A. (Sara Allison)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate predictions of Caribbean coral reef responses to global climate change are currently limited by a lack of knowledge of the dominant environmental controls on coral growth. Corals exhibit significant responses to ...

  10. Biofuels, Climate Policy and the European Vehicle Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    We examine the effect of biofuels mandates and climate policy on the European vehicle fleet, considering the prospects for diesel and gasoline vehicles. We use the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, ...

  11. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  12. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  13. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  14. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    net impact of climate change on agriculture in California,of Climate Change on California Agriculture. ” PresentationEffects of Climate Change on California Agriculture Positive

  15. Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Paper 1080 Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredby author(s). Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsideredimpact of climate change on agriculture, there still exists

  16. Review: Preparing for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

  17. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

  18. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December 2009 Volume 13, Number 6 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research located on Virginia KeyAtlantic With an estimated 40% of the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) from fossil fuels having entered the oceans since the start studies in the Atlantic and equatorial Pacific performed by NOAA researchers and their affiliates. Carbon

  19. http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet See Report By GR1938 HISTORY - 1957 MONUMENTED CGS #12;DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl

  20. Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of Mexico near the spill site. At the time it was called on for this mission, the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and extensive survey of atmospheric loadings of hydrocarbon and other organic species air pollution in the Gulf

  1. Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory Flights of 8 and 10 June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution in the Gulf of Mexico. During May, one of NOAA WP-3D aircraft, equipped with an extensive suite1 Air Chemistry in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Area NOAA WP-3D Airborne Chemical Laboratory within and above the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the Gulf of Mexico on 8 and 10 June 2010

  2. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMay-June 2010 Volume 14, Number 3 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    indicator that 2010 will be an active year is NOAA's accumulated cycle energy (ACE) index, which measures factors that favor tropical cyclone activity. This probability is one of the highest ever issued by NOAA total seasonal activity based on the strength and duration of named storms and hurricanes. The ACE range

  3. PREDICTIVE MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, R.M. (DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding; 3) in-situ combustion; 4) polymer flooding; and 5) steamflood. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes. The IBM PC/AT version includes a plotting capability to produces a graphic picture of the predictive model results.

  4. Functional ANOVA and Regional Climate Experiments: A Statistical Analysis of Dynamic Downscaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sain, Steve

    added an urgency to predict changes in our climate due to our future behavior. The primary tools used the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (Solomon et al., 2007, http the Earth's climate, such as natural changes in solar or volcanic activity, human-induced changes

  5. White House Fellows 25 July 2007ESSLESSL // Climate Change Research at NCAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White House Fellows 25 July 2007ESSLESSL // Climate Change Research at NCAR J. J. HackJ. J. Hack USABoulder, Colorado USA #12;White House Fellows 25 July 2007ESSLESSL // Climate and Global Dynamics Division a basis for prediction of weather and climate #12;White House Fellows 25 July 2007ESSLESSL // Themes

  6. Development of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim Ashfaq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    goals of climate modeling. Water supports the ecosystems as well as a wide range of human activities to improve region- al predictions of the hydrologic cycle to address climate change impacts, adaptationDevelopment of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim

  7. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

  8. European-Led Climate Policy versus Global Mitigation Action: Implications on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change (CMCC) Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore, 30124 Venezia, Italy, Amit Kanudia, Sergey Paltsev, Ronald D. Sands and Katja Schumacher *Reprinted from Climate Change and predictions of the risks of climate change and the challenges of limiting human influence on the environment

  9. STATE OF THE CLIMATE IN 2009 Special Supplement to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Alexander, Lisa V., Climate Change Research Centre, Universi- ty of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Comores Alexander, Lisa V., Climate Change Research Centre, Universi- ty of New South Wales, Sydney, New, St. Peters- burg, Russia Atheru, Zachary, IGAD Climate Prediction and Applications Centre, Nairobi

  10. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  11. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  12. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  13. The 2007 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Administration(NOAA)AccumulatedCyclone Energy (ACE) index (Bell et al. 2000), a measure of the season's overall

  14. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  15. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  16. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  17. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  18. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

  19. Environment and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  20. The 2005 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a record estimated Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index (Bell et al. 2000) of 285% of the median (Fig. 1, and four major hurricanes struck the Fig. 1. NOAA's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index expressed 1983 1989 1986 ACE(%ofMedian) NOAA's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Index 2005 NOAA'sAugust 2005

  1. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  2. Predictive Maintenance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Predictive maintenance aims to detect equipment degradation and address problems as they arise. The result indicates potential issues, which are controlled or eliminated prior to any significant system deterioration.

  3. Validation of GOES-Derived Surface Radiation Using NOAA's Physical Retrieval Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was part of a multiyear collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to produce high-quality, satellite-based, solar resource datasets for the United States. High-quality, solar resource assessment accelerates technology deployment by making a positive impact on decision making and reducing uncertainty in investment decisions. Satellite-based solar resource datasets are used as a primary source in solar resource assessment. This is mainly because satellites provide larger areal coverage and longer periods of record than ground-based measurements. With the advent of newer satellites with increased information content and faster computers that can process increasingly higher data volumes, methods that were considered too computationally intensive are now feasible. One class of sophisticated methods for retrieving solar resource information from satellites is a two-step, physics-based method that computes cloud properties and uses the information in a radiative transfer model to compute solar radiation. This method has the advantage of adding additional information as satellites with newer channels come on board. This report evaluates the two-step method developed at NOAA and adapted for solar resource assessment for renewable energy with the goal of identifying areas that can be improved in the future.

  4. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Frontiers in Climate Forecasting (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Collins, Bill

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Bill Collins directs Berkeley Lab's research dedicated to atmospheric and climate science. Previously, he headed the development of one of the leading climate models used in international studies of global warming. His work has confirmed that man-made greenhouse gases are probably the main culprits of recent warming and future warming poses very real challenges for the environment and society. A lead author of the most recent assessment of the science of climate change by the United Nations' Integovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Collins wants to create a new kind of climate model, one that will integrate cutting-edge climate science with accurate predictions people can use to plan their lives

  5. Department of Energy award DE-SC0004164 Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno Harnish

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts symposium was attended by senior policy makers and distinguished scientists. The juxtaposition of these communities was creative and fruitful. They acknowledged they were speaking past each other. Scientists were urged to tell policy makers about even improbable outcomes while articulating clearly the uncertainties around the outcomes. As one policy maker put it, we are accustomed to making these types of decisions. These points were captured clearly in an article that appeared on the New York Times website and can be found with other conference materials most easily on our website, www.scripps.ucsd.edu/cens/. The symposium, generously supported by the NOAA/JIMO, benefitted the public by promoting scientifically informed decision making and by the transmission of objective information regarding climate change and national security.

  6. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  7. PREDICTIVE MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, R.M. (DOE Bartlesville Energy Technology Technology Center, Bartlesville, OK (United States))

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTIVE MODELS is a collection of five models - CFPM, CO2PM, ICPM, PFPM, and SFPM - used in the 1982-1984 National Petroleum Council study of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential. Each pertains to a specific EOR process designed to squeeze additional oil from aging or spent oil fields. The processes are: 1) chemical flooding, where soap-like surfactants are injected into the reservoir to wash out the oil; 2) carbon dioxide miscible flooding, where carbon dioxide mixes with the lighter hydrocarbons making the oil easier to displace; 3) in-situ combustion, which uses the heat from burning some of the underground oil to thin the product; 4) polymer flooding, where thick, cohesive material is pumped into a reservoir to push the oil through the underground rock; and 5) steamflood, where pressurized steam is injected underground to thin the oil. CFPM, the Chemical Flood Predictive Model, models micellar (surfactant)-polymer floods in reservoirs, which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic or caustic-polymer processes. CO2PM, the Carbon Dioxide miscible flooding Predictive Model, is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO2 injection or water-alternating gas processes. ICPM, the In-situ Combustion Predictive Model, computes the recovery and profitability of an in-situ combustion project from generalized performance predictive algorithms. PFPM, the Polymer Flood Predictive Model, is switch-selectable for either polymer or waterflooding, and an option allows the calculation of the incremental oil recovery and economics of polymer relative to waterflooding. SFPM, the Steamflood Predictive Model, is applicable to the steam drive process, but not to cyclic steam injection (steam soak) processes.

  8. OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/20/2007 OCAO Computer Refreshment Policy Purpose: The NOAA CAO is responsible for budgeting and procuring all personal computers and other support computers used by OCAO staff. To facilitate adequate capital planning and clarify acquisition policies, the following Computer Refreshment Policy

  9. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT of such products is not authorized. ii #12;CONTENTS Abstract 1. INTRODUCTION 2. THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF THE ICE GROWTH EQUATION 3. THE INFLUENCE OF SNOW COVER 4. THE DEGREE-DAY LINEAR MODEL 5. THE DATA SETS 5.1 Ice

  10. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-85 AN ATTEMPT TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF AN ANTI-TURBIDITY SYSTEM ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Pollution and Resources Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan Yoshikuni Okayama of such products for publicity or advertising purposes is not authorized. Contribution No. 1060 from NOAA of phytoplankton, adsorb and concentrate some pollutants such as toxic chemicals, promote the consumption of great

  11. FEBRUARY 14, 2011 NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson approaches the Deepwater Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the country need climate information to make choices about what crops to plant and when to plant them. City that all offshore uses ­ include renewable energ

  12. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  13. Estimating extinction risk under climate change: next-generation models simultaneously incorporate demography, dispersal, and biotic interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissling, W. Daniel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interactions Estimating species-level extinction risk underin predicting species-level extinction risk under climateto assess extinction risk of select species under climate

  14. Towards Ultra-High Resolution Models of Climate and Weather To appear in the International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, 2008.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliker, Leonid

    affordable cost and power considerations. The major conceptual changes required by a kilometer scale climate climate change and weather prediction is one of the most important challenges facing computa- tional fidelity in both short term weather prediction and long term climate change estimates will be better met

  15. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

  16. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

  17. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

  18. Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour;1 Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour? Thomas D. Lowe 1 these kinds of messages (which have recently been dubbed `climate porn' (Ereaut and Segnit, 2006)), can

  19. Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

  20. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  1. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  2. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  3. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  4. Presented by Climate End Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy Bettge_LCF Climate_SC10 CESM working groups · Application ­ Climate change, paleoclimate climate change projections for IPCC AR5 Gerald Meehl and Warren Washington, NCAR · Climate changePresented by Climate End Station Thomas Bettge National Center for Atmospheric Research James B

  5. The Corn and Climate Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Climate Change Science Program Office Part 2: Climate Impacts on Midwestern Agriculture: MonitoringThe Corn and Climate Report An overview of climate science in the service of Midwestern agriculture Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program

  6. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  7. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  8. Climate Action Plan (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Governor Timothy M. Kaine established the Governor's Commission on Climate Change in December 2007. The commission prepared a plan for Virginia that identified ways to reduce greenhouse gas...

  9. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  10. National K-12 Educator Conference; "Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate" (July 23-24, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flammer, Karen; O'Shaughnessy, Tam

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    With the support of the Department of Energy, the National Science Teachers Association and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Imaginary Lines Inc. (dba Sally Ride Science) delivered a highly successful 2-day conference to 165 K-12 educators on climate change. The event took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD. The conference celebrated the 25th anniversary of Dr. Sally Ride’s first flight into space in 1983 and examined how our understanding of Earth has changed in those 25 years. One the first day of the conference, participants heard a keynote talk delivered by Dr. Sally Ride, followed by presentations by well-known climate change scientists: Dr. Richard Somerville, Dr. Inez Fung and Dr. Susan Solomon. These sessions were concurrently webcast and made available to educators who were unable to attend the conference. On the second day of the conference, participants attended breakout sessions where they performed climate change activities (e.g. “Neato Albedo!”, “Greenhouse in a Bottle”, “Shell-Shocked”) that they could take back to their classrooms. Additional break-out sessions on using remote sensing images to illustrate climate change effects on Earth’s surface and how to address the climate change debate, were also offered. During lunch, participants attended an Educator Street Fair and had the opportunity to interact with representatives from NOAA, NASA, the EPA, NEEF and the JASON project. A follow-up evaluation survey was administered to all conference attendees immediately following the conference to evaluate its effectiveness. The results of this survey were overwhelmingly positive. The conference materials: presentation Power Points, workshop handouts and activities were available for teachers to download after the conference from the Sally Ride Science website. In summary, the approximately $55K support for the Department of Energy was used to help plan, deliver and evaluate the “Earth Then, Earth Now: Our Changing Climate”, conference which took place on July 23rd and 24th, 2008 at the NOAA facility in Silver Spring, MD.

  11. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  12. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  13. Conceptualizing climate change in the context of a climate system: implications for climate and environmental education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Conceptualizing climate change in the context of a climate system: implications for climate 1 September 2011) Today there is much interest in teaching secondary students about climate change. Much of this effort has focused directly on students' understanding of climate change. We hypothesize

  14. I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Climate Change -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Climate Change - Implications for Forestry in Britain 231 of the earth's climate results in changes in other aspects of weather such as rainfall, humidity, and wind are able to respond to changing climate or atmospheric composition. Such models allow prediction

  15. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  16. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  17. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  18. book review: Climate change mapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanahan, Mike

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

  19. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

  20. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developing countries "can significantly offset the adverse effects of climate change").Climate Change, 2 which calls on developed countries (but not developing countries)developing countries that will bear the bulk of the effects of climate change.

  1. Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    1 Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http://aerosol.ucsd.edu/courses.html Text: Curry & Webster Atmospheric Thermodynamics Ch1 Composition Ch2 Laws Ch3 Transfers Ch12 Energy Climate Sciences: Atmospheric Thermodynamics Instructor: Lynn Russell, NH343 http

  2. Moving Toward Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

  3. Daily High-Resolution-Blended Analyses for Sea Surface Temperature RICHARD W. REYNOLDS,* THOMAS M. SMITH, CHUNYING LIU,* DUDLEY B. CHELTON,#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    . SMITH, CHUNYING LIU,* DUDLEY B. CHELTON,# KENNETH S. CASEY,@ AND MICHAEL G. SCHLAX# *NOAA purposes from climate monitoring and prediction (e.g., Smith and Reynolds 2003) to fea- ture tracking (e and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as described by Reynolds and Smith (1994) and Reynolds et al. (2002

  4. International Governance of Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parson, Edward; Ernst, Lia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change, Geoengineering, and International1992); David W. Keith, Geoengineering the Climate: HistoryStephen H. Schneider, Geoengineering: Could — Or Should — We

  5. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries:climate change matters because it is likely to be the case that local governments in developing countries

  6. Prediction of plant species distributions across six Peter B. Pearman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    LETTER Prediction of plant species distributions across six millennia Peter B. Pearman,1 The usefulness of species distribution models (SDMs) in predicting impacts of climate change on biodiversity alternative way to evaluate the predictive ability of SDMs across time is to compare their predictions

  7. Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, W

    2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the ARM Science Board is to promote the Nation’s scientific enterprise by ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the DOE’s User Facility known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. The goal of the User Facility is to serve scientific researchers by providing unique data and tools to facilitate scientific applications for improving understanding and prediction of climate science.

  8. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT NO. 1: CLIMATE AND INFILTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past 20 years, extensive field, laboratory, and modeling investigations have been performed at Yucca Mountain, which have led to the development of a number of conceptual models of infiltration and climate for the Yucca Mountain region around the repository site (Flint, A.L. et al. 2001; Wang and Bodvarsson 2003). Evaluating the amount of infiltrating water entering the subsurface is important, because this water may affect the percolation flux, which, in turn, controls seepage into the waste emplacement drifts and radionuclide transport from the repository to the water table. Forecasting of climatic data indicates that during the next 10,000 years at Yucca Mountain, the present-day climate should persist for 400 to 600 years, followed by a warmer and much wetter monsoon climate for 900 to 1,400 years, and by a cooler and wetter glacial-transition climate for the remaining 8,000 to 8,700 years. The analysis of climatic forecasting indicates that long-term climate conditions are generally predictable from a past climate sequence, while short-term climate conditions and weather predictions may be more variable and uncertain. The use of past climate sequences to bound future climate sequences involves several types of uncertainties, such as (1) uncertainty in the timing of future climate, (2) uncertainty in the methodology of climatic forecasting, and (3) uncertainty in the earth's future physical processes. Some of the uncertainties of the climatic forecasting are epistemic (reducible) and aleatoric (irreducible). Because of the size of the model domain, INFIL treats many flow processes in a simplified manner. For example, uptake of water by roots occurs according to the ''distributed model'', in which available water in each soil layer is withdrawn in proportion to the root density in that layer, multiplied by the total evapotranspirative demand. Runoff is calculated simply as the excess of precipitation over a sum of infiltration and water storage in the root zone. More significantly, water movement throughout the soil profile is treated according to the bucket model, in which the amount of water that moves down from one layer to the next is equal to the mass of water in excess of field capacity in the upper layer. The development of a numerical model of infiltration involves a number of abstractions and simplifications to represent the complexity of environmental conditions at Yucca Mountain, such as the arid climate, mountain-type topography, heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, and irregular soil-rock interface.

  9. Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Peter

    Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

  10. Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    Dealing in Doubt: The Climate Denial Industry and Climate Science A Brief History of Attacks action on climate change has become more likely. This time, though, there is a difference. In recent, despite its lack of evidence or scientific support. The last peak in the climate denial campaign

  11. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central · Climate with enhanced cloud absorption Synthesis of models and aerosol observations: · Development

  12. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  13. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    climate and cultural changes are observed in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Near East [e.g., Bookman et1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:769-789 DOI

  14. Understanding and Attributing Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

  15. Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD SPECIAL REPORT 290 #12;#12;Committee on Climate Change and U Washington, D.C. 2008 www.TRB.org Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION

  16. Flux Emergence in the Solar Active Region NOAA 11158: The Evolution of Net Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vemareddy, P; Karthikreddy, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed investigation on the evolution of observed net vertical current using a time series of vector magnetograms of the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 obtained from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We also discuss the relation of net current to the observed eruptive events. The AR evolved from $\\beta\\gamma$ to $\\beta\\gamma\\delta$ configuration over a period of 6 days. The AR had two sub-regions of activity with opposite chirality: one dominated by sunspot rotation producing a strong CME, the other showing large shear motions producing a strong flare. The net current in each polarity over the CME producing sub-region increased to a maximum and then decreased when the sunspots got separated. The time profile of net current in this sub-region followed the time profile of the rotation rate of the S-polarity sunspot of the same sub-region. The net current in the flaring sub-region showed a sudden increase at the time of the strong flare and remained unchanged till the end of the observation, while the ...

  17. Refining climate models

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  18. Climate Action Plan (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the implications that global climate change may have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Minnesota, Governor Tim Pawlenty signed into law the 2007 Next Generation Energy...

  19. Climate Action Plan (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a growing scientific consensus that increasing emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are affecting the temperature and variability of the Earth’s climate. Recognizing the...

  20. Refining climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

  1. Sensitivity of climate models: Comparison of simulated and observed patterns for past climates. Progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prell, W.L.; Webb, T. III

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the potential climatic effects of increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide requires the continuing development of climate models. Confidence in the predictions will be much enhanced once the models are thoroughly tested in terms of their ability to simulate climates that differ significantly from today`s climate. As one index of the magnitude of past climate change, the global mean temperature increase during the past 18,000 years is similar to that predicted for carbon dioxide--doubling. Simulating the climatic changes of the past 18,000 years, as well as the warmer-than-present climate of 6000 years ago and the climate of the last interglacial, around 126,000 years ago, provides an excellent opportunity to test the models that are being used in global climate change research. During the past several years, we have used paleoclimatic data to test the accuracy of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Community Climate Model, Version 0, after changing its boundary conditions to those appropriate for past climates. We have assembled regional and near-global paleoclimatic data sets of pollen, lake level, and marine plankton data and calibrated many of the data in terms of climatic variables. We have also developed methods that permit direct quantitative comparisons between the data and model results. Our research has shown that comparing the model results with the data is an evolutionary process, because the models, the data, and the methods for comparison are continually being improved. During 1992, we have completed new modeling experiments, further analyzed previous model experiments, compiled new paleodata, made new comparisons between data and model results, and participated in workshops on paleoclimatic modeling.

  2. Climate Science and Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Climate Change and Drought Wendy Gordon, Ph.D. The University of Texas ? Austin Environmental Science Institute Texas Wildfires 2011 From the beginning of the fire season on November 15, 2010 to October 31, 2011 nearly 28,000 fires had... have been particularly severe due to the ongoing 2011 Southern US drought, and exacerbating the problem is land management practices, the unusual convergence of strong winds, unseasonably warm temperatures, and low humidity. Climate...

  3. The 2011 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low-activity Era NOAA's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Index May August 2011NOAA Outlooks 2011 165 Fig. 2. NOAA'sAccumulated seasonalAccumu- latedCycloneEnergy(ACE)value(Bell et al. 2000) was 127.1 x 104 kt2 , which Fig. 1.Tracks of Cyclone Energy (ACE) index expressed as percent of the 1981-2010 median value. ACE is calculated

  4. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Special Scientific Report-Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the abunda nce and geographic 'h,rribur ion (,rfishen re nurees. to understand and predict fluctuations

  5. The optimal prediction method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burin des Roziers, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematics. In optimal prediction. Communications press,and R. Kupferman. On the prediction of large- scale dynamicsand D. Levy. Optimal prediction and pertur- bation theory.

  6. Some Mathematical and Numerical Issues in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianping Li; Shouhong Wang

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we address both recent advances and open questions in some mathematical and computational issues in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) and climate dynamics. The main focus is on 1) the primitive equations (PEs) models and their related mathematical and computational issues, 2) climate variability, predictability and successive bifurcation, and 3) a new dynamical systems theory and its applications to GFD and climate dynamics.

  7. Math Theory of Climate Sensitivity, Predictability & Model Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .20 Frequency (year-1) Powerspectra Total Power Thermohaline mode Coupled O-A mode Wind-driven mode Interannual of robustness" ­ non-autonomous and random dynamical systems (NDDS & RDS)" · Two illustrative examples in the wind, i.e., it depends on the accuracy and reliability of the forecast ... #12;· The IPCC process

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: accurate climate-change prediction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wave EnergyLinksZ Newsaccelerating PV

  9. Simulations of Present and Future Climates in the Western United States with Four Nested Regional Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, Phil; Arritt, R.; Coquard, J.; Gutowski, William; Han, J.; Iorio, J.; Kim, Jongil; Leung, Lai R.; Roads, J.; Zeledon, E.

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean-atmosphere climate models. Our primary goal is to assess the range of regional climate responses to increased greenhouse gases in available RCM simulations. The four RCMs used different geographical domains, different increased greenhouse gas scenarios for future-climate simulations, and (in some cases) different lateral boundary conditions. For simulations of the present climate, we compare RCM results to observations and to results of the GCM that provided lateral boundary conditions to the RCM. For future-climate (increased greenhouse gas) simulations, we compare RCM results to each other and to results of the driving GCMs. When results are spatially averaged over the western U.S., we find that the results of each RCM closely follow those of the driving GCM in the same region, in both present and future climates. This is true even though the study area is in some cases a small fraction of the RCM domain. Precipitation responses predicted by the RCMs are in many regions not statistically significant compared to interannual variability. Where the predicted precipitation responses are statistically significant, they are positive. The models agree that near-surface temperatures will increase, but do not agree on the spatial pattern of this increase. The four RCMs produce very different estimates of water content of snow in the present climate, and of the change in this water content in response to increased greenhouse gases.

  10. A consideration of the forcings of climate change using simple physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proxy data like tree rings, or climate models' predictions. all these require training to be appreciated of energy available as a result of the greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide, and estimate how large this energy is compared to the energy needed to achieve a given climate phenomenon, such as a rise in sea

  11. Using Dempster-Shafer Theory to model uncertainty in climate change and environmental impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using Dempster-Shafer Theory to model uncertainty in climate change and environmental impact]. The design wave overtopping in a context of changing climate cannot be deterministically predicted due defense structure due to (1) uncertain elevation of the mean water level and (2) uncertain level of storm

  12. Ecology and the ratchet of events: Climate variability, niche dimensions, and species distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecology and the ratchet of events: Climate variability, niche dimensions, and species distributionsDepartment of Botany and Program in Ecology and dWyoming Water Resources Data System and Wyoming State Climate Office superimposed on anthropogenic trends. Predicting ecological and biogeographic responses to these changes

  13. Carbon sequestration in peatland: patterns and mechanisms of response to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon sequestration in peatland: patterns and mechanisms of response to climate change L I S A R., 2000; Turunen et al., 2002; Kremenetski et al., 2003). Rates of carbon (C) sequestration (i.e., uptake in the climatic water budget is crucial to predicting potential feedbacks on the global carbon (C) cycle. To gain

  14. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  15. Geoengineering the Earth's Climate

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Google Tech Talks

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergency preparedness is generally considered to be a good thing, yet there is no plan regarding what we might do should we be faced with a climate emergency. Such an emergency could take the form of a rapid shift in precipitation patterns, a collapse of the great ice sheets, the imminent triggering of strong climate system feedbacks, or perhaps the loss of valuable ecosystems. Over the past decade, we have used climate models to investigate the potential to reverse some of the effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by deflecting some incoming sunlight back to space. This would probably be most cost-effectively achieved with the placement of small particles in or above the stratosphere. Our model simulations indicate that such geoengineering approaches could potentially bring our climate closer to the state is was in prior to the introduction of greenhouse gases. This talk will present much of what is known about such geoengineering approaches, and raise a range of issues likely to stimulate lively discussion. Speaker: Ken Caldeira Ken Caldeira is a scientist at the Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology and a Professor (by courtesy) at the Stanford University Department of Environmental and Earth System Sciences. Previously, he worked for 12 years in the Energy and Environment Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Department of Energy). His research interests include the numerical simulation of Earth's climate, carbon, and biogeochemistry; ocean acidification; climate emergency response systems; evaluating approaches to supplying environmentally-friendly energy services; ocean carbon sequestration; long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and marine biogeochemical cycles. Caldeira has a B.A. in Philosophy from Rutgers College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from New York University.

  16. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  17. Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand...

  18. Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability November 12,...

  19. NEW WORK AND STUDY OPPORTUNITIES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Climate System Analysis Group (CSAG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    . - Postdoc: Climate modeling - Postdoc: Climate change information communication and dissemination - Research Associate: Climate change information communication and dissemination - PhD: Climate change information communication and dissemination - MSc/PhD: Physical science of climate change What to expect: Successful

  20. Predicting energy usage in a supermarket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrock, Derek Wayne

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure Plan View of the Store Estimated Contribution of the Electrical Energy Using Systems in the Store. . ??. . 9 Schematic of a Typical Compressor and Refrigeration Case. . . . 13 10. Historical Energy Consumption (kWh) and Demand (k... institutional buildings using site and climate data, building system data and user variations such as occupancy and comfort level. He used the following regression equations to predict energy consumption: Consumption = Po+ Pt*(vl) + P&*(v2) + Pz*(v3) + (4*(v4...

  1. Predicting the Future at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Wilson

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes a climate-prediction model funded by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Several articles in the open literature attest to the effects of the Global Ocean Conveyor upon paleoclimate, specifically entrance and exit from the ice age. The data shows that these millennial-scale effects are duplicated on the microscale of years to decades. This work also identifies how man may have influenced the Conveyor, affecting global cooling and warming for 2,000 years.

  2. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron-Gafford, Greg

    PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BE USED TO PREDICT in photosynthesis, and thus substrate supply, influence the rate of ecosystem respiration (Re). Further- more in photosynthesis might result in concomitant changes in both the rate, and temperature-sensitivity, of Re. Re

  3. Status of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status of Climate Change 2013 CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change... • Who will Win, Who will Lose • What Needs to be Done ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 IPCC #5 • No great surprises - Sharper language • Uncertainties are still large • Essentially...

  4. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof aChristinaCliff joins EMSL as101010ClimateClimate

  5. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  6. ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ii Colorado Climate Table of Contents Web: http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu Colorado Climate Spring 2002 Vol. 3, No. 2 Lightning in Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Colorado Climate in Review

  7. Climate Action Plan (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Climate Ready, Ontario's Adaptation Strategy and Action Plan, outlines the problems, goals, and key strategies for the province's approach to climate change and the problems it poses. The Plan...

  8. Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Session Title Climate Smart Agriculture Session Date Khosla (moderator) Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences College of Agricultural Climate Smart Agriculture is a multi-disciplinary approach to practice agriculture

  9. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Climate Change Climate Change September 16, 2014 C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers Women clean energy leaders convene in Boston for the Women in Clean Energy...

  10. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 | Tags:...

  11. Climate Action Plan (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    29 members of Governor John Lynch’s Climate Change Policy Task Force developed a Climate Action Plan in 2009. It is aimed at achieving the greatest feasible reductions in greenhouse gas emissions...

  12. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  13. Adaptive Management of Water Resources in Light of Future Climate Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke; Mark Colosimo

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources managers have always had to make operational decisions in spite of a relatively high degree of uncertainty caused by changing climate, hydrologic, population, land use, socioeconomic, and other conditions. However, based on current climate change predictions and observations of current impacts of climate change or natural variability, the degree of uncertainty appears to be increasing drastically. By better understanding these uncertainties and their policy implications and by managing those uncertainties adaptively, water resources managers and policy makers can reduce the risk of not meeting their management goals and reduce the potential physical, biological and socioeconomic impacts associated with climate change/variation.

  14. Climate Action Plan (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manitoba's Climate Action Plan centers around energy efficiency, although it includes mandates and initiatives for renewable sources of energy.

  15. The 2010 North Atlantic Hurricane Season A Climate Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The2010seasonalAccumulated CycloneEnergy(ACE)value(Belletal. 2000) was 166.3 x 104 kt2 , which cor 2007 High-activity Era High-activity Era Low-activity Era NOAA's Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Index 2010 175 Fig. 2. NOAA'sAccumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index expressed as percent of the 1950

  16. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  17. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  18. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  19. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  20. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  1. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  2. COLORADO CLIMATE Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness Climate - the statistical collection;The Earth's Energy Balance Incoming energy from the sun (solar radiation) heats the Earth Some by the Earth and re-emitted Incoming solar radiation is shorter wavelengths (higher energy) than what

  3. ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit" temperature to radiative flux. #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per

  4. CLIMATE POLICY The Planet's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    CLIMATE POLICY The Planet's Laundromat The Planet's Laundromat ANTHROPOLOGY Rukina's Remarkable Planck Society's Science Express last fall as it began its trip through India. India's Prime Minister Man). As a mem- ber of the German delegation, the visit afford- ed me the opportunity to learn more about India

  5. Exploring Mars' Climate History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Mars' Climate History #12;2 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter ESA Mars Express (NASA: MARSIS by studying the solar wind and other interactions with the Sun. #12;The solar wind is a high-speed stream of electrons and protons released from the Sun. #12;High-energy photons (light) stream constantly from the Sun

  6. METEOROLOGY 5503 CLIMATE DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    ­ Present Average Climate System Behavior (14 lectures) History; Vision of Victor Starr; Global Budgets of Angular Momentum, Energy, Water Vapor; Regional Water Budget; Meridional Ocean Heat Transport 3 and Indices: Diagnostic Tools (wind stress curl, velocity potential, outgoing LW radiation); ENSO cycles

  7. aerosols and climate : uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

  8. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  9. Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Climate Entrepreneurship ...turning an idea into business Dr. Anaďs Sägesser, Director Climate-KIC Switzerland Dr. Regina Vogel, Education Lead Climate-KIC Switzerland Akitaka Fujii, Executive Assistant Climate-KIC Switzerland 20 October 2014 #12;Climate-KIC 2 #12;Climate-KIC 3 «... 1968 you went

  10. Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    - Climate change and agriculture in Oregon"" " " " " 151 Chapter 5 - The potential effects of climate changeOregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute #12;Oregon Climate Assessment Report December 2010 Oregon Climate Change Research Institute Recommended citation

  11. PAGES 111–112 Climate and Earth system models are the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    only tools used to make predictions of future climate change. Such predictions are subject to considerable uncertainties, and understanding these uncertainties has clear and important policy implications. This Forum highlights the concepts of reductionism and emergence, and past climate variability, to illuminate some of the uncertainties faced by those wishing to model the future evolution of global climate. General circulation models (GCMs) of the atmosphere-ocean system are scientists’ principal tools for providing information about future climate. GCMs consequently have considerable influence on climate change–related policy questions. Over the past decade, there have been significant attempts, mainly by statisticians and mathematicians, to explore the uncertainties in model simulations of possible futures, accompanied by growing debate about the interpretation of these simulations as aids in societal decisions. In this Forum, we discuss atmosphere-ocean GCMs in the context of reductionist and emergent approaches to scientific study.

  12. Predicting the fate of a living fossil: how will global warming affect sex determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Predicting the fate of a living fossil: how will global warming affect sex determination, an unlikely response to global warming, as many oviparous species are nesting earlier as the climate warms. Keywords: climate change; global warming; temperature-dependent sex determination; reptile; Sphenodon 1

  13. Latent feature models for dyadic prediction /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Aditya Krishna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prediction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Response prediction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4.3 Weighted link prediction . . . . . .

  14. IC performance prediction system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Venkatakrishnan

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical test data, supplemented with in-line and in-situ data to make performance predictions. Based on the waterlevel parametric test, we will predict chip performance in order to select the appropriate package. Predictions that fall outside acceptable...

  15. ParCAT: Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brian E [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wehner, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate science is employing increasingly complex models and simulations to analyze the past and predict the future of Earth s climate. This growth in complexity is creating a widening gap between the data being produced and the ability to analyze the datasets. Parallel computing tools are necessary to analyze, compare, and interpret the simulation data. The Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT) provides basic tools to efficiently use parallel computing techniques to make analysis of these datasets manageable. The toolkit provides the ability to compute spatio-temporal means, differences between runs or differences between averages of runs, and histograms of the values in a data set. ParCAT is implemented as a command-line utility written in C. This allows for easy integration in other tools and allows for use in scripts. This also makes it possible to run ParCAT on many platforms from laptops to supercomputers. ParCAT outputs NetCDF files so it is compatible with existing utilities such as Panoply and UV-CDAT. This paper describes ParCAT and presents results from some example runs on the Titan system at ORNL.

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, J.

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

  17. Russ S. Schumacher, John M. Haynes, Robert B. Seigel Daniel T. Lindsey Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB, Fort Collins, CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    of understanding the transport of chemical species by deep convective storms" · The project focused on three, Fort Collins, CO NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/RAMMB, Fort Collins, CO " ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! " INTRODUCTION! · In May-June 2012, the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment was conducted, with the goals

  18. LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER TELECONNECTIONS Raymond Assel, NOAA, Great lakes EnvironmentalResearch Laboratory,Ann Arbor, MI 48105-1593

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they were estimated using an electronic digitizer and ice charts produced by the U.S. Department of CommerceLAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER TELECONNECTIONS Raymond Assel, NOAA, Great lakes Environmental research on Great Lakes ice coverteleconnections.Here, annualmaximalice coverfor winters 1963

  19. The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact linwood.pendleton@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact linwood.pendleton@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version Measures of the Ocean and Coastal Economy: 1.GDP (Gross Domestic Product. The Ocean Economy 1 The ocean economy is comprised of six economic sectors that depend on the oceans

  20. The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Ocean and Coastal Economy: A Summary of Statistics For more information, please contact PPI.SocialSci@noaa.gov, see page 3 for pocket version Measures of the Ocean and Coastal Economy: 1.GDP (Gross Domestic Product. The Coastal Economy 1 The Coastal economy is comprised of all economic activity that takes place

  1. NOAA Competitive Level -Codes List of changes All This document converted without change to MSWord from WordPerfect, 8/5/04.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , per John Hanson. 6/10/02 5201 Diving Equipment Worker added per Brooke Larson, WASC. 11/19/01 #12;NOAA, qualification requirements, pay schedules, and working conditions so that an agency may reassign the incumbent are familiar with qualification requirements and recruiting practices. Care and thought is needed in assigning

  2. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  3. Climate Change in the South American Monsoon System: Present Climate and CMIP5 Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Charles; Carvalho, Leila M. V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lau, 1998: Does a monsoon climate exist over South America?J. Climate, 11, 1020–1040.America monsoon system. Climate Dyn. , 36, 1865–1880, doi:

  4. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: aJ. (2009). "Cities, Climate Change and Urban Heat Islandet al. (2006). Climate change in California: health,

  5. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  6. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts of climate change on California agriculture. Climateby climate change in California, such as agriculture areas agriculture. Without proactive climate change mitigation

  7. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a critical conversation on climate change, privatization andamounts due to climate change." Atmospheric Environment 41(Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  8. Climate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original Template The Chair of the Department of DEPT NAME, NAME, is dedicated to improving workplace climate in your office. As part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate Survey Original TemplateClimate workplace climate in your office. As part of this effort, we will be assessing the climate as perceived the success of this campus climate initiative across universities. Again, we will aggregate the data so

  9. Marcus Hutter -1 -Online Prediction Bayes versus Experts Online Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Marcus

    Marcus Hutter - 1 - Online Prediction ­ Bayes versus Experts Online Prediction: Bayes versus;Marcus Hutter - 2 - Online Prediction ­ Bayes versus Experts Table of Contents · Sequential/online prediction: Setup · Bayesian Sequence Prediction (Bayes) · Prediction with Expert Advice (PEA) · PEA Bounds

  10. ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT NAMAs and the Carbon Market Nationally Appropriate . . . . . . . . . . . 63 ChristianEllermann, NaMas FOr disPersed eNergy eNd-Use sectOrs: Using the building sectorDenmark,theNetherlandsMinistryofForeignAffairs,nortotherespectiveorganizationsofeachindividualauthor. CapacityDevelopmentforCDM(CD4CDM)Project UNEPRisøCentre, RisøNationalLaboratoryforSustainableEnergy The

  11. Climate-Energy Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Sayler; Randall Gentry; Jie Zhuang

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 140-page published proceedings of the workshop include individual articles and PowerPoint slides for all workshop presentations. The proceedings also contain pertinent background information on the China-US Joint Research Center, partnering organizations, and workshop goals and objectives. Overall, the workshop increased the understanding of the impacts of climate change on energy use and renewable energy production as well as the complex relationships among land use, energy production, and ecological restoration. The workshop served as an international platform for scientists and students of different research backgrounds to develop a unified perspective on energy and climate relationships. Such understanding will benefit future cooperation between China and the US in mitigating global climate change. The workshop’s agenda, which is highly interdisciplinary, explored many potential opportunities for international collaboration in ecosystem management, climate modeling, greenhouse gas emissions, and bioenergy sustainability. International research groups have been suggested in the areas of genomes and biotechnology of energy plants, sustainable management of soil and water resources, carbon sequestration, and microbial processes for ecological cycles. The project has attracted considerable attention from institutes beyond the China-US Joint Research Center partners, and several of them (such as Institute of Qing-Tibet Plateau Research, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Institute of Applied Ecology, CAS) have expressed interest in joining the partnership. In addition, the workshop played a significant role in facilitating establishment of private-public partnerships between government and private bioenergy companies (such as L.R. Shugarts and Associates, Inc.), including seed providers (Blade Energy Crops, Thousand Oaks, CA), pilot demonstration projects at coal-producing cities (e.g., Huaibei, Anhui province, China), and the development of methodology for assessment of the sustainable production of biofuels (such as life-cycle analysis, sustainability metrics, and land-use policy). Establishment of two US-China scientific research networks in the area of bioenergy and environmental science is a significant result of the workshop.

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust Documentation DataProductswsicloudwsicloudsummarygifAOS3 ARM9 ARM Climate

  13. ARM - Different Climates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation DataDatastreamswacrspeccmaskcopolDatastreamsxsacrslrAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -ListDifferent Climates

  14. Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

  15. Predictive Maintenance Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

  16. NOAA Helps the Construction Sector Build for a Changing Climate The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards, building design is needed to protect a building foundation from frost. In the past, standard foundation depths were inturn developed new insulation standards for protecting building foundations from frost. This resulted

  17. Driving Directions to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center NCDC is located in the Veach-Baley Federal Building, 151 Patton Avenue in Asheville, North Carolina, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    across the six-lane bridge over the French Broad River. · Take Exit 4B, the first exit to the right after-lane bridge over the French Broad River. · Take Exit 4B, the first exit to the right after the bridge

  18. Driving Directions to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center NCDC is located in the Veach-Baley Federal Building, 151 Patton Avenue in Asheville, North Carolina, 28801, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on I-240 across the six-lane bridge over the French Broad River. · Take Exit 4B, the first exit, continue on I-240 across the six-lane bridge over the French Broad River. · Take Exit 4B, the first exit

  19. Climate change will exacerbate California’s insect pest problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trumble, John; Butler, Casey

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadley Centre. 2007. Climate Change. www. metoffice.gov.uk/on parasitoids in a climate change perspective. Ann RevIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2007. Climate

  20. Piecewise training for structured prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Charles; McCallum, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    margin methods for structured prediction. In Internationalaccuracy computational gene prediction. PLoS Computationaltraining for structured prediction Charles Sutton · Andrew