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Sample records for no6 pinal cnty

  1. Electrical Dist No6 Pinal Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No6 Pinal Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrical Dist No6 Pinal Cnty Place: Arizona Phone Number: (480) 987-3461 Website: ed-6pinalcounty.com Outage Hotline: (480)...

  2. Electrical Dist No2 Pinal Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No2 Pinal Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrical Dist No2 Pinal Cnty Place: Arizona Phone Number: (800) 259-1306 Website: ed2.com Outage Hotline: 800-668-8079...

  3. Electrical Dist No3 Pinal Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No3 Pinal Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrical Dist No3 Pinal Cnty Abbreviation: ED3 Place: Arizona Phone Number: (520) 424-9021 Website: www.ed3online.org Outage...

  4. Electrical Dist No4 Pinal Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No4 Pinal Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrical Dist No4 Pinal Cnty Place: Arizona Phone Number: (520) 466-7336 Website: www.caidd.com Outage Hotline: (520) 510-9311...

  5. Electrical Dist No5 Pinal Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electrical Dist No5 Pinal Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrical Dist No5 Pinal Cnty Place: Arizona Phone Number: (520) 466-7336 Website: www.caidd.com Outage Hotline:...

  6. PUD No 1 of Pend Oreille Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PUD No 1 of Pend Oreille Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: PUD No 1 of Pend Oreille Cnty Place: Washington Phone Number: Main Line: (509)-447-3137; North County:...

  7. Sedgwick Cnty El Coop Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cnty El Coop Assn Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sedgwick Cnty El Coop Assn Inc Place: Kansas Phone Number: 316-542-3131 Website: www.sedgwickcountyelectric.coo Twitter:...

  8. Blachly-Lane Cnty Coop El Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blachly-Lane Cnty Coop El Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blachly-Lane Cnty Coop El Assn Place: Oregon Phone Number: (541) 688-8711 Website: www.blachlylane.coop Twitter:...

  9. Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cooperative L&P Assn Lake Cnty Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 800-580-5881 Website: www.clpower.com Facebook:...

  10. Idaho Cnty L&P Coop Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cnty L&P Coop Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Idaho Cnty L&P Coop Assn, Inc Place: Idaho Phone Number: 208-983-1065 Website: www.iclp.coop Outage Hotline: 877-212-0424...

  11. Geothermal progress monitor report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    Geothermal Progress Monitor Report No. 6 presents a state-by-state summary of the status of geothermal leasing, exploration, and development in major physiographic regions where geothermal resource potential has been identified. Recent state-specific activities are reported at the end of each state status report, while recent activities of a more general nature are summarized briefly in Part II of the report. A list of recent publications of potential interest to the geothermal community and a directory of contributors to the geothermal progress monitoring system are also included.

  12. Biodegradation of air-oxidized Illinois No. 6 coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linehan, J.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Wilson, B.W.; Bean, R.M.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Franz, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    We have found that Illinois No. 6 coal, after an air-oxidation pretreatment, can be substantially biodegraded by Penicillium sp. to a product largely soluble in dilute base. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the chemical nature of the biotreated Illinois No. 6 coal and to compare it with the corresponding material from leonardite biosolubilization. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC Order authorizing EESS-6 to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-391 Emera Energy Svcs EESS-6.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 55 - March 21, 2014

  14. Thermal conductivities of Wilsonville solvent and Wilsonville solvent/Illinois No. 6 coal slurry. [Wilsonville solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.H.; Mrochek, J.E.; Johnson, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal conductivities of a Wilsonville solvent and of a slurry prepared from this solvent and Illinois No. 6 coal have been measured at temperatures from 295 up to 500 K. With increasing temperature, the thermal conductivity varied from 1.23 to 1.02 mW cm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ (296 to 438 K) and from 1.51 to 1.02 mW cm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ (295 to 505 K) for the solvent and the slurry, respectively. At room temperature, measurements on toluene were accurate to within 3% of literature values. 18 references, 9 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Amped Up! Volume 1, No. 6: EERE 2015 Year in Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: EERE 2015 Year in Review Amped Up! Volume 1, No. 6: EERE 2015 Year in Review Amped Up! is a bimonthly newsletter that highlights the initiatives, events, and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change. A photo of the Amped Up 6 cover showing the face of a man made from a collage of many smaller photos. Features in this issue include: Release of the 2016-2020 EERE Strategic Plan Q&A with Kevin Lynn, director of the Grid Modernization

  16. Hoogovens blast furnace No. 6 -- The first eleven years of a continuing campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tijhuis, G.; Toxopeus, H.; Berg, H. van den; Vliet, C. van der

    1997-12-31

    Blast furnace No. 6 of Hoogovens Steel has just completed its eleventh year of the fourth (running) campaign, with a total production of approx. 23 million metric tonnes of hot metal. During the last reline in 1985 the furnace was equipped with a third taphole and a bell-less top. The lining consists of graphite and semi-graphite and the cooling consists of a dense pattern of copper plate coolers. The current campaign is marked by several important operational events, in particular the high productivity and PCI rates, but also by the remarkable performance of the lining which has shown limited wear in the first four years of the campaign, and hardly any reduction of the lining thickness in the last seven years. This paper discusses the design of the furnace, and the history of the current campaign with respect to its productivity, PCI rates and lining wear.

  17. Comprehensive Fe-ligand vibration identification in {FeNO}6 Hemes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Jianfeng; Peng, Qian; Oliver, Allen G.; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sage, J. Timothy; Scheidt, W. Robert

    2014-12-09

    Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) has been used to obtain all iron vibrations in two {FeNO}6 porphyrinate complexes, five-coordinate [Fe(OEP)(NO)]ClO4 and six-coordinate [Fe(OEP)(2-MeHIm)(NO)]ClO4. A new crystal structure was required for measurements of [Fe(OEP)(2-MeHIm)(NO)]ClO4, and the new structure is reported herein. Single crystals of both complexes were oriented to be either parallel or perpendicular to the porphyrin plane and/or axial imidazole ligand plane. Thus, the FeNO bending and stretching modes can now be unambiguously assigned; the pattern of shifts in frequency as a function of coordination number can also be determined. The pattern is quite distinct from those foundmore » for CO or {FeNO}7 heme species. This is the result of unchanging Fe–NNO bonding interactions in the {FeNO}6 species, in distinct contrast to the other diatomic ligand species. DFT calculations were also used to obtain detailed predictions of vibrational modes. Predictions were consistent with the intensity and character found in the experimental spectra. The NRVS data allow the assignment and observation of the challenging to obtain Fe–Im stretch in six-coordinate heme derivatives. Furthermore, NRVS data for this and related six-coordinate hemes with the diatomic ligands CO, NO, and O2 reveal a strong correlation between the Fe–Im stretch and Fe–NIm bond distance that is detailed for the first time.« less

  18. Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

    2002-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

  19. Trials with a 100% pellet burden in blast furnace No. 6 at Hoogovens IJmuiden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoone, E.; Toxopeus, H.; Vos, D.

    1995-12-01

    The burden consists of 50% high basicity sinter and 50% home made olivine pellets. Two coke oven plants produce the required coke, about 340 kg/t (680 lb/NT). The average pulverized coal injection rate is 150 kg/t (300 lb/NT). To anticipate the aging coke oven plant No. 2 the coal injection capacity will e increased by 50% in 1996, by the installation of a third coal grinding line. In the Netherlands environmental issues have a high impact on further developments. In particular the environmental regulations require a significant decrease of dust, SO{sub 2} and dioxins emitted by the sinter plant. The appropriate measures must be concluded in the second part of this decade. To avoid costly conventional solutions Hoogovens has been testing since April, 1994 the Emission Optimized Sintering (EOS). In case of failure of EOS, the situation of a (partially) closed sinter plant was tested. Purchased pellets replaced sinter, leading to a 100% pellet and an 80% pellet/20% sinter trial. The trials were executed in the first half of 1994 at blast furnace No. 6, equipped with a PW-bell less top. Results are described.

  20. Thermal conductivities of Wilsonville solvent and Wilsonville solvent/Illinois No. 6 coal slurry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrochek, J.E.; Wilson, J.H.; Johnson, J.K.

    1985-12-01

    This report describes instrumentation and techniques that, when used in conjunction with a unique bench-scale flow system for coal liquids, enabled thermal conductivity measurements of fresh, slurried coal-solvent mixtures under more or less dynamic flow conditions. The transient hot-wire technique was selected as the method of choice, and a high-temperature, high-pressure cell, rated for temperatures to 850 K and pressures to 30 MPa (4366 psig), was fabricated from type 347 stainless steel. The cell, constructed of two identical manifolds joined by a length of pipe (34.9-mm OD x 19.7-mm ID), contained a platinum hot wire gauge (40 SWG, 0.076-mm diam) approx.29 cm in length. The measurement system consisted of a commercially available, precision dc current source (programmable and capable of current output to 164 mA) and a custom-built, switching/voltage amplification network with a digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. Measurements of the voltage drop across the hot-wire gauge (4096 data points) were transferred to a minicomputer for analysis and long-term storage. Thermal conductivities were measured on a Wilsonville solvent and a slurry prepared from this solvent and Illinois No. 6 coal over a temperature range of 295 to 505 K. Thermal conductivities for both the solvent and the slurry decreased with increasing temperatures, similar to the trend showed by toluene. The solvent decreased from 1.23 to 1.02 mW cm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ over the temperature range 296 to 438 K, while the slurry decreased from 1.51 to 1.02 mW cm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ over the range 295 to 505 K. 20 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Cliffs Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 series: Gallia County. Phase II report. Preliminary laboratory results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-06-01

    The US Department of Energy is funding a research and development program entitled the Eastern Gas Shales Project designed to increase commercial production of natural gas in the eastern United States from Middle and Upper Devonian Shales. On September 28, 1978 the Department of Energy entered into a cooperative agreement with Mitchell Energy Corporation to explore Devonian shale gas potential in Gallia County, Ohio. Objectives of the cost-sharing contract were the following: (1) to select locations for a series of five wells to be drilled around the periphery of a possible gas reservoir in Gallia County, Ohio; (2) to drill, core, log, case, fracture, clean up, and test each well, and to monitor production from the wells for a five-year period. This report summarizes the procedures and results of core characterization work performed at the Eastern Gas Shales Project Core Laboratory on core retrieved from the Gallia County EGSP wells, designated OH No. 6/1, OH No. 6/2, OH No. 6/3, OH No. 6/4, and OH No. 6/5. Characterization work performed includes photographic logs, fracture logs, measurements of core color variation, and stratigraphic interpretation of the cored intervals. In addition the following tests were performed by Michigan Technological University to obtain the following data: directional ultrasonic velocity; directional tensile strength, strength in point load; trends of microfractures; and hydraulic fracturing characteristics.

  2. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Run 261 with Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R & D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.

  3. PUD No 1 of Grays Harbor Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  4. Cliff Minerals, Inc. Eastern Gas Shales Project, Ohio No. 6 wells - Gallia County. Phase III report. Summary of laboratory analyses and mechanical characterization results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-07-01

    This summary presents a detailed characterization of the Devonian Shale occurrence in the EGSP-Ohio No. 6 wells. Information provided includes a stratigraphic summary and lithology and fracture analyses resulting from detailed core examinations and geophysical log interpretations at the EGSP Core Laboratory. Plane of weakness orientations stemming from a program of physical properties testing at Michigan Technological University are also summarized; the results of physical properties testing are dealt with in detail in the accompanying report. This data presented were obtained from a study of approximately 1522 feet of core retrieved from five wells drilled in Gallia County in southeastern Ohio.

  5. Pinal County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chuichu, Arizona Coolidge, Arizona Dudleyville, Arizona Eloy, Arizona Florence, Arizona Gold Camp, Arizona Hayden, Arizona Kearny, Arizona Mammoth, Arizona Maricopa, Arizona...

  6. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 6: lab-scale development of microbial degradation process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odom, J.M.

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil, and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 6 summarizes the results of a study of the potential for stimulating microbial reductive dehalogenation as part of the integrated in situ treatment process at the field experiment test site at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky. A series of {open_quotes}microcosm bottle tests{close_quotes} were performed on samples of contaminated soil and groundwater taken from the Paducah site and spiked with trichloroethene (TCE). A number of bottles were set up, each spiked with a different carbon source in order to enhance the growth of different microbial subpopulations already present within the indigenous population in the soil. In addition, a series of bottle tests were completed with samples of the granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment zone material retrieved from the test site during the Paducah field experiment. In these tests, the GAC samples were used in place of the soil. Results of the soil-groundwater microcosms yielded a negative indication of the presence of dechlorinating bacteria at the site. However, charcoal (GAC) samples from one location in the test plot exhibited marked dechlorination with conversion of TCE to dichloroethene.

  7. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 6, November/December 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    EERE’s internal newsletter, Amped Up!, is a bimonthly publication that highlights news within EERE, as well as some of our external successes, lessons learned, and best practices.

  8. EA-1972: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild; Pinal County, Arizona EA-1972: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild; Pinal County, ...

  9. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  10. Materials Data on H12RhC8NO6 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on H12RhC8NO6 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Adsorption of various alcohols on Illinois No. 6 coal in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromacity of Illinois {number_sign}6 coal in water are relatively determined by evaluating equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption of probe compounds on the coal. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various additives on 60--200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed to investigate relatively surface properties of the coal at 25{degree}C. The additives include various alcohols, alkanes and aromatic compounds. The main objectives of this research are to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals with the inverse liquid chromatography technique, using various probe compounds, to analyze flotation recoveries of coals with a micro-flotation apparatus in order to relate coal floatability to evaluated coal surface properties, and to delineate roles of coal-cleaning/handling additives with the inverse liquid chromatography technique.

  13. High temperature fracture and fatigue of ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 6, August 15, 1994--August 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.

    1996-04-01

    This report covers work done in the first year of our new contract {open_quotes}High Temperature Fracture and Fatigue of Ceramics,{close_quotes} which commenced in August, 1995 as a follow-on from our prior contract {open_quotes}Mechanisms of Mechanical Fatigue in Ceramics.{close_quotes} Our activities have consisted mainly of studies of the failure of fibrous ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) at high temperature; with a little fundamental work on the role of stress redistribution in the statistics of fracture and cracking in the presence of viscous fluids.

  14. Materials Data on CaH20C4S4(NO6)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on CdH20C4S4(NO6)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.H.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop the technology for the production of physically robust iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that have suitable activity, selectivity and stability to be used in the slurry phase synthesis reactor development. The catalysts that are developed shall be suitable for testing in the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas, to produce either low- or high-alpha product distributions. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the ``standard-catalyst`` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics. The research is divided into four major topical areas: (a) catalyst preparation and characterization, (b) product characterization, (c) reactor operations, and (d) data assessment. Accomplishments for this period are discussed.

  17. Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly status report No. 6, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.M.

    1992-05-19

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products` laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively ``benign`` system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE`s program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

  18. Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

  19. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-02-29

    The objectives for this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coals with refuse derived fuels were two-fold. First, the effects of different experimental parameters such as temperature, flow rates and reaction times on the formation of chlorinated organic compounds were studied using the tubular furnace as a reactor followed by GC/MS analysis. Secondly, the effect of fuel/air ratio on the flue gas composition and combustion efficiency were studied with the AFBC system.

  20. Fossil Energy Program. Progress report for November 1979. [35 Wt % Illinois No. 6 coal with Wilsonville recycle solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report - the sixty-fourth of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, materials engineering, a coal equipment test program, an atmospheric fluid bed combustor for cogeneration, engineering studies and technical support, process and program analysis, environmental assessment studies, magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, technical support to the TVA fluid bed combustion program, coal cogeneration/district heating plant assessment, chemical research and development, and technical support to major liquefaction projects.

  1. EA-1972: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild;

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pinal County, Arizona | Department of Energy 2: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild; Pinal County, Arizona EA-1972: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild; Pinal County, Arizona SUMMARY Western Area Power Administration prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of a 35.6-mile transmission line that Western operates and maintains under an agreement with the Central Arizona Project. Additional

  2. EA-1972: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1972: Draft Environmental Assessment Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild, Pinal County, Arizona Western Area Power ...

  3. EA-1972: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1972: Final Environmental Assessment Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild, Pinal County, Arizona Western Area Power ...

  4. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-318-B AEP Energy Partners Inc: Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 6- Jan. 10, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from AEP Energy Partners Inc. to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice.

  5. Preliminary conceptual design for geothermal space heating conversion of school district 50 joint facilities at Pagosa Springs, Colorado. GTA Report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engen, I.A.

    1981-11-01

    This feasibility study and preliminary conceptual design effort assesses the conversion of Colorado School District 50 facilities - a high school and gym, and a middle school building - at Pagosa Springs, Colorado to geothermal space heating. A preliminary cost-benefit assessment made on the basis of estimated costs for conversion, system maintenance, debt service, resource development, electricity to power pumps, and savings from reduced natural gas consumption concluded that an economic conversion depended on development of an adequate geothermal resource (approximately 150/sup 0/F, 400 gpm). Material selection assumed that the geothermal water to the main supply system was isolated to minimize effects of corrosion and deposition, and that system-compatible components would be used for the building modifications. Asbestos-cement distribution pipe, a stainless steel heat exchanger, and stainless steel lined valves were recommended for the supply, heat transfer, and disposal mechanisms, respectively. A comparison of the calculated average gas consumption cost, escalated at 10% per year, with conversion project cost, both in 1977 dollars, showed that the project could be amortized over less than 20 years at current interest rates. In view of the favorable economics and the uncertain future availability and escalating cost of natural gas, the conversion appears economicaly feasible and desirable.

  6. Development of advanced NO{sub x} control concepts for coal-fired utility boilers. Quarterly technical progress report no. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.; Pont, J.N.; England, G.; Seeker, W.R.

    1992-09-15

    All three of the CombiNO{sub x} NO{sub x} control technologies were performed simultaneously for the first time. Tests were performed while firing coal as the primary fuel, and natural gas and coal as reburn fuels. The results for the complete CombiNO{sub x} process for coal firing and natural gas reburning are displayed in Figure 3-1. NO/NO{sub x} measurements were taken with the new sample system. The filter and line were cleaned periodically throughout testing to avoid ash build-up; ash has also been shown to convert NO{sub 2} to NO. Reduction due to natural gas reburning was 54% with burnout air injected at a downstream location of approximately 1600{degree}F. Advanced Gas Reburning produced a 79% reduction -- although it is suspected that better reduction would have been possible if injection resolution in the furnace allowed the urea to be injected at a more optimum temperature of 1850{degree}F. The methanol injection step converted 45% of the existing NO to NO{sub 2}, achieving an overall CombiNO{sub x} NO reduction of 89%. The coal reburning CombiNO{sub x} test results are displayed in Figure 3-2. Results are similar to those obtained for natural gas reburning. Reduction due to urea injection was better while reburning with coal than for natural gas, probably due to the more optimum urea injection temperature. The methanol injection step converted 40% of the NO to NO{sub 2}, similar to the 45% NO conversion that occurred for natural gas reburning. An overall CombiNO{sub x} NO reduction of 93% was achieved, resulting in a final NO concentration of 61 ppM at 3% O{sub 2}.

  7. CX-007141: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 4 - Electrical District 5 - Structure ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 09/01/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. CX-007171: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Signal Tap SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. CX-007169: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Saguaro-Oracle Vegetation RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/07/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. Agency's Work Having a Ripple Effect in Community | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reducing energy costs for families is a natural part of CAHRA's mission of fighting poverty in Pinal County. The agency is administering 2.1 million in Recovery Act funding to ...

  11. CX-004891: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge-Oracle (Structure Maintenance)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/29/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. CX-001516: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency AuditsCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 03/31/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  13. CX-004889: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire (Geological Boring)CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 08/19/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  14. CX-004888: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire (Double Circuit Upgrade)CX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 09/15/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  15. CX-007130: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-EmpireCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 09/14/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  16. CX-007133: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Saguaro Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 12/16/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  17. CX-004876: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire (Double Circuit Upgrade)CX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 09/15/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-007132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casa Grande-Empire Double Circuit Upgrade AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  19. CX-007136: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Coolidge-Oracle Pole ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-007168: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rodgers-Cooolidge Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/26/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  1. CX-007145: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/02/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  2. CX-007144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire-Electrical District 5 Double Circuit Upgrade AmendmentCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/28/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  3. CX-007142: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 5 - Saguaro Structure MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/09/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  4. CX-007167: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rogers-Coolidge Danger Tree RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 02/18/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. Gold Camp, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gold Camp is a census-designated place in Pinal County, Arizona.1 References US Census...

  6. Casa Grande, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Casa Grande is a city in Pinal County, Arizona. It falls under Arizona's 1st congressional...

  7. CX-007135: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coolidge-Oracle Crossarm ReplacementCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/29/2010Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. Synthesis of 6-Methyl-9-n-propyldibenzo thiophene-4-ol ammended to 6-Methyl-9-(1-methylethyl)-dibenzo thiophene-4-ol. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October 28, 1991--January 26, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-28

    The material presented below is taken from Status Reports 15, 16 and 17 and covers the progress made toward the synthesis of the modified target molecules 9-isopropyl-4-methoxy-6 methyldibenzothiophene (13) and 9-isopropyl-6methyldibenzothiophene-4-ol (14).

  9. Vertical-emitting, ring-geometry, ultra-low threshold and ultra-high-speed quantum-well lasers for optical interconnect. Status report No. 6, Jun-Sep 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittelstein, M.; Bar-Chaim, N.

    1990-09-01

    Emphasis was placed on the following efforts: design and implementation of a test station for vertical emitting lasers; ridge waveguide structure and ring configiuration lasers; refinement of grating fabrication for repeatability; and single quantum well material investigation, Keywords: Ring lasers; Optical waveguides; Lasers (R.H.)

  10. CX-001118: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Emergency Wood Pole Replacement at 59 Structures Located Along the Coolidge-Oracle 115-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 11/13/2009Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. CX-007140: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vegetation Removal and Access Road Maintenance along the existing Electrical District 2-Saguaro #2 115-kV transmission lineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/21/2011Location(s): Pinal County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. Notices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    64 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 165 / Monday, August 26, 2013 / Notices where the pipeline route crosses the Gila River. A 2.2-mile segment of the Florence- Kelvin Highway, a Pinal County- maintained roadway, would require realignment as a result of constructing the facility. A 2.1-mile section of the road would be relocated north of its current alignment. The proposed facility would require the relocation of the San Carlos Irrigation Project power line which currently passes though the

  13. CX-007131: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007131: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casa Grande-Empire Double Circuit Upgrade and Structure Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/08/2011 Location(s): Pinal County, Arizona Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region Western proposes to replace structures and upgrade to a double circuit 230- kilovolt (kV) transmission line on its Casa Grande-Empire 115-kV transmission line, from Thornton Road to its Empire Substation,

  14. RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    geological boring near 9 structure locations along the existing ED2-ED5 230-kV transmission line located in Pinal County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A, Proposed Action: Western proposes to do geologic borings within our right-of-way near structures 21/5,22/5,23/6,25/4,26/5,27/6,28/5,29/5 & 30/4 along the existing ED2-ED5 230-kV transmission line. This project involves accessing each bore hole location with a auger/drill rig and light crew trucks, setting up the

  15. http://www.wdol.gov/DisplayT4CWD.aspx?WDNo=CBA-2005-2729

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 Diane Koplewski Division of | Revision No.: 6 Director Wage Determinations| Date Of Last Revision: 3192014 |...

  16. http://www.wdol.gov/DisplayT4CWD.aspx?WDNo=CBA-2005-2730

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 Diane Koplewski Division of | Revision No.: 6 Director Wage Determinations| Date Of Last Revision: 3192014 |...

  17. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2004 Pojoaque

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 29, 2004 Board meeting at Cities of Gold Consideration and Action on NNMCAB Bylaws Amendment No. 6

  18. Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line | Department of Energy Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line OCTOBER 1, 2004 On August 17, 2004, at approximately 0940, a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) pilot was killed in the crash of a Bell 206BIII helicopter while stringing "sock

  19. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC | Department of Energy LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC Application from Emera Energy (EESS-6) to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-391 Emera Energy Sub. 6 (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 55 - March 21, 2014 Application to

  20. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-393 Emera...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-393 Emera Energy EESS-8 CN.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal...

  1. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-392 Emera...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-392 Emera Energy EESS-7 CN.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal...

  2. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 55 - March 21, 2014 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal...

  3. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-392 Emera...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EA-392 Emera Energy Sub. 7 (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC...

  4. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC Application from Emera Energy (EESS-6) to export electric energy to...

  5. Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft ...

  6. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residual Fuel Prices by Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Gas Plant Operator Any ... Residual Fuel Oil A general classification for the heavier oils, known as No. 5 and No. 6 ...

  7. Notices Del Norte County, California,'' evaluated

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    claimed in U.S. Patent No. 6,316,197, entitled ''Method of Diagnosing of Exposure to Toxic Agents by Measuring Distinct Pattern in the Levels of Expression of Specific Genes,''...

  8. Hope Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hope Solar Address: No.6-8 Hope Road Taihu Town Tongzhou Dist Place: Beijing, China Sector: Solar Product: Solar cells and power systems...

  9. Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page...

  10. City of San Jose- Private Sector Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, the City of San Jose enacted the Private Sector Green Building Policy (Policy No. 6-32). The policy was adopted in Ordinance No. 28622 in June, 2009. All new buildings must meet...

  11. Goodyear Tire Plant Gains Traction on Energy Savings After Completing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The steam system at the Union City plant is served by four dual fueled (natural gas and No. 6 fuel oil) boilers. The plant uses more than 400,000 MMBtu of natural gas and 4 million ...

  12. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Based on recommendations from their Save Energy Now assessment, Shaw Industries plant 20 ... MMBtu equivalent of natural gas and No.6 oil annually Achieved a simple payback of 1.7 ...

  13. Alcator C-Mod Fusion Research Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 No. 6 (2000) 1251. 6. Hawryluk R., 1979 Proc. of Course in Physics of Plasmas close to Thermonuclear Conditions, (CEC, Brussels, 1980), Vol. 1, 19. 7. Ignat D.W. , Valeo E.J....

  14. Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plan 7 7. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 6 - Baseline Schedule 8 8. RECOMMENDATIONS 8 9. ... plan effective and sufficient? 6. Is the baseline schedule realistic when compared to the ...

  15. 2013 09 26 draft 2020 GNEMRD Roadmap

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Am., 80, no. 6, 1999-2015, http:www.bssaonline.orgcontent806B1999.short . Denny, M. D., and D. M. Goodman, 1990, A case study of the seismic source function: Salmon and ...

  16. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 55 - March 21, 2014 | Department of Energy LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 55 - March 21, 2014 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 55 - March 21, 2014 Application from Emera Energy (EESS-6) to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. PDF icon EA-391 Emera Energy EESS-6 CN.pdf More

  17. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This reports presents the operating results for Run 252 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode (CC-ITSL) using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability in the CC-ITSL mode with catalytic-catalytic reactors and with ash recycle. Run 252 began on 26 November 1986 and continued through 3 February 1987. During this period 214.4 MF tons of Illinois No. 6 coal were fed in 1250 hours of operation. 3 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. SSRL HEADLINES December 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Editions __________________________________________________________________________ SSRL Headlines Vol. 4, No. 6 December, 2003 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Structure of Actin Cross-linked with a-Actinin: A Network of Bundles First Beam Stored in SPEAR3! Holiday Greetings from the Director SLAC Scientific Policy Committee Fall Meeting LCLS Update Second SPPS Experimental Run Underway 2004 Workshop

  19. http://www.wdol.gov/DisplayT4CWD.aspx?WDNo=CBA-2005-2729

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 Diane Koplewski Division of | Revision No.: 6 Director Wage Determinations| Date Of Last Revision: 3/19/2014 _______________________________________|_______________________________________ State: Pennsylvania Area: Allegheny _______________________________________________________________________________ Employed on U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory contract for Site Security Services. Collective Bargaining Agreement between contractor: ACTION FACILITIES

  20. http://www.wdol.gov/DisplayT4CWD.aspx?WDNo=CBA-2005-2730

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 Diane Koplewski Division of | Revision No.: 6 Director Wage Determinations| Date Of Last Revision: 3/19/2014 _______________________________________|_______________________________________ State: West Virginia Area: Monongalia _______________________________________________________________________________ Employed on U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory contract for Site Security Services. Collective Bargaining Agreement between contractor: ACTION FACILITIES

  1. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  2. Methods of diagnosing alagille syndrome

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy; Krantz, Ian D.; Spinner, Nancy B.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 : Energy Prices Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Average for all sulfur contents. b Average self-service cash price. c Includes fuel oils No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, and topped crude. - = no data available Notes: Prices are not adjusted for inflation. The approximate break between historical and forecast values is shown with estimates and

  4. Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench Greenville Tube Company, a manufacturer of high-precision, small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page case study summarizes their experience. PDF icon Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench (February 1997) More Documents & Publications Impacts of IPv6 on Infrastructure Control

  5. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Greenville Tube Company, a manufacturer of high-precision, small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page case study summarizes their experience. PDF icon Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench (February 1997) More Documents & Publications Impacts of IPv6 on Infrastructure Control Systems Optimizing Electric Motor Systems at a Corporate Campus Facility Case

  6. Part 10 of 11

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MODIFICATION NO.6 TO ( DEFINITIZED SUBCONTRACT NO. ZDO*2*30628*09 CONTRACTING PARTY: SUBCONTRACTOR: ADDRESS: SUBCONTRACT TITLE: SUBCONTRACT TYPE: PERlOD OF PERFORMANCE: SUBCONTRACT AMOUNT: PHASE I: PI*IASE II : MOD. I: MOD. 2: MOD. 3: MOD.4: MOD.5 : PHASE III : MOD. 6: TOTAL: PA YMENT TERMS: SUBCONTRACTOR'S REMITTANCE NAME AND ADDRESS: FUNDED AMOUNT AND TASK CHARGE NUMBER: MIDWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY DIVISION EVERGREEN SOLAR, INC . 259 CEDAR HILL STREET

  7. Appendix V Public Involvement Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    V Public Involvement Plan Revision No.: 6 February 2008 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 i FFACO Public Involvement Plan U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of Defense Defense Threat Reduction Agency Detachment 1, Nevada Operations Mercury, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado FFACO, Appendix V February 2008 ii

  8. New technology concept for two-stage liquefaction of coal. Final summary report, 1 July 1983-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Duddy, J.E.; Koziel, M.L.; MacArthur, J.B.; McLean, J.B.; Smith, T.O.

    1986-02-01

    Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) has completed a series of studies for the evaluation of a ''New Technology Concept for Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal''. The time period of studies covered May 26, 1983 to November 25, 1985, a total of thirty months, with the major effort devoted to Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and the balance devoted to Wyodak sub-bituminous coal. A two-stage coal liquefaction process, based on two close-coupled catalytic ebullated-bed reactors with the first stage operating at low temperature for maximum hydrogenation, has been developed and demonstrated on Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. This final report presents an executive summary of the program and completes the reporting requirements of Contract No. DE-AC22-83PC60017. A summary of the studies and process demonstrations is presented along with references to the Topical Reports on Illinois No. 6 coal, Wyodak coal, Conceptual Commercial Plant Design and Economics and reports by DOE sponsored support contractors. Experimental details are contained in the referenced reports. The accomplishments of this program and recommendations for a follow-on program are presented. By application of this new hydrogenation concept in this study, distillate yields of greater than 65 W % of M.A.F. Coal or 4.2 barrels per ton of M.A.F. coal were demonstrated on both Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. This was accompanied by a ten-fold reduction in bottoms viscosity and the production of low sulfur environmentally clean fuels. As reported by Conoco, Inc. and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, a higher level of hydrogenation is evident and the liquids produced are more petroleum-like than coal liquids derived from other liquefaction processes. Upgrading studies on the Wyodak products are being performed by Chevron. 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

  10. EA-324 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 4 LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 4 LLC EA-324 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 4 LLC Order authorizing Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 4 LLC to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA- 324 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 4 LLC More Documents & Publications EA-391 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 6 LLC EA-392 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 7 LLC EA-393 Emera Energy Services Subsidiary No. 8

  11. Cyclone Boiler Field Testing of Advanced Layered NOx Control Technology in Sioux Unit 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc A. Cremer; Bradley R. Adams

    2006-06-30

    A four week testing program was completed during this project to assess the ability of the combination of deep staging, Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MBtu in a cyclone fired boiler. The host site for the tests was AmerenUE's Sioux Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone fired boiler located near St. Louis, MO. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team including AmerenUE, FuelTech Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This layered approach to NOx reduction is termed the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA). Installed RRI and SNCR port locations were guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling conducted by REI. During the parametric testing, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were achieved consistently from overfire air (OFA)-only baseline NOx emissions of 0.25 lb/MBtu or less, when firing the typical 80/20 fuel blend of Powder River Basin (PRB) and Illinois No.6 coals. From OFA-only baseline levels of 0.20 lb/MBtu, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were also achieved, but at significantly reduced urea flow rates. Under the deeply staged conditions that were tested, RRI performance was observed to degrade as higher blends of Illinois No.6 were used. NOx emissions achieved with ALTA while firing a 60/40 blend were approximately 0.15 lb/MBtu. NOx emissions while firing 100% Illinois No.6 were approximately 0.165 lb/MBtu. Based on the performance results of these tests, economics analyses of the application of ALTA to a nominal 500 MW cyclone unit show that the levelized cost to achieve 0.15 lb/MBtu is well below 75% of the cost of a state of the art SCR.

  12. PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE M186 October 15, 2009 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security

  13. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  14. HQ F 580

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HQ F 580. 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Page 1 of 2 All Other Editions are Obsolete RETIREMENT WORK ORDER 1 Sections 4-12 to be filled in by person reporting loss (user or APR) 4. Name of Reporting Person 5. Office Telephone No. 6. Program Office/Routing Symbol 7. Office Address (Include building and room) 8. Date of Occurrence 9. Time 10. Place 11. Description of Asset (If reporting multiple assets include printout from Sunflower the DOE property system including following information): DOE Tag

  15. Approval/Variation Request Comment Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EA15PC3041-3-0 Mar. 25, 2003 Rev. 0 Page 1 of 2 Approval/Variation Request Comment Sheet 1. Page of 2. G APPROVAL REQUEST 3. G VARIATION REQUEST 4. AR/VR No. 5. PO/Subcontract No. 6. Organization 7. Reviewer 8. Comment: 9. Disposition: Working Copy EA15PC3041-3-0 Mar. 25, 2003 Rev. 0 Page 2 of 2 Instructions for Filling Out Approval/Variation Request Comment Sheet Block 1. Technical Reviewer - Enter the total number of pages upon completion of the review. 2. Technical Reviewer - Check the

  16. SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL (Other) | SciTech Connect Other: SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL The goal of this project was to evaluate the performance of Illinois No. 6 coal blended with biomass in a small-scale entrained-flow gasifier and demonstrate the production of liquid fuels under three

  17. Combustion characterization of coal/refuse derived fuels using thermogravimetric-fourier transform infrared-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Lu, Huagang; Hyatt, J.

    1995-12-31

    The fundamental thermal behavior of five materials (Illinois coal No. 6, Kentucky coal No. 9, polyvinyl chloride, cellulose, newspaper) has been investigated using the TGA/FTIR/MS system under the condition of combustion. The system was used to identify molecular chlorine, along with HCI, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and various hydrocarbons in the gaseous products of the combustion of PVC resin in air. This is a significant finding that will lead us to examine this combustion step further to look for the formation of chlorinated organic compounds during co-firing of coal with refuse derived fuels.

  18. Document

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friday, January 9, 2009 Part II Department of Energy Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records; Notice VerDate Nov<24>2008 15:08 Jan 08, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\09JAN2.SGM 09JAN2 yshivers on PROD1PC62 with NOTICES2 994 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 6 / Friday, January 9, 2009 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Privacy Act of 1974; Publication of Compilation of Privacy Act Systems of Records AGENCY: U.S. Department

  19. 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE 1 OF2 AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE M191 See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) REQ. NO. 6.ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE 1 OF 23 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE M188 See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE I5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185*5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Pantex Site Office P.O. Box 30030

  1. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID <!;ODE 1 PAGE 1 OF 3 I PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE IS. P1ROJECT NO. (If applicable) M528 See Block 16C REQ. NO. 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration I Sandia Site Office (MS 0184) P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county,

  2. Low-severity catalytic two-stage liquefaction process: Illinois coal conceptual commercial plant design and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrams, L.M.; Comolli, A.G.; Popper, G.A.; Wang, C.; Wilson, G.

    1988-09-01

    Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) is conducting a program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate a Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. This program which runs through 1987, is a continuation of an earlier DOE sponsored program (1983--1985) at HRI to develop a new technology concept for CTSL. The earlier program included bench-scale testing of improved operating conditions for the CTSL Process on Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and Wyoming sub-bituminous coal, and engineering screening studies to identify the economic incentive for CTSL over the single-stage H-Coal/reg sign/ Process for Illinois No. 6 coal. In the current program these engineering screening studies are extended to deep-cleaned Illinois coal and use of heavy recycle. The results from this comparison will be used as a guide for future experiments with respect to selection of coal feedstocks and areas for further process optimization. A preliminary design for CTSL of Illinois deep-cleaned coal was developed based on demonstrated bench-scale performance in Run No. 227-47(I-27), and from HRI's design experience on the Breckinridge Project and H-Coal/reg sign/ Process pilot plant operations at Catlettsburg. Complete conceptual commercial plant designs were developed for a grassroots facility using HRI's Process Planning Model. Product costs were calculated and economic sensitivities analyzed. 14 refs., 11 figs., 49 tabs.

  3. Coal desulfurization by chlorinolysis: production and combustion-test evaluation of product coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalvinskas, J.; Daly, D.

    1982-04-30

    Laboratory-scale screening tests were carried out on PSOC 276, Pittsburgh Coal from Harrison County, Ohio to establish chlorination and hydrodesulfurization conditions for the batch reactor production of chlorinolysis and chlorinolysis-hydrodesulfurized coals. In addition, three bituminous coals, Pittsburgh No. 8 from Greene County, PA, Illinois No. 6 from Jackson County, Illinois and Eagle No. 5 from Moffat County, Colorado were treated on the lab scale by the chlorinolysis process to provide 39 to 62% desulfurization. Two bituminous coals (PSOC 276, Pittsburgh Coal from Harrison County, Ohio and 282, Illinois No. 6 Coal from Jefferson County, Illinois) and one subbituminous coal (PSOC 230, Rosebud Coal fom Rosebud County, Montana) were then produced in 11 to 15 pound lots as chlorinolysis and hydrodesulfurized coals. The chlorinolysis coals had a desulfurization of 29 to 69%, reductions in volatiles (12 to 37%) and hydrogen (6 to 31%). Hydrodesulfurization provided a much greater desulfurization (56 to 86%), reductions in volatiles (77 to 84%) and hydrogen (56 to 64%). The three coals were combustion tested in the Penn State plane flame furance to determine ignition and burning characteristics. All three coals burned well to completion as: raw coals, chlorinolysis processed coals and hydrodesulfurized coals. The hydrodesulfurized coals experienced greater ignition delays and reduced burning rates than the other coals because of the reduced volatile content. It is thought that the increased open pore volume in the desulfurized-devolatilized coals compensates in part for the decreased volatiles effect on ignition and burning. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.

  5. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite; First quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the progress made during the first quarter of the research project entitled ``A Novel Microorganism for Selective Separation of Coal from Ash and Pyrite,`` DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-93PC93215. The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash-forming minerals. During the reporting period, three different coal samples: Illinois No. 6 coal, Kentucky No. 9 coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, were collected to be used in the investigation. The microorganism, M. phlei, was obtained as freeze-dried cultures and the growth characteristics of the bacteria were studied. Scanning electron microphotographs revealed that M. phlei cells are coccal in shape and are approximately 1 {mu}m in diameter. Electrokinetic measurements showed that the Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal samples had an isoelectric point (IEP) around pH 6 whereas M. phlei had an IEP around pH 1.5. Electrokinetic measurements of the ruptured microorganisms exhibited an increase in IEP. The increase in IEP of the ruputured cells was due to the release of fatty acids and polar groups from the cell membrane.

  6. Production of Illinois base compliance coal using enhanced gravity separation. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, B.C.; Honaker, R.Q.

    1994-09-01

    It is well known that froth flotation is inefficient for treating fine coal fractions containing a significant portion of middling particles. On the other hand, gravity-based processes can effectively remove middling particles containing only a small amount of coal. Falcon Concentrators Inc. and Knelson Gold Concentrators Inc. have developed full-scale, enhanced gravity separators for the treatment of heavy minerals. This project is evaluating the potential of using these concentrators to treat Illinois Basin coal fines. During this reporting period, -28 mesh run-of-mine Illinois No. 5 and No. 6 coal samples were processed using a continuous Falcon concentrator having a 10-inch bowl diameter. For the Illinois No. 5 coal sample, the ash content was reduced in the 100 {times} 325 mesh size fraction from about 18% to 8% while achieving a high combustible recovery value of nearly 97%. In addition, the total sulfur content was substantially decreased from 2.6% to 1.7%. Similar results were obtained from the treatment of the Illinois No. 6 coal sample where ash rejections ranged from 40%-70% for a 28 {times} 325 mesh feed having 7% ash. Combustible recovery values from these tests were greater than 87% while treating mass feed rates between 1 to 2 tons/hour. A parametric study found that lower feed solids contents provided marginally lower product ash and total sulfur contents while feed rate and bowl speed appeared to have no significant effect over the range of values tested.

  7. Application of solar energy for the generation and supply of industrial-process low-to intermediate-pressure steam ranging from 300/sup 0/F-550/sup 0/F (high-temperature steam). Final report, September 30, 1978-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matteo, M.; Kull, J.; Luddy, W.; Youngblood, S.

    1980-12-01

    A detailed design was developed for a solar industrial process heat system to be installed at the ERGON, Inc. Bulk Oil Storage Terminal in Mobile, Alabama. The 1874 m/sup 2/ (20160 ft/sup 2/) solar energy collector field will generate industrial process heat at temperatures ranging from 150 to 290/sup 0/C (300 to 550/sup 0/F). The heat will be used to reduce the viscosity of stored No. 6 fuel oil, making it easier to pump from storage to transport tankers. Heat transfer oil is circulated in a closed system, absorbing heat in the collector field and delivering it through immersed heat exchangers to the stored fuel oil. The solar energy system will provide approximately 44 percent of the process heat required.

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2014 Production (thousand short tons) Thickness (inches) Coalbed ID Number 1 Coalbed Name Underground Surface Total Average 2 Low High 1699 Wyodak - 357,667 357,667 774 160 900 0212 Pittsburgh 57,806 561 58,368 81 11 108 0489 No. 9 45,919 11,551 57,470 63 24 81 0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6) 52,726 3,238 55,964 72 46 85 0036 Pittsburgh 34,687 3,073 37,760 72 18 84 1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2 - 19,556 19,556 926 660 960

  9. Model based control of a coke battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, P.M.; Srour, J.M.; Zulli, P.; Cunningham, R.; Hockings, K.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes a model-based strategy for coke battery control at BHP Steel`s operations in Pt Kembla, Australia. The strategy uses several models describing the battery thermal and coking behavior. A prototype controller has been installed on the Pt Kembla No. 6 Battery (PK6CO). In trials, the new controller has been well accepted by operators and has resulted in a clear improvement in battery thermal stability, with a halving of the standard deviation of average battery temperature. Along with other improvements to that battery`s operations, this implementation has contributed to a 10% decrease in specific battery energy consumption. A number of enhancements to the low level control systems on that battery are currently being undertaken in order to realize further benefits.

  10. Economics and regulation of petroleum futures markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Because the futures market in petroleum products is a relatively recent phenomenon, the implications of public policies formulated for that market have not yet been fully explored. To provide the Office of Competition of the Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to assess policy alternatives, Resource Planning Associates, Inc. (RPA) was asked to analyze the development of the futures market in No. 2 oil, assess the potential for futures markets in other petroleum products, and identify policy alternatives available to DOE. To perform this analysis, the criteria for a viable futures market was established first. Then, the experience to date with the 18-month-old futures market in No. 2 oil was examined, and the potential for viable futures markets in No. 6 oil, gasoline, jet fuel, and crude oil was assessed. Finally, how existing DOE regulations and prospective actions might affect petroleum futures market development was investigated.

  11. Auxiliary quasi-resonant dc tank electrical power converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2006-10-24

    An auxiliary quasi-resonant dc tank (AQRDCT) power converter with fast current charging, voltage balancing (or charging), and voltage clamping circuits is provided for achieving soft-switched power conversion. The present invention is an improvement of the invention taught in U.S. Pat. No. 6,111,770, herein incorporated by reference. The present invention provides faster current charging to the resonant inductor, thus minimizing delay time of the pulse width modulation (PWM) due to the soft-switching process. The new AQRDCT converter includes three tank capacitors or power supplies to achieve the faster current charging and minimize the soft-switching time delay. The new AQRDCT converter further includes a voltage balancing circuit to charge and discharge the three tank capacitors so that additional isolated power supplies from the utility line are not needed. A voltage clamping circuit is also included for clamping voltage surge due to the reverse recovery of diodes.

  12. Viscosity stabilization of SRC residual oil. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-05-01

    The use of SRC residual oils for No. 6 Fuel Oil substitutes has been proposed. The oils exhibit viscosity characteristics at elevated temperatures that allow this substitution with only minor modifications to the existing fuel oil infrastructure. However, loss of low-boiling materials causes an increase in the viscosity of the residual oils that is greater than expected from concentration changes. A process has been developed that minimizes the loss of volatiles and thus maintains the viscosity of these materials. The use of an additive (water, phenol, or an SRC light oil cut rich in low-boiling phenols in amounts up to 2.0 wt %) accomplishes this and hence stabilizes the pumping and atomizing characteristics for an extended period. During the course of the work, the components of the volatiles lost were identified and the viscosity change due to this loss was quantified. 3 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  13. Post waterflood CO2 miscible flood in light oil fluvial - dominated deltaic reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 30, 1994. 1st Quarter, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-15

    Production is averaging about 450 BOPD for the quarter. The fluctuation was primarily due to a temporary shutdown of CO{sub 2} delivery and maturing of the first WAG cycle. CO{sub 2} and water injection were reversed again in order to optimize changing yields and water cuts in the producing wells. Measured BHP was close to the anticipated value. A limited CO{sub 2} volume of 120 MMCF was injected to stimulate well Kuhn No. 6 to test the Huff-Puff process, since the well did not respond to CO{sub 2} injection from the main reservoir. The well will be placed on February 1, 1995. Total CO{sub 2} injection averaged this quarter about 8.8 MMCFD, including 3.6 MMCFD purchased CO{sub 2} from Cardox. The stratigraphy of the sand deposits is also discussed.

  14. How and why Tampa Electric Company selected IGCC for its next generating capacity addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    As the title indicates, the purpose of this paper is to relate how and why Tampa Electric Company decided to select the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) for their next capacity addition at Polk Power Station, Polk Unit No. 1. For a complete understanding of this process, it is necessary to review the history related to the initial formulation of the IGCC concept as it was proposed to the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Initiative Round Three. Further, it is important to understand the relationship between Tampa Electric Company and TECO Pay Services Corporation (TPS). TECO Energy, Inc. is an energy related holding company with headquarters in Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company is the principal, wholly-owned subsidiary of TECO Energy, Inc. Tampa Electric Company is an investor-owned electric utility with about 3200 MW of generation capacity of which 97% is coal fired. Tampa Electric Company serves about 2,000 square miles and approximately 470,000 customers, in west central Florida, primarily in and around Hillsborough County and Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company generating units consist of coal fired units ranging in size from a 110 MW coal fired cyclone unit installed in 1957 to a 450 MW pulverized coal unit with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization installed in 1985. In addition, Tampa Electric Company has six (6) No. 6 oil fired steam units totaling approximately 220 MW. Five (5) of these units, located at the Hookers Point Station, were installed in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Tampa Electric also has about 150 MW of No. 2 oil fired start-up and peaking combustion turbines. The company also owns a 1966 vintage 12 MW natural gas fired steam plant (Dinner Lake) and two nO. 6 oil fired diesel units with heat recovery equipment built in 1983 (Phillips Plant).

  15. Hydrocarbonization research: completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngblood, E.L.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; Westmoreland, P.R.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Oswald, G.E.; Barker, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbonization is a relatively simple process used for producing oil, substitute natural gas, and char by heating coal under a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. This report describes studies that were performed in a bench-scale hydrocarbonization system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period 1975 to 1978. The results of mock-up studies, coal metering valve and flowmeter development, and supporting work in an atmospheric hydrocarbonization system are also described. Oil, gas, and char yields were determined by hydrocarbonization of coal in a 0.1-m-diam fluidized-bed reactor operated at a pressure of 2170 kPa and at temperatures ranging from 694 to 854 K. The nominal coal feed rate was 4.5 kg/h. Wyodak subbituminous coal was used for most of the experiments. A maximum oil yield of approx. 21% based on moisture- and ash-free (maf) coal was achieved in the temperature range of 810 to 840 K. Recirculating fluidized-bed, uniformly fluidized-bed, and rapid hydropyrolysis reactors were used. A series of operability tests was made with Illinois No. 6 coal to determine whether caking coal could be processed in the recirculating fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were generally unsuccessful because of agglomeration and caking problems; however, these problems were eliminated by the use of chemically pretreated coal. Hydrocarbonization experiments were carried out with Illinois No. 6 coal that had been pretreated with CaO-NaOH, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and CaO-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Oil yields of 14, 24, and 21%, respectively, were obtained from the runs with treated coal. Gas and char yield data and the composition of the oil, gas, and char products are presented.

  16. Comparative dermotoxicity of shale oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, L.M.; Wilson, J.S.; Foreman, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    When shale oils are applied at higher dose levels the standard observation of tumor production and latency are often obscured by a severe inflammatory response leading to epidermal degeneration. The two experiments reported here are still in progress, however the interim results are useful in assessing both the phlogistic and tumorigenic properties of three shale oils. Three shale oils were tested in these experiments. The first crude oil (OCSO No. 6) was produced in a modified in situ report at Occidental Oil Company's Logan Wash site near Debeque, Colorado. The second crude oil (PCSO II) was produced in the above ground Paraho vertical-kiln retort located at Anvil Points near Rifle, Colorado and the third oil was the hydrotreated daughter product of the Paraho crude (PCSO-UP). Experiment I was designed to determine the highest dose level at which tumor latency could be measured without interference from epidermal degeneration. Experiment II was designed to determine the effect of application frequency on both tumor response and inflammatory phenomena. Complete epidermal degeneration was used as the only measure of severe inflammation. Relative tumorigenicity was based on the number of tumor bearing mice without regard to multiple tumors on individual animals. In both experiments, tumor occurrence was confirmed one week after initial appearance. The sex-related difference in inflammatory response is striking and certanly has significance for experimental design. An increased phlogistic sensitivity expressed in male mice could affect the meaning of an experiment where only one sex was used.

  17. Task 3.0: Advanced power systems. Semi-annual report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollor, D.P.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hurley, J.P.

    1993-07-01

    A variety of activities are incorporated into the Advanced Power Systems program. Tasks included are (1) fuel utilization properties, (2) pressurized combustion, (3) catalytic gasification, and (4) hot-gas cleanup. ATRAN is stochastic and combines initial coal inorganics in a random manner in order to predict the resulting fly ash particle size and composition. ASHPERT, is an expert system yielding a first-order estimate of fly ash size and composition. Both models are designed to emulate pulverized-coal combustion. Input data required include identity, chemistry, size, quantity, and mineral-to-coal associations. The pressurized combustion task has focused on the construction of a versatile reactor system to simulate pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. Both castable and monolithic refractories have been investigated in determining slag prevention under a variety of conditions. Catalytic gasification coupled with a molten carbonate fuel cell offers an extremely efficient and environmentally sound power generating system using coal. Work with an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal has not been successful. Continued efforts will focus on using the more reactive low-rank coals to try to achieve this goal. Hot-gas cleanup is the critical issue in many of the proposed advanced power system operations on coal. The key to successful ash removal is an understanding of the properties of the ash to be collected as well as the interactions of this material with the barrier itself. The knowledge base under development will assist in assessing many of these barrier material issues for a variety of coal ashes.

  18. Linkages and aromatic clusters in a bituminous coal: Final report, September 1, 1985--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, K.E.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and arrangement of aromatic clusters, oxygen functional groups, and linkages in an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal were determined by controlled solubilization of the coal, followed by solvent fractionation of the soluble product and detailed analyses of the product fractions. The solubilization was carried out in reactions with NaOH/ethanol/H/sub 2/O at temperatures of 260/degree/, 300/degree/ and 320/degree/C. Elemental balance and spectroscopic data revealed that the oxygen functional groups of the coal were attacked selectively in the solubilization process, resulting in an orderly definable diminution of the complex coal structure. Also aliphatic linkages present in selected solubilized product fractions were subjected to a transalkylation reaction. A molecular structural model specific to the Illinois coal was constructed, and the hydroliquefaction behavior of the coal was evaluated in terms of potential product distribution and hydrogen consumption. The structural characteristics are compared with those of a Wyoming subbituminous coal in our previous study. 9 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Coal repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The Coal Repository Project was initiated in 1980 by the Department of Energy/Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to provide a centralized system for the collection of well characterized coal samples, and distribution to organizations involved in the chemical beneficiation of coal and related research. TRW Energy Development Group, together with its subcontractor Commercial Testing and Engineering Company, established the Coal Repository at the TRW Capistrano Chemical Facility, which is the location of the DOE-owned Multi-Use Fuel and Energy Processes Test Plant (MEP). Twenty tons each of three coals (Illinois No. 6, Kentucky No. 11 (West), and Pittsburgh No. 8 (from an Ohio mine)) were collected, characterized, and stored under a nitrogen atmosphere. Ten tons of each coal are 3/8-inch x 0, five tons of each are 14-mesh x 0, and five tons of each are 100-mesh x 0. Although TRW was within budget and on schedule, Department of Energy funding priorities in this area were altered such that the project was terminated prior to completion of the original scope of work. 9 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Annual report, FY 1979 Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Kustas, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    International meetings under the BEFAST program and under INFCE Working Group No. 6 during 1978 and 1979 continue to indicate that no cases of fuel cladding degradation have developed on pool-stored fuel from water reactors. A section from a spent fuel rack stand, exposed for 1.5 y in the Yankee Rowe (PWR) pool had 0.001- to 0.003-in.-deep (25- to 75-..mu..m) intergranular corrosion in weld heat-affected zones but no evidence of stress corrosion cracking. A section of a 304 stainless steel spent fuel storage rack exposed 6.67 y in the Point Beach reactor (PWR) spent fuel pool showed no significant corrosion. A section of 304 stainless steel 8-in.-dia pipe from the Three Mile Island No. 1 (PWR) spent fuel pool heat exchanger plumbing developed a through-wall crack. The crack was intergranular, initiating from the inside surface in a weld heat-affected zone. The zone where the crack occurred was severely sensitized during field welding. The Kraftwerk Union (Erlangen, GFR) disassembled a stainless-steel fuel-handling machine that operated for 12 y in a PWR (boric acid) spent fuel pool. There was no evidence of deterioration, and the fuel-handling machine was reassembled for further use. A spent fuel pool at a Swedish PWR was decontaminated. The procedure is outlined in this report.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of resinite recovery from Illinois coal. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    Resinite is a naturally occurring substance found in coal and derived from original plant resins. It has been commercially exploited in the western USA for use in adhesives, varnishes and thermal setting inks. The overall objective of this project is to compare the properties of the resinite contained in Illinois Basin coals to resinite being commercially exploited in the western US, and to recover the resinite from Illinois coals by microbubble column floatation techniques. The significance of this study is that it has the potential to show the way to recover a valuable chemical, resinite, from coal using only physical processing techniques. The value of the resinite at $1.00/kg or $0.50/lb makes it about fifty times more valuable than steam coal. The removal of resinite from coal does not decrease the value of the remaining coal in any way. During this quarter pure concentrates of resinite from Herrin No. 6 Seam were produced by the density gradient centrifugation technique. This material is also now being characterized by petrographic and chemical methods. Another accomplishment this quarter was the completion of a series of microbubble column flotation tests under eight different conditions. The tests were successful in producing concentrates that are now being evaluated. The significance of the work done during this quarter is the confirmation that the resinite in an Illinois coal can be successfully separated in quantities useful for testing and analysis.

  2. Low/medium Btu coal gasification assessment of central plant for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing, distributing, selling, and using fuel gas for industrial applications in Philadelphia. The primary driving force for the assessment is the fact that oil users are encountering rapidly escalating fuel costs, and are uncertain about the future availability of low sulfur fuel oil. The situation is also complicated by legislation aimed at reducing oil consumption and by difficulties in assuring a long term supply of natural gas. Early in the gasifier selection study it was decided that the level of risk associated with the gasification process sould be minimal. It was therefore determined that the process should be selected from those commercially proven. The following processes were considered: Lurgi, KT, Winkler, and Wellman-Galusha. From past experience and a knowledge of the characteristics of each gasifier, a list of advantages and disadvantages of each process was formulated. It was concluded that a medium Btu KT gas can be manufactured and distributed at a lower average price than the conservatively projected average price of No. 6 oil, provided that the plant is operated as a base load producer of gas. The methodology used is described, assumptions are detailed and recommendations are made. (LTN)

  3. Microbial solubilization of coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.; McCulloch, M.; Wilson, B.W.; Bean, R.M.

    1988-11-01

    Microbial solubilization of coal may serve as a first step in a process to convert low-rank coals or coal-derived products to other fuels or products. For solubilization of coal to be an economically viable technology, a mechanistic understanding of the process is essential. Leonardite, a highly oxidized, low-rank coal, has been solubilized by the intact microorganism, cell-free filtrate, and cell-free enzyme of /ital Coriolus versicolor/. A spectrophotometric conversion assay was developed to quantify the amount of biosolubilized coal. In addition, a bituminous coal, Illinois No. 6, was solubilized by a species of /ital Penicillium/, but only after the coal had been preoxidized in air. Model compounds containing coal-related functionalities have been incubated with the leonardite-degrading fungus, its cell-free filtrate, and purified enzyme. The amount of degradation was determined by gas chromatography and the degradation products were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We have also separated the cell-free filtrate of /ital C. versicolor/ into a <10,000 MW and >10,000 MW fraction by ultrafiltration techniques. Most of the coal biosolubilization activity is contained in the <10,000 MW fraction while the model compound degradation occurs in the >10,000 MW fraction. The >10,000 MW fraction appears to contain an enzyme with laccase-like activity. 10 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-07-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha�middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright� Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

  5. Simulation studies of diesel engine performance with oxygen enriched air and water emulsified fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, D.N.; Baker, D. ); Sekar, R.R.; Siambekos, C.T.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation code of a turbocharged, turbocompound diesel engine was modified to study the effects of using oxygen-enriched combustion air and water-emulsified diesel fuels. Oxygen levels of 21 percent to 40 percent by volume in the combustion air were studied. Water content in the fuel was varied from 0 percent to 50 percent mass. Simulation studies and a review and analysis of previous work in this area led to the following conclusions about expected engine performance and emissions: the power density of the engine is significantly increased by oxygen enrichment. Ignition delay and particulate emissions are reduced. Combustion temperatures and No{sub x} emissions are increased with oxygen enrichment but could be brought back to the base levels by introducing water in the fuel. The peak cylinder pressure which increases with the power output level might result in mechanical problems with engine components. Oxygen enrichment also provides an opportunity to use cheaper fuel such as No. 6 diesel fuel. Overall, the adverse effects of oxygen enrichment could be countered by the addition of water and it appears that an optimum combination of water content, oxygen level, and base diesel fuel quality may exist. This could yield improved performance and emissions characteristics compared to a state-of-the-art diesel engine. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey. Canyon City quadrangle (Oregon). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen uranium anomalies meet the minimum statistical requirements as defined in Volume I. These anomalies are listed and are shown on the Uranium Anomaly Interpretation Map. Potassium (%K), equivalent Uranium (ppM eU), equivalent Thorium (eT), eU/eT, eU/K, eT/K, and Magnetic Pseudo Contour Maps are presented in Appendix E. Stacked Profiles showing geologic strip maps along each flight-line, together with sensor data, and ancillary data are presented in Appendix F. All maps and profiles were prepared on a scale of 1:250,000, but have been reduced to 1:500,000 for presentation in Volume II. Anomaly No. 1 is over mainly sedimentary rocks of undifferentitatd Paleozoic/Mesozoic age (MzPza). Anomaly No. 2 is over a fault contact between Strawberry volcanics (Ts), and volcanic rocks of the Clarno (Tc). Anomaly No. 3 is over an intensely faulted block of Strawberry volcanics (Ts). Anomaly No. 4 is over the contact area between Strawberry volcanic rocks (Ts) and a basalt plug of Tertiary age (Tbi). Anomaly No. 5 is over the contact area between volcanic rocks of the Clarno formation (Tc) and undivided sedimentary rocks of Jurassic/Triassic age. Part of the anomaly is over landslide debris (Q1). Anomalies No. 6 and No. 7 are over a fault contact between volcanic rocks of the Clarno formation (Tc) and undivided sedimentary rocks of Jurassic/Triassic age (JTru).

  7. Assessment of H-Coal process developments: impact on the performance and economics of a proposed commercial plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talib, A.; Gray, D.; Neuworth, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report assesses the performance of the H-Coal process, a catalytic direct liquefaction process, at a process development and large pilot-plant scale of operation. The assessment focused on the evaluation of operating results from selected long-term successful process development unit (PDU) and pilot plant runs made on Illinois No. 6 coal. The pilot plant has largely duplicated the product yield structure obtained during the PDU runs. Also, the quality of products, particularly liquid products, produced during the pilot plant run is quite comparable to that produced during the PDU runs. This confirms the scalability of the H-Coal ebullated-bed reactor system from a PDU-scale, 3 tons of coal per day, to a large pilot scale, 220 tons of coal per day, plant. The minor product yield differences, such as higher yields of C/sub 3/, C/sub 4/, and naphtha fractions, and lower yields of distillate oils obtained during pilot plant runs as compared to the PDU runs, will not impact the projected technical and economic performance of a first-of-a-kind commercial H-Coal plant. Thus, the process yield and operating data collected during the PDU operations provided an adequate basis for projecting the technical and economic performance of the proposed H-Coal commercial plant. 18 references, 9 figures, 56 tables.

  8. SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 1. Integrated report. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This burn test program was conducted during the period of August 1982 to February 1983 to demonstrate that Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) products can displace petroleum as a boiler fuel in oil- and gas-designed boilers. The test program was performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Three forms of SRC (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) and No. 6 Fuel Oil were evaluated in the 700-hp (30 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour) watertube, oil-designed boiler facility at PETC. The test program was managed by the International Coal Refining Company (ICRC) and sponsored by the Department of Energy. Other organizations were involved as necessary to provide the expertise required to execute the test program. This final report represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at PETC. More detailed information with preliminary data can be obtained from separate reports prepared by PETC, Southern Research Institute, Wheelabrator-Frye, Babcock and Wilcox, and Combustion Engineering. These are presented as Annex Volumes A-F. 25 references, 41 figures, 15 tables.

  9. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash forming minerals. During the reporting period, the hydrophobicity of different coal samples was studied both in the presence and absence of M. phlei cells. In the absence of M. Phlei, Illinois No. 6 and Pennsylvania No. 8 exhibited higher contact angles as compared to Kentucky No. 9 coal. All the coal samples exhibited a maximum in contact angle around pH 5--7, which roughly coincides with the iso-electric point (iep) of different coals studied in this investigation. In the presence of M. phlei, maximum contact angle shifted to lower pH range of 2--3 which coincides with the iep of the M. phlei. These measurements reinforce the notion that good flocculation of coal with M. phlei can be achieved around pH 2--3. The amount of soluble fraction released during rupturing of M. phlei cells was studied as a function of sonication time. The rupturing experiments showed that the whole cells (unruptured cells) contain nearly 40% by weight of soluble fractions. Also, during the reporting period, the fabrication of the counter-current flocculation device was completed.

  10. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  11. Production and gasification tests of coal fines/coal tar extrudate. Final report June 1982-December 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, A.; Rib, D.; Smith, D.; Waslo, D.

    1984-01-01

    Gasification is a fuels conversion technology that permits the production of clean synthetic gas from coal and other carbonaceous fuels. Of the various gasifier types, however, the fixed bed is the only system currently being offered on a commercial basis. While this reactor type offers proven performance in terms of reliability and thermal efficiency, it requires a sized feedstock. This means that up to 30% of the incoming run-of-mine coal could be rejected as fines. Direct extrusion of this - 1/8-inch coal fines fraction with a tar binder offers a potentially attractive solution to this problem by consolidating the fines and, at the same time, providing a feed mechanism to the pressurized reactor. Work is described on a recently completed extrudate evaluation program conducted at the General Electric Research and Development Center in Schenectady under GRI and NYSERDA sponsorship. A 6-inch, single screw extruder was used to produce 88 tons of Illinois No. 6 coal extrudate with tar binder, which was then successfully gasified in General Electric's 1-ton/hr, Process Evaluation Facility (PEF) scale, fixed-bed reactor. Performance data on the extrusion process and on gasification testing are presented. The test results indicate that the extrudate makes a satisfactory gasifier feedstock in terms of both thermal and mechanical performance.

  12. Reflection seismic mapping of an abandoned coal mine, Belleville, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, N.; Hinds, R.; Roark, M.

    1997-10-01

    Old mine location maps (1958 vintage) indicate that the northwestern part of an undeveloped property near the town of Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois, is situated above an abandoned and now water-filled, room-and-pillar type coal mine. The central and southeast parts of the Belleville property are shown as overlying intact (non-mined) coal. The coal unit mined at the Belleville site, the Herrin No. 6 is Pennsylvanian in age and about 2.5 m thick at a depth of around 40 m. The current owners of the Belleville property want to construct a large building on the central and southeast parts of the site, but have been concerned about the accuracy of the old mine location maps because of recent mine-related surface subsidence in areas designated on the maps as not mined. To ensure that the proposed new development is located on structurally stable ground, a grid of ten high-resolution reflection seismic lines was acquired on-site. On these reflection seismic data, mined-out areas can be visually identified and differentiated from non-mined areas. The interpretation of the reflection seismic data was constrained and validated by 15 test boreholes. These seismic and borehole data confirm that the central and southeast parts of the property have not been mined extensively. Development of the Belleville site has proceeded with confidence.

  13. Production of low-sulfur binder pitch from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Technical report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. In previous ICCI projects at IGT, flash thermocracking (FTC) was used to successfully upgrade the properties of mild gasification pitch, yielding a suitable blending stock for use as a binder in the production of carbon electrodes for the aluminum industry. However, in pitches from high-sulfur (4%) Illinois coal, the pitch sulfur content is still unacceptably high at 2%. In this project, two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with FTC: (1) the use of conventionally cleaned coal with low ({approximately}1%) sulfur as a mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids prior to FTC. In Case 1, the crude pitch is being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in an existing IGT bench-scale reactor, followed by distillation to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, the crude pitch for biodesulfurization was obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT mild gasification PRU in 1990. Biodesulfurization is to be performed by contacting the pitch with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8 biocatalyst. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are to be conducted in a continuous FTC reactor constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. The finished pitch is then characterized for physical and chemical properties (density, softening point, QI, TI, coking value, and elemental composition), and compared to typical specifications for binder pitches.

  14. Combined processing of coal and heavy resids. Progress report, January 16, 1985-April 15, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the feasibility of using heavy petroleum crudes and residua in the processing of coal and to determine whether both coal and the petroleum solvent can be simultaneously upgraded. The effect of process parameters, the influence of solvent properties and composition and the role of the catalyst in coprocessing are being evaluated. The influence of solvent properties and composition and the effect of catalyst type and a variety of reaction parameters have been investigated in the coprocessing of heavy petroleum crudes and residua with Illinois No. 6 coal. Hydrotreatment of the solvent prior to using as a coprocessing solvent substantially improves the amount of coal conversion achieved. Catalytic treatment is required to produce significant quantities of pentane soluble material. The addition of hydroaromatic compounds at donable hydrogen levels of 0.55% or higher generally increases coal conversion and the amount of oil produced. The selectivity of different catalytic materials for upgrading the petroleum solvent and the coal specifically is evident and has been applied to two stage processing. This report is divided into three parts. Part I is a description of a study of adsorption and pore diffusion limitations in coprocessing. Part II describes the effect of solvent composition particularly the use of coal-derived solvents in conjunction with the petroleum solvent in coprocessing. Part III is an explanation of the relation of pore size to diffusivities given in the October 1984 to January 1985 Progress Report. 11 refs., 17 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. Control of emissions from cofiring of coal and RDF. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghunathan, K.; Bruce, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Research has been conducted toward developing technology for co-firing of coal with municipal solid waste (MSW) in order to reduce emissions of chlorinated organic compounds, particularly polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs and PCDFs). Previous bench- and pilot-scale research has shown that presence of SO{sub 2} can inhibit the PCDD and PCDF formation, and suggested co-firing high-sulfur coal with refuse derived fuel (RDF) to reduce the emissions. The objective of this research is to identify the effect of process and co-firing options in reducing PCDD and PCDF yield from waste combustion. Two types of municipal waste based fuels were used: a fluff refuse-derived fuel (simply referred to as RDF) and a densified refuse derived fuel (dRDF). The coal used was high-sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal. Experiments were conducted in US EPA`s recently constructed Multi-Fuel Combustor (MFC), a state-of-the-art facility with fuel handling and combustion release rates representative of large field units. The MFC was fired, at varying rates, with RDF/dRDF and coal, and sampled for PCDD and PCDF. Tests were conducted over a range of process variables such as lime injection, HCl concentration, flue gas temperature, quench, and residence time so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of waste combustors. The data are used for developing a comprehensive statistical model for PCDD and PCDF formation and control.

  16. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor steam from the flurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case, develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. The baseline design, the economic analysis and computer model will be major research planning tools that Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center will use to plan, guide and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. During the reporting period, work progressed on Tasks 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7. This report covers work done during the period and consists of six sections: introduction and summary; Task 1, baseline design and alternatives; Task 4, process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; Task 5, perform sensitivity studies using the PFS model; Task 6, document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use, and project management and staffing report.

  17. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Bechtel, with Amoco as the main subcontractor, initiated a study on September 26, 1991, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to develop a computer model and baseline design for advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology. This 24-month study, with an approved budget of $2.3 million, is being performed under DOE Contract Number AC22-91PC90027. (1) Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. (2) Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. (3) Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. The baseline design, the economic analysis and computer model will be major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal.

  18. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western, coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. During the reporting period, work progressed on Tasks 1, 2, 4, 6 and 7. This report covers work done during the period and consists of four sections: Introduction and Summary. Task 1: Baseline Design and Alternatives. Task 2: Evaluate baseline and alternative economics. Task 4: Process Flowsheet Simulation (PFS) model. Task 6: Document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use and Project Management and Staffing Report.

  19. Demonstration of coal reburning for cyclone boiler NO{sub x} control. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program, under Round 2, a project for Full Scale Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x},) Control was selected. DOE sponsored The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company, with Wisconsin Power & Light (WP&L) as the host utility, to demonstrate coal reburning technology at WP&L`s 110 MW{sub c}, cyclone-fired Unit No.2 at the Nelson Dewey Generating Station in Cassville, Wisconsin. The coal reburning demonstration was justified based on two prior studies. An Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and B&W sponsored engineering feasibility study indicated that the majority of cyclone-equipped boilers could successfully apply reburning technology to reduce NO{sub x}, emissions by 50 to 70%. An EPRI/Gas Research Institute (GRI)/B&W pilot-scale evaluation substantiated this conclusion through pilot-scale testing in B&W`s 6 million Btu/hr Small Boiler Simulator. Three different reburning fuels, natural gas, No. 6 oil, and pulverized coal were tested. This work showed that coal as a reburning fuel performs nearly as well as gas/oil without deleterious effects of combustion efficiency. Coal was selected for a full scale demonstration since it is available to all cyclone units and represents the highest level of technical difficulty-in demonstrating the technology.

  20. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The investigation of various Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process configurations was conducted at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility between July 1982 and September 1986. The facility combines three process units. There are the liquefaction unit, either thermal (TLU) or catalytic, for the dissolution of coal, the Critical Solvent Deashing unit (CSD) for the separation of ash and undissolved coal, and a catalytic hydrogenation unit (HTR) for product upgrading and recycle process solvent replenishment. The various TSL process configurations were created by changing the process sequence of these three units and by recycling hydrotreated solvents between the units. This report presents a description of the TSL configurations investigated and an analysis of the operating and performance data from the period of study. Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal Wyodak Clovis Point Mine coal were processed. Cobalt-molybdenum and disposable iron-oxide catalysts were used to improve coal liquefaction reactions and nickel-molybdenum catalysts were used in the hydrotreater. 28 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Improved energy efficiency in a specialty paper mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.D. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Energy costs at the James River KVP mill have increased sixfold since the 1973 oil embargo. The cost of energy now surpasses the cost of labor and is second only to that of pulp. Economic pressures thus provide a powerful incentive for efficient use of energy. The KVP mill is a nonintegrated mill that is capable of producing up to 450 tons/day of specialty papers. The mill is equipped with six paper machines, six parchment machines, three off-machine coaters, and related converting equipment. Energy is supplied by a central powerhouse that is equipped with: Two gas/oil-fired Combustion Engineering VU50 power boilers, each capable of producing 210,000 lb/h of 850-psig steam at 825/sup 0/F; One gas/oil-fired Riley water tube boiler capable of producing 150,000 lb/h of 220-psig steam at 525/sup 0/F; Two General Electric turbine generators. No. 5 condensing machine: throttle steam, 850 psig; high-pressure extraction, 220 psig; low-pressure extraction, 220 psig; low-pressure extraction, 38 psig; maximum generation, 9500 kW. No. 6 condensing machine: throttle steam, 850 psig; low-pressure extraction, 38 psig; maximum generation, 9500 kW.

  2. Development and evaluation of coal/water mixture combustion technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheffee, R.S.; Rossmeissl, N.P.; Skolnik, E.G.; McHale, E.T.

    1981-08-01

    The objective was to advance the technology for the preparation, storage, handling and combustion of highly-loaded coal/water mixtures. A systematic program to prepare and experimentally evaluate coal/water mixtures was conducted to develop mixtures which (1) burn efficiently using combustion chambers and burners designed for oil, (2) can be provided at a cost less than that of No. 6 oil, and (3) can be easily transported and stored. The program consisted of three principal tasks. The first was a literature survey relevant to coal/water mixture technology. The second involved slurry preparation and evaluation of rheological and stability properties, and processing techniques. The third consisted of combustion tests to characterize equipment and slurry parameters. The first task comprised a complete search of the literature, results of which are tabulated in Appendix A. Task 2 was involved with the evaluation of composition and process variables on slurry rheology and stability. Three bituminous coals, representing a range of values of volatile content, ash content, and hardness were used in the slurries. Task 3 was concerned with the combustion behavior of coal/water slurry. The studies involved first upgrading of an experimental furnace facility, which was used to burn slurry fuels, with emphasis on studying the effect on combustion of slurry properties such as viscosity and particle size, and the effect of equipment parameters such as secondary air preheat and atomization.

  3. An evaluation of Department of Transportation specification packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratledge, J.E.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Specification packages are broad families of package designs developed and authorized by the US Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for transport of certain Type B and fissile radioactive materials, with each specification containing a number of designs of various sizes. The specification package designs have remained essentially unchanged in a changing regulatory environment. Changes to package designs or authorized contents under the DOT system can be accomplished by rule making action, but there has been little updating of the designs over the years. Many of the individual package designs are no longer supported by reasonably current safety analyses. Since the publication of these specifications, there have been changes in regulatory requirements and improvements in methods of testing and analysis. Additionally, contemplated revisions to the DOT and NRC regulations to bring design requirements into accord with IAEA Safety Series No. 6, 1985 Edition would eliminate fissile classes and require resistance to a crush test for small Type B packages meeting certain criteria. The NRC has requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff review the safety documentation of the specification packages to determine the possible need for further testing and analysis, modifications to the designs, and, perhaps, elimination of any designs for which there is insufficient demonstration of compliance with current and proposed requirements. This paper will present a summary of the technical data and information concerning the use of the packages that has been received to date.

  4. An evaluation of Department of Transportation specification packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratledge, J.E.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-11-01

    Specification packages are broad families of package designs developed and authorized by the US Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for transport of certain Type B and fissile radioactive materials, with each specification containing a number of designs of various sizes. The specification package designs have remained essentially unchanged in a changing regulatory environment. Changes to package designs or authorized contents under the DOT system can be accomplished by rule making action, but there has been little updating of the designs over the years. Many of the individual package designs are no longer supported by reasonably current safety analyses. Since the publication of these specifications, there have been changes in regulatory requirements and improvements in methods of testing and analysis. Additionally, contemplated revisions to the DOT and NRC regulations to bring design requirements into accord with IAEA Safety Series No. 6, 1985 Edition would eliminate fissile classes and require resistance to a crush test for small Type B packages meeting certain criteria. The NRC has requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff review the safety documentation of the specification packages to determine the possible need for further testing and analysis, modifications to the designs, and, perhaps, elimination of any designs for which there is insufficient demonstration of compliance with current and proposed requirements. This paper will present a summary of the technical data and information concerning the use of the packages that has been received to date.

  5. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

  6. A Study of the Use of Jatropha Oil Blends in Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.

    2010-10-01

    Executive Summary: This project investigated the combustion performance of blends of unrefined Jatropha oil and its blends in laboratory boilers. Although a very limited amount of testing blends in distillate oil, ASTM No. 2 oil or heating oil was conducted, the primary interest was in testing the performance of blends with residual ASTM No. 6 oil. The basic idea is to provide a renewable fuel option to residual oil used in space heating and in industrial applications. The intent also was to explore the use of non-edible plant oil and one that might be potentially cheaper than biodiesel. The characteristics of No. 6 oil, such as high viscosity at ambient temperature, which requires it to be kept heated, make the blending with such oils feasible. Jatropha oil is one such oil and there is currently considerable interest building up in its use as a source for making biodiesel and jet fuel. A 10% blend of Jatropha oil with heating oil was burned using a standard burner in a residential boiler. Combustion performance was shown to be comparable with that of burning heating oil by itself with some noticeable differences. Typical heating oil has about 2000 ppm of sulfur, while the Jatropha oil has about 50 ppm leading to lower levels of sulphur dioxide emissions. Stack measurements also showed that the NOx emission was lower with the blend. We have previously reported similar reductions in NOx with blends of biodiesel in heating oil as well as slight reductions in PM2.5, particulates below 2.5 microns in size. Long term tests were not part of this project and hence deleterious effects on pumps, seals etc., if any, were not measured. The majority of the work involved testing blends of Jatropha oil with residual oil in a 1.5 million Btu/hr boiler with a burner modified to burn residual oil. Blends of 20 and 60% Jatropha oil and 100% Jatropha oil were burned in the combustion performance tests. The residual oil used had a sulfur content of over 2000 ppm and hence dramatic reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions are measured with the blends. Again, consistent with our past experience with biodiesel blends, significant reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions nearing 50% with 100% Jatropha oil, were also measured. This is in contrast with the use of biodiesel in diesel engines, where the NOx has a tendency to increase. In addition to the gaseous emission measurements, particulate emissions were measured using an EPA CTM-39 system to obtain both particulates, of sizes below 2.5 microns, so-called PM2.5, and of sizes larger than 2.5 microns. The results show that the particulate emissions are lower with the blending of Jatropha oil. Overall, one can conclude that the blending of Jatropha oil with residual oil is a feasible approach to using non-edible plant oil to provide a renewable content to residual oil, with significant benefits in the reduction of pollutant emissions such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulates.

  7. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

  8. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

  9. Fusion Energy Advisory Committee: Advice and recommendations to the US Department of Energy in response to the charge letter of September 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This document is a compilation of the written records that relate to the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee`s deliberations with regard to the Letter of Charge received from the Director of Energy Research, dated September 1, 1992. During its sixth meeting, held in March 1993, FEAC provided a detailed response to the charge contained in the letter of September 1, 1992. In particular, it responded to the paragraph: ``I would like the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) to evaluate the Neutron Interactive Materials Program of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE). Materials are required that will satisfy the service requirements of components in both inertial and magnetic fusion reactors -- including the performance, safety, economic, environmental, and recycle/waste management requirements. Given budget constraints, is our program optimized to achieve these goals for DEMO, as well as to support the near-term ITER program?`` Before FEAC could generate its response to the charge in the form of a letter report, one member, Dr. Parker, expressed severe concerns over one of the conclusions that the committee had reached during the meeting. It proved necessary to resolve the issue in public debate, and the matter was reviewed by FEAC for a second time, during its seventh meeting, held in mid-April, 1993. In order to help it to respond to this charge in a timely manner, FEAC established a working group, designated Panel No. 6, which reviewed the depth and breadth of the US materials program, and its interactions and collaborations with international programs. The panel prepared background material, included in this report as Appendix I, to help FEAC in its deliberations.

  10. The effect of oxygen-to-fuel stoichiometry on coal ash fine-fragmentation mode formation mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, G.; Seames, W. S.; Mann, M. D.; Benson, S. A.; Miller, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    Ash particles smaller than 2.5 {micro}m in diameter generated during pulverized coal combustion are difficult to capture and may pose greater harm to the environment and human health than the discharge of larger particles. Recent research efforts on coal ash formation have revealed a middle fine-fragment mode centered around 2 {micro}m. Formation of this middle or fine-fragment mode (FFM) is less well understood compared to larger coarse and smaller ultrafine ash. This study is part of an overall effort aimed at determining the key factors that impact the formation of FFM. This work examined the effects of oxygen-to-fuel stoichiometry (OFS). Pulverized Illinois No.6 bituminous coal was combusted and the ash generated was size segregated in a Dekati low pressure inertial impactor. The mass of each fraction was measured and the ash was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis. The FFM ash types were classified based on the SEM images to evaluate the significant fine-fragment ash formation mechanisms and determine any possible link between stoichiometry and formation mechanism. From the particle size distributions (PSDs), the coarse mode appears unaffected by the change in OFS, however, the OFS 1.05 lowered the fraction of ultrafine ash in relation to the higher OFS settings, and appears to increase the portion of the FFM. An intermediate minimum was found in the FFM at 1.3 {micro}m for the 1.20 and 1.35 OFS tests but was not observed in the 1.05 OFS. SEM analysis also suggests that OFS may contribute to changing formation mechanisms.

  11. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. Y. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Hyun, S. [Mercer Univ., Macon, GA (United States)

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  12. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat. Phase I design. Final report. [For sugarcane processing plant in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-08-01

    This report is the final effort in the Phase I design of a solar industrial process heat system for the Hilo Coast Processing Company (HCPC) in Pepeekeo, Hawaii. The facility is used to wash, grind and extract sugar from the locally grown sugarcane and it operates 24 hours a day, 305 days per year. The major steam requirements in the industrial process are for the prime movers (mill turbines) in the milling process and heat for evaporating water from the extracted juices. Bagasse (the fibrous residue of milled sugarcane) supplied 84% of the fuel requirement for steam generation in 1979, while 65,000 barrels of No. 6 industrial fuel oil made up the remaining 16%. These fuels are burned in the power plant complex which produces 825/sup 0/F, 1,250 psi superheated steam to power a turbogenerator set which, in addition to serving the factory, generates from 7 to 16 megawatts of electricity that is exported to the local utility company. Extracted steam from the turbo-generator set supplies the plant's process steam needs. The system consists of 42,420 ft./sup 2/ of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors will be oriented in a North-South configuration and will track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) will be circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370/sup 0/F and 450/sup 0/F respectively. It is estimated that the net useable energy delivered to the industrial process will be 7.2 x 10/sup 9/ Btu's per year. With an HCPC boiler efficiency of 78% and 6.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu's per barrel of oil, the solar energy system will displace 1489 barrels of oil per year. (WHK)

  13. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report, June 20, 1980-September 19, 1980. [Diphenylmethane, diphenyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-04

    This report describes work accomplished under two task: Task A, Mechanism of Cleavage of Key Bond types Present in Coals, and Task B, Catalysis of Conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O Systems. Under Task A, we have made additional measurements of catalytic carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bond cleavage in coal-related diphenylmethane and diphenyl ether structures. The results provide further support for, but do not definitely confirm, the tentative conclusion that the highly effective iron oxide catalysts involves oxidation to radical cation species. The homogeneous scission of carbon-oxygen bonds in diphenyl ether structure has also been studied. In the Task B studies of CO-H/sub 2/O systems, we typically obtain 50% benzene-soluble product material from 20 min. reaction of beneficiated Illinois No. 6 coal. This conversion level is obtained with aqueous solutions either at a starting pH above 12.6 or in neutral solutions with water-soluble catalysts present. We have studied a number of catalysts, including the potassium or sodium salts of molybdate, chromate, manganate, and tungstate; all are effective in the 3000 to 6000 ppM range. A striking result is that sodium nitrate at 6000 ppM is as effective as the metal salts. We found that the nitrate was converted to ammonium ion; also, formate was detected in the product aqueous phase. Finally, we find that catalytic quantities of sodium formate in CO/H/sub 2/O at pH 7 are effective in the conversion. However, in a control run in N/sub 2//H/sub 2/O, with a quantity of sodium formate equivalent to twice the molar quantity of hydrogen transferred to the coal in a successful run, the coal was converted to a product totally insoluble in benzene and with a lower hydrogen content than the starting coal.

  14. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  15. COAL CLEANING VIA LIQUID-FLUIDIZED CLASSIFICAITON (LFBC) WITH SELECTIVE SOLVENT SWELLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Calo

    2000-12-01

    The concept of coal beneficiation due to particle segregation in water-fluidized beds, and its improvement via selective solvent-swelling of organic material-rich coal particles, was investigated in this study. Particle size distributions and their behavior were determined using image analysis techniques, and beneficiation effects were explored via measurements of the ash content of segregated particle samples collected from different height locations in a 5 cm diameter liquid-fluidized bed column (LFBC). Both acetone and phenol were found to be effective swelling agents for both Kentucky No.9 and Illinois No.6 coals, considerably increasing mean particle diameters, and shifting particle size distributions to larger sizes. Acetone was a somewhat more effective swelling solvent than phenol. The use of phenol was investigated, however, to demonstrate that low cost, waste solvents can be effective as well. For unswollen coal particles, the trend of increasing particle size from top to bottom in the LFBC was observed in all cases. Since the organic matter in the coal tends to concentrate in the smaller particles, the larger particles are typically denser. Consequently, the LFBC naturally tends to separate coal particles according to mineral matter content, both due to density and size. The data for small (40-100 {micro}m), solvent-swollen particles clearly showed improved beneficiation with respect to segregation in the water-fluidized bed than was achieved with the corresponding unswollen particles. This size range is quite similar to that used in pulverized coal combustion. The original process concept was amply demonstrated in this project. Additional work remains to be done, however, in order to develop this concept into a full-scale process.

  16. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) when the caking bituminous coals are used with diluents, only 20% Pittsburgh No. 8 coal can be added to the diluent swhile 40% Illinois No. 6 could be added due to the higher free swelling index of the Pittsburgh No. 8; (2) When limestone is used as a diluent, considerably more sulfur is retained in the char than when using sand; (3) when the char from an experiment using limestone is recycled as the diluent for another experiment, the char continually retains additional sulfur through at least three recycles; (4) decomposition of the limestone and reduction is indicated by the high concentrations of CO observed at 900/sup 0/C; (5) increasing the coal feed rate by a factor of 4 from 2.4 to 10.7 lb/hr at low H/sub 2//Coal ratios (approx. = 0.6) results in no appreciable change in gaseous HC yields (approx. = 27%) or concentration (approx. = 45%) but higher BTX yields (1.1% vs. 5.4%); (6) although only one experiment was conducted, it appears that hydrogasification of untreated New Mexico sub-bituminous coal at 950/sup 0/C does not give an increase in yield over hydrogasification at 900/sup 0/C; (7) the hydrogasification of Wyodak lignite gives approximately the same gaseous HC yields as that obtained from North Dakota lignite but higher BTX yields particularly at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (9% vs. 2%); (8) treating New Mexico sub-bituminous coal with NaCO/sub 3/ does not increase its hydrogasification qualities between 600/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C at 1000 psi but does decrease the BTX yield.

  17. The effect of selective solvent absorption on coal conversion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    Using a pair of different recycle oils from Wilsonville and {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation (GPC) chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and elemental analysis, no significant differences were observed between the composition of the recycle oil and that portion of the oil not absorbed by the coal. For these complex mixtures, coals are not selective absorbants. Since most of the heteroatoms responsible for most of the specific interactions have been removed by hydrogenolyses, this is perhaps not surprising. To address the issue of the role of hydrogen bond donors in the reused as hydrogen donor coal, tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin were used as hydrogen donor solvents. This work is reported in detail in Section 2. The basic idea is that the presence of the t-butyl group on the aromatic ring will hinder or block diffusion of the hydrogen donor into the coal resulting in lower conversions and less hydrogen transferred with 2-t-butyltetralin than with tetralin. Observed was identical amounts of hydrogen transfer and nearly identical conversions to pyridine solubles for both hydrogen donors. Diffusion of hydrogen donors into the coal does not seem to play a significant role in coal conversion. Finally, in Section 3 is discussed the unfavorable impact on conversion of the structural rearrangements which occur when Illinois No. 6 coal is swollen with a solvent. We believe this rearrangement results in a more strongly associated solid leading to the diminution of coal reactions. Hydrogen donor diffusion does not seem to be a major factor in coal conversion while the structural rearrangement does. Both areas warrant further exploration.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of resinite recovery from Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    Resinite is a naturally occurring substance found in coal and derived from original plant resins. It is ubiquitous in North American coals. It makes up one to four percent by volume of most Illinois coals. It has been commercially exploited in the western USA for use in adhesives, varnishes and thermal setting inks. The overall objective of this project is to compare the properties of the resinite contained in Illinois Basin coals to resinite being commercially exploited in the western United States, and to recover the resinite from Illinois coals by microbubble column floatation techniques. The significance of this study is that it has the potential to show the way to recover a valuable chemical, resinite, from coal using only physical processing techniques. The value of the resinite at $1.00/kg or $0.50/lb makes it about fifty times more valuable than steam coal. The removal of resinite from coal does not decrease the value of the remaining coal in any way. The unique aspects are that: (1) it is the first examination of the resinite recovery potential of Illinois coal, (2) it integrates the latest characterization techniques such as density Gradient centrifugation, microspectrofluorometry, and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry, and (3) it uses microbubble column flotation to determine the resinite recovery potential. During this quarter samples were obtained, information from both the databases of both the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) and the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was obtained and evaluated, and EBCSP samples from the Herrin No. 6, the Springfield No. 5 and the Colchester No. 2 seams were analyzed petrographically and the resinites in these samples were characterized by fluorescence spectral analysis.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of resinite recovery from Illinois coal. Technical report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    Resinite is a naturally occurring substance found in coal and derived from original plant resins. It is ubiquitous in North American coals. It makes up one to four percent by volume of most Illinois coals. It has been commercially exploited in the western USA for use in adhesives, varnishes and thermal setting inks. The overall objective of this project is to compare the properties of the resinite contained in Illinois Basin coals to resinite being commercially exploited in the western United States, and to recover the resinite from Illinois coals by microbubble column floatation techniques. This project is relevant to priority 1.4A identified in ICCI/RFP93-1. The significance of this study is that it has the potential to show the way to recover a valuable chemical, resinite, from coal using only physical processing techniques. The value of the resinite at $1.00/kg or $0.50/lb makes it about fifty times more valuable than steam coal. The removal of resinite from coal does not decrease the value of the remaining coal in any way. The unique aspects are that: (1) it is the first examination of the resinite recovery potential of Illinois coal, (2) it integrates the latest characterization techniques such as density gradient centrifugation, microspectrofluorometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and (3) it uses microbubble column flotation to determine the resinite recovery potential. During this quarter samples were obtained, information from both the databases of both the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) and the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was obtained and evaluated, and IBCSP samples from the Herrin No. 6, the Springfield No. 5 and the Colchester No. 2 seams were analyzed petrographically and the resinites in these samples were characterized by fluorescence spectral analysis.

  20. Coking and rheological measurements using Exxon donor solvent materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Sams, T.L.; Johnson, J.K.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes a study made under contract with Exxon Research and Engineering Company to investigate the rheology and density of Exxon-supplied slurries of Illinois and Wyodak coals, solvents, and bottoms in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Coal Liquids Flow System. The rheological data were taken between 478 and 700/sup 0/K at 28-K increments at three shear rates at each temperature. Density was measured at 478, 533, 589, 644, 672, and 700/sup 0/K at one mass flow rate. The slurry compositions studied included Illinois No. 6 coal with two different solvents and recycle bottoms at solvent-to-coal-to-bottoms weight ratios of 2.0/1.0/0.5, 1.2/1.0/0.5, 1.6/1.0/0.5, and Wyodak solvent, coal, and bottoms at a 1.6/1.0/0.5 ratio. The rheology measurements showed that the behavior of the Wyodak slurries below 589/sup 0/K was almost Newtonian, and above 589/sup 0/K it was very non-Newtonian. The Illinois-coal slurries showed a greater deviation from Newtonian character than did the Wyodak slurries. The peaks in the plots of viscosity vs temperature for the slurries varied with solvent type, mass flow rate, and solvent-to-coal-to-bottoms ratio. The data and results from this study will be useful in comparing physical properties of these coals and slurries with others and in building up the coal-slurry data base. 4 references, 36 figures, 15 tables.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL GAS PRESSURIZED STRIPPING (GPS)-BASED TECHNOLOGY FOR CO2 CAPTURE FROM POST-COMBUSTION FLUE GASES Topical Report: Techno-Economic Analysis of GPS-based Technology for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    This topical report presents the techno-economic analysis, conducted by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) and Nexant, for a nominal 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing CCS patented Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) technology for post-combustion carbon capture (PCC). Illinois No. 6 coal is used as fuel. Because of the difference in performance between the GPS-based PCC and the MEA-based CO2 absorption technology, the net power output of this plant is not exactly 550 MWe. DOE/NETL Case 11 supercritical PC plant without CO2 capture and Case 12 supercritical PC plant with benchmark MEA-based CO2 capture are chosen as references. In order to include CO2 compression process for the baseline case, CCS independently evaluated the generic 30 wt% MEA-based PCC process together with the CO2 compression section. The net power produced in the supercritical PC plant with GPS-based PCC is 647 MW, greater than the MEA-based design. The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) over a 20-year period is adopted to assess techno-economic performance. The LCOE for the supercritical PC plant with GPS-based PCC, not considering CO2 transport, storage and monitoring (TS&M), is 97.4 mills/kWh, or 152% of the Case 11 supercritical PC plant without CO2 capture, equivalent to $39.6/tonne for the cost of CO2 capture. GPS-based PCC is also significantly superior to the generic MEA-based PCC with CO2 compression section, whose LCOE is as high as 109.6 mills/kWh.

  2. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  3. Observation on the role of chlorine in high temperature erosion-corrosion of alloys in an AFBC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, W.; Orndorff, W.; Smith, J.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Anderson, K.; Smith, S.; Ho, K.

    1997-12-31

    Two 1,000-hour burns were conducted with the 12-inch (0.3m) laboratory AFBC system at Western Kentucky University. Operating conditions similar to those used at the 160 MW AFBC system at the TVA Shawnee Steam Plant located near Paducah, KY were used. A 1,000-hour burn was done with a low-chlorine (0.012% Cl and 3.0% S) Western Kentucky No.9 coal. A second 1,000-hour burn was conducted with high-chlorine (0.28% Cl and 2.4% S) Illinois No.6 coal. Four different metal alloys [carbon steel C1020 (0.18% C and 0.05% Cr), 304 SS (18.39% Cr and 8.11% Ni), 309 SS (23.28% Cr and 13.41% Ni), and 347 SS (18.03% Cr and 9.79% Ni)] were exposed uncooled in the freeboard at the entrance to the convection pass, where the metal temperature was approximately 900K. The carbon steel samples were essentially destroyed. However, it was expected that C1020 carbon steel samples would not withstand the high temperatures selected for the testing. A small amount of scale failure was observed on the other three samples in both test runs. Based on the SEM-EDS mapping results, there is no localized chloride distribution observed on the surface of the coupons, neither in the scale failure area nor on the rest of the metal part. Some trace amounts of chloride was found, but it was evenly distributed on the surface of the coupons. There is no concentration of chloride on the spot of scale failure. The scale failure might be due to sulfur attack and/or the effect of erosion. Further study with higher chlorine content coals for more conclusive information is needed.

  4. Production of low sulfur binder pitich from high-sulfur Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce electrode binder pitch with sulfur content below 0.6 wt% from high-sulfur Illinois coal mild gasification liquids. Previously, flash thermocracking (FTC) was used to successfully upgrade the properties of mild gasification pitch, yielding a suitable blending stock for use as a binder in the production of carbon electrodes for the aluminum industry. However, in pitches from high-sulfur (4%) Illinois coal, the pitch sulfur content (2%) was still higher than preferred. In this project two approaches to sulfur reduction are being explored in conjunction with FTC: (1) the use of a moderate-sulfur (1.2%) Illinois coal as mild gasification feedstock, and (2) direct biodesulfurization of the liquids from high-sulfur coal prior to FTC. In Case 1, the liquids are being produced by mild gasification of IBC-109 coal in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor, followed by distillation to isolate the crude pitch. In Case 2, biodesulfurization with Rhodococcus Rhodochrous IGTS8 biocatalyst is being performed on crude pitch obtained from Illinois No. 6 coal tests conducted in the IGT MILDGAS PRU in 1990. Following preparation of the crude pitches, pitch upgrading experiments are being conducted in a continuous FTC reactor constructed in previous ICCI-sponsored studies. This quarter, mild gasification of IBC-109 coal was completed, producing 450 g of coal liquids, which were then distilled to recover 329 g of Case 1 crude pitch. Next month, the pitch will be subjected to FTC treatment and evaluated. Biodesulfurization experiments were performed on Case 2 pitch dispersed in l-undecanol, resulting in sulfur reductions of 15.1 to 21.4%. This was marginally lower than the 24.8% desulfurization obtained in l-dodecanol, but separation of pitch from the dispersant was facilitated by the greater volatility of l-undecanol.

  5. Coprocessing of coal and heavy petroleum crudes and residua: a solvent evaluation and a parametric study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Tsai, K.J.; Pass, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study has investigated the combined hydroprocessing of coal with petroleum solvents consisting of heavy and reduced crudes and residua to determine the feasibility of simultaneous upgrading of both materials to lighter products. Six hydrogen-rich heavy petroleum materials have been processed with Illinois No. 6 coal at 400/sup 0/C and 425/sup 0/C for 30 minutes under three reaction conditions: a N/sub 2/ atmosphere, a H/sub 2/ atmosphere and a H/sub 2/ atmosphere using hydrotreating extrudates. Liquefaction of bituminous coal can be achieved in the petroleum solvents with coal conversion being dependent upon the reaction conditions. Noncatalytic coal conversions of 45 to 50% are achieved in a H/sub 2/ atmosphere. Addition of a catalyst increases conversion to near 70%. Only approximately 35% conversion is obtained in a N/sub 2/ atmosphere. In the catalytic environment substantial conversions to pentane soluble material occur. Hydrotreatment and extraction of the solvent prior to coprocessing increases the amount of coal conversion and, in some cases, increases the amount of pentane soluble material produced. The influence of the solvent appears to be related to the molecular weight, viscosity and Conradson Carbon number of the petroleum materials. Evaluation of the reaction parameters of temperature, hydrogen pressure, time and catalyst extrudate size for coprocessing has been undertaken. Based on the production of pentane soluble oil and coal conversion, feasible parameters are established: 425/sup 0/C, 1250 psig H/sub 2/ pressure at ambient temperature, long reaction time and a hydrogenation catalyst with a small particle size. Combined processing is shown to be sensitive to catalyst extrudate size, with powdered catalyst giving substantially more oil yield and coal conversion than the extrudates. 6 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Nucleic and amino acid sequences relating to a novel transketolase, and methods for the expression thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Lange, Bernd Markus; McCaskill, David G.

    2001-01-01

    cDNAs encoding 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from peppermint (Mentha piperita) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences have been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID NO:3, SEQ ID NO:5, SEQ ID NO:7) are provided which code for the expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase from plants. In another aspect the present invention provides for isolated, recombinant DXPS proteins, such as the proteins having the sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO:4, SEQ ID NO:6 and SEQ ID NO:8. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthases, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding a plant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, or its derivatives such as isopentenyl diphosphate (BP), or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, or the production of its products.

  7. Product evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.; Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have placed stringent requirements on the quality of transportation fuels. Most petroleum refiners are scrambling to meet provisions of the Amendments to be implemented between 1995 and 2000. These requirements will also have significant implications for the production of alternative fuels. These have been examined for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) derived fuels. This analysis was conducted in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project, Baseline Design/Economics for Advanced Fischer-Tropsch Technology, conducted by Bechtel and Amoco. The goal of this study was to develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal using gasification, syngas conversion in slurry reactors with iron catalysts, and conventional refinery upgrading of the F-T derived hydrocarbon liquids. One alternative case using ZSM-5 upgrading technology was also considered. This study included complete capital and operating cost estimates for the processes. To perform economic analyses for the different design cases, the products from the liquefaction plant had to be valued relative to conventional transportation fuels. This task was accomplished by developing a Linear Programming (LP) model for a typical midwest refinery, and then feeding the F-T liquids to the refinery. In this way, the breakeven value determined for these materials is indicative of the price they could command if available in the marketplace. Inputs to the LP model include: refinery size, configuration, feedstocks, products, specifications, prices, and operating and capital recovery costs. The model was set up to be representative of conditions anticipated for the turn of the century. This required inclusion of fuel specifications from the CAAA of 1990 which have or will come into force by the year 2000.

  8. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this study are to: (1) Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. (2) Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. (3) Develop a process flowsheet simulation model. The baseline design, the economic analysis and computer model will be major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. The study has been divided into seven major tasks: Task 1: Establish the baseline design and alternatives. Task 2: Evaluate baseline and alternative economics. Task 3: Develop engineering design criteria. Task 4: Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. Task 5: Perform sensitivity studies using the PFS model. Task 6: Document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use. Task 7: Perform project management, technical coordination and other miscellaneous support functions. During the reporting period, work progressed on Tasks 1, 4 and 7. This report covers work done during the period and consists of four sections: Introduction and Summary. Task 1--Baseline Design and Alternatives. Task 4--Process Flowsheet Simulation (PFS) Model, and Project Management and Staffing Report.

  9. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM- 5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case, and develop a process flowsheet simulation model. The baseline design, the economic analysis and computer model will be major research planning tools that Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center will use to plan, guide and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. The study has been divided into seven major tasks: Task 1, establish the baseline design and alternatives; Task 2, evaluate baseline and alternative economics; Task 3, develop engineering design criteria; Task 4, develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; Task 5, perform sensitivity studies using the PFS model; Task 6, document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use; and Task 7, perform project management, technical coordination and other miscellaneous support functions. This report covers work done during the period and consists of four sections: Introduction and summary; Task 1, baseline design and alternatives; Task 4, process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; and project management and staffing report.

  10. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of the study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. Develop a process flowsheet simulation model. The baseline design, the economic analysis and computer model will be major research planning tools that PETC will use to plan, guide and evaluate its ongoing and future research and commercialization programs relating to indirect coal liquefaction for the manufacture of synthetic liquid fuels from coal. The study has been divided into seven major tasks. Task 1: Establish the baseline design and alternatives. Task 2: Evaluate baseline and alternative economics. Task 3: Develop engineering design criteria. Task 4: Develop a process flowsheet simulation model. Task 5: Perform sensitivity studies using the PFS model. Task 6: Document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use, and Task 7: Perform project management, technical coordination and other miscellaneous support functions. During the reporting period, work progressed on Tasks 1, 4 and 7. This report covers work done during the period and consists of four sections: Introduction and Summary. Task 1--Baseline Design and Alternatives. Task 4--Process Flowsheet Simulation Model. Project Management and Staffing Report.

  11. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases will be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model. During the period of this report, a Topical Report summarizing the Baseline Case design was drafted and issued to DOE/PETC for review and release approval. Major effort was spent on the Alternate Upgrading and Refining Case. Its design specifications were finalized, and material and utility balances completed. Initial capital cost estimates were developed. A Topical Report, summarizing the Alternative (ZSM-5) Upgrading and Refining Case design, is being drafted. Under Task 4, some of the individual plant models were expanded and enhanced. An overall ASPEN/SP process simulation model was developed for the Baseline Design Case by combining the individual models of Areas 100, 200 and 300. In addition, a separate model for the simplified product refining area, Area 300, of the Alternate Upgrading and Refining case was developed. Under Task 7, cost and schedule control was the primary activity. A technical paper entitled ``Baseline Design/Economics for Advanced Fischer-Tropsch Technology`` was presented in the DOE/PETC`s Annual Contractors Review Conference, held at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on September 27-29, 1993. A contract amendment was submitted to include the Kerr McGee ROSE unit in the Baseline design case and to convert the PFS models from the ASPEN/SP to ASPEN/Plus software code.

  12. Baseline design/economics for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology. Quarterly report, July--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This report is Bechtel`s twelfth quarterly technical progress report and covers the period of July through September, 1994. All major tasks associated with the contract study have essentially been completed. Effort is under way in preparing various topical reports for publication. The objectives of this study are to: Develop a baseline design and two alternative designs for indirect liquefaction using advanced F-T technology. The baseline design uses Illinois No. 6 Eastern Coal and conventional refining. There is an alternative refining case using ZSM-5 treatment of the vapor stream from the slurry F-T reactor and an alternative coal case using Western coal from the Powder River Basin. Prepare the capital and operating costs for the baseline design and the alternatives. Individual plant costs for the alternative cases win be prorated on capacity, wherever possible, from the baseline case. Develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; establish the baseline design and alternatives; evaluate baseline and alternative economics; develop engineering design criteria; develop a process flowsheet simulation (PFS) model; perform sensitivity studies using the PFS model; document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use; and perform project management, technical coordination and other miscellaneous support functions. Tasks 1, 2, 3 and 5 have essentially been completed. Effort is under way in preparing topical reports for publication. During the current reporting period, work progressed on Tasks 4, 6 and 7. This report covers work done during this period and consists of four sections: Introduction and Summary; Task 4 - Process Flowsheet Simulation (PFS) Model and Conversion to ASPEN PLUS; Task 6 - Document the PFS model and develop a DOE training session on its use; and Project Management and Staffing Report.

  13. Corrosion and degradation of materials in the Synthane coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurkewycz, R.; Firestone, R.F.

    1981-09-01

    Corrosion monitoring of materials was conducted in the operating environments of the Synthane coal gasification pilot plant between 1976 and 1978. Metal and refractory specimens were exposed in the gasifier vessel in two test locations (fluidized bed, freeboard). Metal coupons only were exposed in the gasifier char cooler (freeboard) and four test locations in the quench system (vapor and liquid phases). Exposure times under operating conditions were 181 to 782 h. In two gasifier test locations (600 psig, 1284/sup 0/F and 1434/sup 0/F), the performance of nickel-base alloys with >20 wt % Cr, 40 to 46 wt % Ni, and 3 to 9.1 wt % Mo was consistently better than for other test alloys. Equivalent linear corrosion rates for these better alloys were < 20 mpy (782 h) with Montana Rosebud coal as feedstock; however, with Illinois No. 6 coal the linear rates were >20 mpy but <75 mpy (181 h). IN-600 (76.5 wt % Ni, 15.8 wt % Cr) was found unsuitable for gasifier internal application. All refractories tested in the two gasifier test locations (600 psig, 1284/sup 0/F and 1434/sup 0/F), with the exception of silicon nitride, were not greatly affected during either exposure period. The better materials were monolithic refractories with 5 to 30% porosity and 50 to 60% alumina content. Corrosion monitoring of metals in the gasifier char cooler freeboard (600 psig, 800/sup 0/F) showed that Type 304 was more resistant to corrosion attack than Type 410 and carbon steel (A-515).During exposure in the product gas quench system (5 to 600 psig, 200/sup 0/ to 445/sup 0/F), austenitic stainless steels, IN-600, and Type 430 experienced only limited corrosion loss and slight to moderate pitting attack (maximum pit depth <7 mils). Monel 400 and carbon steel specimens incurred unacceptable levels of degradation.

  14. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  15. Determination of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples by gamma spectroscopy at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, W.E.; Heinrich, R.R.; Lamoureux, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    We currently have six Ge/Ge(Li) detectors that are being used for gamma counting of environmental samples (three with horizontal geometry, three with vertical geometry). The detectors were calibrated for close-geometry efficiency by counting standards in a set configuration (a height of 6.4 cm in a 4-oz. wide-mouthed Naglene bottle) immediately adjacent to the cryostat face. This configuration was chosen so that the standards would be symmetrical to the centers of both the horizontal and vertical detectors. Two solid standards were prepared by adding a known amount of Standard Reference Material NBL No. 6-A (Pitchblende) and NBL No. 7-A (Monazite Sand) to a blanked soil and mixing. Homogeneity of the standards was checked by counting each standard at each quadrant (on a horizontal detector). The final mixtures showed less than 1% deviation between the high and low quadrant counts. Two liquid secondary standards were prepared from stock solutions of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 131/I, and /sup 110m/Ag, which has been characterized as point sources using several detector efficiency curves. These efficiencies were determined using point source standards from the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). All standards had activity levels that allowed less than 1% counting statistics to be obtained on the major peaks (i.e., those with stronger branching ratio) within two hours. Analysis of the resulting data yield smooth efficiency curves for each of the six detectors. Although the standard compositions varied, solid and liquid, the densities were all approx. =1.0 g/cm/sup 3/. 3 refs.

  16. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

  17. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program Hot Oxygen Injection Into The Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Riley

    2002-10-21

    Increased levels of blast furnace coal injection are needed to further lower coke requirements and provide more flexibility in furnace productivity. The direct injection of high temperature oxygen with coal in the blast furnace blowpipe and tuyere offers better coal dispersion at high local oxygen concentrations, optimizing the use of oxygen in the blast furnace. Based on pilot scale tests, coal injection can be increased by 75 pounds per ton of hot metal (lb/thm), yielding net savings of $0.84/tm. Potential productivity increases of 15 percent would yield another $1.95/thm. In this project, commercial-scale hot oxygen injection from a ''thermal nozzle'' system, patented by Praxair, Inc., has been developed, integrated into, and demonstrated on two tuyeres of the U.S. Steel Gary Works no. 6 blast furnace. The goals were to evaluate heat load on furnace components from hot oxygen injection, demonstrate a safe and reliable lance and flow control design, and qualitatively observe hot oxygen-coal interaction. All three goals have been successfully met. Heat load on the blowpipe is essentially unchanged with hot oxygen. Total heat load on the tuyere increases about 10% and heat load on the tuyere tip increases about 50%. Bosh temperatures remained within the usual operating range. Performance in all these areas is acceptable. Lance performance was improved during testing by changes to lance materials and operating practices. The lance fuel tip was changed from copper to a nickel alloy to eliminate oxidation problems that severely limited tip life. Ignition flow rates and oxygen-fuel ratios were changed to counter the effects of blowpipe pressure fluctuations caused by natural resonance and by coal/coke combustion in the tuyere and raceway. Lances can now be reliably ignited using the hot blast as the ignition source. Blowpipe pressures were analyzed to evaluate ht oxygen-coal interactions. The data suggest that hot oxygen increases coal combustion in the blow pipe and tuyere by 30, in line with pilot scale tests conducted previously.

  18. Elemental Modes of Occurrence in an Illinois #6 Coal and Fractions Prepared by Physical Separation Techniques at a Coal Preparation Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.; Seidu, L; Shah, N; Huffman, G; Honaker, R; Kyger, J; Higgins, B; Robertson, J; Pal, S; Seehra, M

    2009-01-01

    In order to gain better insight into elemental partitioning between clean coal and tailings, modes of occurrence have been determined for a number of major and trace elements (S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Pb) in an Illinois No.6 coal and fractions prepared by physical separation methods at a commercial coal preparation plant. Elemental modes of occurrence were largely determined directly by XAFS or Moessbauer spectroscopic methods because the concentrations of major minerals and wt.% ash were found to be highly correlated for this coal and derived fractions, rendering correlations between individual elements and minerals ambiguous for inferring elemental modes of occurrence. Of the major elements investigated, iron and potassium are shown to be entirely inorganic in occurrence. Most (90%) of the iron is present as pyrite, with minor fractions in the form of clays and sulfates. All potassium is present in illitic clays. Calcium in the original coal is 80-90% inorganic and is divided between calcite, gypsum, and illite, with the remainder of the calcium present as carboxyl-bound calcium. In the clean coal fraction, organically associated Ca exceeds 50% of the total calcium. This organically-associated form of Ca explains the poorer separation of Ca relative to both K and ash. Among the trace elements, V and Cr are predominantly inorganically associated with illite, but minor amounts (5-15% Cr, 20-30% V) of these elements are also organically associated. Estimates of the V and Cr contents of illite are 420 ppm and 630 ppm, respectively, whereas these elements average 20 and 8 ppm in the macerals. Arsenic in the coal is almost entirely associated with pyrite, with an average As content of about 150 ppm, but some As ({approx} 10%) is present as arsenate due to minor oxidation of the pyrite. The mode of occurrence of Zn, although entirely inorganic, is more complex than normally noted for Illinois basin coals; about 2/3 is present in sphalerite, with lesser amounts associated with illite and a third form yet to be conclusively identified. The non-sulfide zinc forms are removed predominantly by the first stage of separation (rotary breaker), whereas the sphalerite is removed by the second stage (heavy media). Germanium is the only trace element determined to have a predominantly organic association.

  19. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

  20. Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller

    2007-12-15

    This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950[degree]C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800[degree] to 950[degree]C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na[sub 2]O, NaCl, and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820[degree]. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 [mu]m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  2. The fate of alkali species in advanced coal conversion systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.

    1991-11-01

    The fate of species during coal combustion and gasification was determined experimentally in a fluidized bed reactor. A molecular-beam sampling mags spectrometer was used to identify and measure the concentration of vapor phase sodium species in the high temperature environment. Concurrent collection and analysis of the ash established the distribution of sodium species between gas-entrained and residual ash fractions. Two coals, Beulah Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous, were used under combustion and gasification conditions at atmospheric pressure. Steady-state bed temperatures were in the range 800--950{degree}C. An extensive calibration procedure ensured that the mass spectrometer was capable of detecting sodium-containing vapor species at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. In the temperature range 800{degree} to 950{degree}C, the concentrations of vapor phase sodium species (Na, Na{sub 2}O, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) are less than 0.05 ppm under combustion conditions with excess air. However, under gasification conditions with Beulah Zap lignite, sodium vapor species are present at about 14 ppm at a temperature of 820{degree}. Of this amount, NaCl vapor constitutes about 5 ppm and the rest is very likely NAOH. Sodium in the form of NaCl in coal enhances the vaporization of sodium species during combustion. Vapor phase concentration of both NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased when NaCl was added to the Beulah Zap lignite. Ash particles account for nearly 100% of the sodium in the coal during combustion in the investigated temperature range. The fine fly-ash particles (<10 {mu}m) are enriched in sodium, mainly in the form of sodium sulfate. The amount of sodium species in this ash fraction may be as high as 30 wt % of the total sodium. Sodium in the coarse ash particle phase retained in the bed is mainly in amorphous forms.

  3. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two different co-processed fuel oils were tested: one that had been partially hydrotreated, and the other a product of fractionation before hydrotreating. Task 5 focused on examining refining methods that would utilize coal and produce thermally stable jet fuel, included delayed coking and solvent extraction. Delayed coking was done on blends of decant oil and coal, with the goal to produce a premium carbon product and liquid fuels. Coking was done on bench scale and large laboratory scale cokers. Two coals were examined for co-coking, using Pittsburgh seam coal and Marfork coal product. Reactions in the large, laboratory scaled coker were reproducible in yields of products and in quality of products. While the co-coke produced from both coals was of sponge coke quality, minerals left in the coke made it unacceptable for use as anode or graphite grade filler.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems and CO{sub 2} capture processes. Financial models were developed to estimate the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, cost of electricity, and CO{sub 2} avoidance cost. Results showed that, depending on the plant size and the type of coal burned, CO{sub 2} avoidance cost is between $47/t to $67/t for a PC +MEA plant, between $22.03/t to $32.05/t for an oxygen combustion plant, and between $13.58/t to $26.78/t for an IGCC + Selexol plant. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact on the CO2 avoidance cost of the heat of absorption of solvent in an MEA plant and energy consumption of the ASU in an oxy-coal combustion plant. An economic analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant was also conducted. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 100 million gallons/year was estimated to be about $13.92/t.

  5. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was 50 hours of gasification on a petroleum coke from the Hunt Oil Refinery and an additional 73 hours of operation on a high-ash coal from India. Data from these tests indicate that while acceptable fuel gas heating value was achieved with these fuels, the transport gasifier performs better on the lower-rank feedstocks because of their higher char reactivity. Comparable carbon conversions have been achieved at similar oxygen/coal ratios for both air-blown and oxygen-blown operation for each fuel; however, carbon conversion was lower for the less reactive feedstocks. While separation of fines from the feed coals is not needed with this technology, some testing has suggested that feedstocks with higher levels of fines have resulted in reduced carbon conversion, presumably due to the inability of the finer carbon particles to be captured by the cyclones. These data show that these low-rank feedstocks provided similar fuel gas heating values; however, even among the high-reactivity low-rank coals, the carbon conversion did appear to be lower for the fuels (brown coal in particular) that contained a significant amount of fines. The fuel gas under oxygen-blown operation has been higher in hydrogen and carbon dioxide concentration since the higher steam injection rate promotes the water-gas shift reaction to produce more CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of the CO and water vapor. However, the high water and CO{sub 2} partial pressures have also significantly reduced the reaction of (Abstract truncated)

  6. Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

    2009-05-01

    There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

  7. Low Cost Chemical Feedstocks Using an Improved and Energy Efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) Removal Process, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Howard, S.; Lu, Yingzhong

    2012-08-10

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new low-cost and energy efficient Natural Gas Liquid (NGL) recovery process - through a combination of theoretical, bench-scale and pilot-scale testing - so that it could be offered to the natural gas industry for commercialization. The new process, known as the IROA process, is based on U.S. patent No. 6,553,784, which if commercialized, has the potential of achieving substantial energy savings compared to currently used cryogenic technology. When successfully developed, this technology will benefit the petrochemical industry, which uses NGL as feedstocks, and will also benefit other chemical industries that utilize gas-liquid separation and distillation under similar operating conditions. Specific goals and objectives of the overall program include: (i) collecting relevant physical property and Vapor Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) data for the design and evaluation of the new technology, (ii) solving critical R&D issues including the identification of suitable dehydration and NGL absorbing solvents, inhibiting corrosion, and specifying proper packing structure and materials, (iii) designing, construction and operation of bench and pilot-scale units to verify design performance, (iv) computer simulation of the process using commercial software simulation platforms such as Aspen-Plus and HYSYS, and (v) preparation of a commercialization plan and identification of industrial partners that are interested in utilizing the new technology. NGL is a collective term for C2+ hydrocarbons present in the natural gas. Historically, the commercial value of the separated NGL components has been greater than the thermal value of these liquids in the gas. The revenue derived from extracting NGLs is crucial to ensuring the overall profitability of the domestic natural gas production industry and therefore of ensuring a secure and reliable supply in the 48 contiguous states. However, rising natural gas prices have dramatically reduced the economic incentive to extract NGLs from domestically produced natural gas. Successful gas processors will be those who adopt technologies that are less energy intensive, have lower capital and operating costs and offer the flexibility to tailor the plant performance to maximize product revenue as market conditions change, while maintaining overall system efficiency. Presently, cryogenic turbo-expander technology is the dominant NGL recovery process and it is used throughout the world. This process is known to be highly energy intensive, as substantial energy is required to recompress the processed gas back to pipeline pressure. The purpose of this project is to develop a new NGL separation process that is flexible in terms of ethane rejection and can reduce energy consumption by 20-30% from current levels, particularly for ethane recoveries of less than 70%. The new process integrates the dehydration of the raw natural gas stream and the removal of NGLs in such a way that heat recovery is maximized and pressure losses are minimized so that high-value equipment such as the compressor, turbo-expander, and a separate dehydration unit are not required. GTI completed a techno-economic evaluation of the new process based on an Aspen-HYSYS simulation model. The evaluation incorporated purchased equipment cost estimates obtained from equipment suppliers and two different commercial software packages; namely, Aspen-Icarus and Preliminary Design and Quoting Service (PDQ$). For a 100 MMscfd gas processing plant, the annualized capital cost for the new technology was found to be about 10% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery above 70% and about 40% lower than that of conventional technology for C2 recovery below 50%. It was also found that at around 40-50% C2 recovery (which is economically justifiable at the current natural gas prices), the energy cost to recover NGL using the new technology is about 50% of that of conventional cryogenic technology.

  8. COMPNAME","COMPID","YEAR","PLANTNAME","KIND","CONSTRUC","INSTALLED","MAXCAP","NE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EQUIP","TOTCOST","COSTCAP","GROSSEXP","OPERENG","FUEL","COOLANTS","STEXP","STOTH","STTRANS","ELECEXP","MISCST","RENTS","MAINSUP","MAINSTRUC","MAINBOIL","MAINELEC","MAINMISC","TOTPROD","EXPKWH","UNITCL","QUANTCL","AVGHEATCL","ACDELCL","ACBURNCL","ACBTUCL","ACNETGENCL","ABTUNETGCL","UNITGAS","QUANTGAS","AVGHEATGAS","ACDELGAS","ACBURNGAS","ACBTUGAS","ACNETGNGAS","ABTUNETGAS","UNITOIL","QUANTOIL","AVGHEATOIL","ACDELOIL","ACBURNOIL","ACBTUOIL","ACNETGNOIL","ABTUNETOIL" "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Sequoyah","Nuclear","01/01/81",,2441160,2303000,8760,1008,1.8570502e+10,3184031,533636867,2488511062,3025331960,1239,33187938,21080862,86166618,4316783,11925073,0,0,13329621,28360769,0,16330987,1528775,8295886,3650336,7012139,201997849,11,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",189924066,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10230 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Nuclear","01/01/96","1/1/1996",1269000,1200000,8208,728,8230350000,1953589,2108999339,4827648621,6938601549,5468,30551823,12179502,38261150,3963151,7056493,0,0,10400580,24553068,0,14243155,2328791,9244870,870737,990214,124091711,15,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",84467683,0,0,0,0.43,0.04,10260 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",1088000,1407000,8760,14,256798000,0,6064116,119609619,125673735,116,112893140,2747882,9870790,0,0,0,0,0,477926,0,2274,1326,0,475339,7436,13582973,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",24224936,139600,0,0.41,0.03,0,13170 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",325200,431000,8760,8,176258000,0,3324533,63486109,66810642,205,80539157,665541,6810251,0,0,0,0,0,151587,0,1339166,1553,0,3922,4338,8976358,51,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2252179,1024,0,2.67,2.61,0,0,"Gallons",2063233,139100,0,0.37,0,0.03,14710 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Browns Ferry","Nuclear","01/01/74","1/1/1977",3456000,2529000,8760,1085,1.771301e+10,890631,909522117,3830292072,4740704820,1372,47061477,58344025,102890781,3642332,11672365,0,0,16130309,26099224,0,5560106,0,25822517,1921329,0,252082988,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MillionBTU",186421503,0,0,0,0.53,0,10520 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Cumberland","Steam","01/01/73","1/1/1973",2600000,2591000,8760,323,1.6530325e+10,1829568,103903145,1638681020,1744413733,671,63827428,5077791,197194700,0,86656,0,0,3945,13987241,0,1210473,1306476,16946838,4232440,841362,240887922,15,"Tons",6868849,10459,26.16,27.86,1.2,0.01,9746,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","1/1/1972",820300,622000,8760,9,264695000,0,3063638,102977658,106041296,129,1709273,879771,11709062,0,0,0,0,0,72128,0,301000,0,0,150309,2816,13115086,50,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3589538,1024,0,3.06,3.03,0,0,"Gallons",1173222,139500,0,0.55,0,0.03,14460 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","1/1/1972",476000,420000,8760,7,326221000,0,2826177,64911682,67737859,142,3078759,1248563,12167389,0,0,0,0,0,69117,0,27275,0,0,74,2699,13515117,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3866688,1024,0,2.8,2.71,0,0,"Gallons",3619161,138400,0,0.35,0,0.03,13670 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Bull Run","Steam","01/01/67","1/1/1967",950000,912000,8760,87,4389788000,2220883,35786684,300943172,338950739,357,21987402,2324904,50419615,0,2286709,0,0,1742,6906593,0,754423,481980,8505768,2788903,314448,74785085,17,"Tons",1593346,11895,28.85,30.74,1.24,0.01,9257,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Thomas H. Allen","Steam","01/01/59","1/1/1959",990000,858000,8760,122,4102572000,142024,73025058,451231229,524398311,530,20254094,1206283,60294160,0,16,0,0,0,9854407,0,392524,824748,8011764,5402527,184253,86170682,21,"Tons",2039487,9680,25.5,29.45,1.39,0.01,10585,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Watts Bar","Steam","01/01/42","1/1/1945",240000,0,8760,0,-1381000,11997,4933530,18578656,23524183,98,-6629,177,0,0,0,0,0,0,109802,0,908,5,0,0,0,110892,-80,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Paradise","Steam","01/01/63","1/1/1970",2558200,2286000,8760,296,1.4181992e+10,8519495,115906466,1287447341,1411873302,552,57696636,6093708,168293657,0,752026,0,0,536,10779025,0,3529172,4127133,18094770,3094627,676700,215441354,15,"Tons",6332104,10413,21.43,26.2,1.14,0.01,10280,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Gallatin","Steam","01/01/56","1/1/1959",1255200,992000,8760,131,7002818000,690082,44703289,427469961,472863332,377,5073325,1612720,80238724,0,1258244,0,0,73323,7350012,0,1803476,714460,6039653,3054984,792751,102938347,15,"Tons",3266195,9540,22.99,24.49,1.19,0.01,9651,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"John Sevier","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1957",800000,748000,8760,129,5522165000,1570328,37309270,253176616,292056214,365,2993416,946133,70531483,0,3286201,0,0,0,4864155,0,569877,953882,3537596,666934,559907,85916168,16,"Tons",2120222,11710,32.44,33.21,1.3,0.01,9802,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Kingston","Steam","01/01/54","1/1/1955",1700000,1583000,8760,275,1.0147089e+10,3475653,55125946,433125237,491726836,289,31839874,1201130,133624099,0,732904,0,0,671,15993919,0,2888077,697638,10886872,3114678,359796,169499784,17,"Tons",4038449,11134,31.75,32.96,1.34,0.01,9845,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Colbert","Steam","01/01/55","1/1/1965",1350000,1283000,8760,222,6557785000,279029,50717782,608908796,659905607,489,12808186,3684548,92134159,0,115314,0,0,3096,11894009,0,1552144,1216679,16776178,4392373,150021,131918521,20,"Tons",2890398,10787,27.4,31.47,1.38,0.01,10066,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Shawnee","Steam","01/01/53","1/1/1956",1750000,1368000,8760,264,8060005000,504507,64076435,534941906,599522848,343,20760203,5379072,113531307,0,6565666,0,0,278,7470171,0,2988378,2163530,11022440,5415043,396055,154931940,19,"Tons",3766896,10234,28.54,29.83,1.34,0.01,10474,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Johnsonville","Steam","01/01/51","1/1/1959",1485200,1213000,8760,269,6638234000,87967,76839994,522564850,599492811,404,5328716,12443723,83697340,0,-481100,0,0,6321,6501533,0,2973740,1891947,6444598,2867797,430252,116776151,18,"Tons",2922958,11389,26.49,28.52,1.16,0.01,10912,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tennessee Valley Authority",18642,1999,"Widows Creek","Steam","01/01/52","1/1/1965",1968760,1652000,8760,332,8498846000,855691,74795817,748521437,824172945,419,22653730,3695032,119092329,0,6555644,0,0,1697,9854746,0,1449646,2594983,13869309,4635675,4932791,166681852,20,"Tons",3858785,10808,28.8,30.16,1.27,0.01,10896,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"PALO VERDE 17.49%","n","01/01/86","01/01/88",666364,659000,8760,0,5317709000,1244457,281584974,735793972,1018623403,1529,6013000,4282694,25651422,2986065,4032493,0,0,2276671,26939892,0,5837013,1933729,6303817,3749209,2418208,86411213,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBTU",57406,0,0,440.13,0.44,0.01,10795,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"San Tan","Combined Cy","01/01/74","01/01/75",414000,292000,4112,43,714062000,149179,2773141,65463525,68385845,165,-5000,380221,14107193,0,1594474,0,0,0,845877,0,332730,170816,0,7389209,249749,25070269,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",6579686,1017,2.12,2.12,2.08,0.02,9372,"BBL",291,485968,0,24.61,4.22,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"SOLAR PV1 & PV2","So1ar","01/01/98","01/01/98",216,100,3000,0,119493,0,0,1676818,1676818,7763,1852000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Steam","01/01/52","01/01/54",108000,106000,736,12,50072000,313326,2433283,15283485,18030094,167,726000,180057,1483303,0,338591,0,0,169009,304652,0,157896,27729,608781,344347,214929,3829294,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",651225,1016,2.16,2.16,2.12,0.03,13215,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"KYRENE","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/73",226850,149000,290,0,18990000,0,0,16888448,16888448,74,0,114913,724438,0,85074,0,0,0,40298,0,64493,11249,0,291038,96634,1428137,75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",281631,1017,2.09,2.09,2.06,0.04,15094,"BBL",60,488889,0,24.61,4.19,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"MOHAVE 10%","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",163620,158000,8715,0,996913000,42812,5046928,50920964,56010704,342,1221000,250561,13703464,0,389195,0,0,245787,1776796,-12611,497248,178489,1673455,685271,112185,19499840,20,"Tons",457815,10939,28.47,29.64,1.35,0.01,10093,"MCF",45107,1028,0,2.94,2.86,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CORONADO","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/80",821880,760000,8760,213,5039392000,8300198,158523884,696108809,862932891,1050,7523000,1228492,96325127,0,4607490,0,0,403466,4002498,10446,1754276,1703703,12035645,3902862,1238765,127212770,25,"Tons",2632698,9886,34.53,35.42,1.79,0.02,10357,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",24155,137315,24.21,26.79,4.65,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CRAIG 29%","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/81",259414,248000,8760,0,2050747000,83589,52424794,181936864,234445247,904,680000,368849,22362014,0,1036824,0,0,425951,1689040,12271,323682,251566,1760910,701820,370069,29302996,14,"Coal",1040589,10060,22.56,21.42,1.06,0.01,10223,"MCF",28100,1000,0,2.49,2.49,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"CROSS CUT","Steam","01/01/42","01/01/49",30000,3000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 21.7%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",522857,488000,8760,539,3676183000,42866,27115117,246304509,273462492,523,5605000,1396220,45545213,0,1123640,0,0,257918,3750053,132023,667722,165042,7069421,2110905,434407,62652564,17,"Tons",1685726,10956,23.51,26.74,1.22,0.01,10061,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",8625,139078,22.75,28.63,4.9,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"NAVAJO 100%","Steam","01/01/74","01/01/76",2409480,2250000,8760,539,1.6020912e+10,197537,124954457,1135043822,1260195816,523,25829493,6236459,196347455,0,5554459,0,0,1293757,8406791,0,3306198,769371,29759456,10024854,2263428,263962228,16,"Tons",7339290,10979,23.5,26.63,1.21,0.01,10074,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",39756,139079,22.75,22.47,3.85,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"FOUR CORNERS 10%","Steam","01/01/69","01/01/70",163620,148000,8760,0,1176172000,11573,7334703,91939839,99286115,607,37000,105696,11684589,0,978340,0,0,90099,1040379,83795,135949,61864,1112429,291525,340786,15925451,14,"Tons",644302,8885,17.41,17.97,1.01,0.01,9757,"MCF",26430,1008,0,4.13,4.1,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"HAYDEN 50%","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",137700,131000,6809,0,812423000,482702,13855905,64632670,78971277,574,16419000,157050,8427442,0,469402,0,0,101091,1360780,0,245277,92834,431566,123971,241674,11651087,14,"Tons",413486,10561,22.49,20.28,0.96,0.01,10759,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",1248,138870,26.63,32.67,5.6,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/61",390472,407000,4062,62,888092000,139014,5833721,51714773,57687508,148,23000,345003,21091146,0,1032200,0,0,1186582,715713,0,741888,530777,2232219,897096,413430,29186054,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",9553025,1009,2.14,2.14,2.12,0.02,10859,"BBL",3,500000,0,24.61,4.1,0,0 "Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"AGUA FRIA","Gas Turbine","01/01/74","01/01/75",222950,197000,451,0,42223000,0,299904,22692012,22991916,103,0,108584,1469697,0,233742,0,0,0,36481,0,284381,9332,0,296342,34359,2472918,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",617372,1007,2.12,0,2.1,0.03,14371,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Alexandria City",298,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/56","01/01/74",171000,170000,5326,20,194429,0,0,0,0,0,0,708998,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,199997,14994,0,404462,0,1328451,6833,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346281,10,2.24,2.24,2.14,0.03,12.45,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/50",,102500,103000,8760,45,381623000,0,0,0,0,0,0,4120850,6152121,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,10272971,27,,239196,8800,25.72,25.72,1.46,0.02,11031,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Ames City of",554,1999,,"GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","1/1/1972",22000,18000,95,0,1007000,0,0,0,0,0,0,9422,53460,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62882,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,99000,137300,0.54,0.54,3.93,0.05,13498 "Anaheim City of",590,1999,,"GAS TRUBINE","01/01/90","01/01/91",49270,45998,638,6,27719000,0,9226000,27237000,36463000,740,0,280835,699954,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,187223,0,0,0,1146979,2314991,84,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",258683,1009,2.76,2.76,2.74,25.7,9394,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#1","4 Gas 2 Int","01/01/62","01/01/72",85000,33000,1010,14,9983618,80839,3457655,22418738,25957232,305,380194,55796,353989,0,0,0,0,809120,0,3922,67280,67353,0,442853,0,1800313,180,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,273580,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.03,19744,778,0,133500,33.82,33.82,6.03,0,0 "Anchorage City of",599,1999,"#2","3 Gas 1 Ste","01/01/75","01/01/84",243200,151000,19516,30,759258360,11240,8928538,75136820,84076598,346,5364843,257796,10642281,0,678572,0,0,1623991,233929,0,330573,231135,303990,1190866,118352,15611485,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7701758,0,1000,1.38,1.38,1.38,0.01,10144,570,0,133500,34.71,34.71,6.19,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Gas Turbine","01/01/54","01/01/54",5500,5000,0,0,493000,0,0,1065016,1065016,194,0,142,36663,0,0,0,0,7532,0,0,143,0,0,142049,0,186529,378,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1347,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Northeast","Steam","01/01/71","01/01/71",31500,31300,7566,24,120607160,70498,2376720,5711293,8158511,259,0,42490,2760067,0,395223,0,0,366434,798118,0,24135,51518,290200,20129,3652,4751966,39,"TON",58175,12000,39.8,39.48,1.64,0.02,12637,"MCF",125541,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.03,12648,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1009,1999,"Downtown","Steam","01/01/35","01/01/54",27500,22500,465,11,4508000,24099,1221355,5587700,6833154,248,0,31568,193351,0,41643,0,0,12652,492890,0,23781,136549,88433,55977,1897,1078741,239,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",70119,1020,2.75,2.75,2.7,0.04,15874,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER TURBINES","GAS TURBINE","01/01/88","01/01/88",200000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER SOLAR","SOLAR","01/01/86","01/01/86",300,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"DECKER","STEAM","01/01/70","01/01/77",726000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"HOLLY","STEAM","01/01/60","01/01/74",558000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Austin City of",1015,1999,"SEAHOLM","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/55",120000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Braintree Town of",2144,1999,"Potter II","Gas Turbine","01/01/77","01/01/77",97500,79500,1284,27,72929000,20271,3762859,18429374,22212504,228,132748,176565,2625145,0,1154442,0,0,0,0,0,158096,316309,488498,491410,262035,5672500,78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",931167,1035,3.03,3.03,2.92,0.03,11631,"BBLS",14190,138809,15.72,15.72,2.7,0.03,10520 "Brownsville Public Utils Board",2409,1999,"SILAS RAY","STEAM GAS T","01/01/46","01/01/77",155000,197000,5256,29,206,528443,4499041,192117166,197144650,1272,0,205477,6239714,0,1311,0,0,155739,309455,0,74856,224382,203068,176038,1264465,8854505,42983034,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2346974,1059,2.65,2.65,2.5,0.03,12048,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2439,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/70","01/01/87",39,30,265,8,5177,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,311874,0,0,0,0,499578,0,0,0,0,0,216081,0,1027533,198480,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",72688,1000,3.8,3.8,3.8,0.06,29839,"Bbl29839",639,128000,55.63,55.63,7.12,0.06,29839 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Bryan Municipal","STEAM, GAS","01/01/55","01/01/74",138000,115000,0,20,118273000,0,7590674,7546886,15137560,110,46427,76607,3529286,0,372623,0,0,606045,154868,9320,63805,20315,520977,159461,31344,5544651,47,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1626575,1,2.25,2.25,2.21,0.03,14.05,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Bryan City of",2442,1999,"Roland C. Dandy","STEAM","01/01/77","01/01/77",105000,106000,0,19,461142000,1183486,10201555,18752019,30137060,287,105283,76291,11510542,0,391030,0,0,512056,181517,12858,53081,31539,405327,91686,57727,13323654,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",5120070,1,2.24,2.24,2.21,0.02,11.36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Gas Turbine","Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/71",25500,25000,106,1,2093500,13587,531143,3214616,3759346,147,17164,6073,130467,0,0,0,0,324,5442,16648,0,0,0,75762,0,234716,112,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",6016,137674,20.61,21.69,3.75,0.06,16616 "Burlington City of",2548,1999,"Joseph C McNeil GenrЬ ","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",50,53,4305,48,183109400,278455,18147811,50484579,68910845,1378217,571376,140467,6439721,0,788415,0,0,291816,360657,0,131396,35661,553086,1325161,20193,10086573,55,"Wood-Tons",263762,4750,23.46,23.52,2.47,0.03,13742,"MCF",66041,1012124,2.82,2.82,2.78,0.24,86785,"BBL",2260,136430,20.13,21.19,3.7,0,71.02 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Streeter Station","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/73",51500,50000,1650,23,38111600,281328,3758281,14375110,18414719,358,699506,97410,1113417,0,230220,0,0,102634,142771,0,90418,180725,588058,55402,9122,2610177,68,"Tons",19527,12429,38.79,36.49,1.47,0.02,14033.99,"MCF",49410,1000,2.75,2.75,2.75,0.04,14033.99,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Cedar Falls City of",3203,1999,"Combustion Turbine","Combustion","01/01/68","01/01/68",25000,20000,193,0,2814300,70777,134588,3497629,3702994,148,3062,4978,122537,0,0,0,0,5713,0,0,6674,9708,0,32837,0,182447,65,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",50599,1000,2.42,2.42,2.42,0.04,17979.25,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"Reid Garner #4","Steam-coal","01/01/83","01/01/83",275000,250000,0,96,1597086000,319709000,0,0,319709000,1163,0,0,22054817,0,0,0,0,0,21659183,0,0,0,0,0,0,43714000,27,"Tons",672949,11858,0,13.11,1.31,0.01,11079,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",7515,133622,0,25,4.55,0.05,11570 "California Dept-Wtr Resources",3255,1999,"BottleRock & S Geysep","Steam-Geoth","01/01/85","01/01/85",55000,0,0,0,0,10000,0,0,10000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,0,0,0,0,0,553000,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Chanute City of",3355,1999,"Plant #3","Internal Co","01/01/85","01/01/91",31915,39975,595,8,10378156,50000,612000,15500000,16162000,506,0,369525,245371,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,166666,0,0,136912,0,918474,89,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",78668,1000,2.66,2.66,2.66,0.02,0.02,"Barrels",3969,138000,26.57,26.57,0.08,0.01,0.01 "PUD No 1 of Clark County",3660,1999,"River Road CCCT","Gas Turbine","01/01/97","01/01/97",248000,258504,7058,21,1711891704,1053160,141767983,13187783,156008926,629,2319343,4203148,23066109,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,91900,0,0,0,27361157,16,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",11463,1060,2042,2012,1.9,0.01,7114,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Combine Cyc","01/01/71","01/01/71",25550,24000,2149,6,43507,0,0,4581109,4581109,179,0,10000,1053091,0,0,0,0,130000,80000,0,10000,0,12009,328580,0,1623680,37320,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",374997,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.02,8.62,"BBL",70,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.05,13.99 "Clarksdale City of",3702,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/65","01/01/65",11500,11500,754,6,12158,0,0,1445133,1445133,126,0,10000,478409,0,0,0,0,100000,50000,0,20000,0,0,226974,0,885383,72823,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",169662,1000,2.8,2.8,2.8,0.03,13.99,"BBL",115,142.5,23.14,23.14,3.86,0.07,20.18 "Coffeyville City o",3892,1999,"COFFEYVILLE","STEAM","01/01/01","01/01/73",56985,55900,4013,23,68578900,0,0,0,0,0,0,57285,2419645,0,0,0,0,0,1146750,0,0,0,8610,0,0,3632290,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MMBTU",938070,1000,2.25,2.58,2.58,0.03,1368,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Steam","01/01/00","01/01/64",11125,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,68864,7301,41,105,51389,127700,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Coldwater Board of Public Util",3915,1999,,"Diesel","01/01/48","01/01/78",13250,45933,1719,6,7081208,0,0,0,0,0,0,40423,214682,0,0,0,0,37863,0,0,0,12739,0,71418,0,377125,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",65604,9530000,2.84,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1725,126000,17.7,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Birdsall","Steam-Gas","01/01/53","01/01/57",62500,4500,1717,4,20716000,10761,2593301,11384249,13988311,224,0,67716,1180669,0,107787,0,0,227078,88988,0,31363,89311,290603,224308,38374,2346197,113,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",412714,806,2.83,2.83,3.52,0.06,16212,"GALLONS",22000,137420,0.11,0.11,0.81,0.01,16212 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Drake","Steam-Gas","01/01/25","01/01/74",257300,256000,8760,106,1484262000,2725551,23014851,80547185,106287587,413,0,1059853,25816108,0,1094453,0,0,3228406,1184954,0,462905,237248,4111443,1735831,152472,39083673,26,"TONS",769313,10914,29.13,31.49,1.44,0.01,11585,"MCF",494125,808,2.73,2.73,3.38,0.03,11585,"BARRELS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"Nixon","Steam-Gas","01/01/80","01/01/80",207000,214000,6081,81,1117841000,5059222,39785705,107090082,151935009,734,0,969721,11571054,0,779121,0,0,1343687,1057607,0,489855,218501,3309067,2974204,146609,22859426,20,"TONS",538337,10432,18.31,18.84,0.9,0,10120,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",13952,136738,24.87,24.87,4.33,0.04,10120 "Colorado Springs City of",3989,1999,"CTS","Gas","01/01/99","01/01/99",71660,73000,458,0,22292000,418573,123167,32084223,32625963,455,0,0,715385,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,26204,0,741589,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",291394,983,2.89,2.87,2.92,0.03,12852,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbia City of",4045,1999,,"Steam/Gas T","01/01/10","01/01/70",86000,226000,8760,46,62152000,115894,3578025,15986526,19680445,229,5320808,43503,2133251,0,531664,0,0,967929,376491,0,170114,28005,512239,452108,0,5215304,84,"Tons",37319,13265,53.83,53.69,2.02,3.22,15930,"Mcf",34179,0,3.64,3.64,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Columbus City of",4065,1999,"O'Shaughnessy",,,,5000,5000,0,1,5860000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,49898,0,0,0,0,0,2864,0,52762,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Concord City of",4150,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,545243,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Connecticut Mun Elec Engy Coop",4180,1999,"Millstone Unit 3","Nuclear (e)","01/01/86","01/01/86",1253100,1164700,7329,933,8277624400,0,20415627,29930688,50346315,40,0,324496,363329,24201,162455,0,0,48209,296706,13608,313554,74201,315415,228127,1354,2165655,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Wansley 1 & 2","Coal fired","01/01/76","01/01/78",22220,0,0,0,149590620,0,0,9113036,9113036,410,28304,29233,2186381,0,24950,0,0,15863,81536,0,42895,19710,138435,167350,13819,2720172,18,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Dalton City of",4744,1999,"Scherer 1 & 2","Coal fired","/ /","01/01/84",22680,0,0,0,144814966,0,0,13467749,13467749,594,50818,27106,2605498,0,25617,0,0,15303,77539,0,34949,22981,256897,16076,11927,3093893,21,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Denton City of",5063,1999,"SPENCER PLANT","STEAM","01/01/55","01/01/73",179000,259100,11980,36,305539695,0,0,0,0,0,0,233373,9138796,0,348227,0,0,468112,432003,0,71604,11794,211613,467529,210327,11593378,38,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",3800668,1,2.24,2.24,2.24,2.99,12.43,"BBl",0,139.68,7.82,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Willamette","Steam","01/01/31","01/01/50",25000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1189332,1189332,48,0,0,260,0,1204,0,0,-975,0,0,0,0,0,5095,7459,13043,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Eugene City of",6022,1999,"Energy Center","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",51200,41000,0,0,192829000,1280,320371,7521672,7843323,153,0,13058,1366594,0,0,0,0,261785,0,0,0,94,0,127793,0,1769324,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,321587,0,2.51,0,0,0,2495.24,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"ANIMAS","STEAM-COMBI","01/01/55","01/01/94",32180,28000,7808,14,170805000,5968,1109574,25033191,26148733,813,0,70145,3611891,0,225548,0,0,460952,226694,0,122984,0,217797,1021413,38103,5995527,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1668856,1013,2.13,2.13,2.1,0.02,9897,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Farmington City of",6204,1999,"SAN JUAN","STEAM-COAL","/ /","/ /",4300042200,43000,7919,10,293222700,0,5471749,62874731,68346480,0,0,71242,5641682,0,114021,0,0,120758,93838,131,62021,34762,382623,77158,65298,6663534,23,"TONS",167448,9421,32.33,32.33,1.72,0.01,10774,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Fayetteville Public Works Comm",6235,1999,"Butler-Warner Gen PtP","Gas-Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/88",303400,276500,1134,33,0,749336,5123088,100277060,106149484,350,4108529,0,-6665,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,292639,-141172,144802,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1724674,1046,2.72,2.72,2.6,0.03,12249.5,"Barrels",4,138800,27.15,27.87,4.78,0.06,13375.25 "Fort Pierce Utilities Auth",6616,1999,"Steam","Steam","01/01/21","01/01/89",120011,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,564929,6990,0,231196,0,0,428922,138247,0,21508,56082,204594,1437831,87424,3177723,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #1","Internal Co",,"01/01/64",13190,0,0,9,2066120,5022,1113459,3036221,4154702,315,51721,42612,209909,0,0,0,0,518539,0,0,0,79604,0,0,0,850664,412,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",293755,138788,0.81,0.68,0.18,0.97,14.88 "Freeport Village of Inc",6775,1999,"Power Plant #2","Internal Co","1/1/1968","01/01/73",37390,57000,1,9,1277200,1827,3178208,8088951,11268986,301,0,52596,205053,0,0,0,0,634322,0,28573,0,101784,0,0,0,1022328,800,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",319336,138788,0.86,0.64,0.13,0.16,9.2 "Fremont City of",6779,1999,"Wright","Steam","01/01/56","01/01/76",132700,83390,8760,47,336075,202231,5905920,42850719,48958870,369,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"DEERHAVEN","STEAM (330-","01/01/69","01/01/81",327500,290000,12226,0,1352589900,254025,31881608,176716069,208851702,638,0,357675,29040171,0,1948913,669408,0,709824,318849,0,0,234571,2947099,1471570,212996,37911076,28,"Tons",434183,13091,0,43.31,1.65,0.02,10917.81,"Mcf",3363772,1047,0,2.65,2.53,0.03,12133.79,"Barrels",37465,152355.8,0,17.6,2.75,0.03,11346.38 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"DEERHAVEN","GAS TURBINE","01/01/76","01/01/97",121000,106000,1766,0,84018600,0,1321304,28064043,29385347,243,0,39742,3231130,0,28286,26111,0,2792,9961,0,0,15073,36357,60563,3746,3453761,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1122969,1047,0,2.86,2.74,0.04,14030.74,"Barrels",692,139057.2,0,20.13,3.45,0.06,18331.59 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"CRYSTAL RIVER","NUCLEAR","01/01/77","01/01/77",12530,13000,8736,0,100282800,3267,4269194,7051636,11324097,904,0,649986,434350,0,10743,21,0,0,421140,180700,453410,74742,63458,47809,56124,2392483,24,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mmbtu",1060237,1,0,0.41,0.41,0,10572.47,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"KELLY","STEAM (310,","01/01/13","01/01/65",69000,70000,6288,38,122927200,29000,3448845,16424862,19902707,288,0,116270,4283336,0,725363,41979,0,353107,42098,0,37872,118991,299095,266800,56631,6341542,52,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1386371,1041,0,2.8,2.69,0.04,1359.07,"Barrels",27416,150944,0,14.6,2.3,0.03,11701.63 "Gainesville Regional Utiliti",6909,1999,"KELLY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/38","01/01/65",48900,23000,187,0,1323700,0,3911,6914299,6918210,141,0,2848,102069,0,3654,898,0,156,983,0,56884,2806,253,6844,9228,186623,141,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",34317,1041,0,2.97,2.85,0.08,27441.76,"Barrels",125,137462.3,0,2.18,0.38,0.01,33607.61 "Garland City of",6958,1999,"C E Newman","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/64",90,0,0,15,52988540,0,0,0,0,0,0,393626,2065599,0,337730,0,0,304378,0,0,0,95143,576059,204996,14547,3992078,75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",751031,1027,2.68,2.68,2.61,0.03,14558,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Garland City of",6958,1999,"Ray Olinger","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/75",340,0,0,53,1124489300,352431,77747728,0,78100159,229706,0,925754,28773849,0,899894,0,0,340126,0,0,75135,141289,2796239,1696904,58564,35707754,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",12530666,1015,2.29,2.29,2.25,0.02,11307,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Glendale City of",7294,1999,"Grayson Power Plant","C.C. 8 & St","01/01/77","01/01/77",98000,30000,6550,46,83627000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2304766,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2304766,28,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,885159,1032,2.6,2.6,2.52,0.02,10922,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Glendale City of",7294,1999,"Grayson Power Plant","Steam 3, 4,","01/01/53","01/01/64",117000,79000,8095,46,235016000,0,0,0,0,0,0,83118,12398533,0,2564287,0,0,0,199205,0,21789,81361,407902,1157488,0,16913683,72,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,6354878,665,1.96,1.96,2.94,0.04,13452,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Glendale City of",7294,1999,"Grayson Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","01/01/74",53000,1000,34332,46,295600,0,0,0,0,0,0,60626,127128,0,0,0,0,0,312,0,0,0,73,124,0,188263,637,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,49491,1032,2.57,2.57,2.49,0.04,17276,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Haven City of",7483,1999,"Sims 111","Steam","01/01/61","01/01/83",65000,65640,7248,34,325839300,194823,17546372,59386460,77127655,1187,608741,60314,5842025,0,518785,0,0,229677,414863,0,31843,59567,1244336,91370,29265,8522045,26,"tons",160760,11367,0,36.34,1.59,17.93,11338,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",13850,1000,0,4.34,0,0,0 "Grand Haven City of",7483,1999,"Diesel Plant","internal co","01/01/31","01/01/74",20430,9030,28,1,72500,27458,445645,4740308,5213411,255,22625,776,38089,0,0,0,0,0,30018,0,0,2297,0,0,74851,146031,2014,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",933,1000,0,4.34,11.87,525.39,44239,"brls",376,144000,0,0.05,0,0,0 "Grand River Dam Authority",7490,1999,"GRDA #1","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",490000,519,8044,97,3074727000,1689890,98855201,234243925,334789016,683,0,134410,29404628,0,904037,0,0,798928,375518,0,169174,314792,2121091,430639,266073,34919290,11,"TONS",1895637,8384,14.42,14.42,0.86,0,10337.97,"MCF",107483,1006,2.44,2.44,2.39,0,35.72,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand River Dam Authority",7490,1999,"GRDA #2","STEAM","01/01/86","01/01/86",520000,553,8023,120,2084345000,0,53986144,402596506,456582650,878,0,83334,20574802,0,2216945,0,0,525668,233196,0,104888,178859,2453678,344835,172902,26889107,13,"TONS",2049199,8701,14.76,15.18,0.87,0,10756.78,"MCF",67904,1006,2.52,2.52,2.46,0,20.98,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "PUD No 1 of Grays Harbor Cnty",7548,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,82928,2208894,12774993,15066815,0,0,61617,6477957,0,27174,0,0,0,581817,934,212,0,14634,18437,28696,7211478,0,"Tons",249975,8218,25.98,25.74,1.56,0.02,10782,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Greenwood Utilities Comm",7651,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,445,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Greenwood Utilities Comm",7651,1999,"Wright","Steam","1/1/1902","1/1/1955",17500,11721,1472,12,10291142,44232,477968,5142250,5664450,324,0,43208,293538,0,168488,0,0,154435,29059,1228,19461,29411,12072,62764,5858,819522,80,"Tons",140,13248,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",93243,1019,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Greenwood Utilities Comm",7651,1999,"Henderson","Steam","1/1/1960","1/1/1967",46179,40900,2903,23,50661210,117233,1499663,13202167,14819063,321,0,56586,2045916,0,255116,0,0,157434,117767,0,52669,867,272422,88793,111926,3159496,62,"Tons",545,13100,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",687608,1019,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",120,138486,0,0,0,0,0 "Harrisonburg City of",8198,1999,"PLEASANT VALLEY","GAS-TURBINE","01/01/97","01/01/98",14000,13795,0,2,1546628,18753,975623,6407017,7401393,529,0,9077,75597,0,0,0,0,10595,4440,0,0,5214,15176,0,188,120287,78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"GALLONS",186918,0,0.4,0.4,0,0,0 "Harrisonburg City of",8198,1999,"MT. CLINTON","GAS-TURBINE","01/01/98","01/01/99",14000,8846,0,2,525731,0,139162,2862528,3001690,214,0,1057,18332,0,0,0,0,6844,366,0,0,5001,1332,0,21,32953,63,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"GALLONS",66356,0,0.4,0.4,0,0,0 "Henderson City Utility Comm",8449,1999,"STATION ONE","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/68",40591,20000,0,30,4898138,0,2293070,8187353,10480423,258,0,312060,1078245,0,309093,0,0,263344,276291,0,0,14500,164236,186376,9722,2613867,534,"TONS",34517,11434,28.82,28.66,1.31,20.31,11501,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Henderson City Utility Comm",8449,1999,"STATION TWO","STEAM","01/01/73","01/01/74",350000,312000,0,0,2104822040,0,0,115186365,115186365,329,0,469431,479283,0,1971482,0,0,894387,491084,0,272097,167212,3356917,539212,306867,8947972,4,"TONS",249039,11435,23.99,24.09,1.05,10.97,11458,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Holland City of",8723,1999,"48th Street","Oil/Gas Tur","01/01/94","01/01/94",75300,75651,1207,0,55601071,336770,5131914,24597253,30065937,399,33140,0,1847609,0,0,0,0,304910,0,0,0,0,0,70013,0,2222532,40,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",717801,1020,2.6,2.6,2.55,0.03,13168,"Brls",2149,137000,29.4,29.4,5.11,0,222 "Holland City of",8723,1999,"James DeYoung","Steam","01/01/41","01/01/68",62250,55503,8760,45,321994740,803565,5456558,33980556,40240679,646,169931,203954,7360870,0,1786693,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1639115,0,10990632,34,"Tons",168615,12700,41,41,1.57,0.02,13300,"Mcf",4050,1020,3,3,2.94,0,13,"Brs",250,137000,29.4,29.4,5.11,0,4.46 "Holland City of",8723,1999,"6th Street","Oi/Gas Turb","01/01/74","/ /",24000,13000,54,0,139040,20548,219739,2965966,3206253,134,0,0,27012,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11677,0,38689,278,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Brs",1208,137000,29.4,29.4,5.11,0.25,49992 "Holyoke City of",8774,1999,"Steam","Conventiona","01/01/02","01/01/61",25500,18000,272,32,-1054,143821,1991971,11336832,13472624,528,0,1028334,2937101,0,124366,0,0,0,0,0,416066,0,0,0,0,307775,-292007,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",57642,1020,2.74,2.74,2.68,0.05,23544,"Barrels",265,152297,16.24,22.59,3.53,0.05,23544 "Homestead City of",8795,1999,"G.W.","Int. Combus","01/01/26","01/01/81",59100,63000,8700,21,73393186,7431029,52158226,0,59589255,1008,3549232,0,2715528,0,0,0,0,211533,0,0,749417,13328,0,1665477,0,5355283,73,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCP",652925,1091,2.85,3.21,2.85,0,10060,"BARRELS",13090,140600,24,24,0,0,1038 "Terrebonne Parish Consol Govt",8884,1999,"Houm plnt","Stem","01/01/62","01/01/76",78950,67,8908,26,108812349,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",1412914,1,2.82,2.82,2.66,0.03,13778,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Hudson Town of",8973,1999,"Cherry St Station","Internal Co","01/01/00","01/01/72",15200,15200,328,10,2018120,3500,332760,3278258,3614518,238,0,29030,151138,0,0,0,0,177436,0,0,27887,98252,0,122644,0,606387,300,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,33210,910,2.98,2.98,3.27,0,0,,2307,140000,24.47,22.62,3.85,0.04,0 "Hudson Town of",8973,1999,"HLP Peaking","Internal Co","01/01/62","01/01/62",4400,4400,283,0,1552200,0,1503,711956,713459,162,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lafayette City of",9096,1999,"Doc Bonin","Steam","01/01/65","01/01/77",331500,276000,14682,26,772281,302436,6849008,50156340,57307784,173,1732453,190840,21238385,0,398587,0,0,563223,268406,0,110983,25741,202633,459320,729180,24187298,31319,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",8285542,1055,2.47,2.47,2.34,0.02,11586,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lafayette City of",9096,1999,"Curtis A. Rodemacherи","Steam","01/01/51","01/01/60",33700,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Hutchinson Utilities Comm",9130,1999,"NO.2","GAS TURBINE","01/01/75","01/01/95",90500,52000,3484,8,143171,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1199515,1000000,1.94,1.94,1.94,0.02,857,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Hutchinson Utilities Comm",9130,1999,"NO.1","INTERNAL CO","01/01/41","01/01/63",19280,13000,481,17,1411,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",10876,1000000,2.5,2.5,2.5,0.02,11409,"BARRELS",898,138500,21.33,21.33,3.67,0.04,11409 "Hutchinson Utilities Comm",9130,1999,"NO.1","GAS TURBINE","01/01/71","01/01/71",16000,12600,1947,17,18870,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",210955,1000000,2.16,2.16,2.16,0.02,11179,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"YUMA AXIS (YUCCA)","STEAM/GAS T","01/01/59","01/01/59",97000,88000,8721,26,352808000,64181,2260883,23196343,25521407,263,0,379434,10637888,0,935878,0,0,640464,495843,0,99827,69611,406661,211055,674585,14551246,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",4064674,1009,2.34,2.34,2.32,0.03,11.62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"BRAWLEY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/62","01/01/62",22500,0,0,0,0,5071,76410,2726341,2807822,125,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1734,0,0,0,2153,82770,0,0,86657,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"ROCKWOOD","GAS TURBINE","01/01/77","01/01/80",49900,43000,449,3,8735400,3032,432127,10030106,10465265,210,0,48642,178668,0,0,0,0,31135,0,0,83679,478,0,196364,0,538966,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",120588,1009,2.77,2.77,2.75,0.03,13.81,"BBLS",309,139000,31.32,31.32,5.36,0.08,12.78 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"EC STEAM PLANT","STEAM","01/01/49","01/01/93",236000,200000,14438,32,346976000,145322,8507545,92188450,100841317,427,0,435334,9038913,0,564914,0,0,928726,354013,0,378925,35949,1083557,364726,297164,13482221,39,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",3854124,1009,2.73,2.73,2.7,0.03,11.2,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Imperial Irrigation District",9216,1999,"COACHELLA PLANT","GAS TURBINE","01/01/73","01/01/76",92600,79900,484,3,8735400,0,660201,8509765,9169966,99,0,0,384991,0,0,0,0,16129,0,0,0,0,0,221825,0,622945,71,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",133342,1009,2.68,2.68,2.65,0.07,15.4,"BBLS",161,139000,19.82,19.82,3.4,0.03,15.49 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Station H","Combustion","01/01/72","01/01/72",43900,35000,768,0,9679000,0,264494,7881342,8145836,186,3650000,0,418654,0,0,0,0,259,6023,0,1558,1922,0,40063,6460,474939,49,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",165620,1006,2.52,2.52,2.5,4.32,17250,"barrel",70,137380,0,22.9,3.97,0,0 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Station I","Combustion","01/01/72","01/01/72",39200,20000,84,0,913000,0,302177,5529062,5831239,149,1900000,0,60551,0,0,0,0,165,6970,0,5781,13239,0,25841,31762,144309,158,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",2704,137380,19.9,22.39,3.88,6.63,17087 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Station J","Combustion","01/01/69","01/01/69",36000,25000,236,0,2002000,0,0,7805061,7805061,217,0,0,125702,0,0,0,0,222,1531,0,871,4113,0,24419,8730,165588,83,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",6516,137380,19.17,19.29,3.34,6.28,18779 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Missouri City","Steam","01/01/55","01/01/55",46000,39000,1671,4,15124000,35409,3991334,17761788,21788531,474,0,7082,502886,0,176489,0,0,179516,70526,0,12705,8751,225619,212687,60099,1456360,96,"tons",12047,11335,30.77,38.88,1.72,3.33,18669,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",1600,137380,20.32,22.13,3.83,0,0 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Blue Valley Steam","Steam","01/01/58","01/01/65",115000,84320,13965,66,241792052,334550,7113970,51575531,59024051,513,0,419819,4808525,0,524873,0,0,530126,996421,0,397024,47705,1359676,212400,446582,9743151,40,"tons",141859,10419,27.47,28,1.34,1.99,13563,"Mcf",318933,1007,2.6,2.6,2.58,0,0,"barrel",381,137380,19.7,29.02,5.03,0,0 "Independence City of",9231,1999,"Blue Valley RCT","Gas Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",61000,0,0,0,-34900,0,79423,9483847,9563270,157,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6781,13176,0,85297,2666,107920,-3092,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",0,0,19.7,0,0,0,0 "Indiana Municipal Power Agency",9234,1999,"Anderson","Combustion","01/01/92","01/01/92",77400,0,677,1,16207699,338303,2059957,27858215,30256475,391,24719,109921,852328,0,0,0,0,-99533,0,0,0,0,0,35406,0,898122,55,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",221255,1008,3.76,3.76,0,0.03,13866,"Barrels",913,135000,0,21.44,0,0,0 "Indiana Municipal Power Agency",9234,1999,"Richmond","Combistion","01/01/92","01/01/92",77400,0,672,2,16681301,285908,1897137,27678416,29861461,386,24719,109412,777649,0,0,0,0,63041,0,0,0,0,0,113291,0,1063393,64,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",205930,1008,3.25,3.25,0,0.03,13826,"Barrels",4618,135000,0,22.83,0,0,0 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"St. Johns River Powr","Steam","01/01/87","01/01/88",1359200,1254800,16230,379,9769075000,8261567,216790382,1265014325,1490066274,1096,3558053,1278911,141047857,0,5601281,0,0,1074855,5428044,46697,1187268,2385486,20285812,4095589,1403840,183835640,19,"Ton",3747220,12457,34.89,34.89,1.42,0.02,9594,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"bbl",63214,139174,0,21.47,2.12,0,0 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Southside Station","Steam","01/01/50","01/01/64",231600,212500,10904,10,554635000,260352,9143119,32049310,41452781,179,1629842,271851,15520408,0,1599580,0,0,0,206567,0,326718,25186,630482,191705,280057,19052554,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2507368,1060,0,2.34,3.06,0.03,11179,"Bbl",557864,151168,0,15.84,3.06,0.03,11179 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Northside Station","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/77",1158700,770000,15844,253,3351845000,2786108,56942751,225240754,284969613,246,33142204,2784678,74049151,0,5992982,0,0,44719,4602152,0,1374517,505398,7585701,1471833,857253,99268384,30,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",8655547,1061,0,2.25,2.88,0.02,10216,"Bbl",3945407,150694,0,13.69,2.88,0.02,10216 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Northside Station","Combustion","01/01/68","01/01/75",248400,133600,1573,0,37400000,0,13725,30470646,30484371,123,788220,0,2222304,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2222304,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Bbl",106276,141886,0,20.19,4.14,0.05,16933 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Kennedy Station","Steam","01/01/55","01/01/69",149600,99000,5097,10,347132000,1512681,17018214,28634062,47164957,315,401104,268512,9068081,0,772026,0,0,0,215330,0,64213,51497,330526,641660,660280,12072125,35,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",391837,1061,0,2.34,2.97,0.02,11107,"Bbl",540582,151503,0,14.74,2.97,0.02,11107 "Jacksonville Electric Auth",9617,1999,"Kennedy Station","Combustion","01/01/69","01/01/78",168600,154000,1125,0,42180000,0,1327436,21421124,22748560,135,25091556,0,2490159,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2490159,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Bbl",112392,139127,0,20.19,4.14,0.05,15570 "Jamestown City of",9645,1999,"Samuel A. Carlson","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/68",57700,49026,8760,35,150393293,431201,4905918,44660838,49997957,867,0,307142,3248587,0,767918,0,0,67674,0,0,323990,45918,307513,223184,92412,5384338,36,"Tons",90599,12698,32.64,32.62,1.3,0.02,15.15,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"NEARMAN","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",235000,0,6232,0,1163529000,1149455,33440175,132136477,166726107,709,0,2403060,10767308,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,4927543,0,0,0,0,18097911,16,"Tons",816559,11608,0,13.63,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",337856,0,0,0.53,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"QUINDARO","GAS TURBINE","01/01/61","01/01/77",121100,0,848,0,37328000,0,0,12878040,12878040,106,0,0,2472937,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,154961,0,0,0,0,2627898,70,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",82098,0,0,2.67,0,0,0,"Gallons",3996910,10968,0,0.56,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"Kaw","STEAM","01/01/55","01/01/62",144000,0,735,0,52780000,226366,10485751,61538861,72250978,502,0,1219250,2547603,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,120227,0,0,0,0,3887080,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",768569,14616,0,2.89,0,0,0,"Gallons",2470,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kansas City City of",9996,1999,"Quindaro","STEAM","01/01/66","01/01/71",232000,0,7553,0,432609000,318548,21469578,113626934,135415060,584,0,4220013,12201830,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6446514,0,0,0,0,22868357,53,"Tons",257094,10922,0,18.02,0,0,0,"MCF",136450,0,0,2.53,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kaukauna City of",10056,1999,"Gas-Turbine","Gas-Turbine","01/01/69","01/01/69",20000,20000,0,0,1633000,27532,147667,1773210,1948409,97,0,6258,0,0,0,0,0,5950,179,0,5243,0,0,25424,859,43913,27,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kaukauna City of",10056,1999,"Diesel","Internal Co","01/01/66","01/01/66",6000,6000,0,1,2547740,0,0,750737,750737,125,0,1797,0,0,0,0,0,17685,70,0,1675,0,0,119575,865,141667,56,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kennett City of",10152,1999,,,"01/01/42","01/01/75",31906,0,0,11,1634000,22309,787483,6445027,7254819,227,0,388548,59743,0,0,0,0,90225,0,0,0,0,0,71100,0,609616,373,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERAT","STOCK ISLAN","01/01/65","01/01/65",6000,1830,504,3,787200,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",1537,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.04,12420 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"BIG PINE & CUDJOE KE","PEAKING DIE","01/01/66","01/01/66",7800,6000,1241,3,1626000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",3240,147619,25.24,22.91,3.69,0.04,12353 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERAT","COMBUSTION","01/01/98","01/01/98",19770,17800,170,3,6338385,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",19072,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.07,18656 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERA","COMBUSTION","01/01/98","01/01/98",19770,17800,312,3,4201594,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",12081,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.06,17828 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERA","MEDIUM SPEE","01/01/92","01/01/92",19200,17400,1348,4,7680400,725946,2129491,33095400,35950837,1872,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",15168,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.04,12245 "Key West City of",10226,1999,"STOCK ISLAND GENERA","COMBUSION T","01/01/78","01/01/78",23450,20000,338,3,3341400,102063,3836252,41439758,45378073,1935,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",10618,147619,25.24,23.84,3.85,0.07,19703 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Cane Island Unit 1","Gas Turbine","01/01/94","01/01/95",40000,40500,959,0,14625850,2178026,8322640,16405426,26906092,673,0,155794,616975,0,21370,0,0,0,47552,0,0,82207,42233,3552,0,969683,66,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Cane Island Unit 2","Combined Cy","01/01/95","01/01/95",120000,120900,8016,0,410918450,0,18118934,33576386,51695320,431,0,574702,9819459,0,1048989,0,0,0,317852,44,602,7445,273743,228456,0,12271292,30,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Hansel 8-20","Internal Co","01/01/59","01/01/80",18350,17800,1896,7,2753500,83022,1284485,18177017,19544524,1065,0,0,60138,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,60138,22,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Kissimmee Utility Authority",10376,1999,"Hansel 21-23","Combined Cy","01/01/83","01/01/83",55000,52300,3391,23,48803800,188985,8733288,12117381,21039654,383,1360859,467366,1917038,0,669123,0,0,0,263562,0,0,9168,294075,290,407232,4027854,83,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lake Worth City of",10620,1999,"Tom G Smith","Gas Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",30000,0,0,0,9028400,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lake Worth City of",10620,1999,"Tom G Smith","Gas-Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",34000,0,10495,35,57950539,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lake Worth City of",10620,1999,"Tom G Smith","Internal Co","01/01/65","01/01/65",10000,0,1433,0,2538120,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"McIntosh","Steam","01/01/71",,404000,382000,7228,201,1839190600,1885069,31460078,296239998,329585145,816,8226431,522705,41752998,0,2155417,0,0,1371320,950229,0,705662,501402,5163353,1063922,1302923,55489931,30,"Tons",500198,12850,43.47,43.81,0,0,0,"MCF",5551769,953000,2.45,2.45,0,0,0,"BBLS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"McIntosh","Internal Co","01/01/70","1/1/1970",5500,5500,344,0,892340,0,0,1320630,1320630,240,0,0,34735,0,0,0,0,9947,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,44682,50,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBLS",1518,138953,25.45,22.89,3.92,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"McIntosh","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","1/1/1973",20200,20000,284,0,22266010,0,0,4357281,4357281,216,21292755,0,764571,0,0,0,0,494377,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1258948,57,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",67719,953000,2.51,2.51,2.39,0,0,"BBLS",927,138953,25.45,23.77,4.07,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"Larsen","Steam","01/01/59","1/1/1966",70000,87000,3471,7,109781131,18222,3205076,39859999,43083297,615,1568340,-458515,4264086,0,661973,0,0,352157,157768,0,224398,35362,686445,74964,71417,6070055,55,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1067068,953000,2.52,2.52,2.4,0,0,"BBLS",62536,149341,15.9,15.4,2.46,0,0 "Lakeland City of",10623,1999,"Larsen","GasTurbine","01/01/62","1/1/1992",141000,144000,5825,39,519222486,10000,355941,47760931,48126872,341,1320675,0,14688881,0,0,0,0,57111,49377,0,75387,135332,474794,0,18035,15498917,30,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",4954465,953000,2.5,2.5,2.38,0,0,"BBLS",778,138657,18.94,23.73,4.07,0,0 "Lansing City of",10704,1999,"Erickson","Steam","01/01/73","01/01/73",154716,155993,7562,28,902816777,503834,8008408,37441310,45953552,297,9431143,598448,15649944,0,1139751,0,0,375627,144309,0,521787,398880,1081673,289370,373441,20573230,23,"Tons",359532,12604,40.78,41.97,1.66,0.02,10054,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",2451,137028,18.35,17.87,3.1,0.03,10213 "Lansing City of",10704,1999,"Ottawa","Steam","01/01/38","01/01/54",2500,0,0,0,0,608570,3547880,114658,4271108,1708,1064667,0,0,0,43886,0,0,0,127,0,0,16474,0,0,716,61203,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lansing City of",10704,1999,"Eckert","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/00",375000,313553,8760,81,1359307426,17065,20619486,113409313,134045864,357,7390092,1095136,26848959,0,3418600,303612,0,443302,132055,0,712432,787553,4216929,2271054,978202,40742496,30,"tons",809048,10575,30.23,30.51,1.51,0.02,12067,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",12900,138067,18.25,18.61,3.21,0.03,9035 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"Laramie River","Steam","01/01/80",,183000,0,0,0,1368728000,948685,27384698,112496736,140830119,770,162367,402737,7659439,0,0,0,0,2448015,0,0,0,0,3077883,0,0,13588074,10,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"Rokeby 2","Gas Turbine","01/01/97","1/1/1997",95400,85000,472,10,27550000,292531,1645078,27003893,28941502,303,4175680,124454,675616,0,0,0,0,179579,0,0,6681,10203,0,200778,21818,1219129,44,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",338164,996,2.05,2.05,2.05,0.03,12591,"BBLS",1980,137799,0,22.26,3.78,0.06,14724 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"8th & J","Gas Turbine","01/01/72","1/1/1972",27000,31000,81,10,1838000,77662,98128,4865007,5040797,187,164554,41168,79431,0,0,0,0,43462,0,0,1750,5169,0,55828,0,226808,123,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",29571,989,2.75,2.75,2.79,0.04,16104,"BBLS",67,128691,0,22.26,3.78,0.07,17830 "Lincoln Electric System",11018,1999,"Rokeby #1","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","1/1/1975",72400,71000,64,10,2311000,95118,1918857,8492052,10506027,145,175405,74672,114678,0,0,0,0,94085,0,0,40687,67514,0,1328510,21818,1741964,754,"N/A",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",32475,994,2.33,2.33,2.34,0.03,14499,"BBLS",293,137799,19.45,22.23,3.77,0.08,20315 "Littleton Town of",11085,1999,"NEW HAVEN HARBOR",".225% JOINT",,,0,0,0,0,1732502,0,0,0,0,0,0,90,51512,0,948,0,0,0,0,0,2392,0,0,0,0,54942,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Logansport City of",11142,1999,"Logansport","Steam","01/01/58","01/01/64",38500,0,8760,22,162228320,109642,1405355,19237386,20752383,539,0,190031,3821848,0,128670,0,0,36753,919428,0,140403,20089,563819,408835,480785,6710661,41,90397,92870,11500,41.15,41.15,2.13,0.02,13.17,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Logansport City of",11142,1999,"Logansport","Oil/Gas","01/01/69","01/01/69",17500,0,0,0,577170,0,1025207,0,1025207,59,0,0,42618,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,42618,74,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"VALLEY","STEAM","01/01/54","01/01/56",545600,337000,0,7,27314000,926527,25439704,84246953,110613184,203,3500000,60235,13221495,0,55929,0,0,0,442925,0,11284,70392,77493,61823,114689,14116265,517,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",404724,1,3,3,2.96,37.96,12816,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"HARBOR","CONBINED ST","01/01/94","01/01/94",229000,558000,2259,41,524137000,1740059,87786094,289957234,379483387,1657,8879733,276214,3330349,0,62330,0,0,0,1084424,0,580563,202658,212797,374547,185390,6309272,12,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",4522291,1,3,3,2.96,25.77,8701,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"HARBOR","GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","01/01/72",38000,36000,48,0,850000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"HAYNES","STEAM","01/01/62","01/01/67",1608000,1489000,8015,123,2113574000,933038,37791521,306054386,344778945,214,1741576,1052843,50891914,0,3057224,0,0,1792056,5017847,0,939570,1424717,3202792,2787404,1583937,71750304,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",22709425,1,3,3,2.96,32.1,10839,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Los Angeles City of",11208,1999,"SCATTERGOOD","STEAM","01/01/58","01/01/74",823200,835000,8758,91,1679449000,515557,47288037,164431480,212235074,258,46903,1404338,66439099,0,1408691,0,0,0,3756004,0,214277,727252,3701955,1608703,1273919,80534238,48,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",15638964,1,3,3,2.96,28.3,9556,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lower Colorado River Authority",11269,1999,"Ferguson",,"01/01/74","01/01/74",446000000,0,0,0,1378410000,931823,26158508,42319502,69409833,0,0,347319,29342167,0,137242,0,0,734629,899018,0,332791,702887,413738,469747,33658,33413196,24,"TONS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",14169320,1013,2.06,2.06,2.03,0.02,10552,"BBL",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lower Colorado River Authority",11269,1999,"Fayette","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/88",1690000000,0,0,0,1.1015857e+10,13591047,103023934,837863878,954478859,1,0,2157811,109413990,0,3840257,0,0,2391848,4494846,0,2014006,1954362,4931568,1961033,403807,133563528,12,"TONS",6553001,8409,16.17,16.17,0.96,0,0,"MCF",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BBL",19258,141000,14.25,14.25,2.4,0,0 "Lower Colorado River Authority",11269,1999,"Sim Gideon","Steam","01/01/65","01/01/69",623000000,0,0,0,2101292000,458719,20455136,65676320,86590175,0,0,482445,43723684,0,794924,0,0,891660,1130940,0,200902,1092136,961820,567117,75540,49921168,24,"TONS",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",20136681,1095,2.1,2.1,1.91,0.02,10495,"BBL",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,,"STEAM","01/01/49","01/01/58",72000,51000,5256,6,20565500,6000,300000,13000000,13306000,185,0,105299,1101550,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,26625,6656,0,33282,0,1273412,62,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",382836,1025,2.88,2.88,2.81,0.05,19081,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,"BRANDON","GAS TURBINE","01/01/90","01/01/90",20000,21000,8760,8,139296480,0,1000000,15500000,16500000,825,0,233999,3337924,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,59168,14792,0,73959,0,3719842,27,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1543387,1018,2.16,2.16,2.12,0.02,11279,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,"HOLLY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/64","01/01/74",52500,45000,4818,3,21967922,10000,300000,5300000,5610000,107,0,11700,962730,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2958,740,0,3698,0,981826,45,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",384439,1040,2.5,2.5,2.41,0.04,18200,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Lubbock City of",11292,1999,"HOLLY","STEAM","01/01/65","01/01/78",98000,102000,8760,32,323909370,62000,1000000,21000000,22062000,225,0,818996,9820907,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,207086,51772,0,258858,0,11157619,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",3921699,1040,2.5,2.5,2.41,0.03,12592,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Manitowoc Public Utilities",11571,1999,"MPU","Gas-Turbine","01/01/99","01/01/99",25000,0,214,0,3613,290255,201403,6104428,6596086,264,0,0,264472,0,0,0,0,30590,0,0,0,0,0,41325,0,336387,93105,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",51,1000,0.41,0.41,4.17,0.07,0,"Barrels",2438,141200,20.88,20.88,3.52,0.07,0 "Manitowoc Public Utilities",11571,1999,"MPU","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/91",79000,107500,8760,39,249415,211671,5013787,36586533,41811991,529,0,138503,5701868,0,541602,0,0,470467,759564,704,62857,42576,1443126,445568,10944,9617779,38561,"Tons",163852,11080,40.02,40.02,1.81,0.02,0,"MCF",2,1000,0.71,0.71,7.13,0.02,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Manitowoc Public Utilities",11571,1999,"MPU","Internal Co","01/01/85","01/01/85",10500,0,207,0,2140,0,352901,5986839,6339740,604,0,6091,84690,0,0,0,0,49736,0,0,0,0,0,58906,0,199423,93188,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",8,1000,0.62,0.62,0.62,0.03,0,"Barrels",1570,141200,22.77,22.77,3.84,0.03,0 "Marquette City of",11701,1999,"Shiras Steam Plant","Steam","01/01/64","01/01/83",77358,52900,24,40,263218000,951797,8431629,56045965,65429391,846,41203,67627,4986648,0,777004,0,0,293702,159196,0,54712,51526,724902,292519,10515,7418351,28,"Tons",181283,9554,21.46,22.7,1.19,0.02,13173,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",582,138200,20.58,26.46,4.56,0.02,13173 "Marquette City of",11701,1999,"#4 Plant","Gas-Turbine","01/01/79","01/01/79",23000,24700,1,0,5060000,0,300285,4190798,4491083,195,0,4733,283345,0,0,0,0,17195,3952,0,4867,6844,0,27249,40,348225,69,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",13164,138200,21.37,23.67,3.68,0.06,15100 "Marshall City of",11732,1999,"Mrshll","Stem/Intern","01/01/36","01/01/94",57000,43,24,56,48751000,313299,4219564,22221117,26753980,469,395259,452378,1560029,0,0,0,0,0,349846,0,37339,40097,532898,65835,0,3038422,62,26848,11000,32,0,0,0,0,0,190844,140000,2,0,0,0,0,0,755,10000,24.17,0,0,0,0,0 "Massachusetts Mun Whls Elec Co",11806,1999,"Stonybrook Intermedil","Combined Cy","01/01/81","01/01/81",360000,352000,12276,33,780857100,1222270,29736068,116789790,147748128,410,161005,341244,19982046,0,0,0,0,1295017,0,0,217695,109254,0,4801314,0,26746570,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",5422522,1025,2.75,2.75,2.68,0,0,"barrel",265482,138500,21.33,19.11,3.28,0.01,9096 "Massachusetts Mun Whls Elec Co",11806,1999,"Stonybrook Peaking","Gas Turbine","/ /","/ /",170000,170000,620,33,40304600,457327,10488903,45433687,56379917,332,41438,85682,1683238,0,0,0,0,251375,0,0,16235,17343,0,119640,0,2173513,54,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",86543,138500,21.33,19.45,3.34,0.04,12490 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Power Plant 3","Gas Turbine","01/01/98","01/01/98",115600,92000,851,5,32881000,95000,0,25388890,25483890,220,483472,16336,1488284,0,0,0,0,2781,65038,0,8158,7240,0,77867,59525,1725229,52,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",454570,1012,3.19,3.19,3.16,4.5,14233,"bbl",1154,129200,0.39,0.39,3.06,3.42,11185 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Gas Turbine 2","Gas Turbine","01/01/76","01/01/76",56,51000,90,5,2234000,0,0,5867669,5867669,104780,0,16153,125470,0,0,0,0,120168,30978,0,8157,0,0,109601,61288,471815,211,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"bbl",5874,129200,0.51,0.51,3.95,5.64,14268 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Gas Turbine 3","Gas Turbine","01/01/79","01/01/79",57,50000,416,5,11756000,0,0,8189960,8189960,143684,0,16153,502404,0,0,0,0,120168,30977,0,8158,0,0,125268,61288,864416,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",167915,1012,3.33,3.33,3.3,4.78,14473,"bbl",63,129200,0.51,0.51,3.95,9,22782 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Plant 2","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/63",27200,25000,1054,5,13725000,103203,908048,4415135,5426386,199,42,16153,666001,0,3889,0,0,120168,30978,0,8158,22083,74263,39108,61287,1042088,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",173245,1012,3.33,3.33,3.3,4.21,12774,"bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "McPherson City of",12208,1999,"Gas Turbine 1","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56400,52000,289,5,10349000,0,0,5796442,5796442,103,0,16153,444620,0,0,0,0,120169,30977,0,8158,0,0,41682,61288,723047,70,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",142295,1012,3.33,3.33,3.3,4.6,13948,"bbl",74,129200,0.51,0.51,3.95,6.37,16124 "Modesto Irrigation District",12745,1999,"Mc Clure","Gas Turbine","01/01/80","01/01/81",142400,114000,458,3,17013650,41196,671200,22702649,23415045,164,0,39428,921989,0,0,0,0,64862,0,0,93204,0,0,143571,0,1263054,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",184791,1,2.85,2.85,2.79,0.04,14761.28,"BBl",9827,139269,36.12,36.12,0,0.09,15255.06 "Modesto Irrigation District",12745,1999,"Woodland","Gas Turbine","01/01/93","01/01/93",56000,50400,3047,11,112459100,734117,28375,53064895,53827387,961,0,276493,3266313,0,0,0,0,513943,0,0,1528,0,0,410220,0,4468497,40,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1012876,1,3.02,3.02,2.96,0.03,9186.75,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Menasha City of",12298,1999,"Menasha","Steam","01/01/49","01/01/64",23400,19595,2037,14,13992,6795,1217617,5289233,6513645,278,20649,40246,27120,0,79885,0,0,60710,95780,0,0,31581,159677,52699,457,548155,39176,"TONS",6898,13928,56.5,56.5,2.02,0.03,15599,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Michigan South Central Pwr Agy",12807,1999,"ENDICOTT","STEAM",,,60000,60000,7000,52,254166000,1446080,18162501,58822650,78431231,1307,914746,337766,5265494,0,924558,0,35080,360832,450758,0,195457,66358,661707,192331,74782,8565123,34,"TONS",137701,12027,37.16,36.29,1.51,0.01,12748,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Moorhead City of",12894,1999,"Mhd Power Plant","gas turbine","01/01/61","01/01/61",10000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Morgan City City of",12927,1999,"Joe Cefalu Plant","Steam","01/01/62","01/01/73",70000,40000,0,14,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Muscatine City of",13143,1999,"MUSCATINE","STEAM","01/01/58","01/01/83",275500,149900,16238,134,1301983501,784560,72060043,213242536,286087139,1038,28455966,817203,14751640,0,1679994,0,0,663199,1356159,0,672523,554305,2370831,1148168,1101042,25115064,19,"TONS",877820,8297,12.88,13.05,0.79,0.01,11188,"MCF",283208,10200,3.26,3.26,3.18,0,0,"BARRELS",610,138500,30.04,21.9,3.77,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Hallam Peaking Unit","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56700,60000,258,0,10894000,0,229583,4830489,5060072,89,0,0,440985,0,0,0,0,60635,0,0,0,89639,0,94772,13125,699156,64,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Canaday","Steam","01/01/58","01/01/58",108800,121200,2001,14,85089000,0,9403261,329722,9732983,89,328840,152096,2125397,0,407076,0,0,27245,201168,0,32073,131835,231925,109745,195984,3614544,42,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Gerald Gentleman Sta(","Steam","01/01/78","/ /",1362600,1254000,8657,192,8027362000,3015802,318185462,344602325,665803589,489,19495116,1045932,44726329,0,1955325,0,0,1668527,2934342,193314,448908,877355,10569506,3498868,1294889,69213295,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"McCook Peaking Unit","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56700,56000,60,0,211000,0,194256,4595530,4789786,84,0,0,81476,0,0,0,0,25734,0,0,0,2300,0,73703,18199,201412,955,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Hebron Peaking Unit","Gas Turbine","01/01/73","01/01/73",56700,57000,75,0,854000,0,301381,5462494,5763875,102,0,0,181334,0,0,0,0,26759,0,0,0,1630,0,58749,11328,279800,328,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Cooper Nuclear Stat.(","Nuclear","01/01/74","01/01/74",835550,783000,8563,726,6510414600,1028504,187460511,519340650,707829665,847,2508133,8619618,38176410,69343,4859991,0,0,93589,58078357,0,1807073,518308,3317219,1964536,2016373,119520817,18,,20216418,0,0,5.67,53.53,0,10598,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Nebraska Public Power District",13337,1999,"Sheldon Station","Steam","01/01/61","01/01/65",228650,220000,8701,78,1347971000,1843119,10754821,79036432,91634372,401,5634223,590917,10462420,0,930249,0,0,633786,1478748,0,168336,7310,2160302,1295964,920587,18648619,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "New Ulm Public Utilities Comm",13488,1999,"No 3 & 4 & 6","Steam Gener","01/01/02","01/01/64",27000,44000,24,21,16916000,0,3055780,9310761,12366541,458,473090,425178,467864,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,31350,152102,138437,0,1214931,72,"tons",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",16576,1000,2.82,2.82,2.82,0.03,10,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "New Ulm Public Utilities Comm",13488,1999,"No 5","Gas Turbine","01/01/75","01/01/75",24000,24000,24,21,2041000,0,0,2465211,2465211,103,0,22377,91296,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1650,0,14351,0,129674,64,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"barrel",4657,140000,26.02,19.6,3.36,0.05,13500 "North Attleborough Town of",13679,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,326,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "North Attleborough Town of",13679,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,336,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,33,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Roxboro 4","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/80",96000,0,8175,0,520837921,1000,1011000,44494000,45506000,474,72000,48000,9137000,0,80000,0,0,22000,837000,0,67000,17000,475000,136000,53000,10872000,21,"Tons",211870,12369,42.51,42.95,1.74,0.02,10083,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1763,140091,22.71,21.55,3.66,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Mayo 1","Steam","01/01/83","01/01/83",119000,761,7807,69,651982032,3301000,16199000,82569000,102069000,858,26000,92000,11843000,0,79000,0,0,54000,1174000,0,76000,30000,808000,111000,73000,14340000,22,"Tons",265246,12531,44.52,44.47,1.77,0.02,10243,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",5203,140620,21.57,9.23,1.56,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Roxboro 4","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/80",96000,0,8175,0,520837921,1000,1011000,44494000,45506000,474,72000,48000,9137000,0,80000,0,0,22000,874000,0,67000,17000,475000,136000,53000,10909000,21,"Tons",211870,12369,42.51,42.95,1.74,0.02,10083,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1763,140091,22.7,21.55,3.66,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Mayo 1","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/00",119000,761,7807,69,651982032,3301000,16199000,82569000,102069000,858,26000,92000,11843000,0,79000,0,0,54000,1221000,0,76000,30000,808000,111000,73000,14387000,22,"Tons",265246,12531,44.52,44.47,1.77,0.02,10243,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",5203,140620,21.57,9.23,1.56,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Brunswick","Nuclear","01/01/75","01/01/77",318000,1696,8584,784,2400008776,617000,94117000,339616000,434350000,1366,297000,666000,11776000,401000,2353000,0,0,533000,9457000,0,1849000,3278000,1064000,298000,1353000,33028000,14,"MW Days",308602,3413000,0,38.16,0.47,0,10533,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "North Carolina Eastern M P A",13687,1999,"Harris","Nuclear","01/01/87","01/01/87",154000,905,8485,491,1171376626,10260000,369018000,452494000,831772000,5401,118000,675000,5246000,252000,1018000,0,0,337000,4827000,0,1102000,634000,445000,182000,302000,15020000,13,"MW Days",156551,3413000,0,33.51,0.41,0,10947,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Oklahoma Municipal Power Auth",14077,1999,"PCRP","Combined cy","01/01/95","01/01/95",60000,60000,0,0,138484081,0,11344757,29655189,40999946,683,0,598783,2955212,0,0,0,0,253386,0,0,44427,0,0,105374,0,3957182,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1392824,1040,2.17,0,2.14,0.02,10460,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"FORT CALHOUN","NUCLEAR","01/01/73","01/01/73",502000,492000,7785,634,3580681000,1072930277,146516232,296914274,442618959,882,0,4971003,23034948,164893,24110476,0,0,-21786,44474249,3358,250883,11195901,6710538,736065,-37917,115592611,32,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"GRAMS",315984,120828860,0,72.9,60.33,6.42,10650.7,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"SARPY COUNTY","GAS TURBINE","01/01/72","01/01/96",216405,248000,8271,0,55696000,23490,2151281,52951321,55126092,255,0,54073,2103596,0,0,0,0,0,404211,0,3965,2988,0,310603,72329,2951765,53,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",707344,823,2.46,2.46,2.49,0.04,12745,"BARRELS",3829,138176,17.91,17.91,1.41,0.01,8647 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"JONES STREET","GAS TURBINE","01/01/73","01/01/74",116000,129400,8332,0,4369000,0,240081,9753334,9993415,86,0,6331,293819,0,0,0,0,0,47413,0,6227,3925,0,20535,134815,513065,117,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",13267,138176,13.48,13.48,2.32,0.04,9604 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"NEBRASKA CITY","STEAM","01/01/79","01/01/79",565000,631500,7500,0,4036035000,-2006108,95061544,382545074,475600510,842,0,779178,25569961,0,1719974,0,0,633248,6781672,0,412434,994984,3789696,1154076,1789468,43624691,11,"TONS",2500212,8357,9.58,9.58,0.57,0,9500,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",9924,138281,20.11,20.11,3.46,0,9493 "Omaha Public Power District",14127,1999,"NORTH OMAHA","STEAM","01/01/54","01/01/68",644700,664700,7628,0,3047689000,903939,34352799,194479388,229736126,356,0,473699,25644165,0,1556034,0,0,1205626,5794175,56855,619731,1383677,5536481,4204373,2068776,48543592,16,"TONS",1996018,8393,11.99,11.99,0.71,0,11245,"MCF",706934,988,3.06,3.06,5.95,0,11266,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Orrville City of",14194,1999,,"Steam","01/01/16","01/01/71",84,57,8760,65,330508,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"ton",195800,11500,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",6100,1000,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owatonna City of",14246,1999,,"Steam","01/01/24","01/01/69",26000,0,0,0,0,139199,957861,5646398,6743458,259,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owatonna City of",14246,1999,,"Gas Turbine","/ /","/ /",19000,0,0,0,0,0,0,1935528,1935528,102,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owensboro City of",14268,1999,"Plant 1","Steam","01/01/39","01/01/50",52500,0,0,0,0,0,2061142,4570567,6631709,126,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,9106,0,0,0,0,760,9866,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Owensboro City of",14268,1999,"Elmer Smith","Steam","01/01/64","01/01/74",415000,183200,8569,99,2600771,835345,8832392,209611123,219278860,528,801542,250280,29285825,0,1422865,0,0,496091,498805,0,465966,39935,4297784,658819,98181,37514551,14424,"Tons",1247843,10825,20.49,20.56,0.95,0.01,10197,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Painesville City of",14381,1999,"ELECTRIC PLANT","STEAM",,"01/01/88",53500,46000,8760,66,154647000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"TONS",92400,12517,0,33.22,1.33,0,0,"MCF",21300,1000,0,4.41,4.41,0,0,"BARRELS",47,138000,0,14.36,2.48,0,0 "Paragould Light & Water Comm",14446,1999,"Jones Road","Gas turbine","01/01/90",,16,14,415,1,400000,0,8093740,0,8093740,505859,0,0,166593,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,45047,0,211640,529,"mmbtu",91074,0,0,1.83,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Pasadena City of",14534,1999,"Broadway Steam Plantф",,"01/01/54","01/01/65",183000,183000,0,25,179950000,489703,3194316,50159075,53843094,294,0,387760,8839709,0,555006,0,0,988783,11216,228337,138986,37842,440585,136394,7625,11772243,65,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",2295070,1019,3.43,3.43,3.36,0.04,13290,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Pasadena City of",14534,1999,"Glenarm Gas Turbine","Included in","01/01/06","01/01/76",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",59150,1,3.43,3.43,3.36,0.04,16342,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Peabody City of",14605,1999,,"Gas Turbine","01/01/71","01/01/91",65900,65900,8760,5,11639468,177260,0,22101467,22278727,338,0,22746,409579,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,176643,0,608968,52,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",143226,1,3.05,2.96,2.89,0.03,13227,"BBLS",1239,134127,22.14,22.89,4.06,0.05,12185 "Peru City of",14839,1999,"Peru","Steam","01/01/03","01/01/59",34500,35563,1585,13,12600568,5739,1706469,9574492,11286700,327,325600,0,442012,0,172164,0,0,119874,37861,0,0,14278,126165,22675,0,935029,74,"Tons",7915,12797,47.4,47.33,1.85,0.03,16076,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",221,140000,26.47,24.56,4.18,0,103.08 "Piqua City of",15095,1999,"City of Piqua","Steam & Gas","01/01/32","01/01/89",81113,0,159,39,2138000,21863555,0,0,21863555,270,4196219,76685,242280,0,19742,0,0,231157,56432,0,61697,67457,9593,91301,0,856344,401,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",10878,144000,25.3,25.3,4.3,0.09,23092 "Platte River Power Authority",15143,1999,"Craig Station","Steam","01/01/79","01/01/80",154000,0,0,0,1205402000,60113,33649805,110581113,144291031,937,947978,194976,12128811,0,1172233,0,0,260695,1245083,7283,237766,121071,814536,181154,912508,17276116,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Platte River Power Authority",15143,1999,"Rawhide","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",270000,270000,8668,86,2119444000,1977213,176729012,277169671,455875896,1688,1471951,1258343,14119301,0,2361900,0,0,4034357,686346,1872,639188,491650,2599323,371255,1094312,27657847,13,"Ton",1294255,8825,10.4,10.4,0.6,0.01,10.78,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",54089,138,0.78,0.78,5.63,0,3.5 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"C.M. POLETTI","Steam","01/01/77","01/01/77",883000000,831000000,6386000,122000,1826391000,730000,72140000,359400000,432270000,0,10329000,561000,60034000,0,0,0,0,668000,7300000,0,826000,377000,2299000,2700000,411000,75176000,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCFS",10932333,1031,2.95,3.39,3.29,31.61,10284,"BBLS",1348181,148399,15.78,17.33,2.78,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"R.M. FLYNN","GT/Steam-Co","01/01/94","01/01/94",164000000,159000000,7280000,27000,9.96144e+11,0,7238000,129266000,136504000,1,1136000,88000,43602000,0,0,0,0,93000,1585000,0,0,137000,469000,3225000,39000,49238000,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCFS",7095707,1012,4.39,5.62,5.55,42.59,7774,"BBLS",120516,141470,19.98,32.3,4.68,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,,,"/ /","/ /",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"JAF","Nuclear","01/01/75","01/01/75",883000000,848000000,8204000,757000,6.567395e+12,805000,166067000,568085000,734957000,1,13913000,23876000,38317000,0,487000,0,0,54000,32618000,0,5766000,184000,4261000,5843000,3143000,114549000,0,"GMU 235",0,82,0,0,0,5.17,0,"Equivalent",842735,0,0,40.32,0.49,0,10508,,0,235,0,0,0,0,0 "Power Authority of State of NY",15296,1999,"IP3","Nuclear","01/01/76","01/01/76",1013000000,1031000000,7662000,828000,7.26917e+12,747000,206897000,755257000,962901000,1,17924000,29680000,39545000,0,11264000,0,0,0,36622000,0,1577000,2648000,15765000,11868000,29759000,178728000,0,"GMU235",0,82,0,0,0,4.76,0,"Equivalent",937453,0,0,36.9,0.45,0,10560,,0,235,0,0,0,0,0 "Rantoul Village of",15686,1999,"Rantoul Light & Powep ","Internal Co","01/01/00","01/01/67",18132,38,100,3,16000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11984,0,0,0,0,211546,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,223530,13971,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",19070,10500,0.62,0.62,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Reedy Creek Improvement Dist",15776,1999,"CEP TURBINE","GAS TURBINE","01/01/88","01/01/88",35000,28000,6321,12,173569000,0,1455178,24161379,25616557,732,0,640027,4274368,0,0,0,0,392603,0,0,0,341,0,1449579,0,6756918,39,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCP",1545973,1040,2.76,2.76,2.76,0.02,8007,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Reedy Creek Improvement Dist",15776,1999,"CEP HRSG","HRSG","01/01/88","01/01/88",8500,7000,2327,2,30042000,0,0,2731920,2731920,321,0,93944,742496,0,115993,0,0,17882,0,0,0,59,0,247253,0,1217627,41,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",268549,1049,2.76,2.76,2.76,0.02,8939,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Redding City of",15783,1999,"Redding Power Plant","Steam","01/01/89","01/01/94",28000,28900,1977,16,18060300,602377,15385522,117247,16105146,575,0,1320,443065,0,117993,0,0,77221,568426,0,70690,2368,53194,57222,0,1391499,77,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",287348,1027,1.54,1.54,1.45,0.03,16610,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Redding City of",15783,1999,"Redding Power Plant","Combustion","01/01/96","01/01/96",65680,27400,854,16,18037300,1807131,0,59683477,61490608,936,0,97874,621818,0,0,0,0,25071,0,0,24410,0,0,321071,0,1090244,60,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"mcf",216279,1027,2.53,2.53,2.18,0.02,15570,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Richmond City of",15989,1999,"WWVS","Steam","01/01/55","01/01/72",97700,173080,0,40,627786010,80644,2830371,31698586,34609601,354,0,465409,11078167,0,452274,0,0,404016,348230,0,104865,43599,701670,259774,21756,13879760,22,"Tons",308831,11699,29.73,30.79,1.45,0.01,11517,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",708,138000,0.46,0.46,0,0,0 "Rochelle Municipal Utilities",16179,1999,"Caron Rd Steam Plant(","Steam","01/01/63","01/01/63",11000,0,13,0,62,0,0,11112324,11112324,1010,0,0,15556,0,134143,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,193715,0,343414,5538935,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Rochelle Municipal Utilities",16179,1999,"2nd Ave Diesel Plant(","Internal Co","01/01/00","01/01/89",24000,7500,900,8,990,0,0,6076110,6076110,253,0,0,130511,0,520866,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,301469,0,952846,962471,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Rochester Public Utilities",16181,1999,"SILVER LAKE","STEAM","01/01/49","01/01/69",98400,99962,6002,48,206169300,467713,5967620,20459364,26894697,273,0,105471,4663327,0,733957,0,0,427195,653639,0,121158,91168,610473,166756,202286,7775430,38,"Tons",105624,11800,35.06,34.95,1.48,0,0,"Mcf",116790,1022,2.87,2.87,2.81,0.02,12548,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Rochester Public Utilities",16181,1999,"CASCADE CREEK","GAS TURBINE","01/01/75","01/01/75",35000,31412,214,0,975100,0,0,2553775,2553775,73,0,5098,155418,0,0,0,0,0,2538,0,712,425,0,13749,25610,203550,209,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Bbl",6593,140546,25.25,22.87,3.87,0.16,31067 "Ruston City of",16463,1999,,,,,0,0,0,0,158085,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,1024,2014,0,0,0,12204,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Sacramento Municipal Util Dist",16534,1999,"McClellanј","Ga","01/01/86","01/01/86",49999,0,0,3,7166000,0,2636791,21642932,24279723,486,280011,128813,308700,0,0,0,0,93215,0,0,46694,4591,0,454373,0,1036386,145,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MC",90473,0,3.39,3.39,3.28,0.04,0,"Diesel/gal",1254,0,1.43,1.43,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"Total All Plants",,,,4515000,0,0,345,1.74570025e+10,12977200,1115386160,2245397416,3373760776,747,46882000,12160268,206856386,1142440,9404554,374590,0,6237186,12301280,6685,9401271,2767009,20299658,10510426,3154574,294616327,17,"Tons",5220135,8563,16.23,16.23,0.95,9.82,10370,"MCF",37334239,1010,2.64,2.64,2.62,28.78,10988,"Barrels",12309,139887,18.78,18.78,3.2,32.97,10315 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"J K Spruce","Steam","1/1/1992","1/1/1992",555000,546000,6546,82,3480720800,0,65252301,515684631,580936932,1047,23719,571470,31109011,0,1807766,51663,0,193515,960889,0,759790,205041,2649188,748621,211926,39268880,11,"Tons",1949398,8860,15.91,15.91,1.01,8.91,9857,"MCF",38851,1008,2.27,2.27,2.25,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"Mission Road","Steam","1/1/1909","1/1/1958",100000,96000,436,4,5787800,24329,2488463,10241714,12754506,128,128349,114144,487728,0,158813,0,0,102150,168983,0,21233,17234,339856,83899,40097,1534137,265,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",134106,1013,3.64,3.64,3.59,84.27,14024,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"Leon Creek","Steam","1/1/1949","1/1/1959",160000,171000,676,4,16974100,44831,2782361,17503846,20331038,127,157506,125267,942872,0,184569,0,0,128819,161398,0,28472,58566,543819,190400,43539,2407721,142,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",258204,1002,3.65,3.65,3.64,55.55,12533,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"O W Sommers","Steam","1/1/1972","1/1/1974",880000,846000,7232,55,2199508300,5854171,33295035,79674715,118823921,135,395537,545083,59562142,0,1025490,87705,0,302727,706288,0,702876,370388,615434,259192,190180,64367505,29,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",23626870,1009,2.54,2.54,2.51,27.24,10444,"Barrels",5652,140932,19.35,19.35,3.27,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"J T Deely","Steam","1/1/1977","1/1/1978",830000,854000,8760,90,5149460300,0,30290474,285476722,315767196,380,12595000,638478,53085711,0,1562761,85357,0,320680,966629,0,838807,331106,3399637,799226,238550,62266942,12,"Tons",3270737,8389,16.42,16.42,0.98,10.43,10513,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",5811,141351,18.29,18.29,3.08,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"South Texas Project","Nuclear","1/1/1988","1/1/1989",700000,708000,0,0,5399983000,5170385,957819101,1216165845,2179155331,3113,29619638,9121123,23744212,1142440,2798248,0,0,4436896,8134977,6685,6295439,1408553,10346770,6695513,2005195,76136051,14,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MMBTU",56623147,0,0.42,0.42,0.42,4.4,10485,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"W B Tuttle","Steam","1/1/1954","1/1/1963",425000,351000,2570,25,83806100,116166,6081714,40803880,47001760,111,3029638,407804,3903164,0,659061,0,0,371008,270977,0,137334,47220,945777,460460,131033,7333838,88,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1126499,1007,3.47,3.47,3.44,46.57,11568,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "San Antonio Public Service Bd",16604,1999,"V H Brauning","Steam","1/1/1966","1/1/1970",865000,0,5631,85,1120762100,1767318,17376711,79846063,98990092,114,932613,636899,33301546,0,1207846,149865,0,381391,931139,0,617320,328901,1459177,1273115,294054,40581253,36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",12149759,1011,2.74,2.74,2.71,29.7,10522,"Barrels",846,122847,18.29,18.29,3.55,0,0 "Seattle City of",16868,1999,"Centralia (8% share)","Steam","01/01/72","01/01/72",107200,32000,0,1,689802000,167213,4462081,22916331,27545625,257,0,186229,12042641,0,56382,0,0,0,1030435,2329,557,0,306392,38323,72862,13736150,20,"Tons",453199,7850,27.6,26.57,1.76,0.02,10315,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Shrewsbury Town of",17127,1999,"PEAKING","INTERNAL CO","01/01/69","01/01/78",13750,0,78,0,1082000,4737,38713,3032851,3076301,224,0,0,58499,0,0,0,0,45786,0,0,42833,0,0,0,0,147118,136,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"OIL",1983,138000,28.45,27.35,4.71,0.05,10622 "Sikeston City of",17177,1999,"SIKESTON POWER PLANT<","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",235000,233000,8443,100,1773464000,2528654,38360820,167291312,208180786,886,3085679,204618,18720527,0,834479,0,0,232178,1031476,0,212026,97405,1771411,163729,1555715,24823564,14,"TONS",1085410,8260,16.81,16.81,1.02,0.01,10111,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",2150,141000,22.77,24.41,4.12,0,16.31 "PUD No 1 of Snohomish County",17470,1999,"Centralia Steam Plt","Steam",,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",17543,1999,"WINYAH(1-4)","STEAM","01/01/75","01/01/81",1120000,1204000,31151,198,7364804000,2141000,80365000,380646000,463152000,414,12899000,1811000,102679000,0,2905000,0,0,1172000,4230000,0,835000,1709000,6368000,2320000,450000,124479000,17,"Tons",2805462,12906,35.38,36.6,1.42,1.39,9833,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "South Carolina Pub Serv Auth",17543,1999,"CROSS(1-2)","STEAM","01/01/84","01/01/94",1147115,1190000,14859,156,7031840000,149000,105829000,824295000,930273000,811,8568000,612000,95992000,0,3621000,0,0,562000,3226000,0,331000,462000,7502000,2902000,585000,115795000,16,"Tons",2609876,12811,36.41,36.78,1.44,1.37,9510,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"INTERSTATE","NAT GAS/OIL","01/01/97","01/01/97",118000,114000,864,0,89431266,0,0,11583325,11583325,98,2178709,40002,2621094,0,91,0,0,0,0,0,38739,0,0,77237,0,2777163,31,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"DKTHRMS",1205210,100000,2.08,2.08,2.08,28.74,13806,"BARRELS",5093,138000,17.96,22.11,3.81,52.67,13806 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"FACTORY","OIL TURBINE","01/01/73","01/01/73",23000,17000,155,0,3128000,0,29188,2322399,2351587,102,0,0,166375,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,11905,0,178280,57,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",7959,138000,18.43,20.9,3.61,53.19,14747 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"REYNOLDS","OIL TURBINE","01/01/70","01/01/70",18000,14000,98,0,1502000,0,155353,2975996,3131349,174,0,0,89354,0,539,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,13975,0,103868,69,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",4241,138000,19.02,21.07,3.64,59.49,16366 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"LAKESIDE","STEAM","01/01/60","01/01/64",76000,66000,4842,0,191454930,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"TONS",119179,10437,24.15,22.89,1.1,13.33,12994,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",784,138000,20.26,20.76,3.58,0,0 "Springfield City of",17828,1999,"DALLMAN","STEAM","01/01/68","01/01/78",441000,324000,8756,209,1931782345,2315629,22827681,167456590,192599900,437,2590219,1382828,24106633,0,7228992,0,0,0,0,224260,1367568,1520197,3381012,3887022,2944868,46043380,24,"TONS",947286,10415,24.07,22.37,1.07,11.37,11338,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"BARRELS",8185,138000,18.13,20.92,3.61,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"James River Gas Turb¬ ","Gas Turbine","01/01/89","01/01/92",150000,162000,1707,2,112871000,0,0,38867000,38867000,259,0,0,3686000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,5000,0,185000,0,3876000,34,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1413185,1005,2.58,2.58,2.56,32.66,12708,"Barrels",1933,138200,17.18,20.23,3.49,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"Southwest Gas Turbin","Gas Turbine","01/01/83","01/01/83",88000,114000,740,2,33605000,0,77000,13480000,13557000,154,0,0,1234000,0,0,0,0,4000,0,0,0,0,0,160000,0,1398000,42,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",467515,1005,2.6,2.6,2.59,36.7,14123,"Barrels",814,138200,17.21,19.54,3.37,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"Main Avenue","Gas Turbine","01/01/68","01/01/68",12000,13000,55,1,680000,0,0,1538000,1538000,128,0,0,46000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,4000,0,50000,74,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",1981,138200,24.82,23.44,4.03,68.28,16910 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"James River","Steam","01/01/57","01/01/70",255000,237000,33862,81,1450754000,1659000,14631000,79255000,95545000,375,2850000,583000,20746000,0,2519000,0,0,408000,262000,0,130000,65000,3963000,646000,610000,29722000,20,"Tons",853266,9210,7.79,21.61,1.17,13.89,11312,"Mcf",689975,1005,2.49,2.49,2.47,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Springfield City of",17833,1999,"Southwest","Steam","01/01/76","01/01/76",195000,183000,7556,65,1185498000,1856000,15406000,80315000,97577000,500,2690000,558000,14080000,0,1555000,0,0,366000,205000,0,581000,137000,2335000,656000,1027000,21332000,18,"Tons",693360,8794,4.54,18.33,1.08,11.66,10684,"Mcf",467597,1007,2.39,2.39,2.36,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "St George City of",17874,1999,"SUGARLOAF","2-Internal","01/01/86","01/01/86",14000,14000,1,6,626000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "St George City of",17874,1999,"Bloomington","7-Internal","01/01/98","01/01/98",12250,10500,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tacoma City of",18429,1999,"Centralia Steam Plntд","Steam","01/01/72","01/01/72",0,0,0,0,0,166897,4289405,25226129,29682431,0,73131,68311,11716542,0,112000,0,0,80230,140403,0,120346,80230,1008476,240691,26146,13593375,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"SAM O. PURDOM","STEAM","01/01/58","01/01/66",44000,48000,11136,38,209772978,15500,9202970,33194960,42413430,964,0,773581,8940370,0,537020,0,0,279940,1813670,2800,263170,105370,237360,129170,194990,13277441,63,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",2462334,1148,3.22,3.22,3.07,0.04,13261,"bbl",31211,6300,20.25,20.25,3.21,0.08,20734 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"SAM O. PURDOM","GAS TURBINE","01/01/63","01/01/64",25000,20000,415,0,6838100,0,516700,3207630,3724330,149,0,37110,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,27080,0,0,0,0,64190,9,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",135368,1047,3.22,3.22,3.08,0.06,20734,"bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"A.D. HOPKINS","STEAM","01/01/71","01/01/72",334350,314000,8760,54,1431868500,243700,15462840,61918010,77624550,232,0,365600,47652750,0,808720,0,0,334300,1440890,0,286010,23770,76650,588440,570760,52259040,36,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",14643073,1052,3.16,3.16,3,0.03,10001,"bbl",31324,6300,20.39,20.39,3.24,0.03,10228 "Tallahassee City of",18445,1999,"A.D. HOPKINS","GAS Turbine","01/01/00","01/01/72",43320,36000,870,0,21124800,0,0,4237440,4237440,98,0,109010,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,117890,0,0,0,0,226900,11,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",398330,1148,3.2,3.2,3.06,0.06,19763,"bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Taunton City of",18488,1999,"Cleary-Flood","Steam-Gas T","01/01/71","01/01/76",110000,110000,3132,54,156001000,576884,4698715,37144991,42420590,386,791678,791678,5245790,0,1114114,0,0,533566,1685023,0,0,0,0,0,0,9370171,60,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",972473,1018,4.2,4.2,4.12,0.13,30320,"Barrels",75356,117188,16.96,15.46,3.14,0.01,3007 "Taunton City of",18488,1999,"W. Water Street","Steam","01/01/02","01/01/58",13500,0,0,0,0,24173,3733601,5419707,9177481,680,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1188,0,0,0,0,1188,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Taunton City of",18488,1999,"Cleary-Flood","Steam","01/01/66","01/01/66",28300,25000,354,54,9067000,148310,2028703,7526961,9703974,343,0,249139,355473,0,342596,0,0,168675,368569,0,0,0,0,0,0,1484452,164,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",20281,95484,15,17.52,4.37,0.04,8970 "Texas Municipal Power Agency",18715,1999,"Gibbons Creek SES","Steam","01/01/83","01/01/83",493900,462000,6908,122,2602361000,25930000,158171000,425745000,609846000,1235,3957000,2960000,34144000,0,482000,0,0,300000,111000,0,1160000,322000,2989000,844000,734000,44046000,17,"Tons",1643836,8470,20.78,20.66,1.23,0.01,10711,"MCF",146379,1015,2.35,2.35,2.35,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Traverse City City of",19125,1999,"Bayside Station","Steam","01/01/12","01/01/68",29000,14000,290,15,3250000,83612,1866905,7544366,9494883,327,0,626829,148366,0,0,0,0,23461,10829,42858,365474,17778,92524,76059,12931,1417109,436,"Tons",2113,12500,43.5,43.5,1.74,0.02,16253.85,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Turlock Irrigation District",19281,1999,"Walnut Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/86","01/01/86",49900,45486,222,2,4176400,0,14724791,181069,14905860,299,0,9273,193510,0,0,0,0,45773,0,0,0,0,0,252574,0,501130,120,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",70330,1,2.75,2.75,2.7,46.33,17145,"Bbl",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Turlock Irrigation District",19281,1999,"Almond Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/95","01/01/95",49900,49900,3162,12,126500000,149270,24481629,30353821,54984720,1102,0,95458,3736849,0,79785,0,0,1827172,0,0,0,523257,0,640938,0,6903459,55,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",1175749,1,3.18,2.48,2.38,29.54,9446,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Vermont Public Pwr Supply Auth",19780,1999,"J.C. McNeil Station","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/84",50000,53000,5366,35,41562673,79627,4515588,12712285,17307500,346,119308,43331,1497213,0,229588,0,0,81441,92419,0,37321,14987,144967,145773,7437,2294477,55,"tons(wood)",283916,4750,23.48,24.64,2.59,0.03,13455,"mcf",252167,1012000,3.28,3.28,3.25,0.04,12556,"bbl",2124,136321,15.88,21.41,3.74,0,0 "Vernon City of",19798,1999,"Vernon power Plant","Internal Co","01/01/33","01/01/33",30000,19000,0,1,241160,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,18568,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,18568,77,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"42 gal",624,130952,0,29.75,5.41,0.07,14231 "Vernon City of",19798,1999,"Vernon Power Plant","Gas Turbine","01/01/87","01/01/87",14000,11250,1171150,1,117150,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62378,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,62378,532,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",1031,0,22683.2,2.75,2.66,0.05,19986,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Vero Beach City of",19804,1999,"City of Vero Beach","Steam","01/01/59","01/01/92",158000,151000,8804,41,224236,3059208,26587907,49708983,79356098,502,5414436,1818902,11418,0,0,0,0,647002,0,0,808280,685525,0,1428535,0,5399662,24080,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,2318953,1051,3.87,3.87,3.69,0.04,11858,,45055,144840,18.97,18.97,3.12,0.04,14119 "Vineland City of",19856,1999,"Harry M. Downs","Steam","01/01/00","01/01/70",66250,57100,5104,41,50663680,102765,6943679,34504958,41551402,627,0,194475,1693950,0,506222,0,0,630731,1378637,0,137240,12568,459914,91094,2412,5107243,101,"Tons",16966,12734,49.33,49.07,1.9,0.03,13621,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",2206466,152654,0.35,0.35,2.49,0.03,12734 "Energy Northwest",20160,1999,"Nuclear Plant # 2","Nuclear","01/01/72","01/01/84",1200000,1163000,6519,1018,6975110000,0,1096311831,2199928002,3296239833,2747,38664908,18739254,30590701,2894774,12309953,0,0,75427,21147467,0,3819721,545674,1021005,2269200,18016550,111429726,16,"Grms U-235",726798,4.55e+10,32.01,42.09,41.9,4.39,10460.08,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Western Minnesota Mun Pwr Agny",20421,1999,"Watrtown Power Plant? ","Gas Turbin","01/01/78","01/01/78",60000,42,0,2,2254000,0,0,16335022,16335022,272,39000,17392,54938,0,0,0,0,0,3375,0,0,42360,0,102001,663,220729,98,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",7508,0,28.37,24.9,0,0.83,0 "Willmar Municipal Utils Comm",20737,1999,"WILLMAR","STEAM","01/01/00","01/01/70",29350,17500,6239,17,26618660,110447,878898,6858792,7848137,267,13984,40591,1085227,0,259713,0,0,318116,132083,5000,40431,2416,288530,102454,0,2020002,76,"TONS",32320,8600,26.74,33.58,1.95,0.04,17555,"MCF",28158,1022,2.4,2.4,2.4,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Winfield City of",20813,1999,"EAST","STEAM","01/01/69","01/01/69",26500,0,0,12,24657,134138,2513749,6029328,8677215,327,1429863,315408,850195,0,0,0,0,0,152329,0,0,0,0,0,0,1317932,53451,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",356043,1,2.39,2.39,2.39,0.03,0.01,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Winfield City of",20813,1999,"WEST","GAS TURBINE","01/01/61","01/01/61",11500,0,0,1,2972500,0,157556,2719909,2877465,250,97445,56898,232145,0,0,0,0,0,31724,0,0,0,0,0,0,320767,108,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",58535,1,2.39,2.39,2.39,0.03,0.01,".",0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 6","01/01/67",,7500,0,0,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 7","01/01/86",,32500,34500,0,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Total Plant","01/01/15","1/1/1986",74000,70000,17360,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 4","01/01/49",,11500,11000,1320,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm",21048,1999,"Wyandotte","Steam # 5","01/01/59",,22500,24500,8120,40,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Zeeland City of",21158,1999,"Zeeland Plant","Internal Co","01/01/36","01/01/80",22182,20100,6642,9,10671685,233107,958741,7490195,8682043,391,39130,160274,324998,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,130885,11183,123764,0,0,751104,70,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Mcf",110179,1025,2.66,2.66,2.6,25.21,9704.09,"gals",63744,130,0.49,0.49,3.81,3.81,712.06 "Utah Associated Mun Power Sys",40575,1999,"Hunter - Unit II","Steam","01/01/80","01/01/80",62703,65000,8614,0,477394000,24130,12455094,36987524,49466748,789,196762,79885,5146144,0,247463,0,0,117117,474771,220,72026,45503,228073,39173,16505,6466880,14,"Tons",219787,11688,22.14,22.14,0.95,0.01,10767,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",15134,139950,0,0,0,0,0 "Utah Associated Mun Power Sys",40575,1999,"San Juan - Unit IV","Steam","/ /","/ /",35000,36000,8087,0,277529800,0,6606911,34780439,41387350,1182,330940,146935,4915693,0,99850,0,0,107665,90002,0,45259,27595,322125,62872,54783,5872779,21,"Tons",156254,9223,31,31,1.68,0.02,10404,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Gallons",37096,134772,0,0,0,0,0 "Intermountain Power Agency",40576,1999,,"Steam Inter","01/01/86","01/01/87",1640000,1600000,8760,472,13211071,95806000,859083000,1682967000,2637856000,1608,0,3439000,172897000,0,8441000,0,0,2062000,781000,0,3925000,2091000,9516000,3866000,3110000,210128000,15905,"Tons",5268671,11851,31.12,25.64,1.06,0.01,9457,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Barrels",12309,137273,22.25,26.22,4.55,0,0 "American Mun Power-Ohio Inc",40577,1999,"Richard H. Gorsuch","STEAM","01/01/51","01/01/53",212000,194000,8760,106,1376874,822631,5383169,64333905,70539705,333,62261347,1032894,14712122,0,2153372,0,0,180146,1071556522,0,606713,341707,6319652,1253782,0,24415086,17732,"TON",869869,11581,23.16,23.16,0.88,0.01,13479,"MCF",72788,1040,3.65,3.65,3.5,0.04,13479,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern Municipal Power Agny",40581,1999,"COYOTE","STEAM","01/01/81","01/01/81",414588000,0,8150,81,2913837000,0,0,420000000,420000000,1,0,863403,26074593,0,3373195,0,0,1267272,1238167,0,405837,334491,2651805,324789,643962,37177514,13,"TON",2425659,6947,10.64,10.64,0.77,0.89,11.57,"GAL.",236904,136552,0.56,0.56,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Southern Minnesota Mun P Agny",40580,1999,"SHERCO #3","STEAM PLANT","01/01/87",,331954,357000,7219,0,2035404000,0,0,331434191,331434191,998,3571246,1376329,18703611,0,1905690,0,0,392953,4634715,9336,422268,415136,2261396,2483729,678192,33283355,16,"TONS",1161899,8701,16.34,15.53,0.89,0.01,9934,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Michigan Public Power Agency",40582,1999,"Belle River","Steam","01/01/84","01/01/85",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Michigan Public Power Agency",40582,1999,"Campbell #3","Steam","01/01/80","01/01/80",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Island City of",40606,1999,"BURDICK","GAS TURBINE","01/01/68","01/01/68",14800,16,76,15,984760,0,0,1554976,1554976,105,0,2286,35784,0,5087,0,0,4586,3641,174,142,374,616,5648,0,58338,59,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",20055,1000,2.26,1.78,1.78,0.04,20365,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Island City of",40606,1999,"PGS","STEAM","/ /","/ /",100000,100000,8410,49,554461278,1708020,24075151,64351183,90134354,901,0,133740,4506550,0,718768,0,0,867378,199672,0,24187,229866,682366,387132,0,7749659,14,"TONS",358870,8391,10.89,12.56,0.75,0.01,10862,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Grand Island City of",40606,1999,"BURDICK","STEAM","01/01/57","01/01/72",92500,55000,2977,15,36138330,376970,3684704,31154613,35216287,381,0,102306,1368110,0,305181,0,0,256501,220102,7223,23106,51661,178024,228731,0,2740945,76,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",504548,1000,2.29,2.71,2.71,0.04,13962,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"CT 1 (5 Units)","Combustion","01/01/86","01/01/86",124000,0,877,5,22025,981098,1465987,45464256,47911341,386,0,0,917842,0,0,0,0,208067,9810,0,95167,0,0,420321,0,1651207,74970,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",328153,0,2.7,2.7,2.44,0.04,15363,"gal",43800,0,0.43,0.43,0.43,0.04,15400 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"CT 2 (STIG)","Combustion","01/01/96","01/01/96",49900,0,1502,9,102136,0,0,62901868,62901868,1261,307564,0,2704183,0,0,0,0,120252,34596,0,411336,0,0,1176957,0,4447324,43543,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"MCF",914572,0,2.83,2.83,2.33,0.03,9135,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"Geothermal One","Steam","01/01/83","01/01/83",110000,110540,8301,30,625621000,47873178,43427882,0,91301060,830,133458,764505,20092994,0,0,0,0,1317733,114299,0,286198,163870,39903,901827,786469,24467798,39,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Steam",11071643,1210000,0.93,0.93,0.77,0.02,18504,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Northern California Power Agny",40613,1999,"Geothermal Two","Steam","01/01/86","01/01/86",110000,110540,8207,30,627369000,58362769,52110952,0,110473721,1004,170987,681966,20079701,0,0,0,0,1433824,67816,0,36,101301,24056,451698,784863,23625261,38,,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,"Steam",10898373,1200000,0.93,0.93,0.78,0.02,19066,,0,0,0,0,0,0