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Sample records for nm tx southwest

  1. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  2. EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX February 18, 2009 EIS-0412:...

  3. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    Report Southwest Power Pool,” Prepared by Boston PacificTables Figure 1. Southwest Power Pool Region Footprint and14 Table 1. Southwest Power Pool Membership

  4. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2012 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Daniel Shantz Chemical Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 979-845-3492 shantz.chandler@trinity.edu Lin Luo Dow Chemical Co. 2301 Brazosport Blvd. B-251 Freeport, TX 77541 979-238-3204 LLuo2@dow Chair #12;2012 PROGRAM 7:30 AM Registration ­ John Novak, Treasurer Duncan Hall All talks will be held

  5. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2012 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Daniel Shantz Chemical Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 979-845-3492 shantz.chandler@trinity.edu Lin Luo Dow Chemical Co. 2301 Brazosport Blvd. B-251 Freeport, TX 77541 979-238-3204 LLuo2@dow #12;2012 PROGRAM 7:30 AM Registration ­ John Novak, Treasurer Duncan Hall All talks will be held in Mc

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/1-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasource HistoryNM-aTX-a <

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/13-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-a < RAPID‎ |TX-a

  8. LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and purge ports. #12;LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX 3' x 5' Solar Panels 191 watts per panel 600 KW Solar Array 2,988 Solar Panels 850,000 kWh Annual Output Solar Classroom Deck SOLAR PV SYSTEM #12 in the United States #12;LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX THE LAYOUT AFTER HOURS GYM ENTRY SOLAR

  9. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    and Retails Electricity Markets in SPP The Southwest Powerand Retails Electricity Markets in SPP.3 2.1 Wholesale Markets in the Southwest PowerRetail Demand Response in SPP Wholesale Markets in the Southwest Power

  10. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Pacific Southwest Research Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Pacific Southwest Research Station Publications List Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest Ecosystems Center for Urban Forest Research Chemical branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed

  11. Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc Place: Tomball, Texas Zip: 77375 Product: Distributor of small scale PV...

  12. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  13. Tank 241-TX-111 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-09

    This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term storage and long-term management of single-shell tank 241-TX-111.

  14. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-09

    This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term storage and long-term management of single-shell tank 241-TX-105.

  15. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S.

    2007-11-01

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

  16. The TX Fonts December 15, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintmire, John W.

    The TX Fonts Young Ryu December 15, 2000 Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Changes 2 3 A Problem: DVIPS, 2000) 1st public release 2.0 (November 2, 2000) · An encoding error in txi and txbi (`$' "24) is fixed. (Not all TS1 encoding glyphs are implemented.) 2.1 (November 18, 2000) · Complete implementation of TS1

  17. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  18. ,"Alamo, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alamo, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

  19. Southwest Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Electric Cooperative offers rebates to its customers that purchase energy efficient heating and air conditioning equipment . This program offers rebates for customers who buy Energy Star...

  20. Hanford Single Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-TX Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D> G.

    2014-07-22

    This document identifies 241-TX Tank Farm (TX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-TX-107 and 241-TX-114) identified in RPP-RPT-50870, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-TX Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the TX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/5-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevadaa < RAPID‎f <CA-aabTX-a <AK-abNM-a

  2. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2008 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    for registration (membership due included). Group registration can be accommodated on-site; the group, Micromeritics) 10:05 AM Gary Gildert (Custom Catalytic Solution Inc., La Porte, TX) The Seven Steps

  3. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2006 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    XIAO TOTAL PETROCHEMICALS USA, INC. RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Deer Park, TX 77536 (281) 884 in Methane Reactions Catalyzed by Supported Metal Clusters" 8:50 AM Dr. Jon G. McCarty, Catalytica Energy

  4. KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan Competition April 18, 2014 - 12:05pm...

  5. Southwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet)Investment insay

  6. Southwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. TemperatureThousand Cubic Feet)Investment

  7. Southwest

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMayBuilding K-25Kyle Travis, left andInvestment in

  8. SunZia Southwest Transmission Project Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of March 28, 2012 2 1.0 Background. SunZia Southwest Transmission Project (SunZia or the Project) is a joint development effort currently underway in Arizona and New Mexico. The...

  9. 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in Los Angeles on September 30, 2010.

  10. 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides links to the presentations given at the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Southwest Region Workshop, held in San Jose, California, August 25­–26, 2011.

  11. Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 2,725 - No Data...

  12. Tank 241-TX-116 tank characterization plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homi, C.S.

    1996-05-10

    This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term storage and long-term management of single-shell tank 241-TX-116.

  13. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Executive Vice President, Southwest Sciences, Inc., Santa Fe, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the measured range of 100 to 500 ppm. The sensor can be used to control individual burners in small scale percent, respectively. Burners are used in these combustion systems to generate heat for a wide variety boilers or furnaces. Unlike larger industrial boilers, where an array of burners may be used to heat

  14. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

    2004-11-01

    The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

  15. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Working Group 3) · Trophic ecology · Chemical indicators · Bioenergetics · Niche separation · Climate indicators Bioenergetics Niche separation Climate change 7 | Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean Trophic ecology Chemical indicators Bioenergetics Niche separation

  16. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2005-08-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of October 1, 2004--March 31, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Action plans for possible Phase 2 carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are completed, and a proposal was developed and submitted describing how the Partnership may develop and carry out appropriate pilot tests. The content of this report focuses on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period.

  17. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

  18. 7 -29 nm 29 -56 nm 56 -95 nm Particlenumberconcentration(#cm-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    Freeway Stop-and-go ULSD n = 4 7 - 29 nm 29 - 56 nm 56 - 95 nm Pariclenumberconcentration,(#cm -3 ) 0 1e+5 2e+5 3e+5 4e+5 5e+5 Freeway Stop-and-go ULSD n = 4 Freeway Stop-and-go Particlenumberconcentration.4 miles ·Average speed: 30 mph · Fuel: ·Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) ConclusionsConclusions ELPI

  19. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  20. SouthWest Catalysis Society 2011 Spring Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    , TX 77478 scott.mitchell@sabicusa.com Lin Luo The Dow Chemical Co. 2301 Brazosport Blvd. Freeport, TX of Texas A&M University to co-sponsor a symposium honoring Prof. Jack Lunsford for his accomplishments Award for Excellence in Applied Catalysis later in the day. On-site registration will begin at 7:30 AM

  1. txH20: Volume 7, Number 1 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    of working with a top-notch communications team. ?is special drought issue of txH?O is evidence of its good work. Neal Wilkins Working to make every drop count Published by Texas Water Resources Institute Editor Kathy Wythe Texas Water Resources... ] Timeline of Droughts in TexasD The United States signs a water treaty with Mexico for allocation of the waters of the Rio Grande below Fort Quitman, Texas. 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948...

  2. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1998-08-03

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-113 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment.

  3. Rotary mode core sampling approved checklist: 241-TX-116

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    1999-02-24

    The safety assessment for rotary mode core sampling was developed using certain bounding assumptions, however, those assumptions were not verified for each of the existing or potential flammable gas tanks. Therefore, a Flammable Gas/Rotary Mode Core Sampling Approved Checklist has been completed for tank 241-TX-116 prior to sampling operations. This transmittal documents the dispositions of the checklist items from the safety assessment.

  4. EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5Department oftoStatementMitigationTX | Department of

  5. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The...

  6. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool More Documents &...

  7. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  8. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration...

  9. Cultural Geography and Interregional Contacts in Prehistoric Liangshan (Southwest China)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hein, Anke Marion

    2013-01-01

    George 2005. Physical Geography of the Gaoligong Shan Areaof China's Physical Geography. China Knowledge Series.shou Sun. 1962. Economic Geography of Southwest China : (

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Southwest Region

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969Central Region About U.S. Natural Gas PipelinesSouthwest Region

  11. Southwest Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit with form History Southwest Arkansas

  12. Southwest Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit with form History Southwest

  13. txH2O: Volume 5, Number 3 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2010-01-01

    is funded in part by the U.S. Geological Survey and authorized by the Water Resources Research Act. To subscribe to txH2O or New Waves, TWRI?s monthly e-mail newsletter, visit http://twri.tamu.edu. 2 I This is your stream. This is your stream on drugs... and understood by ECLOX-using personnel, after the completion of this year?s cities? protocols, that will be 36 cities that have the tools to maintain secure drinking water.? *Some information from a TEEX news release A big production is under- way in Texas...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/11-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasourceWA-a <aaTX-a <

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/11-TX-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasourceWA-a <aaTX-a <b

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/11-TX-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasourceWA-a <aaTX-a <bc

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/12-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasourceWA-aCA-aMT-aTX-a <

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/4-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevadaa < RAPID‎f <CA-aabTX-a < RAPID‎

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - TX-2002 AIRS Validation Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring Single Column Model IOP ARMStructure02.09govCampaignsTX-2002

  20. S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    Management Nov. 30, 2002 Prof. Jeff Tian, SMU #12;S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 2 Software Quality: Why: customer view of quality Probability: statistical modeling Time/input/environment: OP · OP: OperationalS/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance -- Meeting New Challenges Jeff Tian

  1. Harnessing the power of Deep Learning :sromanka@tx.technion.ac.il Roman Kaplan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cidon, Israel

    " Harnessing the power of Deep Learning :sromanka@tx.technion.ac.il Roman Kaplan The hottest topic the exact application 2. We think how to implement the right system. 3. We (mostly you) chooseReduce, Hadoop/Spark/GraphLab. Use Machine Learning for Your Desired Purpose :sromanka@tx.technion.ac.il Roman

  2. Nomenclature Issues and the Y-Chromosome J.M. Butler (Genetic Genealogy Conference, Houston, TX)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomenclature Issues and the Y-Chromosome J.M. Butler (Genetic Genealogy Conference, Houston, TX on Genetic Genealogy Houston, TX October 20, 2007 http://www.ybase.org/convert.asp The Problem · STR marker in the forensic DNA community? · What are some potential solutions to aid the genetic genealogy community

  3. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-04-01

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

  4. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data acquired on the southwest rift delineated two distinct basement resistivity structures northwest of the rift zone: a high-resistivity basement at approximately 60 m a.s.l,...

  5. Direct-Current Resistivity At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data acquired on the southwest rift delineated two distinct basement resistivity structures northwest of the rift zone: a high-resistivity basement at approximately 60 m a.s.l,...

  6. Salt Tolerance of Landscape Plants Common to the Southwest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    2008-01-01

    With sharply increasing costs of providing potable water, many communities in the Southwest are attempting to utilize non-potable saline water for irrigating large landscapes. This publication provides the information related to salt effects...

  7. Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest Oregon Watershed Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --------------------------------------------- Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest by a high-intensity burn over areas of steep topography. The areal distribution of soil hydraulic of infiltration capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture characteristics. Also, measures

  8. Southwest ACSA_Preceedings _182Section_6.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    of restaurants?), name 1. SIdeal plan of the city of Sforzinda, Filarete, 1464. Revista de Urbanismo, http://revista urbanismo.uchile.cl/n5/munizagatotal. html, Accessed 13 August 2009. #12;Southwest ACSA_Preceedings _184

  9. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department...

  10. Southwest Region Experiment Station - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, A

    2011-08-19

    Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI), an independent, university-based research institute, has been the operator of the Southwest Region Photovoltaic Experiment Station (SWRES) for almost 30 years. The overarching mission of SWTDI is to position PV systems and solar technologies to become cost-effective, major sources of energy for the United States. Embedded in SWTDI's general mission has been the more-focused mission of the SWRES: to provide value added technical support to the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) to effectively and efficiently meet the R&D needs and targets specified in the SETP Multi-Year Technical Plan. : The DOE/SETP goals of growing U.S. PV manufacturing into giga-watt capacities and seeing tera-watt-hours of solar energy production in the U.S. require an infrastructure that is under development. The staff of the SWRES has supported DOE/SETP through a coherent, integrated program to address infrastructural needs inhibiting wide-scale PV deployment in three major technical categories: specialized engineering services, workforce development, and deployment facilitation. The SWRES contract underwent three major revisions during its five year period-of- performance, but all tasks and deliverables fell within the following task areas: Task 1: PV Systems Assistance Center 1. Develop a Comprehensive multi-year plan 2. Provide technical workforce development materials and workshops for PV stakeholder groups including university, professional installers, inspectors, state energy offices, Federal agencies 3. Serve on the NABCEP exam committee 4. Provide on-demand technical PV system design reviews for U.S. PV stakeholders 5. Provide PV system field testing and instrumentation, technical outreach (including extensive support for the DOE Market Transformation program) Task 2: Design-for-Manufacture PV Systems 1. Develop and install 18 kW parking carport (cost share) and PV-thermal carport (Albuquerque) deriving and publishing lessons learned Task 3: PV Codes and Standards 1. Serve as the national lead for development and preparation of all proposals (related to PV) to the National Electrical Code 2. Participate in the Standards Technical Panels for modules (UL1703) and inverters (UL1741) Task 4: Assess Inverter Long Term Reliability 1. Install and monitor identical inverters at SWRES and SERES 2. Operate and monitor all inverters for 5 years, characterizing all failures and performance trends Task 5: Test and Evaluation Support for Solar America Initiative 1. Provide test and evaluation services to the National Laboratories for stage gate and progress measurements of SAI TPP winners

  11. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  12. 248-nm photolysis of tricarbonylnitrosylcobalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, D.M.; Nazran, A.S.; Drouin, M.; Hackett, P.A.

    1986-06-19

    Laser-based time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the 248-nm photolysis of the pseudo-nickel carbonyl, tricarbonylnitrosylcobalt, in the gas phase. Co(CO)/sub 3/NO dissociates by a series of sequential ligand eliminations to give predominantly CoCO. This species reacts back with parent Co(CO)/sub 3/NO with a gas kinetic rate constant of (6.4 +/- 0.6) x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ to form a binuclear species, (Co/sub 2/(CO)/sub 4/NO), of unknown structure. Added CO results in the formation of Co(CO)/sub 3/ and finally Co(CO)/sub 4/. The rate constant for the reactions of CO with Co(CO) is (6.2 +/- 0.6) x 10/sup -11/ cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ which is also a lower limit for the rates of reaction of CO with Co(CO)/sub 2/ and Co(CO)/sub 3/. This behavior shows marked similarity with recent work on the other carbonyls and begins to establish a general pattern for metal carbonyl photolysis.

  13. SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER CONSULTING, LLC 7425 Amanda Ellis Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Houston, TX 77004 RE: Report on Findings Related to the Restoration of In-Situ Uranium Mines in South Mining The regulation of in-situ uranium mining in Texas falls under the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC is one of the final steps in the process of in-situ uranium mining. TCEQ sets restoration standards (in

  14. Verification of the WRF model during a high ozone event over Houston, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ames, Douglas Seeley

    2003-01-01

    High ozone values were observed in Houston, TX during August 25 - September 1, 2000. A comparison of WRF data with observations and MM5 data was conducted to determine the WRF model's performance in simulating the meteorological conditions...

  15. Oceanic eddy formation and propagation southwest of Taiwan Feng Nan,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    Oceanic eddy formation and propagation southwest of Taiwan Feng Nan,1,2 Huijie Xue,2 Peng Xiu,2 Fei October 2011; published 31 December 2011. [1] Oceanic eddies are active and energetic southwest of Taiwan, the Kuroshio Current Loop (KCL) appears southwest of Taiwan more frequently than in other seasons, and ACEs

  16. Evolution of vertical faults at an extensional plate boundary, southwest Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    Evolution of vertical faults at an extensional plate boundary, southwest Iceland James V. Grant1 Abstract Vertical faults having both opening and vertical displacements are common in southwest Iceland of both oblique and normal spreading in southwest Iceland. Individual fracture segments are commonly

  17. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  18. Southwest Climate Outlook, March 2012 3 | Feature Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Southwest Climate Outlook, March 2012 3 | Feature Article http://climas half of Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma com- bined. When all was said and done, damages in the highest 1 percent blanketed almost all of Texas, western Oklahoma, and eastern New Mexico and covered

  19. Southwest Research Institute Signal Exploitation and Geolocation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    :2008 BY LLOYD'S REGISTER QUALITY ASSURANCE APRIL 1, 2012 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: UQA 0111601 ISO 9001:2008 QualitySouthwest Research Institute ® Signal Exploitation and Geolocation Division CERTIFIED TO ISO 9001 to have the division quality management system certified to the stringent quality standards of ISO 9001

  20. Report for the week of August 10, 2009 Southwest Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Report for the week of August 10, 2009 Southwest Michigan Final Grape IPM Evening Meeting of the Season: Weekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary ** The final grape IPM evening meeting of the season vines as the recent rains may have encouraged some late- emerging adults to come out. ** A small amount

  1. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  2. Ultrahigh speed volumetric ophthalmic OCT imaging at 850nm and 1050nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsaid, Benjamin M.

    The performance and imaging characteristics of ultrahigh speed ophthalmic optical coherence tomography (OCT) are investigated. In vivo imaging results are obtained at 850nm and 1050nm using different configurations of ...

  3. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With p

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/14-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad < RAPID‎aa <

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/14-TX-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad < RAPID‎aa

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/14-TX-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad < RAPID‎aae

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/3-TX-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-ecca

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/3-TX-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-eccae <

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/3-TX-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-eccae

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/5-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-aeNV-a

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/6-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-ab < RAPID‎ |ca <ca

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/7-TX-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-ab < RAPID‎NV-a <ab

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/8-TX-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-abFD-a <a <

  14. Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, NorthMauna Loa Southwest

  15. Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrderInformation Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank

  16. Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, 2010 Table 1 2009 Texas Research Incentive Program Funding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    #12;© Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, 2010 #12;7 9 19 22 29 32 39 42 47 51 56 57 67 71 74 80 82 The Once-in-a-Lifetime Opportunity Conceptualizing a New Vision and Mission Environmental (SWOT) Analysis Acknowledgements Strategic Planning Council Texas Tech Administration #12;Guy Bailey President Texas Tech

  17. April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Hydrological Applications of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction · AVHRR - Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer · It is a sensor aboard NOAA - POES. · AVHRR Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Potential Evapo-Transpiration · Energy Balance Model Rn = E + H + G Where: Rn2/208 (Grass Reference), u2 = wind velocity(m.s-1), Ta = air temperature (şC), Ts = land surface

  18. Optimal Deployment Plan of Emission Reduction Technologies for TxDOT's Construction Equipment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul

    2010-10-12

    -road equipment of TxDOT to reduce emissions in a cost effective and optimal manner. Three technologies were considered for deployment in this research, (1) hydrogen enrichment (HE), (2) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and (3) fuel additive (FA... Gas ....................................................................... 24 Biodiesel ............................................................................ 24 Hydrogen...

  19. ACM SIGGRAPH 2002, San Antonio, TX Modeling the Accumulation of Wind-Driven Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    ACM SIGGRAPH 2002, San Antonio, TX Modeling the Accumulation of Wind-Driven Snow Technical Sketch of snow drifts formed by the accumulation of wind-blown snow near buildings and other obstacles. Our our method is able to model how the snow is convected, deposited, and lifted by the wind. The results

  20. Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Joonghyeok

    2013-07-16

    Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

  1. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  2. Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, NorthMauna Loa Southwest Rift

  3. Southwest Arkansas E C C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit with form History Southwest Arkansas E

  4. Characterization of atmospheric ammonia near Fort Worth, TX Part II. Impact of ammonia on particulate matter formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, USA 8 Earth, USA 2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA 3 Now

  5. Spectral-efficiency of multi-antenna links in ad-hoc wireless networks with limited Tx CSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindasamy, Siddhartan

    An asymptotic expression is derived for the mean spectral efficiency of multi-antenna links randomly distributed on a plane in a uniform manner where transmitters (Tx) have Channel-State-Information (CSI) of the channels ...

  6. Proceedings of the ASME 2014 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference October 22-24, 2014, San Antonio, TX, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    , San Antonio, TX, USA DSCC2014-6274 DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR LITHIUM ION BATTERY CELLS CONNECTED This paper presents a new method for estimating the capac- ity of a lithium ion battery cell in the presence

  7. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  8. 100 nm Ti Au/(a) (b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastner, Marc A.

    f (kHz) RVb C in n CA (a) (b) (c) #12;#12;#12;20 10 0 GM(µS) 6420 VG (Volts) 0.4 0.2 0.0 GM(e 2 /h) Wide MOSFET Narrow MOSFET #12;#12;#12;#12;EF Ec Ev eVG xt Et 0.2 0.0 GM(µS) 0.40.20.0 time (s) 1.0 0Si(V) 210 time (s) 3.5 3.0 2.5 GM(µS) (c) 10 8 GM(µS) 151050 time (s) GM-aSi GM-Au (d) a-Si:H Gate 200 nm

  9. Case Study: Continuous Commissioning and Energy Management at Alamo Colleges, San Antonio, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    Commissioning® Process Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko Masuda, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, PhD, PE Ahmet Ugursal, PhD Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference, Dallas, Texas. November 18, 2014 ESL-KT-14-11-40 CATEE 2014: Clean Air.... Measurement and Verification 7. Case Study: Alamo Colleges 2 ESL-KT-14-11-40 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Case Study: Continuous Commissioning® and Energy Management at Alamo Colleges, San Antonio, TX. Joseph...

  10. The environment of deposition of the Dalton Coal (Upper Pennsylvanian), Palo Pinto Co., TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Glenn Robert

    1986-01-01

    C. L = 1ff I I I I I I I I I la 3. 75 I I I l l I l 2 7. 9 ~ ~'8 5 8. 5 0 2000 fi 0 500 rn Figure 5. Da1 ton Coa1 i sopach map based on coal thicknesses measured a1ong the outcrop face and in cores. 25 1D in appendi x C...THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE DALTON COAL (UPPER PENNSYI. VANIAN), PALO PINTO CO. , TX. A Thesis by GLENN ROBERT LOWENSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for tne...

  11. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-TX.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages RecentTempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdfSD.pdf Jump to: navigation, searchTX.pdf

  12. File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFiderisInformation 3-FD-d -Open EnergyTX-f -

  13. File:03-TX-g - Lease of Relinquishment Act Lands.pdf | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFiderisInformation 3-FD-d -Open EnergyTX-f

  14. Transformations of Spanish urban landscapes in the American Southwest, 1821-1900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brew, Nina V

    1986-01-01

    Through an examination of changes in urban structure and building form, I will consider the continuity of historical Spanish urban form in the American Southwest. The study encompasses three phases of increasing Anglo ...

  15. The War in the Desert: The Vietnam Antiwar Movement in the American Southwest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Brandon M.

    2010-10-12

    The Vietnam antiwar movement developed in the American Southwest out of a coalition of Chicanos, GI's, and students who agreed that the Vietnam War was racist, imperialist, costly, and negatively affected them and their communities. The antiwar...

  16. VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  17. Characterization of Miocene-Pliocene carbonate platforms, southern Southwest Palawan Basin, Philippines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sta. Ana, Ma. Corazon Victor

    2009-06-02

    Isolated carbonate platforms and buildups of the Likas Formation provide a long record of carbonate sedimentation in the southern end of the Southwest Palawan Basin. While most carbonate platforms terminated in early Miocene and middle Miocene time...

  18. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-05-12

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-TX-104. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-TX-104 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for FY 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998).

  19. Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ESCH, R.A.

    1998-11-19

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

  20. Tectonic control of coastal onlap cycles, southwest Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    Local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves for 14 sections define three Cenozoic depositional onlap-offlap cycles separated by regionally significant unconformities. A paleoclimatic curve for western Oregon and Washington, based on paleoecologic data sets, demonstrates that the local transgressions are coincident with cool climates and the regressions with warm climates, and are therefore not driven by glacioeustatic cycles. Comparison of the local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves with the global Cenozoic Cycle Chart (modified Exxon Sea Level Chart - May, 1986) further demonstrates the uniqueness of the western Washington curves. The global Cenozoic cycle Chart curve represents coastal onlap and sea level curves based on integration of both climate and tectonic variations. The non-parallel cycle pattern for southwest Washington suggests a unique tectonically forced system. Evidence derived from stratigraphic sequences, igneous rock geochemistry, radiometric dating, remnant magnetic patterns, sandstone provenance studies, and paleogeographic reconstructions is used to identify the tectonic events controlling the local depositional cycles. The principal events are (1) middle Eocene accretion of a seamount chain; (2) early-late Eocene westward relocation of subduction; (3) late Eocene onset of Cascade arc volcanism; (4) late-early Miocene plate readjustment due to back-arc extension in the Columbia River Plateau and Great Basin; and (5) late Pliocene to early Pleistocene northeast compression forced by continued subduction of remnants of the Kula Plate beneath North America.

  1. Entertainment Technology Center, CMU Post-Graduation Survey Results, Dec 2012, May 2013, and Aug 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alumni Contacts 13 ETC dlist email 11 Intern Search/Company Websites 9 Faculty Contacts 8 Interviews Southwest: AZ, NM, OK, TX 1 West: CA, HI, NV 40 Southeast: AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN 3

  2. The Diurnal Path of the Sun: Ideology and Interregional Interaction in Ancient Northwest Mesoamerica and the American Southwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiowetz, Michael Dean

    2011-01-01

    Postclassic wind god of highland Central Mexico. In recentlyand wind aspect Ehecatl) in highland Central Mexico, areMogollon Wind Mountain site in southwest New Mexico revealed

  3. The Diurnal Path of the Sun: Ideology and Interregional Interaction in Ancient Northwest Mesoamerica and the American Southwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiowetz, Michael Dean

    2011-01-01

    impact of the West Mexican Aztatlán culture and cosmology on social transformations that occurred in the North American Southwest and northern Mexico

  4. EIS-0412: Federal Loan Guarantee to Support Construction of the TX Energy LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility near Beaumont, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy is assessing the potential environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to TX Energy, LLC (TXE). TXE submitted an application to DOE under the Federal loan guarantee program pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) to support construction of the TXE industrial Gasification Facility near Beaumont, Texas.

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of SO3 -at 355 and 266 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Continetti, Robert E.

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy of SO3 - at 355 and 266 nm S. Dobrin, B. H. Boo, L. S. Alconcel, and R Photoelectron spectra of SO3 - were recorded at 266 and 355 nm to study photodetachment of the SO3 - anion (2 A1) to the ground state of neutral SO3 (1 A1). A long vibrational progression in the 355 nm spectrum is attributed

  6. Sandia Energy - Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity Home Climate Water Security Partnership News Global Climate &...

  7. NM (United States)] 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Clayton, Steven Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States) 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS;...

  8. QER Public Meeting Santa Fe, NM Electricity Infrastructure Transmissio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    QER Public Meeting Santa Fe, NM Electricity Infrastructure Transmission, Storage, and Distribution - Jurisdictional issues and priorities Remarks of Susan Ackerman, Chair, Oregon...

  9. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  10. Site Characterization Activities with a focus on NETL MMV efforts: Southwest Regional Partnership, San Juan Basin Pilot, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's San Juan Basin pilot site to aid in the deploymentSite Characterization Activities with a focus on NETL MMV efforts: Southwest Regional Partnership Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico as part of the Southwest Regional Partnership's (SWP) pilot

  11. RF power potential of 45 nm CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Christopher

    This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS devices with varying device widths and layouts. We find that 45 nm CMOS can deliver a peak output power density of around 140 mW/mm with ...

  12. RF Power Potential of 45 nm CMOS Technology Usha Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    RF Power Potential of 45 nm CMOS Technology Usha Gogineni 1 , Jesús A. del Alamo 1 devices in recent years has motivated their use in millimeter-wave power applications. Specific, VT Abstract - This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS

  13. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

  14. Transportation Solutions to Enhance Prosperity and the Quality of Life Southwest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operations/management. Of all our students, Mr. Yi-Chang Chiu, a doctoral student at UT-Austin, was selectedTransportation Solutions to Enhance Prosperity and the Quality of Life enter Southwest Region to Enhance Prosperity and the Quality of Life Transportation Solutions to Enhance Prosperity and the Quality

  15. Phylogeny, diet, and habitat of an extinct ground sloth from Cuchillo Cura, Neuquen Province, southwest Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , southwest Argentina Michael Hofreiter,a Julio L. Betancourt,b, * Alicia Pelliza Sbriller,c Vera Markgraf Laboratorio de Microhistologia, INTA-EEA Bariloche, CC 277 (R8400AMC) Bariloche, Argentina d Vera Markgraf in southwestern Argentina (38.5° S). Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial DNA show that the dung originated

  16. EVALUATION OF TIDAL INLETS CHANNEL MIGRATION AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    484 EVALUATION OF TIDAL INLETS CHANNEL MIGRATION AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA are analyzed to understand common factors that contribute to channel migration for inlets with/without jetties depth sufficient for reliable navigation in critical shoaling areas. In addition, ebb shoals have been

  17. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed economy in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We

  18. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed Pacific Islands in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We develop

  19. Wood Products-Utilization Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood Products-Utilization 231 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Utilization products. California's native and exotic hardwoods offer a wide range of utilization opportunities

  20. Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado Peter M. Brown, Rocky tree-ring data do we have to reconstruct fire & forest history? Fire scars: Cambial mortality caused Mountain Tree-Ring Research Rosalind Wu, San Juan National Forest Carissa Aoki, Colorado State University

  1. Indigenous Tweets, Visible Voices, and Technology Panel discussion at SouthbySouthwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scannell, Kevin Patrick

    Indigenous Tweets, Visible Voices, and Technology Panel discussion at SouthbySouthwest March 9 and minority language speakers are writing blogs, they're tweeting, creating podcasts, youtube videos, etc. all in their native language. Let's see some examples! Here's a blog by my friend and collaborator

  2. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01

    and R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-a Reliable Diode-Pumped Hydrocarbon-Free 795-nm Rubidiumand R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-

  3. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Gardner, T.L.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Miller, M.E.; Schuessler, B.K.

    1996-11-01

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of five between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  4. Refining: moods and modes for 1984. [From NPRA meeting, San Antonio, TX 3/84

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-11

    Thousands of refining experts met in March in San Antonio, TX at the 82nd meeting of the National Petroleum Refiners Association, including many international oil-industry officials and executives. For major US refiners, the mood was decidedly optimistic, because: (1) for a number of refiners, negative margins on many crude oils that persisted even after the March 1983 price adjustment by OPEC are finally improving as capacities for upgrading residual fuel into more-valuable light products continue to come onstream; and (2) multinational oil companies, while concerned about downstream market penetration by producing countries, nevertheless expressed the feeling that this would probably further reduce the negotiating power of OPEC. For smaller, nonmajor refiners, the mood was one of concern: in the US, 97 refineries have officially closed since 1981, most of them smaller, inefficient facilities. There was optimism by all about environmental and social concerns, specifically acid rain and lead pollution. For the national oil companies of less-developed countries, a vicious circle emerged concerning the economic ramifications of the continuing development of catalysts for cracking heavy feedstock. This issue presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for March 1984 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  5. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  6. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  7. Changes in Native Aquatic Vegetation, Associated Fish Assemblages, and Food Habits of Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) Following the Addition of Triploid Grass Carp to Manage Hydrilla (Hydrilla Verticillata) in Lake Conroe, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Patrick Alexander

    2011-10-21

    Nuisance aquatic vegetation (mainly Hydrilla Verticillata ) has become problematic in Lake Conroe, TX. Consequently, triploid grass carp (Ctenopharynogodon idella) were stocked at densities sufficient to completely denude ...

  8. Effects of mineral aerosols on the summertime climate of southwest Asia: Incorporating subgrid variability in a dust emission scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc Pace

    [1] Improvements in modeling mineral aerosols over southwest Asia are made to the dust scheme in a regional climate model by representing subgrid variability of both wind speed and surface roughness length. The new module ...

  9. Application of in-situ cosmogenic nuclide analysis to landform evolution in Dartmoor, south-west Britain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hägg, Joseph Hunter

    2009-01-01

    Located beyond the southern limit of glaciation in Britain, the upland granitic terrain of Dartmoor, south-west England, has been exposed to long intervals of intense periglacial activity during the Pleistocene. This ...

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad-MT-daa9-NM-b <

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad-MT-daa9-NM-b <d

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad-MT-daa9-NM-b <df

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-h | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad-MT-daa9-NM-b <dfh

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-j | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad-MT-daa9-NM-b

  15. Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

    2002-12-02

    The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

  16. NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009-Transferring from New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2010 NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009- 2010 11/9/2010 Transferring from New Mexico Junior College to the University of New Mexico #12;NMJC Course UNM Equivalent Important UNM Phone Numbers................................................................................................... http://advisement.unm.edu/ The University of New Mexico and New Mexico Junior College work closely

  17. Single Sub-20 nm Wide, Centimeter-Long Nanofluidic Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single Sub-20 nm Wide, Centimeter-Long Nanofluidic Channel Fabricated by Novel Nanoimprint Mold an imprint mold of a channel pattern and nanoimprint to duplicate such channel. The centimeter-long channel without additional size shrinking.17 Single channels have been fabricated by using edge patterning18 (note

  18. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS component of wind velocity. Thus, there is no direct measurement of the three-dimensional (3-D) wind field

  19. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON NON-MATRICULATED (NM) APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON NON-MATRICULATED (NM) APPLICATION OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR (206) 543 order payable to the University of Washington in U.S. Funds. Return application and fee to: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 225 Schmitz Hall, Box 355850 Seattle, WA 98195-5850 SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

  20. (plexiglass) covers (negligible transmittance at 290320 nm). NOx emission decreased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (plexiglass) covers (negligible transmittance at 290­320 nm). NOx emission decreased from shoots, and the compensation point was estimated to be around 1 p.p.b. As ultraviolet radiation induces NOx emission from P exposure to ultraviolet light and NOx emission, and between the ambient con- centration of NOx and its

  1. Sub-20-nm Alignment in Nanoimprint Lithography Using Moire Fringe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as expected, independent of the size of the gap between the wafer and the imprint mold. We achieved a single control or wafer-mold mismatch compensation. With better stages, precision temperature control, and wafer-mold is insufficient; one must achieve sub-30 nm overlay alignment accuracy in addition to low defect density and high

  2. Proceedings of the 88th Annual Meeting (held June 18-23 in San Antonio, TX), Air and Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 1995 Paper No. 95-7.02 1995 H.C. Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    and Waste Management Association June 18-23, San Antonio, TX In: Proceedings of the 88th Annual Meeting Air and Waste Management Association Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania #12;Proceedings of the 88th Annual Meeting (held June 18-23 in San Antonio, TX), Air and Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June

  3. High reflectivity grating waveguide coatings for 1064nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bunkowski; O. Burmeister; D. Friedrich; K. Danzmann; R. Schnabel

    2006-08-01

    We propose thin single-layer grating waveguide structures to be used as high-reflectivity, but low thermal noise, alternative to conventional coatings for gravitational wave detector test mass mirrors. Grating waveguide (GWG) coatings can show a reflectivity of up to 100% with an overall thickness of less than a wavelength. We theoretically investigate GWG coatings for 1064nm based on tantala (Ta2O5) on a Silica substrate focussing on broad spectral response and low thickness.

  4. Concentrating Solar Power and Water Issues in the U.S. Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, N.; Macknick, J.; Tovar-Hastings, A.; Komor, P.; Gerritsen, M.; Mehta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) systems utilize the sun's energy to create heat that is used to generate electrical power. CSP systems in the United States are installed primarily in the Southwest, with 92% of plants that are operational, under construction, or under development located in three western states--Arizona, California, and Nevada. This report provides an overview of CSP development in these states, or the 'Southwest' for the purposes of this discussion, with a particular focus on the water supply issues associated with CSP. The Western Governors' Association (WGA) commissioned staff from the Western States Water Council (WSWC) to collaborate with staff from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to prepare this report. The WGA has long supported the effective management of the West's water resources, as well as the development of a clean, diverse, reliable, and affordable energy supply consisting of traditional and renewable energy resources. This report is specifically intended to help inform these goals, especially as WGA continues to underwrite a Regional Transmission Expansion Planning project, undertaken by the WSWC and the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), to better understand energy development within the existing and future water resource constraints of the West. This report builds upon earlier research conducted by NREL, the University of Colorado-Boulder, and Stanford University that was supported through the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) and presents information gathered through extensive research and literature reviews, as well as interviews and outreach with state water administrators and energy regulators, WECC and other experts familiar with CSP development in the Southwest.

  5. Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries 95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark S.

    Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries Ô95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library Mark S. Ackerman Roy T. Fielding Information and Computer Science Maintenance will be critical to digital libraries, especially those that promote broad access to diverse

  6. 1998 * Tsou, M. and Buttenfield, B.P. Client/Server Components and Metadata Objects for Distributed Geographic Information Services. Proceedings, GIS/LIS '98, Fort Worth, TX,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsou, Ming-Hsiang

    Geographic Information Services. Proceedings, GIS/LIS '98, Fort Worth, TX, November, 1998: 590-599. CLIENT management of geographic information is pushing the GIS community to establish an open GIS architecture/server components underlie specification of task-oriented programming, and the modularization of GIS software

  7. THE OUTER EDGE OF THE KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    THE OUTER EDGE OF THE KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu). One of the more curious features of the Kuiper Belt is the apparent dearth of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) orbiting the Sun beyond 50 AU with modest eccentricities and incli- nations, e

  8. November 15, 2006 IMACS 2006, College Station, TX 2006 -p. 1/18 A third order scheme for Hamilton-Jacobi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    November 15, 2006 IMACS 2006, College Station, TX 2006 - p. 1/18 A third order scheme for Hamilton-Jacobi/18 Presentation outline s Brief overview of numerical methods for Hamilton-Jacobi equations s A conforming, piecewise quadratic scheme on triangular meshes, with local evolution for Hamilton-Jacobi equations

  9. ION GNSS 2006, Fort Worth TX, 26-29 September 2006 1/14 Integrated GPS/INS System for Pedestrian Navigation in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    ION GNSS 2006, Fort Worth TX, 26-29 September 2006 1/14 Integrated GPS/INS System for Pedestrian research is focused on integrated IMU/GPS navigation systems for pedestrian and vehicular navigation. Dr evaluates the performance of a shoe/foot mounted inertial system for pedestrian navigation application. Two

  10. PROJECT NAME: MEMPHIS AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #4-TX07017) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MEMPHIS AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #4-TX07017) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  11. PROJECT NAME: SCENIC DRIVE DAM (EPWUDam #6-TX07019) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: SCENIC DRIVE DAM (EPWUDam #6-TX07019) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  12. PROJECT NAME: SAN DIEGO DAM (TX.07314) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: SAN DIEGO DAM (TX.07314) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning for the feasibility study is to detennine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist in our effmis), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location and affected

  13. PROJECT NAME: MOREHEAD AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #2-TX07015) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MOREHEAD AVE. DAM (EPWU Dam #2- TX07015) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  14. PROJECT NAME: CLIFF ST. DAM (EPWU Dam #10-TX07023) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: CLIFF ST. DAM (EPWU Dam #10- TX07023) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  15. PROJECT NAME: TREMONT AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #7-TX07020) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: TREMONT AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #7- TX07020) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  16. PROJECT NAME: MURCHISON AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #8--TX07021) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: MURCHISON AVE. DAM (EPWUDam #8--TX07021) 1. Provide the name of all non. The purpose for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist (NFIP), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location

  17. PROJECT NAME: OHIO ST. RESERVOIR DAM (TX.09511) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    PROJECT NAME: OHIO ST. RESERVOIR DAM (TX.09511) 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests for the feasibility study is to determine the need to update/upgrade the dam in order to assist in our efforts), which allows for flood insurance discounts to local residents. #12;Image 1: Dam location and affected

  18. THE SECULAR EVOLUTION OF THE PRIMORDIAL KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    THE SECULAR EVOLUTION OF THE PRIMORDIAL KUIPER BELT. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058, USA, (hahn@lpi.usra.edu). The Kuiper Belt is a vast swarm of comets orbiting at the Solar System's outer edge. This Belt is comprised of debris that was left over from the epoch of planet

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tract OO - NM 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40 JohnTract OO - NM 06

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/1-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasource HistoryNM-a <

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada <UtahMontanasourceWA-aCA-aMT-a <NM-a

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/15-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevadaa < RAPID‎ | RoadmapCO-ceWA-ebNM-c <

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/11-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-a <CA-cID-aMT-bda

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-a

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad < RAPID‎ |

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpNV-ad-MT-da <b

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-ec

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-ecc <

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-ecc <f

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-a <CA-a <HI-ecc <fg

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-ab < RAPID‎ |c <deeb

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/7-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-ab < RAPID‎

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ | RoadmapAK-abFD-a <

  15. NM Legislation5 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentativea(Patent) |centerConnectConference:NM

  16. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1–xTx)N(T=Mn,Fe,Co,andNi)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1–xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.more »As a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.« less

  17. Cost-Effective Energy Efficiency Measures for 15% Above 2009 IECC Code-Compliant House for Residential Buildings in TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2011-01-01

    ?Compliant House in TX 11th ICEBO Conference Oct. 18 ? 20, 2011 11 17 Energy Efficiency Measures (3/4) DHW System Measures 11.Tankless gas water heater 12.Removal of pilot light from DHW system 13.Solar DHW system ? 32 sq. ft. collector, 65 gal tank 14....5% 2.9% 3.0% 2.2% 2.9% 2.3% 4.0% 3.3% 2.2% ? 4.0% 4.3% 11 Tankless Gas Water Heater (from .594 to .748 Energy Factor) 1.6% 1.7% 1.7% 1.6% 1.7% 1.7% 1.6% 1.7% 1.6% 1.6% ? 1.7% 1.6% 1.7% 1.7% 1.6% 1.7% 1.6% 1.5% 1.5% ? 1.7% 1.5% 12 Removal of Pilot...

  18. Presented at the 2010 Rocky Mountain AAPG Section Meeting in Durango Colorado 1 Pre-and Post-injection Vertical Seismic Profiling over the Southwest Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    -injection Vertical Seismic Profiling over the Southwest Regional Partnership's Phase II Fruitland Coal CO2 Pilot Tom of pre and post injection vertical seismic profiles collected at the Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP into the Fruitland coals. The pre-injection vertical seismic profiles were completed on June 2nd and 3rd of 2008

  19. EIS-0443: Project Financing for Southwest Intertie Project- South, Clark, Lincoln, Nye, and White Pine Counties, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration, is considering whether to provide partial financing of the southern portion of the Southwest lntertie Project (SWIP-South) which consists of approximately 235 miles of 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line.

  20. Modeling the Summertime Climate of Southwest Asia: The Role of Land Surface Processes in Shaping the Climate of Semiarid Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcella, Marc P.

    Presented is a study on the role of land surface processes in determining the summertime climate over the semiarid region of southwest Asia. In this region, a warm surface air temperature bias of 3.5°C is simulated in the ...

  1. Seismic anisotropy in the wedge above the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto and southwest Japan derived from shear wave splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    Seismic anisotropy in the wedge above the Philippine Sea slab beneath Kanto and southwest Japan generated by shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in the subducting Philippine Sea are further divided into PHS1 and PHS2 (upper and lower planes of the double seismic zone in the Philippine

  2. Investigating New Polymers for a Chlorine Tolerant RO Membrane Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (SCENE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Investigating New Polymers for a Chlorine Tolerant RO Membrane Southwest Center for Education of such a polymer could poten(ally enable our u(liza(on of addi(onal water sources, thereby(gate new polymers for a more chlorine tolerant membrane. We tested Acrylonitrile

  3. University of Houston -Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid 5000 Gulf Freeway, ERP 2 Room 224, Houston, TX 77204-2010 Phone: (713)743-1010 Fax: (713)743-9098

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    TCHAPP University of Houston - Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid 5000 Gulf Freeway, ERP 2 of Scholarships and Financial Aid 5000 Gulf Freeway, ERP 2 Room 224, Houston, TX 77204-2010 Phone: (713

  4. EUV actinic defect inspection and defect printability at the sub-32 nm half pitch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huh, Sungmin

    2010-01-01

    5) Binary Binary Attenuated PSM Specification' LlCDICD=20%0.3/0.5) Binary Attenuated PSM -&-22nmHP ~16nmHP o~~~~~~~~~~

  5. [12.7.20044:01pm] [101114] [Page No. 101] {Eserial}4393-van-Pelt/3d/vanPelt-tx08.3d Van Pelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryker, Michael

    . Prog Brain Res.147:103-114. Corrections indicated in red. #12;[12.7.2004­4:01pm] [101­114] [Page No[12.7.2004­4:01pm] [101­114] [Page No. 101] {Eserial}4393-van-Pelt/3d/vanPelt-tx08.3d Van Pelt U N Research, Vol. 147 ISSN 0079-6123 Copyright ß 2005 Elsevier BV. All rights reserved CHAPTER 8 Molecular

  6. FY09 assessment of mercury reduction at SNL/NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2010-02-01

    This assessment takes the result of the FY08 performance target baseline of mercury at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, and records the steps taken in FY09 to collect additional data, encourage the voluntary reduction of mercury, and measure success. Elemental (metallic) mercury and all of its compounds are toxic, and exposure to excessive levels can permanently damage or fatally injure the brain and kidneys. Elemental mercury can also be absorbed through the skin and cause allergic reactions. Ingestion of inorganic mercury compounds can cause severe renal and gastrointestinal damage. Organic compounds of mercury such as methyl mercury, created when elemental mercury enters the environment, are considered the most toxic forms of the element. Exposures to very small amounts of these compounds can result in devastating neurological damage and death.1 SNL/NM is required to report annually on the site wide inventory of mercury for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program, as the site's inventory is excess of the ten pound reportable threshold quantity. In the fiscal year 2008 (FY08) Pollution Prevention Program Plan, Section 5.3 Reduction of Environmental Releases, a performance target stated was to establish a baseline of mercury, its principle uses, and annual quantity or inventory. This was accomplished on July 29, 2008 by recording the current status of mercury in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

  7. Transport of triplet excitons along continuous 100 nm polyfluorene chains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xi, Liang; Bird, Matthew; Mauro, Gina; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Cook, Andrew R.; Chen, Hung -Cheng; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-03

    Triplet excitons created in poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexyl)fluorene (pF) chains with end trap groups in solution are efficiently transported to and captured by the end groups. The triplets explore the entire lengths of the chains, even for ~100 nm long chains enabling determination of the completeness of end capping. The results show that the chains continuous: they may contain transient barriers or traps, such as those from fluctuations of dihedral angles, but are free of major defects that stop motion of the triplets. Quantitative determinations are aided by the addition of a strong electron donor, TMPD, which removes absorption bands of the end-trappedmore »triplets. For chains having at least one end trap, triplet capture is quantitative on the 1 µs timescale imposed by the use of the donor. Fractions of chains having no end traps were 0.15 for pF samples with anthraquinone (AQ) end traps and 0.063 with naphthylimide (NI) end traps. These determinations agreed with measurements by NMR for short (« less

  8. High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Kurucz

    2006-05-01

    The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error varies from 0.1 to 1.0 percent. The residual spectrum was calibrated two different ways: First by normalizing it to the continuum of theoretical solar model ASUN (Kurucz 1992), and second, by degrading the spectrum to the resolution of the observed irradiance (Thuillier et al. 2004) to determine a normalization function that was then applied to the high resolution spectrum.

  9. The influence of ridge geometry at the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (9?-25?E) : basalt composition sensitivity to variations in source and process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standish, Jared Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Between 90-25° E on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge lie two sharply contrasting supersegments. One 630 km long supersegment erupts N-MORB that is progressively enriched in incompatible element concentrations ...

  10. Surface expression of eastern Mediterranean slab dynamics: Neogene topographic and structural evolution of the southwest margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schildgen, T. F.

    he southwest margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau has experienced multiple phases of topographic growth, including the formation of localized highs prior to the Late Miocene that were later affected by wholesale uplift ...

  11. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    without close human supervision. By the year 2000, the sensing instruments may work from radiation, tGen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest

  12. Site Suitability Assessment for Irrigating Urban Landscapes with Water of Elevated Salinity in the Southwest. Consolidated Final Report. Part 1. Water Quality and Plant Tolerance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S.

    With increasing population and the demand for potable water, water with elevated salinity and reclaimed water are now commonly used for irrigating urban landscape in many communities in the arid Southwest. It not only saves potable water, but also...

  13. Transport of Triplet Excitons along Continuous 100 nm Polyfluorene Chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, L.; Bird, M.; Mauro, G.; Asaoka, S.; Cook, A. R.; Chen, H. -C.; Miller, J. R

    2014-10-03

    Triplet excitons created in poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexyl)fluorene (pF) chains with end trap groups in solution are efficiently transported to and captured by the end groups. The triplets explore the entire lengths of the chains, even for ~100 nm long chains enabling determination of the completeness of end capping. The results show that the chains continuous: they may contain transient barriers or traps, such as those from fluctuations of dihedral angles, but are free of major defects that stop motion of the triplets. Quantitative determinations are aided by the addition of a strong electron donor, TMPD, which removes absorption bands of the end-trapped triplets. For chains having at least one end trap, triplet capture is quantitative on the 1 µs timescale imposed by the use of the donor. Fractions of chains having no end traps were 0.15 for pF samples with anthraquinone (AQ) end traps and 0.063 with naphthylimide (NI) end traps. These determinations agreed with measurements by NMR for short (<40 polymer repeat units (PRU)) chains, where NMR determinations are accurate. The results find no evidence for traps or barriers to transport of triplets, and places limits on the possible presence of defects as impenetrable barriers to less than one per 300 PRU. The present results present a paradigm different from the current consensus, derived from observations of singlet excitons, that conjugated chains are divided into “segments,” perhaps by some kind of defects. For the present pF chains, the segmentation either does not apply to triplet excitons or is transient so that the defects are healed or surmounted in times much shorter than 1 µs. Triplets on chains without end trap groups transfer to chains with end traps on a slower time scale. Rate constants for these bimolecular triplet transfer reactions were found to increase with the length of the accepting chain, as did rate constants for triplet transfer to the chains from small molecules like biphenyl. A second set of polyfluorenes with 2-butyloctyl side chains was found to have a much lower completeness of end capping

  14. Efficient Excitation of Gain-Saturated Sub-9-nm-Wavelength Tabletop Soft-X-Ray Lasers and Lasing Down to 7.36 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Liu, Yanwei [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Jorge, Rocca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated the efficient generation of sub-9-nm-wavelength picosecond laser pulses of microjoule energy at 1-Hz repetition rate with a tabletop laser. Gain-saturated lasing was obtained at =8.85 nm in nickel-like lanthanum ions excited by collisional electron-impact excitation in a precreated plasma column heated by a picosecond optical laser pulse of 4-J energy. Furthermore, isoelectronic scaling along the lanthanide series resulted in lasing at wavelengths as short as =7.36 nm. Simulations show that the collisionally broadened atomic transitions in these dense plasmas can support the amplification of subpicosecond soft-x-ray laser pulses.

  15. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 ?m active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  16. A Comparison of the Published Stellar Photometry Data in the South-West Field of the Galaxy M31 Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Narbutis; R. Stonkute; V. Vansevicius

    2006-10-05

    We compare stellar photometry data in the South-West part of the M31 disk published by Magnier et al. (1992), Mochejska et al. (2001) and Massey et al. (2006) as the local photometric standards for the calibration of star cluster aperture photometry. Large magnitude and color differences between these catalogs are found. This makes one to be cautious in using these data as the local photometric standards for new photometry.

  17. ANALYZING HIGHWAY DAMAGE COSTS ATTRIBUTED TO TRUCK TRAFFIC OF PROCESSED MEAT AND RELATED INDUSTRIES IN SOUTHWEST KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chunxiao

    2007-12-03

    .................................................................................... 10 2.1 Processed Meat Industries in Southwest Kansas ............................................ 11 2.1.1 Various Stages in the Movement of Cattle.............................................. 12 2.1.2 Cattle Feeding Industry... ................................................................................................................ 57 4.1 Truck VMT for Transporting Feeder Cattle to Feed Yards............................ 62 4.1.1 Truck Travel Paths for Transporting Feeder Cattle to Feed Yards ....... 62 4.1.2 Truckloads for Transporting Feeder Cattle to Feed Yards...

  18. Drought and the 2002-2003 El Nio in the Southwest U.S. Glenn A. Tootle1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    following the 11 identified El Nino events during 1923- 2002 are evaluated to determine if currentDrought and the 2002-2003 El Niño in the Southwest U.S. Glenn A. Tootle1 and Thomas C. Piechota2 1 of drought causing water shortages and low lake levels, and now an El Niño event is occurring. This study

  19. Southwest Michigan Community Action Agency Â… Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual ReportSouthwest Michigan Community Action

  20. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET: extending EUV learning to 16-nm half pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie Mae; Denham, Paul E.; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Michael; Smith, Nathan; Wallow, Thomas; Montgomery, Warren; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-18

    Several high-performing resists identified in the past two years have been exposed at the 0.3-numerical-aperture (NA) SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (BMET) with an engineered dipole illumination optimized for 18-nm half pitch. Five chemically amplified platforms were found to support 20-nm dense patterning at a film thickness of approximately 45 nm. At 19-nm half pitch, however, scattered bridging kept all of these resists from cleanly resolving larger areas of dense features. At 18-nm half pitch, none of the resists were are able to cleanly resolve a single line within a bulk pattern. With this same illumination a directly imageable metal oxide hardmask showed excellent performance from 22-nm half pitch to 17-nm half pitch, and good performance at 16-nm half pitch, closely following the predicted aerial image contrast. This indicates that observed limitations of the chemically amplified resists are indeed coming from the resist and not from a shortcoming of the exposure tool. The imageable hardmask was also exposed using a Pseudo Phase-Shift-Mask technique and achieved clean printing of 15-nm half pitch lines and modulation all the way down to the theoretical 12.5-nm resolution limit of the 0.3-NA SEMATECH BMET.

  1. Vulnerability and adaptation to severe weather events in the American southwest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boero, Riccardo; Bianchini, Laura; Pasqualini, Donatella

    2015-05-04

    Climate change can induce changes in the frequency of severe weather events representing a threat to socio-economic development. It is thus of uttermost importance to understand how the vulnerability to the weather of local communities is determined and how adaptation public policies can be effectively put in place. We focused our empirical analysis on the American Southwest. Results show that, consistently with the predictions of an investment model, economic characteristics signaling local economic growth in the near future decrease the level of vulnerability. We also show that federal governments transfers and grants neither work to support recovery from and adaptationmore »to weather events nor to distribute their costs over a broader tax base. Finally, we show that communities relying on municipal bonds to finance adaptation and recovery policies can benefit from local acknowledgment of the need for such policies and that they do not have to pay lenders a premium for the risk induced by weather events. In conclusion, our findings suggest that determinants of economic growth support lower vulnerability to the weather and increase options for financing adaptation and recovery policies, but also that only some communities are likely to benefit from those processes.« less

  2. Carbon Sequestration Atlas and Interactive Maps from the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McPherson, Brian

    In November of 2002, DOE announced a global climate change initiative involving joint government-industry partnerships working together to find sensible, low cost solutions for reducing GHG emissions. As a result, seven regional partnerships were formed; the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is one of those. These groups are utilizing their expertise to assess sequestration technologies to capture carbon emissions, identify and evaluate appropriate storage locations, and engage a variety of stakeholders in order to increase awareness of carbon sequestration. Stakeholders in this project are made up of private industry, NGOs, the general public, and government entities. There are a total of 44 current organizations represented in the partnership including electric utilities, oil and gas companies, state governments, universities, NGOs, and tribal nations. The SWP is coordinated by New Mexico Tech and encompasses New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Utah, and portions of Kansas, Nevada, Texas, and Wyoming. Field test sites for the region are located in New Mexico (San Juan Basin), Utah (Paradox Basin), and Texas (Permian Basin).[Taken from the SWP C02 Sequestration Atlas] The SWP makes available at this website their CO2 Sequestration Atlas and an interactive data map.

  3. Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1300 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. No abstract prepared. Authors: Fish, M. A. 1 ; Serkland, Darwin Keith ; Guilfoyle, Peter S. 1 ; Stone, Richard V. 1 ;...

  4. The SEMATECH Berkeley MET pushing EUV development beyond 22-nm half pitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulleau, P.; Anderson, C. N.; Backlea-an, L.-M.; Chan, D.; Denham, P.; George, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Hoef, B.; Jones, G.; Koh, C.; La Fontaine, B.; McClinton, B.; Miyakawa, R.; Montgomery, W.; Rekawa, S.; Wallow, T.

    2010-03-18

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) play a crucial role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists and masks, One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) MET, Using conventional illumination this tool is limited to approximately 22-nm half pitch resolution. However, resolution enhancement techniques have been used to push the patterning capabilities of this tool to half pitches of 18 nm and below, This resolution was achieved in a new imageable hard mask which also supports contact printing down to 22 nm with conventional illumination. Along with resolution, line-edge roughness is another crucial hurdle facing EUV resists, Much of the resist LER, however, can be attributed to the mask. We have shown that intenssionally aggressive mask cleaning on an older generation mask causes correlated LER in photoresist to increase from 3.4 nm to 4,0 nm, We have also shown that new generation EUV masks (100 pm of substrate roughness) can achieve correlated LER values of 1.1 nm, a 3x improvement over the correlated LER of older generation EUV masks (230 pm of substrate roughness), Finally, a 0.5-NA MET has been proposed that will address the needs of EUV development at the 16-nm node and beyond, The tool will support an ultimate resolution of 8 nm half-pitch and generalized printing using conventional illumination down to 12 nm half pitch.

  5. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 19, 2013-Researchers at Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling November 19, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 19, 2013-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are investigating the...

  6. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, W.; Kim, J.; Rekawa, S.; Fischer, P.; Anderson, E. H.

    2009-06-05

    To extend soft x-ray microscopy to a resolution of order 10 nm or better, we developed a new nanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. The new process, based on the double patterning technique, has enabled us to fabricate high quality gold zone plates with 12 nm outer zones. Testing of the zone plate with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope, XM-1, in Berkeley, showed that the lens clearly resolved 12 nm lines and spaces. This result represents a significant step towards 10 nm resolution and beyond.

  7. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, W.

    2010-01-01

    of 12 nm Resolution Fresnel Zone Plate Lens based Soft X-raynanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. Theoptical performance of Fresnel zone plate lens based imaging

  8. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  9. Controlled placement of colloidal quantum dots in sub-15 nm clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Hee-Sun

    We demonstrated a technique to control the placement of 6 nm-diameter CdSe and 5 nm-diameter CdSe/CdZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) through electron-beam lithography. This QD-placement technique resulted in an average of ...

  10. RF Power Potential of 90 nm CMOS: Device Options, Performance, and Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    of the RF power potential of the various device options offered in a state-of-the-art 90 nm CMOS foundry and reliability. In a modern foundry process, in addition to the nominal digital devices, it is common to offer in a foundry process. Technology The technology that has been studied in this work is a foundry 90 nm CMOS

  11. Photophysics of O2 excited by tunable laser radiation around 193 nm B. L. G. Bakkera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijmegen, University of

    Photophysics of O2 excited by tunable laser radiation around 193 nm B. L. G. Bakkera) and D. H and the velocity map imaging technique. Angular and kinetic energy distributions of the product O ions and O(3 P2 by tunable radiation around 193 nm, a wavelength falling within the Schumann­Runge bands,1 the dominant

  12. Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25 #12;Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013 Paper 6722 DRAGON5: Designing Computational Schemes Dedicated to Fission Nuclear Reactors

  13. Coherence and Linewidth Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    bandwidth for a single-pass FEL amplifier initiated by SASE.Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W.M. Fawley, A.M. Sessler,Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W. M. Fawley and A. M.

  14. Switching of 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses using a compact PMN-PT modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adany, Peter; Price, E. Shane; Johnson, Carey K.; Zhang, Run; Hui, Rongqing

    2009-03-13

    is demonstrated using the soliton self-frequency shift in a photonic crystal fiber. By dynamically controlling the optical power into the fiber, this system switches the wavelength of 100 fs pulses from 900 nm to beyond 1120 nm with less than 5??s time...

  15. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  16. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

  17. Training Session: Euless, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  18. Houston, TX Trinity Uni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Baton Rou jnovak@PI Lin Luo The Dow C 2301 Brazo Freeport, T lluo2@dow NACS Rep Mike Reyn Shell Inter pecially if yo sh. e colleagues am to them ur Treasurer ould be mad nt registrati ip. : The best 00 t). WCS p (last #12;3 7 8 8 9 10 10 1 12 2 3 3 7:30 AM 8:25 AM 8:30 AM 9:15 AM 0:00 AM 0:30 AM 1

  19. D&TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval ,, *' ;x-L*Qwner contacted0*.

  20. ~tx410.ptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rz machine |NNSA0202(2).pdf More THURSDAY,

  1. ~tx421.ptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 rz machine |NNSA0202(2).pdf More THURSDAY,

  2. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at a wavelength of 940 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W J; You, L X; He, Y H; Zhang, L; Liu, X Y; Yang, X Y; Wu, J J; Guo, Q; Chen, S J; Wang, Z; Xie, X M

    2015-01-01

    We develop single-photon detectors comprising single-mode fiber-coupled superconducting nanowires, with high system detection efficiencies at a wavelength of 940 nm. The detector comprises a 6.5-nm-thick, 110-nm-wide NbN nanowire meander fabricated onto a Si substrate with a distributed Bragg reflector for enhancing the optical absorptance. We demonstrate that, via the design of a low filling factor (1/3) and active area ({\\Phi} = 10 {\\mu}m), the system reaches a detection efficiency of ~60% with a dark count rate of 10 Hz, a recovery time <12 ns, and a timing jitter of ~50 ps.

  3. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-13

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  4. Electron-beam-induced deposition of 3-nm-half-pitch patterns on bulk Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Oven, J. C.

    This paper demonstrates electron-beam-induced deposition of few-nm-width dense features on bulk samples by using a scanning electron-beam lithography system. To optimize the resultant features, three steps were taken: (1) ...

  5. Fiber-coupled nanowire photon counter at 1550 nm with 24% system detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Xiaolong

    We developed a fiber-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detector system in a close-cycled cryocooler and achieved 24% and 22% system detection efficiencies at wavelengths of 1550 and 1315 nm, respectively. The ...

  6. Understanding of hydrogen silsesquioxane electron resist for sub-5-nm-half-pitch lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    The authors, demonstrated that 4.5-nm-half-pitch structures could be achieved using electron-beam lithography, followed by salty development. They also hypothesized a development mechanism for hydrogen silsesquioxane, ...

  7. Timing performance of 30-nm-wide superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafi, Faraz

    We investigated the timing jitter of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs, also referred to as cascade-switching superconducting single-photon detectors) based on 30-nm-wide nanowires. At bias currents ...

  8. Sub-20nm substrate patterning using a self-assembled nanocrystal template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Ryan C

    2005-01-01

    A hexagonally close-packed monolayer of lead selenide quantum dots is presented as a template for patterning with a tunable resolution from 2 to 20nm. Spin-casting and micro-contact printing are resolved as methods of ...

  9. High energy femtosecond fiber laser at 1018 nm and high power Cherenkov radiation generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongyu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Two novel laser systems for ultrafast applications have been designed and built. For the seeding of a high energy cryogenically cooled Yb:YLF laser, a novel 1018 nm fiber laser system is demonstrated. It produces >35 nJ ...

  10. Comprehensive inverse modeling for the study of carrier transport models in sub-50nm MOSFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djomehri, Ihsan Jahed, 1976-

    2002-01-01

    Direct quantitative 2-D characterization of sub-50 nm MOSFETs continues to be elusive. This research develops a comprehensive indirect inverse modeling technique for extracting 2-D device topology using combined log(I)-V ...

  11. Mode instability thresholds for Tm-doped fiber amplifiers pumped at 790 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Arlee V

    2015-01-01

    We use a detailed numerical model of stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering to compute mode instability thresholds in Tm$^{3+}$-doped fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifies 2040 nm light using a 790 nm pump. The cross-relaxation process is strong, permitting power efficiencies of 60%. The predicted instability thresholds are compared with those in similar Yb$^{3+}$-doped fiber amplifiers with 976 nm pump and 1060 nm signal, and are found to be higher, even though the heat load is much higher in Tm-doped amplifiers. The higher threshold in the Tm-doped fiber is attributed to its longer signal wavelength, and to stronger gain saturation, due in part to cross-relaxation heating.

  12. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup June 18, 2014 Los Alamos to partner with Toshiba to remotely and safely peer inside nuclear reactors LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18,...

  13. Investigation of a Polarization Controller in Titanium Diffused Lithium Niobate Waveguide near 1530 nm Wavelength 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Won Ju

    2013-12-10

    Optical polarization control in Ti diffused channel waveguides onto LiNbO_(3) substrates have been investigated near 1530 nm wavelength regime by utilizing electro-optic effects of the substrate material. A device configuration composed of two...

  14. Carbon nanotube assisted formation of sub-50 nm polymeric nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A novel processing method was developed for sub-50 nm structures by integrating quantum dots (QDs) on patterned polymer substrates. Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMa) was prepared by the initiated chemical vapor ...

  15. A 674 nm external cavity diode laser for a ??Sr? ion trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thon, Susanna M. (Susanna Mitrani)

    2005-01-01

    Atomic ion traps are a promising candidate for scalable quantum information processing. In this thesis, a 674 nm extended cavity diode laser is built to address an optical quantum bit in ??Sr? with the goal of testing such ...

  16. Hanna, A., J. Vukovich, S. Arunachalam, D. Loughlin, H.C. Frey, J. Touma, J. Irwin, and V. Isakov, "Assessment of Uncertainty in Benzene Concentration Estimates in the Houston, TX, Area," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    , "Assessment of Uncertainty in Benzene Concentration Estimates in the Houston, TX, Area," Proceedings, Annual & Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, PA, June 2004 1 Assessment of Uncertainty in Benzene for a particular urban area. We present the results of a case study involving benzene emissions in the Houston area

  17. Photometry of symbiotic stars XI. EG And, Z And, BF Cyg, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1329 Cyg, TX CVn, AG Dra, RW Hya, QW Sge, IV Vir and the LMXB V934 Her

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Skopal; T. Pribulla; M. Vanko; Z. Velic; E. Semkov; M. Wolf; A. Jones

    2004-02-06

    We present new photometric observations of EG And, Z And, BF Cyg, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1329 Cyg, TX CVn, AG Dra, RW Hya, AR Pav, AG Peg, AX Per, QW Sge, IV Vir and the peculiar M giant V934 Her. The current issue gathers observations of these objects to December 2003.

  18. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of "high tech" causing lethargy in implementation. 6. Time lag in technology transfer. 7. The "vision are simplifying computer output. 13. Implementation of "high tech" is putting 21st century technology into 19Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest

  19. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. The University of California's Woody Biomass increasing energy costs, national interest in the development of alternative energy sources began to develop

  20. Desalination is here. In the arid southwest, from Texas to California, as well as in Florida and a few other states, the demand for freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Desalination is here. In the arid southwest, from Texas to California, as well as in Florida of sustainability, desalination presents particular problems, not only in the energy used to accomplish the desalination itself (where great progress has been made in the past 20 years), but in all of the ancillary

  1. Polarization-Independent and High-Efficiency Dielectric Metasurfaces Spanning 600-800 nm Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qi-Tong; Wang, Bo; Gan, Fengyuan; Chen, Jianjun; Chu, Weiguo; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial metasurfaces are capable of completely manipulating the phase, amplitude, and polarization of light with high spatial resolutions. The emerging design based on high-index and low-loss dielectrics has led to the realization of novel metasurfaces with high transmissions, but these devices usually operate at the limited bandwidth, and are sensitive to the incident polarization. Here, for the first time we report experimentally the polarization-independent and high-efficiency dielectric metasurfaces spanning the visible wavelengths about 200 nm, which are of importance for novel flat optical devices operating over a broad spectrum. The diffraction efficiencies of the gradient metasurfaces consisting of the multi-fold symmetric nano-crystalline silicon nanopillars are up to 93% at 670 nm, and exceed 75% at the wavelengths from 600 to 800 nm for the two orthogonally polarized incidences. These dielectric metasurfaces hold great potential to replace prisms, lenses and other conventional optical elements.

  2. Highly Unidirectional Uniform Optical Grating Couplers, Fabricated in Standard 45nm SOI-CMOS Foundry Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uroševi?, Stevan Lj

    2014-01-01

    This paper defines new structures of highly unidirectional uniform optical grating couplers which are all within constraints of the standard 45nm SOI-CMOS foundry process. Analysis in terms of unidirectivity and coupling efficiency is done. Maximum achieved unidirectivity (power radiation in one direction) is 98%. Unidirectional uniform gratings are fabricated in the standard 45nm SOI-CMOS foundry process. These gratings are measured and compared, using the new method of comparison, with typical bidirectional uniform gratings fabricated in the same process, in terms of coupling efficiency (in this case unidirectivity) with the standard singlemode fiber. For both types of gratings spectrum is given, measured with optical spectrum analyzer.

  3. A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2012-06-05

    The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

  4. Accurate value for the absorption coefficient of silicon at 633 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, J.; Schaefer, A.R.; Song, J.F.; Wang, Y.H.; Zalewski, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    High-accuracy transmission measurements at an optical wavelength of 633 nm and mechanical measurements of the thickness of a 13 micrometer thick silicon-crystal film have been used to calculate the absorption and extinction coefficients of silicon at 633 nm. The results are 3105 + or - 62/cm and 0.01564 + or - 0.00031, respectively. These results are about 15% less than current handbook data for the same quantities, but are in good agreement with a recent fit to one set of data described in the literature.

  5. Measurement of the quantum efficiency of TMAE and TEA from threshold to 120 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holroyd, R.A.; Preses, J.M.; Woody, C.L.; Johnson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Several existing and planned high energy physics experiments incorporate detectors which use either TMAE (tetrakis-dimethylaminoethylene) or TEA (triethylamine) as their photosensitive agent. Understanding the operation of these devices requires knowledge of the absolute photoionization quantum efficiencies and absorption lengths of TMAE and TEA. In an experiment performed at the National Synchrotron Light source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, we have measured these parameters from 120 nm to 280 nm. The quantum efficiencies were normalized to the known photoionization yields of benzene and cis-2-butene. The results of these measurements and details of the experiment are presented in this paper.

  6. Per Capita Consumption The NM.S calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capita consumption of fresh and frozen products was 10.5 pounds, 0.1 pound more than 1999. .resh in the world. Fish and Fishery Products Apparent Consumption Average 1995-1997 (LiveWeightEquivalent) 3,400 3Per Capita Consumption 85 The NM.S calculation of per capita consumption is based

  7. THz-TDS systems for 1560-nm-wavelength-laser operation Masato Suzuki1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    THz-TDS systems for 1560-nm-wavelength-laser operation Masato Suzuki1 , Ken-ichi Fujii2 for new applications. It is expected that THz-TDS systems for 1.5 µm laser operation have advantages,11] The next stage of development of THz system for 1.5 µm operation requires a prototype of compact THz system

  8. Effects of amines on formation of sub-3 nm particles and their subsequent growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measured with a particle size magnifier (PSM). Our observations provide the laboratory evidence that amines) in a fast flow nucleation reactor coupled with a particle sizing magnifier (PSM), a butanol-based ultrafine ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS). The PSM, coupled with a CPC, can count particles as small as $1 nm

  9. Experimental Implementation of 1310-nm Differential Phase Shift QKD System with Up-conversion Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the 1-bit Michelson Interferometer (b), and the up-conversion unit (c). LD VOAPM TRCV WDM WDM TCSPCTRCV- conversion Unit. LD: CW laser Diode; EOM: Electric-optic Modulator; PM: Phase Modulator; VOA: VariableExperimental Implementation of 1310-nm Differential Phase Shift QKD System with Up-conversion

  10. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J.; Edri, E.

    2014-08-01

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  11. Microsecond gain-switched master oscillator power amplifier (1958 nm) with high pulse energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke Yin; Weiqiang Yang; Bin Zhang; Ying Li; Jing Hou [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073, Hunan (China)

    2014-02-28

    An all-fibre master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) emitting high-energy pulses at 1958 nm is presented. The seed laser is a microsecond gain-switched thulium-doped fibre laser (TDFL) pumped with a commercial 1550-nm pulsed fibre laser. The TDFL operates at a repetition rate f in the range of 10 to 100 kHz. The two-stage thulium-doped fibre amplifier is built to scale the energy of the pulses generated by the seed laser. The maximum output pulse energy higher than 0.5 mJ at 10 kHz is achieved which is comparable with the theoretical maximum extractable pulse energy. The slope efficiency of the second stage amplifier with respect to the pump power is 30.4% at f = 10 kHz. The wavelength of the output pulse laser is centred near 1958 nm at a spectral width of 0.25 nm after amplification. Neither nonlinear effects nor significant amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is observed in the amplification experiments. (lasers)

  12. 2 Gbps SerDes Design Based on IBM Cu-11 (130nm) Standard Cell Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Jeff

    2 Gbps SerDes Design Based on IBM Cu-11 (130nm) Standard Cell Technology Rashed Zafar Bhatti EE Denneau IBM T.J. Watson Research Center Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 denneau@us.ibm.com Jeff Draper of jitter. Power consumption of the proposed SerDes design is 30 mW per serial link targeted to IBM Cu-11

  13. 180-nm CMOS Wideband Capacitor-free Inductively Coupled Power Receiver and Charger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    180-nm CMOS Wideband Capacitor-free Inductively Coupled Power Receiver and Charger Orlando Lazaro.lazaro@ece.gatech.edu, rincon-mora@gatech.edu Abstract: Wireless microsystems like biomedical implants and embedded sensors life is short. Periodically coupling power wirelessly is one way of replenishing onboard batteries

  14. SI-BASED UNRELEASED HYBRID MEMS-CMOS RESONATORS IN 32NM TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    SI-BASED UNRELEASED HYBRID MEMS-CMOS RESONATORS IN 32NM TECHNOLOGY Radhika Marathe*, Wentao Wang*, and Dana Weinstein HybridMEMS Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA *authors before the presence of parasitics. This enables RF-MEMS resonators at orders of magnitude higher

  15. FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber , DESY, Hamburg, Germany for the VUV-FEL team Abstract The VUV-FEL is a free electron laser user facility being commissioned at DESY. It is based on the TTF-FEL, which was in operation until end of 2002 providing a photon beam for two pilot

  16. An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm Kenneth lithography design rules. The proposed microscope features an array of user-selectable Fresnel zoneplate-EUV, Fresnel zoneplate microscope, the AIT has been in the vanguard of high-resolution EUV mask imaging

  17. A high-power 626 nm diode laser system for Beryllium ion trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ball; M. W. Lee; S. D. Gensemer; M. J. Biercuk

    2013-04-07

    We describe a high-power, frequency-tunable, external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system near 626 nm useful for laser cooling of trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ions. A commercial single-mode laser diode with rated power output of 170 mW at 635 nm is cooled to $\\approx - 31$ C, and a single longitudinal mode is selected via the Littrow configuration. In our setup, involving multiple stages of thermoelectric cooling, we are able to obtain $\\approx$130 mW near 626 nm, sufficient for efficient frequency doubling to the required Doppler cooling wavelengths near 313 nm in ionized Beryllium. In order to improve nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency, we achieve larger useful power via injection locking of a slave laser. In this way the entirety of the slave output power is available for frequency doubling, while analysis may be performed on the master output. We believe that this simple laser system addresses a key need in the ion trapping community and dramatically reduces the cost and complexity associated with Beryllium ion trapping experiments.

  18. Performance of a High-Concentration Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier with 100 nm Amplification Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajireza, P.; Shahabuddin, N. S.; Abbasi-Zargaleh, S.; Emami, S. D.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z. [Center for Advanced Devices and Systems, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07

    Increasing demand for higher bandwidth has driven the need for higher Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) channels. One of the requirements to achieve this is a broadband amplifier. This paper reports the performance of a broadband, compact, high-concentration and silica-based erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier optimized to a 2.15 m long erbium-doped fiber with erbium ion concentration of 2000 ppm. The gain spectrum of the amplifier has a measured amplification bandwidth of 100 nm using a 980 nm laser diode with power of 150 mW. This silica-based EDFA shows lower noise figure, higher gain and wider bandwidth in shorter wavelengths compared to Bismuth-based EDFA with higher erbium ion concentration of 3250 ppm at equivalent EDF length. The silica-based EDF shows peak gain at 22 dB and amplification bandwidth between 1520 nm and 1620 nm. The lowest noise figure is 5 dB. The gain is further improved with the implementation of enhanced EDFA configurations.

  19. Sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface modifications induced by long-pulse 1054 nm laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    Sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface modifications induced by long-pulse 1054 nm laser irradiation Sheng fluences. Due to high temperature and elevated non-hydrostatic stresses upon laser irradiation, damage Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Sapphire; Laser irradiation; Spall; Fracture; Twinning

  20. Excitation cross section of erbium-doped GaN waveguides under 980?nm optical pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Rongqing; Xie, R.; Feng, I.-W.; Sun, Z. Y.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-08-04

    Excitation cross section of erbium-doped GaN waveguides is measured to be approximately 2.2×10?21cm2 at 980?nm pumping wavelength. This cross section value is found relatively insensitive to the crystalline quality of ...

  1. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131.e., this is energy that does not have to #12;Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference PHOTOVOLTAICS AS AN ENERGY SERVICES TECHNOLOGY: A CASE STUDY OF PV SITED AT THE UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS

  2. Applications of Sr Isotopes in Archaeology N.M. Slovak and A. Paytan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    an introduction to the fundamental principles, approaches, applications, and future directions of radiogenic stron of 86 Sr/88 Sr in natural N.M. Slovak (*) Department of Behavioral Sciences, Santa Rosa Junior College Sr/86 Sr signatures. M. Baskaran (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Isotope Geochemistry, Advances

  3. Table 2 -Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    MO NE NY NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area Lime applied NR 85 81 85 67 16 72 55 27 65 10 57 53 NR 70 95 3 1 50 51 Lime (tons treated acre) NR 1.0 2.1 1.9 2.5 2.1 2.4 2.0 2.6 2.8 1.5 1.9 1.1 NR 1.9 1.7 NR 0.5 2 NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area Lime applied NR 95 90 69 18 69 71 14 77 16 76 99 NR 82 80 NR 5 58 54 Lime

  4. Double patterning HSQ processes of zone plates for 10 nm diffraction limitedperformance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Weilun; Kim, Jihoon; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Rekawa, Senajith; Attwood, David T.

    2009-01-09

    In e-beam lithography, fabrication of sub-20 nm dense structures is challenging. While there is a constant effort to develop higher resolution resist processes, the progress of increasing pattern density is slow. For zone plates, consisting of dense lines and spaces, the outermost zone width has been limited to slightly less than 20 nm due to effects such as low aerial image contrast, forward scattering, intrinsic resist resolution, and development issues. To circumvent these effects, we have successfully developed a new double patterning HSQ process, and as a result, we have fabricated zone plates of 10 and 12 nm using the process. We previously developed a double patterning process in which a dense zone plate pattern is sub-divided into two semi-isolated, complementary zone set patterns. These patterns are fabricated separately and then overlaid with high accuracy to yield the desired pattern. The key to success with this process is the accuracy of the overlay. For diffraction-limited zone plates, accuracy better than one-third of the smallest zone width is needed. In our previous work, the zone set patterns were formed using PMMA and gold electroplating, which were overlaid and aligned to the zero-level mark layer with sub-pixel accuracy using our internally developed algorithm. The complete zone plate fabrication was conducted in-house. With this process, we successfully fabricated zone plates of 15 nm outermost zone. Using this zone plate, we were able to achieve sub-15 nm resolution at 1.52 nm wavelength, the highest resolution ever demonstrated in optical microscopy at that time. We attempted to extend the process to fabricating 12 nm and smaller zones. However, the modest PMMA contrast, combined with a relatively large electron beam size compared to the target feature sized limited the process latitude. To overcome this problem, we developed a new overlay process based on high resolution negative tone resist of hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ). With the development in TMAH at 45 C, we can reliably achieve zone width as small as 8 nm with negligible line edge roughness in the semi-dense zone set. Such narrow zones in HSQ, however, detach easily from the gold plating base substrate needed for the electroplating step. We developed a process to condition the gold substrate with (3-mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane, or 3-MTP, which can form a homogeneous hydroxylation surface on gold surface and bond with hydroxyl in HSQ. Fig 2 shows the basic process steps of the double patterning HSQ process. Unlike the PMMA process, both zone sets are formed in HSQ and overlaid, and the complete zone plate pattern is converted to gold using electroplating in the final step. Using the new process, we successfully realized zone plates of 10 nm and 12 nm outermost zones. Fig. 3 shows the SEM micrographs of the zone plates outer regions. The zone plates are 30 nm thick in gold. To the best of our knowledge, these zone plates have the smallest zonal features ever fabricated using e-beam lithography. The complete zone plate fabrication was conducted in-house, using our vector scan electron beam lithography tool, the Nanowriter, which has a measured beam diameter of 6.5 nm (FWHM) at 100 keV. An internally developed, sub-pixel alignment algorithm, based on auto/cross-correlation methods, was used for the overlay. A 12 nm zone plate was tested with a full-field transmission x-ray microscope at the LBNL's Advanced Light Source. Fig. 4 shows an x-ray image of a 40 nm thick gold radial spoke pattern taken with the zone plate at 1.75 nm wavelength (707eV, FeL3 edge), along with the scanning transmission electron micrograph of same object. Numerous small features in the object can be seen in the x-ray image. Data analysis indicates that a near diffraction limited performance was achieved using the zone plate. In our presentation, we will discuss the details and subtleties of the overlay fabrication as well as the zone plate image results.

  5. Intrinsic Case Study of Advisors’ Perceptions of Advising International Transfer Students Transitioning from a Two-Year College to a Land-Grant University in the Southwest Region of the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sousa, David Alexandre

    2014-12-15

    This qualitative intrinsic case study examined advisor’s perceptions of advising transitioning international transfer students transferring from a two-year college to a land-grant institution in the southwest region on the United States. Literature...

  6. Effect of Key Parameters on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Toluene at Low Concentrations in Air under 254 + 185 nm UV Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quici, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    under 254 + 185 nm UV Irradiation Natalia Quici, a,b Maríaunder 254 + 185 nm UV Irradiation Natalia Quici, a,b Maríaunder 254 + 185 nm irradiation was investigated using a

  7. THE INFRARED SPECTRUM OF URANIUM HOLLOW CATHODE LAMPS FROM 850 nm to 4000 nm: WAVENUMBERS AND LINE IDENTIFICATIONS FROM FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lawler, James E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nave, Gillian [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    We provide new measurements of wavenumbers and line identifications of 10, 100 U I and U II near-infrared (NIR) emission lines between 2500 cm{sup -1} and 12, 000 cm{sup -1} (4000-850 nm) using archival Fourier transform spectrometer spectra from the National Solar Observatory. This line list includes isolated uranium lines in the Y, J, H, K, and L bands (0.9-1.1 {mu}m, 1.2-1.35 {mu}m, 1.5-1.65 {mu}m, 2.0-2.4 {mu}m, and 3.0-4.0 {mu}m, respectively), and provides six times as many calibration lines as thorium in the NIR spectral range. The line lists we provide enable inexpensive, commercially available uranium hollow cathode lamps to be used for high-precision wavelength calibration of existing and future high-resolution NIR spectrographs.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELDS OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT FROM FULL STOKES ANALYSIS OF Si I 1082.7 nm AND He I 1083.0 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2012-04-20

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament in the photosphere and upper chromosphere are obtained from spectro-polarimetric observations recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We apply Milne-Eddington inversions on full Stokes vectors of the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm to obtain the magnetic field vector and velocity maps in two atmosphere layers. We find that (1) a complete filament was already present in H{alpha} at the beginning of the TIP II data acquisition. Only a partially formed one, composed of multiple small threads, was present in He I. (2) The AR filament comprises two sections. One shows strong magnetic field intensities, about 600-800 G in the upper chromosphere and 800-1000 G in the photosphere. The other exhibits only comparatively weak magnetic field strengths in both layers. (3) The Stokes V signal is indicative of a dip in the magnetic field strength close to the chromospheric PIL. (4) In the chromosphere, consistent upflows are found along the PIL flanked by downflows. (5) The transversal magnetic field is nearly parallel to the PIL in the photosphere and inclined by 20 Degree-Sign -30 Degree-Sign in the chromosphere. (6) The chromospheric magnetic field around the filament is found to be in normal configuration, while the photospheric field presents a concave magnetic topology. The observations are consistent with the emergence of a flux rope with a subsequent formation of a filament.

  9. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2012-07-11

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  10. A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2011-05-30

    The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

  11. 32.8-nm X-ray laser produced in a krypton cluster jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanova, E P; Vinokhodov, A Yu

    2013-12-31

    We have interpreted the well-known experimental quantum yield data for a 32.8-nm X-ray laser operating at the 3d{sup 9}4d (J = 0) – 3d{sup 9}4p (J = 1) transition of Kr{sup 8+} with the use of gaseous krypton or a krypton cluster jet. Proceeding from our model we propose a novel scheme for the 32.8-nm laser produced in a krypton cluster jet. The quantum yield is shown to saturate for a plasma length of ?300 ?m, a krypton ion density n{sub Kr} ? (4 – 9) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, and an electron temperature Te ? 5000 eV. In this case, the energy conversion coefficient amounts to ?5 × 10{sup -3} of the pump pulse energy. We propose the experimental setup for producing a highefficiency subpicosecond X-ray laser in a krypton cluster jet. (lasers)

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuel Cycle | Department| Department of EnergyNM, Production |

  13. Promethium-doped phosphate glass laser at 933 and 1098 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupke, W.F.; Shinn, M.D.; Kirchoff, T.A.; Finch, C.B.; Boatner, L.A.

    1987-12-28

    A promethium (Pm/sup 3 +/) laser has been demonstrated for the first time. Trivalent promethium 147 doped into a lead-indium-phosphate glass etalon was used to produce room-temperature four-level laser emission at wavelengths of 933 and 1098 nm. Spectroscopic and kinetic measurements have shown that Pm/sup 3 +/ is similar to Nd/sup 3 +/ as a laser active ion.

  14. Geothermal Electric Plant Planned in N.M. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References:SequestrationElectric Plant Planned in N.M.

  15. Effects of amines on formation of sub-3 nm particles and their subsequent growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu H.; McGraw R.; Lee S.-H.

    2012-01-28

    Field observations and quantum chemical calculations suggest that amines can be important for formation of nanometer size particles. Amines and ammonia often have common atmospheric emission sources and the similar chemical and physical properties. While the effects of ammonia on aerosol nucleation have been previously investigated, laboratory studies of homogeneous nucleation involving amines are lacking. We have made kinetics studies of multicomponent nucleation (MCN) with sulfuric acid, water, ammonia and amines under conditions relevant to the atmosphere. Low concentrations of aerosol precursors were measured with chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMS) to provide constrained precursor concentrations needed for nucleation. Particle sizes larger than {approx}2 nm were measured with a nano-differential mobility analyzer (nano-DMA), and number concentrations of particles larger than {approx}1 nm were measured with a particle size magnifier (PSM). Our observations provide the laboratory evidence that amines indeed can participate in aerosol nucleation and growth at the molecular cluster level. The enhancement of particle number concentrations due to several atmospherically relevant amine compounds and ammonia were related to the basicity of these compounds, indicating that acid-base reactions may contribute to the formation of sub-3 nm particles.

  16. Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

    2011-04-15

    Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

  17. EIS-0005-S2: Bonneville Power Administration Proposed FY 1979 Program Facility Planning Supplement Southwest Oregon Area Service, Supplemental

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statement, one of a series prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration on various facets of its construction and maintenance activities, addresses the potential impact of a major new facility proposed for fiscal year 1979. To allow power generated in Wyoming to be delivered to Southwest Oregon and to facilitate the exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest and the Middle Snake region, two basic plans of service, each with two corridor routing options, have been identified to meet system requirements. BPA proposes construction of the following two transmission facilities: (1) a 500-kV line from Idaho Power Company's Brownlee Substation in Idaho to BPA's Slatt Substation near Arlington, Oregon, and (2) a 500-kV line from Buckley (near Maupin, Oregon) to Malin, Oregon. This statement must be reviewed and used in conjunction with the overall programmatic environmental statement entitled ""The Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System, Including Its Participation in the Hydro-Thermal Power Program: A Program Environmental Statement and Planning Report (The ""Role EIS""), particularly Appendix B - BPA Power Transmission.

  18. Formation of 15 nm scale Coulomb blockade structures in silicon by electron beam lithography with a bilayer resist process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) wafers with 400 nm buried oxide layers pre- pared by Smart CutTM technology were used. The device region was thinned down to 30 nm by dry oxidation and then the top oxide layer was etched down to a thickness of 20 oxide layer and patterned for formation of EBL markers for e-beam lithogra- phy. After patterning marker

  19. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  20. Stable gain-switched thulium fiber laser with 140 nm tuning range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fengqiu; Kelleher, Edmund; Guo, Guoxiang; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhu, Shining

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a gain-switched thulium fiber laser that can be continuously tuned over 140 nm, while maintaining stable nanosecond single-pulse operation. To the best of our knowledge, this system represents the broadest tuning range for a gain-switched fiber laser. The system simplicity and wideband wavelength tunability combined with the ability to control the temporal characteristics of the gain-switched pulses mean this is a versatile source highly suited to a wide range of applications in the eye-safe region of the infrared, including spectroscopy, sensing and material processing, as well as being a practical seed source for pumping nonlinear processes.

  1. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia-Wei Yeh; K. K. Sriram; Alessandro Taloni; Yeng-Long Chen; Chia-Fu Chou

    2015-02-18

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  2. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  3. Polarimetry diagnostic on OMEGA EP using a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, A., E-mail: adavies@lle.rochester.edu; Haberberger, D.; Boni, R.; Ivancic, S.; Brown, R.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A polarimetry diagnostic was built and characterized for magnetic-field measurements in laser-plasma experiments on the OMEGA EP laser. This diagnostic was built into the existing 4? (263-nm) probe system that employs a 10-ps laser pulse collected with an f/4 imaging system. The diagnostic measures the rotation of the probe beam's polarization. The polarimeter uses a Wollaston prism to split the probe beam into orthogonal polarization components. Spatially localized intensity variations between images indicate polarization rotation. Magnetic fields can be calculated by combining the polarimetry data with the measured plasma density profile obtained from angular filter refractometry.

  4. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  5. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Rymaszewski; Marlon Barbero; Patrick Breugnon; Stépahnie Godiot; Laura Gonella; Tomasz Hemperek; Toko Hirono; Fabian Hügging; Hans Krüger; Jian Liu; Patrick Pangaud; Ivan Peric; Alexandre Rozanov; Anqing Wang; Norbert Wermes

    2016-01-04

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  6. Damage thresholds of thin film materials and high reflectors at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainer, F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Carniglia, C.K.; Hart, T.T.; Lichtenstein, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-ns, 248-nm KrF laser pulses were used to measure laser damage thresholds for halfwave-thick layers of 15 oxide and fluoride coating materials, and for high reflectance coatings made with 13 combinations of these materials. The damage thresholds of the reflectors and single-layer films were compared to measurements of several properties of the halfwave-thick films to determine whether measurements of these properties of single-layer films to determine whether measurements of these properties of single-layer films were useful for identifying materials for fabrication of damage resistant coatings.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shiprock Mill Site - NM 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co - OH 51SavannahMill Site - NM 0-04

  8. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NM.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages RecentTempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf JumpTransmissionKY.pdfND.pdf JumpNM.pdf

  9. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  10. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R.E.; Wine, P.H. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl{sub 2}CO). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S({sup 3}P{sub j}) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S({sup 1}D{sub 2})+OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N{sub 2}+N{sub 2}O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Two-photon laser excitation of trapped 232Th+ ions via the 402 nm resonance line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera-Sancho, O A; Zimmermann, K; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Glowacki, P

    2012-01-01

    Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of 232Th+ ions in a radiofrequency ion trap are reported. As the first excitation step, the strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the 6d^2 7s J=3/2 ground state to the 6d7s7p J=5/2 state at 24874 cm^{-1} is driven by radiation from an extended cavity diode laser. Spontaneous decay of the intermediate state populates a number of low-lying metastable states, thus limiting the excited state population and fluorescence signal obtainable with continuous laser excitation. We study the collisional quenching efficiency of helium, argon, and nitrogen buffer gases, and the effect of repumping laser excitation from the three lowest-lying metastable levels. The experimental results are compared with a four-level rate equation model, that allows us to deduce quenching rates for these buffer gases. Using laser radiation at 399 nm for the second step, we demonstrate two-photon excitation to the state at 49960 cm^{-1}, among the highest-lying classified levels of Th+. Thi...

  12. Variation of the Mn I 539.4 nm line with the solar cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilovic, S; Livingston, W; Krivova, N; Vince, I

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the long-term program at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), the Mn I 539.4 nm line has been observed for nearly three solar cycles using the McMath telescope and the 13.5 m spectrograph in double-pass mode. These full-disk spectrophotometric observations revealed an unusually strong change of this line's parameters over the solar cycle. Optical pumping by the Mg II k line was originally proposed to explain these variations. More recent studies have proposed that this is not required and that the magnetic variability might explain it. Magnetic variability is also the mechanism that drives the changes in total solar irradiance variations (TSI). With this work we investigate this proposition quantitatively by using using the model SATIRE-S. We applied exactly the same model atmospheres and value of the free parameter as were used in previous solar irradiance reconstructions to now model the variation in the Mn I 539.4 nm line profile and in neighboring Fe I lines. We compared the results of the ...

  13. MICROMAGNETIC STUDIES OF THE TRANSITION BETWEEN VORTEX AND SINGLE-DOMAIN STATES IN SUB-100 NM NANODOTS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Andrew

    2012-04-26

    20 40 60 80 100 120 140 To ta l E ne rg y (e V ) Vortex-­?Core Posi2on (nm) Total Energy vs. Vortex-­?Core Posi2on 65 nm Diameter Iron Dot 0 kOe 0.5 kOe 17... B ar ri er (e V ) Applied Field (kOe) Energy Barriers vs. Applied Field 40 nm Diameter Iron Dot Vortex Annihila:on Vortex Nuclea:on 21 FIG. 8. Energy barriers plotted versus applied...

  14. Assembly of Sub-10-nm Block Copolymer Patterns with Mixed Morphology and Period Using Electron Irradiation and Solvent Annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Jeong Gon

    Block copolymer self-assembly generates patterns with periodicity in the ?10–100 nm range and is increasingly recognized as a route to lithographic patterning beyond the resolution of photolithography. Block copolymers ...

  15. High-order harmonic generation in atomic hydrogen at 248 nm: Dipole-moment versus acceleration spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Chu, Shih-I

    1992-12-01

    We present a study of the high-order harmonic-generation (HG) spectra of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm based on the Fourier transform of the expectation values of the induced dipole moment and acceleration. The calculations ...

  16. EUV light source with high brightness at 13.5 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, V M; Prokof'ev, A V; Khristoforov, O B [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Koshelev, K N [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khadzhiyskiy, F Yu [EUV Labs, Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    The results of the studies on the development of a highbrightness radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range are presented. The source is intended for using in projection EUV lithography, EUV mask inspection, for the EUV metrology, etc. Novel approaches to creating a light source on the basis of Z-pinch in xenon allowed the maximal brightness [130 W(mm{sup 2} sr){sup -1}] to be achieved in the vicinity of plasma for this type of radiation sources within the 2% spectral band centred at the wavelength of 13.5 nm that corresponds to the maximal reflection of multilayer Mo/Si mirrors. In this spectral band the radiation power achieves 190 W in the solid angle of 2? at a pulse repetition rate of 1.9 kHz and an electric power of 20 kW, injected into the discharge. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Ion generation and CPC detection efficiency studies in sub 3-nm size range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangasluoma, J.; Junninen, H.; Sipilae, M.; Kulmala, M.; Petaejae, T. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Lehtipalo, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Airmodus Ltd., Finland, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Mikkilae, J.; Vanhanen, J. [Airmodus Ltd., Finland, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Attoui, M. [University Paris Est Creteil, University Paris-Diderot, LISA, UMR CNRS 7583 (France); Worsnop, D. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland) and Aerodyne Research Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2013-05-24

    We studied the chemical composition of commonly used condensation particle counter calibration ions with a mass spectrometer and found that in our calibration setup the negatively charged ammonium sulphate, sodium chloride and tungsten oxide are the least contaminated whereas silver on both positive and negative and the three mentioned earlier in positive mode are contaminated with organics. We report cut-off diameters for Airmodus Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6 and 1.6-1.8 nm for negative sodium chloride, ammonium sulphate, tungsten oxide, silver and positive organics, respectively. To study the effect of sample relative humidity on detection efficiency of the PSM we used different humidities in the differential mobility analyzer sheath flow and found that with increasing relative humidity also the detection efficiency of the PSM increases.

  18. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Danna; Peterson, Charles G; Dallmann, Nicholas; Hughes, Richard J; Mccabe, Kevin P; Nordholt, Jane E; Tyagi, Hush T; Peters, Nicholas A; Toliver, Paul; Chapman, Thomas E; Runser, Robert J; Mcnown, Scott R

    2008-01-01

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  19. Time and spectrum-resolving multiphoton correlator for 300–900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Thibault, Marilyne; Jennewein, Thomas; Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto

    2014-10-14

    We demonstrate a single-photon sensitive spectrometer in the visible range, which allows us to perform time-resolved and multi-photon spectral correlation measurements at room temperature. It is based on a monochromator composed of two gratings, collimation optics, and an array of single photon avalanche diodes. The time resolution can reach 110 ps and the spectral resolution is 2 nm/pixel, limited by the design of the monochromator. This technique can easily be combined with commercial monochromators and can be useful for joint spectrum measurements of two photons emitted in the process of parametric down conversion, as well as time-resolved spectrum measurements in optical coherence tomography or medical physics applications.

  20. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant uncertainty existed about the quantum efficiency at 1550 nm the necessary operating temperature. This project has resulted in several conclusions after fabrication and measurement of the proposed structures. We have successfully demonstrated the Ge/Si proof-of-concept in producing high analog gain in a silicon region while absorbing in a Ge region. This has included significant Ge processing infrastructure development at Sandia. However, sensitivity is limited at low temperatures due to high dark currents that we ascribe to tunneling. This leaves remaining uncertainty about whether this structure can achieve the desired performance with further development. GM detection in InGaAs/InAlAs, Ge/Si, Si and pure Ge devices fabricated at Sandia was shown to overcome gain noise challenges, which represents critical learning that will enable Sandia to respond to future single photon detection needs. However, challenges to the operation of these devices in GM remain. The InAlAs multiplication region was not found to be significantly superior to current InP regions for GM, however, improved multiplication region design of InGaAs/InP APDs has been highlighted. For Ge GM detectors it still remains unclear whether an optimal trade-off of parameters can achieve the necessary sensitivity at 1550 nm. To further examine these remaining questions, as well as other application spaces for these technologies, funding for an Intelligence Community post-doc was awarded this year.

  1. Emission parameters and thermal management of single high-power 980-nm laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezotosnyi, V V; Krokhin, O N; Oleshchenko, V A; Pevtsov, V F; Popov, Yu M; Cheshev, E A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-28

    We report emission parameters of high-power cw 980-nm laser diodes (LDs) with a stripe contact width of 100 ?m. On copper heat sinks of the C-mount type, a reliable output power of 10 W is obtained at a pump current of 10 A. Using a heat flow model derived from analysis of calculated and measured overall efficiencies at pump currents up to 20 A, we examine the possibility of raising the reliable power limit of a modified high-power LD mounted on heat sinks of the F-mount type using submounts with optimised geometric parameters and high thermal conductivity. The possibility of increasing the maximum reliable cw output power to 20 W with the use of similar laser crystals is discussed. (lasers)

  2. Automated Coronal Hole Detection using He I 1083 nm Spectroheliograms and Photospheric Magnetograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Henney; J. W. Harvey

    2007-01-05

    A method for automated coronal hole detection using He I 1083 nm spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms is presented here. The unique line formation of the helium line allows for the detection of regions associated with solar coronal holes with minimal line-of-sight obscuration across the observed solar disk. The automated detection algorithm utilizes morphological image analysis, thresholding and smoothing to estimate the location, boundaries, polarity and flux of candidate coronal hole regions. The algorithm utilizes thresholds based on mean values determined from over 10 years of the Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope daily hand-drawn coronal hole images. A comparison between the automatically created and hand-drawn images for a 11-year period beginning in 1992 is outlined. In addition, the creation of synoptic maps using the daily automated coronal hole images is also discussed.

  3. Oxygen in Galactic Disk Stars: non-LTE abundances from the 777 nm O I triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2005-06-29

    Oxygen abundances for a large sample of dwarf and giant stars kinematically selected to be part of the Galactic thin and thick disks have been determined from a non-LTE analysis of the O I triplet lines at 777 nm. The abundance analysis was performed using the infrared flux method temperature scale, trigonometric surface gravities, and accurate atomic data. Within this framework, the ionization balance of iron lines could not be satisfied and so we adopted the iron abundances from Fe II lines only given that they are relatively less sensitive to changes in the atmospheric parameters. We show the resulting [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relationship and briefly discuss its implications.

  4. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Shih-Huang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-14

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  5. Geologic setting, petrophysical characteristics, and regional heterogeneity patterns of the Smackover in southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1992-06-01

    This is the draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3 of DOE contract number DE-FG22-89BC14425, entitled ``Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity.`` This volume constitutes the final report on Subtask 3, which had as its primary goal the geological modeling of reservoir heterogeneity in Smackover reservoirs of southwest Alabama. This goal was interpreted to include a thorough analysis of Smackover reservoirs, which was required for an understanding of Smackover reservoir heterogeneity. This report is divided into six sections (including this brief introduction). Section two, entitled ``Geologic setting,`` presents a concise summary of Jurassic paleogeography, structural setting, and stratigraphy in southwest Alabama. This section also includes a brief review of sedimentologic characteristics and stratigraphic framework of the Smackover, and a summary of the diagenetic processes that strongly affected Smackover reservoirs in Alabama. Section three, entitled ``Analytical methods,`` summarizes all nonroutine aspects of the analytical procedures used in this project. The major topics are thin-section description, analysis of commercial porosity and permeability data, capillary-pressure analysis, and field characterization. ``Smackover reservoir characteristics`` are described in section four, which begins with a general summary of the petrographic characteristics of porous and permeable Smackover strata. This is followed by a more-detailed petrophysical description of Smackover reservoirs.

  6. LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -WE RECOMMEND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    McBride Killed Seeking Help After Accident (Essence) Will the oil & gas boom reach Lubbock? Posted Midland's economy has seen big benefits from their oil and gas boom. Could the same thing happen in Lubbock? On Friday, the Lubbock Economic Development Alliance hosted a luncheon exploring

  7. ~txF74.ptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotion toCoal_Budget_Fact_Sheet.pdf More Documents &ER-B-00-03 + +

  8. ~tx22C0.ptx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDate Rec TypeFutureGen_Fact_Sheet.pdf-234-4433

  9. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSales Type: Sales120NE MASoAtlWSC

  10. ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOUTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    SERVICE CLIMATE CHANGE & CULTURAL RESOURCE PLANNING PROGRAM 17 EARTH SYSTEM MODELS 18 CLIMATE ASSESSMENTS

  11. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a prescribed burn and a wildfire are often small, and too often shift rapidly from pre- scribed to wildfire retardants, and to study effects of fire on soil,vegetation, and air quality. TEST SITE Four acres

  12. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST-' FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (measured as a deposit) was used through- out the tests. The aerosols were assessed by two different methods toxic than malathion to larch casebearer larvae. METHODS Insects Overwintering 2nd and 3rd instar larch to the selection of a mixture of Superior Spray Oil 7N5 and tnpropylene glycol monomethylether in the ratio 911 (v

  13. G SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This soil is well-drained, runoff is medium, and permeabil- ity is moderately rapid. The soil is slightly.). In 1927, the #12;first attempt was made to clear the pasture of this noxious weed, by digging and burning commercially. The seedlings were graded, and only thrifty trees with 8- to 12-inchtops and well developed root

  14. Ornamentals for Southwest Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Ernest

    1947-01-01

    and flowering shrubs, vines, bulbs, herbaceous flowers and lawn blanco, mesquite, non-fruiting mu1... in this section. Other useful anti ttractive trees are sycamore, palo blanco, Arizona walnut and cedar lm. For quick results and dense shade, the Texas umbrella is out- tanding, but. the berries are very unsightly in the fall and minter and will probably have...

  15. C SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    annual rainfall of 45 inches. Mean an- nual temperature is 57" F; January temperature aver- ages 54" F steep gulch. Annual rainfall averaged 54 inches for the 11-year period-20 percent higher than the mean

  16. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Fraxinus uhdei Wenzig Lingelsheim), saligna eucalyptus (Eucalyptus salig~laSm. ), Aus- tralian toon (Toona immediately after firetrees were treated. Because only 13 percent of the saligna eucalyptus seedlings were of the original saligna eucalyptus plots.

  17. C SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LUMBER POTENTIAL OF 12-YEAR-OLD SALlGNA EUCALYPTUS TREES IN HAWAl Roger G. Satolmen USDA F Q P ~ S ~Service Resea~ckl o k g PSW-288 1974 Abstract: The sawtimber potential of 12-year-old Eucalyptus saligna when pressure treated. Oxford: 176.1(969): 812.31: 852:2. Retrieval Terms: Eucalyptus saligna; Hawaii

  18. C SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ROWH OF YOUNG SALlGNA EUCALYPTUS IN HAWA 6 years after thinning Craig D. Wbibesli One of the most favored introduced tree species for reforestation in Hawaii is saligna eucalyptus (Eu- calyptus saligna Sm. Research NO& p$w-239 Specific guides are needed for management of fast- 1975 growing eucalyptus stands

  19. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is on the windward slope of Eucalyptus deglupta B1. (Deglupta eucalyptus) Mauna Kea, 3 miles west of Hakalau, at 1,725 feet Eucalyptus grandis Hillex. Maiden (Rosegum eucalyptus) Myoporum sandwicense (D.C.)Gray (Naio

  20. , SOUTHWEST .. Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , under other conditions of weather and topography, on a small group of fires, control effort of them in the short period between September 25 and October 4. The loss of 16 lives can be attrib- uted to the fire activity. More than 700 homes and other structures were burned, and fire damage and suppression

  1. Pacific Southwest Forest & Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ( G) support rod, (H) shaft, ( I) cup shaft, (J) body cover plate, and (K) hub. -2- #12;The body. The magnets are imbedded in an aluminum rotor attached to the anemometer shaft (fig. 2). Four magnets are used

  2. A Monolithic active pixel sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180nm HV-SOI process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Hemperek; Tetsuichi Kishishita; Hans Krüger; Norbert Wermes

    2015-02-23

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on thick-film High Voltage SOI technology (HV-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer. FD-SOI MAPS suffer from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The X-FAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry witch mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neutron irradiated samples.

  3. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  4. Optical emission from a small scale model electric arc furnace in 250-600 nm region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekinen, A.; Tikkala, H.; Aksela, H.; Niskanen, J.

    2013-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy has been for long proposed for monitoring and studying industrial steel making processes. Whereas the radiative decay of thermal excitations is always taking place in high temperatures needed in steel production, one of the most promising environment for such studies are electric arc furnaces, creating plasma in excited electronic states that relax with intense characteristic emission in the optical regime. Unfortunately, large industrial scale electric arc furnaces also present a challenging environment for optical emission studies and application of the method is not straightforward. To study the usability of optical emission spectroscopy in real electric arc furnaces, we have developed a laboratory scale DC electric arc furnace presented in this paper. With the setup, optical emission spectra of Fe, Cr, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and MgO were recorded in the wavelength range 250-600 nm and the results were analyzed with the help of reference data. The work demonstrates that using characteristic optical emission, obtaining in situ chemical information from oscillating plasma of electric arc furnaces is indeed possible. In spite of complications, the method could possibly be applied to industrial scale steel making process in order to improve its efficiency.

  5. Nonlinear optical properties of bulk cuprous oxide using single beam Z-scan at 790?nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serna, J.; Rueda, E.; García, H.

    2014-11-10

    The two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficient ? and the nonlinear index of refraction n{sub 2} for bulk cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) direct gap semiconductor single crystal have been measured by using a balance-detection Z-scan single beam technique, with an excellent signal to noise ratio. Both coefficients were measured at 790?nm using a 65 fs laser pulse at a repetition rate of 90.9?MHz, generated by a Ti:Sapphire laser oscillator. The experimental values for ? were explained by using a model that includes allowed-allowed, forbidden-allowed, and forbidden-forbidden transitions. It was found that the forbidden-forbidden transition is the dominant mechanism, which is consistent with the band structure of Cu{sub 2}O. The low value for ? found in bulk, as compared with respect to thin film, is explained in terms of the structural change in thin films that result in opposite parities of the conduction and valence band. The n{sub 2} is also theoretically calculated by using the TPA dispersion curve and the Kramers-Kronig relations for nonlinear optics.

  6. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel (nate) J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  7. In: Proceedings of the 88th Annual Meeting (held June 18-23 in San Antonio, TX), Air and Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 1995, Paper No. 95-TA42.02, 1995 H.C. Frey and A.C. Cullen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Meeting Air & Waste Management Association Pittsburgh, PA Presented at: 88th Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste Management Association San Antonio, Texas June 18-23, 1995 #12;2 INTRODUCTION Virtually allIn: Proceedings of the 88th Annual Meeting (held June 18-23 in San Antonio, TX), Air and Waste

  8. Modification of laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters for the enhanced detection of 1 nm condensation nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.; Wang, J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes simple modifications to thermally diffusive laminar flow ultrafine condensation particle counters (UCPCs) that allow detection of {approx}1 nm condensation nuclei with much higher efficiencies than have been previously reported. These nondestructive modifications were applied to a commercial butanol based UCPC (TSI 3025A) and to a diethylene glycol-based UCPC (UMN DEG-UCPC). Size and charge dependent detection efficiencies using the modified UCPCs (BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC) were measured with high resolution mobility classified aerosols composed of NaCl, W, molecular ion standards of tetraalkyl ammonium bromide, and neutralizer-generated ions. With negatively charged NaCl aerosol, the BNL 3025A and BNL DEGUCPC achieved detection efficiencies of 37% (90x increase over TSI 3025A) at 1.68 nm mobility diameter (1.39 nm geometric diameter) and 23% (8x increase over UMN DEG-UCPC) at 1.19 nm mobility diameter (0.89 nm geometric diameter), respectively. Operating conditions for both UCPCs were identified that allowed negatively charged NaCl and W particles, but not negative ions of exactly the same mobility size, to be efficiently detected. This serendipitous material dependence, which is not fundamentally understood, suggests that vapor condensation might sometimes allow for the discrimination between air 'ions' and charged 'particles.' As a detector in a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a UCPC with this strong material dependence would allow for more accurate measurements of sub-2 nm aerosol size distributions due to the reduced interference from neutralizer-generated ions and atmospheric ions, and provide increased sensitivity for the determination of nucleation rates and initial particle growth rates.

  9. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  10. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yen-Ting [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan); Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. Ĺ.; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Chen, Li-Chyong [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuei-Hsien [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nanishi, Yasushi [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)

    2013-11-11

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a “narrow-pass” approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm.

  11. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  12. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikowski, L.; Mauro, G.; Bird, M.; Karten, B.; Asaoka, S.; Wu, Q.; Cook, A. R.; Miller, J.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  13. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  14. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore »large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  15. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Castor, J I; Iglesias, C A; Cheng, K T; Dunn, J; Johnson, W R; Filevich, J; Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Rocca, J J

    2008-04-15

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main calculational tool has been the average atom code. We have recently observed C{sup 2+} plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one at a wavelength of 46.9 nm (26.44 eV). In this paper we compare the average atom method, AVATOMKG, against two more detailed methods, OPAL and CAK, for calculating the index of refraction for the carbon plasmas and discuss the different approximations used. We present experimental measurements of carbon plasmas that display this anomalous dispersion phenomenon. It is shown that the average atom calculation is a good approximation when the strongest lines dominate the dispersion. However, when weaker lines make a significant contribution, the more detailed calculations such as OPAL and CAK are essential. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential. With the advent of tunable X-ray lasers the frequency dependent interferometer measurements of the index of refraction may enable us to determine the absorption coefficients and line-shapes and make detailed comparisons against our atomic physics codes.

  16. Integrated Vulnerability and Impacts Assessment for Natural and Engineered Water-Energy Systems in the Southwest and Southern Rocky Mountain Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Wolfsberg, Andrew; Macknick, Jordan; Middleton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the Southwest and Southern Rocky Mountains (SWSRM), energy production, energy resource extraction, and other high volume uses depend on water supply from systems that are highly vulnerable to extreme, coupled hydro-ecosystem-climate events including prolonged drought, flooding, degrading snow cover, forest die off, and wildfire. These vulnerabilities, which increase under climate change, present a challenge for energy and resource planners in the region with the highest population growth rate in the nation. Currently, analytical tools are designed to address individual aspects of these regional energy and water vulnerabilities. Further, these tools are not linked, severely limiting the effectiveness of each individual tool. Linking established tools, which have varying degrees of spatial and temporal resolution as well as modeling objectives, and developing next-generation capabilities where needed would provide a unique and replicable platform for regional analyses of climate-water-ecosystem-energy interactions, while leveraging prior investments and current expertise (both within DOE and across other Federal agencies).

  17. Paint Rock and southwest Paint Rock fields, Concho County, Texas: Strawn analogs of modern island carbonate facies of Ambergris Cay, Belize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, A.M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1987-02-01

    Lower Strawn (Desmoinesian Goen Limestone) reservoirs at Paint Rock and Southwest Paint Rock fields are a complex of carbonate and associated facies interpreted as having been deposited in various environments on and around large, emergent islands on shallow carbonate shelves. The origin and geometries of the component lithofacies in these fields, and their reservoir diagenetic histories, are similar to those presently accumulating on Ambergris Cay, a linear island complex on the northern shelf of Belize. Paint Rock field originated as a narrow, elongate Chaetetes reef trend that formed the foundation on which the overlying island facies were deposited. As on Ambergris Cay, these reef limestones developed extensive porosity during postdepositional subaerial exposure due to meteoric leaching. In contrast, Southwest Paint Rock field is cored by older island deposits rather than reef limestones. With ensuing stillstand or subsequent sea level rise, beach grainstones were deposited along the windward and leeward margins of the foundation highs in these fields. Tight lagoonal micrites and coals (peat-swamp facies) comprise the inner island facies, and are locally associated with porous supratidal dolomites. These island complexes are transected locally by tidal channels that are filled with nonporous micrites. Repeated sea level fluctuations during the history of these fields resulted in a characteristic cyclic stratigraphy of stacked island facies and reservoirs. The reservoirs in the field are developed in the bedrock or older island cores, as well as in the overlying beach facies and supratidal dolomites. These fields are mappable as linear stratigraphic traps with low-relief closure, and are readily identified by subsurface geologic and facies analyses. Similar shelf island-type fields analogous to these strawn and Holocene Belizean examples are found throughout the Midland basin and Eastern shelf.

  18. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  19. Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L.

    10760 1 Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface using a reproducible, simple process incorporating polyimide with good adhesion that does not require based on a simplified, robust process incorporating photosensitive polyimide with good metal adhesion

  20. Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields P2) with O2(X 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields of O(3 P2) with O2(X 3 g - ), O2 Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Product imaging of O(3 P2) following dissociation of ozone has been used to determine the relative yields of the product channels O(3 P2) + O2(X 3 g - ) of ozone. All three channels

  1. Sub-10-nm half-pitch electron-beam lithography by using poly,,methyl methacrylate... as a negative resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    is of great importance for high-density magnetic storage, integrated circuits, and nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Until now, hydrogen silsesquioxane HSQ and calixarene were the only two reported negative, the authors report that 10-nm half-pitch dense nanostructures can also be readily fabricated using the well

  2. Experimental Demonstration of a 2-Stage Continuously Tunable Optical Tapped-Delay-Line in which N+M Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touch, Joe

    +M Pump Lasers Produce NĂ?M Taps A. Mohajerin-Ariaei1 , M. R. Chitgarha1 , M. Ziyadi1 , S. Khaleghi1 , A experimentally demonstrate a 2-stage continuously tunable optical tapped-delay- line in which N+M pump lasers a transfer function, and a set of wavelength pumps is used such that each wavelength acts as one of the taps

  3. Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse 17 April 2008; accepted 4 June 2008; published online 23 June 2008 The effect of pulse duration on in with pulse durations from 25 to 110 ns. Employing a long pulse, for example, 110 ns, in a CO2 laser system

  4. Dynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas for a monochromatic 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    EUV spectrum. It was shown that for CO2 laser most of the laser energy deposition is localized around to monochromatic 13.5 nm EUV emission can be expected. It was found that 0.5% Sn- doped foam targets show an almost

  5. Void-free filling of spin-on dielectric in 22 nm wide ultrahigh aspect ratio Si trenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

    structures for the 22 nm semiconductor node. Polysilazane based spin-on dielectric SOD material is spin plasma HDP deposited materials for iso- lation purposes in future semiconductor devices.1­3 SOD can of certain properties of the material. For STI, the foremost requirement for candidate SOD material

  6. A 0.02 nJ Self-calibrated 65nm CMOS Delay Line Temperature Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Wai Tung

    presents an area and power efficient delay line based temperature sensor for on-chip monitoring to be monitored on a chip. Therefore, the integrated temperature sensor arrays should introduce minimum areaA 0.02 nJ Self-calibrated 65nm CMOS Delay Line Temperature Sensor Shuang Xie and Wai Tung Ng

  7. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 138, 054301 (2013) Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    -phase chemistry and photochemistry of alkyl disulfides, with dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) at the forefront of many investigations.3­17 Depending on the wave- length used, the competing dissociation pathways for DMDS observed both the methyl perthiyl radical and S2 fragments from the 193 nm photodis- sociation of DMDS

  8. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 Letendre Department of Business/Economics Green Mountain College Poultney, VT 05701 and Center for Energy, CA 94596 John Byrne and Young-Doo Wang Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University

  9. Structural, electronic transport and magnetoresistance of a 142nm lead telluride nanowire synthesized using stress-induced growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedi, E-mail: dediamada@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China) [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Electronics and Telecommunication, Indonesian Institute of Sciences Bandung (Indonesia); Chien, Chia-Hua [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China) [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsiung, Te-Chih [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Nano Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Ping-Chung; Chen, Yang-Yuan, E-mail: dediamada@phys.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chih-Hao [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, structurally uniform single crystalline PbTe nanowires (NWs) were synthesized using a stress-induced growth. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns show that the PbTe NWs were grown along the [100] direction. The electrical conductivity ? of a NW with 142 nm in diameter exhibited a semiconducting behavior at 50–300 K. An enhancement of electrical conductivity ? up to 2383 S m{sup ?1} at 300 K is much higher than ? [0.44–1526 S m{sup ?1}, Chen et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, p023115, (2013)] in previous studies. The room temperature magnetoresistance of the 142 nm NW was ?0.8% at B = 2 T, which is considerably higher than that [0.2% at B = 2 T, Ovsyannikov et al., Sol. State Comm. 126, 373, (2003)] of the PbTe bulk reported.

  10. Construction of an inexpensive molecular Iodine spectrometer using a self developed Pohl wavemeter around 670 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthwal, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    We describe construction of an inexpensive Iodine Spectrometer with a home made Iodine vapour cell and a self developed wavemeter based on Pohl Interferometer, around 670 nm wavelength.This can be easily realised in an undergraduate teaching laboratory to demonstrate use of a diode laser interferometry using a Pohl interferometer and measurement of wavelength using image processing techniques.Visible alternative to the IR diode lasers, 670 nm diode laser used here give chance to undergraduate students to perform comprehensive though illustrative atomic physics experiments including the Zeeman effect, the Hanle effect, Magneto Optic Rotation (MOR) effect with a little tweaking in the present spectrometer. The advantage of the spectrometer is its ease of construction with readily available optics, electronics, evacuation and glass blowing facilities and easy analysis algorithm to evaluate the wavelength. The self developed algorithm of raster scanning and circular averaging gives the researcher insight into the...

  11. Electrical and chemical properties of XeCl*(308 nm) exciplex lamp created by a dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baadj, S.; Harrache, Z., E-mail: zharrache@yahoo.com; Belasri, A. [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d’Oran, USTO-MB, Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Matériaux Conducteurs et leurs Application (LPPMCA) (Algeria)

    2013-12-15

    The aim of this work is to highlight, through numerical modeling, the chemical and the electrical characteristics of xenon chloride mixture in XeCl* (308 nm) excimer lamp created by a dielectric barrier discharge. A temporal model, based on the Xe/Cl{sub 2} mixture chemistry, the circuit and the Boltzmann equations, is constructed. The effects of operating voltage, Cl{sub 2} percentage in the Xe/Cl{sub 2} gas mixture, dielectric capacitance, as well as gas pressure on the 308-nm photon generation, under typical experimental operating conditions, have been investigated and discussed. The importance of charged and excited species, including the major electronic and ionic processes, is also demonstrated. The present calculations show clearly that the model predicts the optimal operating conditions and describes the electrical and chemical properties of the XeCl* exciplex lamp.

  12. Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue) B 420-460 Live Dead UV Blue Alexa 350 DAPI Indo-1(Violet) Hoechst 33342 C - empty Violet 405 A 505-550 Pac. Orange V500 VioGreen BVio 510 Viability Dye eF506 Alexa 430 Sapphire B 420-460 Pac. Blue eF450 V

  13. Sub-5 nm Domains in Ordered Poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) Block Polymers for Lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennemur, Justin; Yao, Li; Bates, Frank Stephen; Hillmyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    A series of poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly- (methyl methacrylate) (PCHE PMMA) diblock copolymers with varying molar mass (4.9 kg/mol Mn 30.6 kg/mol) and narrow molar mass distribution were synthesized through a combination of anionic and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) techniques. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of -(hydroxy)polystyrene (PS-OH) yielded -(hydroxy)poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHEOH) with little loss of hydroxyl functionality. PCHE-OH was reacted with -bromoisobutyryl bromide (BiBB) to produce an ATRP macroinitiator used for the polymerization of methyl methacrylate. PCHE PMMA is a glassy, thermally stable material with a large effective segment segment interaction parameter, eff = (144.4 6.2)/T (0.162 0.013), determined by meanfield analysis of order-to-disorder transition temperatures (TODT) measured by dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Ordered lamellar domain pitches (9 D 33 nm) were identified by small-angle X-ray scattering from neat BCPs containing 43 52 vol % PCHE ( f PCHE). Atomic force microscopy was used to show 7.5 nm lamellar features (D = 14.8 nm) which are some of the smallest observed to date. The lowest molar mass sample (Mn = 4.9 kg/mol, f PCHE = 0.46) is characterized by TODT = 173 3 C and sub-5 nm nanodomains, which together with the sacrificial properties of PMMA and the high overall thermal stability place this material at the forefront of high- systems for advanced nanopatterning applications.

  14. Formation of in-volume nanogratings with sub-100 nm periods in glass by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Qiao, Lingling; Bellouard, Yves; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We present direct experimental observation of the morphological evolution during the formation of nanogratings with sub-100-nm periods with the increasing number of pulses. Theoretical simulation shows that the constructive interference of the scattering light from original nanoplanes will create an intensity maximum located between the two adjacent nanoplanes, resulting in shortening of the nanograting period by half. The proposed mechanism enables explaining the formation of nanogratings with periods beyond that predicted by the nanoplasmonic model.

  15. Continuous-wave laser oscillation on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine pumped by O2,,a1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    of atomic iodine in favor of the I 2 P1/2 state. The laser output power was 220 mW in a stable cavityContinuous-wave laser oscillation on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine pumped by O2,,a11/2 I 2 P3/2 transition of atomic iodine is conventionally obtained by a near-resonant energy

  16. 7 dB quadrature squeezing at 860 nm with periodically-poled KTiOPO4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigenari Suzuki; Hidehiro Yonezawa; Fumihiko Kannari; Masahide Sasaki; Akira Furusawa

    2006-08-15

    We observed -7.2 dB quadrature squeezing at 860 nm by using a sub-threshold continuous-wave pumped optical parametric oscillator with a periodically-poled KTiOPO4 crystal as a nonlinear optical medium. The squeezing level was measured with the phase of homodyne detection locked at the quadrature. The blue light induced infrared absorption was not observed in the experiment.

  17. Note: Deep ultraviolet Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shaoqing; University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Fan, Fengtao; Guo, Meiling; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Zhaochi E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Can E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Deep UV Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm was developed in this laboratory. An ellipsoidal mirror and a dispersed-subtractive triple monochromator were used to collect and disperse Raman light, respectively. The triple monochromator was arranged in a triangular configuration with only six mirrors used. 177.3 nm laser excited Raman spectrum with cut-off wavenumber down to 200 cm{sup ?1} and spectral resolution of 8.0 cm{sup ?1} can be obtained under the condition of high purity N{sub 2} purging. With the C–C ? bond in Teflon selectively excited by the 177.3 nm laser, resonance Raman spectrum of Teflon with good quality was recorded on the home-built instrument and the ?-?{sup *} transition of C–C bond was studied. The result demonstrates that deep UV Raman spectrograph is powerful for studying the systems with electronic transition located in the deep UV region.

  18. Intense {ital J}=0{endash}1 soft-x-ray lasing at 28.5 nm in neonlike chromium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Praeg, A.R.; Loewenthal, F.; Balmer, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    Intense 3{ital p}-3{ital s}, {ital J}=0{endash}1 soft-x-ray lasing at 28.5 nm in neonlike chromium has been observed experimentally using a compact Nd:glass laser as the driver. 2.4-cm-long polished chromium slab targets were irradiated with up to 100-J/500-ps pulses at the fundamental wavelength of 1.054 {mu}m. The prepulse technique was applied using a defined prepulse 5 ns before the main pulse and with a prepulse-to-main pulse energy ratio of 0.7{percent}. It is demonstrated that a pump energy of {approximately}80 J, corresponding to a pump irradiance of approximately 9 TW/cm{sup 2} is sufficient to observe soft-x-ray lasing at 28.5 nm. At a drive laser energy of {approximately}90 J a gain coefficient of (2.2{plus_minus}0.5) cm{sup {minus}1} was measured. The one-dimensional space-resolved measurements show that the 28.5-nm laser line is emitted from a 60-{mu}m-wide (full width at half maximum) plasma region. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. The Formation of IRIS Diagnostics. VII. The Formation of the OI 135.56 nm Line in the Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    The O I 135.56 nm line is covered by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) small explorer mission which studies how the solar atmosphere is energized. We here study the formation and diagnostic potential of this line by means of non-LTE modelling employing both 1D semi-empirical and 3D radiation-Magneto Hydrodynamic (RMHD) models. We study the basic formation mechanisms and derive a quintessential model atom that incorporates the essential atomic physics for the formation of the O I 135.56 nm line. This atomic model has 16 levels and describes recombination cascades through highly excited levels by effective recombination rates. The ionization balance O I/O II is set by the hydrogen ionization balance through charge exchange reactions. The emission in the O I 135.56 nm line is dominated by a recombination cascade and the line is optically thin. The Doppler shift of the maximum emission correlates strongly with the vertical velocity in its line forming region, which is typically located at 1.0 - ...

  20. AlNAlGaInN superlattice light-emitting diodes at 280 nm G. Kipshidze, V. Kuryatkov, K. Zhu, and B. Borisov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Mark

    -emitting diodes operating at 280 nm, grown by gas source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia, are described storage. However, despite recent progress, preparation of light sources operating below 300 nm is still molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia13 on sapphire substrates. Epitaxial growth starts with the nitridation

  1. Mascarenas, D., Hush, D., Theiler, J., Farrar, C., Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663 MS T001, Los Alamos, NM 87544

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    Mascarenas, D., Hush, D., Theiler, J., Farrar, C., Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663 MS T001, Los Alamos, NM 87544 Title: The Application of Compressed Sensing to Detecting Damage Los Alamos National Laboratory Engineering Institute PO Box 1663 MS T001 Los Alamos, NM, 87544 505

  2. Development of a coherent vacuum ultraviolet source at 104108 nm generated by four-wave sum frequency mixing in Hg vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    Development of a coherent vacuum ultraviolet source at 104­108 nm generated by four-wave sum-harmonic generation and four-wave mixing in a gas- eous nonlinear medium.8­11 Two tunable outputs from a pulsed dye ultraviolet VUV light source in the 104­108 nm range has been developed by utilizing four-wave sum frequency

  3. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nmQuantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been

  4. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of 1,3-Butadiene and 1,3-Butadiene-1,1,4,4-d4 at 193 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of 1,3-Butadiene and 1,3-Butadiene-1,1,4,4-d4 at 193 nm Abstract: The photodissociation dynamics of 1,3-butadiene at 193 nm have been investigated the dissociation dynamics in more detail, further studies were carried out using 1,3-butadiene-1,1,4,4-d4

  5. Linking ecosystem scale vegetation change to shifts in carbon and water cycling: the consequences of widespread pińon mortality in the Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvak, Marcy Ellen [University of New Mexico

    2012-10-01

    The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality. Pińon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, were extremely vulnerable to this drought. An abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of pińon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) across 1.5 million ha triggered rapid and extensive changes in the structure of PJ woodlands with potentially large, yet unknown, consequences for ecosystem services and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate system. Given the spatial extent of PJ woodlands (3rd largest biome in the US) and climatic predictions of increased frequency and intensity of drought in the region, it is crucial to understand the consequences of these disturbances on regional carbon and energy dynamics, biogeochemical processes and atmospheric CO2. The overall objective of our research was to quantify what impact widespread mortality of pińon trees has for carbon and water cycling in PJ woodlands. Our specific objectives for this proposal were: 1) Quantify the carbon, water and energy exchange trajectory after mortality in PJ woodlands; 2) Determine the mechanisms controlling the response and recovery of ecosystem production and respiration processes following large-scale pińon mortality; 3) Use the relationships we measure between ecosystem structure and function PJ woodlands recover from mortality to scale the results of our study up to the regional scale.

  6. 60 nm gate length Al2O3 / In0.53Ga0.47As gate-first MOSFETs using InAs raised source-drain regrowth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    plasma / trimethylaluminum (TMA) cycles. A 60 nm sputtered W/15 nm electron beam evaporated Cr/400 nm PECVD SiO2/15 nm electron beam evaporated Cr gate stack was blanket- deposited. Gate lengths between 60 and optical lithography. A high power inductively coupled (ICP) plasma SF6/Ar etch defined vertical pillars

  7. Lithography-free sub-100nm nanocone array antireflection layer for low-cost silicon solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01

    High density and uniformity sub-100nm surface oxidized silicon nanocone forest structure is created and integrated onto the existing texturization microstructures on photovoltaic device surface by a one-step high throughput plasma enhanced texturization method. We suppressed the broadband optical reflection on chemically textured grade-B silicon solar cells for up to 70.25% through this nanomanufacturing method. The performance of the solar cell is improved with the short circuit current increased by 7.1%, fill factor increased by 7.0%, conversion efficiency increased by 14.66%. Our method demonstrates the potential to improve the photovoltaic device performance with low cost high and throughput nanomanufacturing technology.

  8. Effect of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons following ischemic insult

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Dong-Hee [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Moon Young [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jeong Hoon [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rehabilitation Medicine, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, National University Health System (Singapore); Lee, Jongmin, E-mail: leej@kuh.ac.kr [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 710 nm wavelength light (LED) has a protective effect in the stroke animal model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the effects of LED irradiation in vitro stroke model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment promotes the neurite outgrowth through MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of synaptic markers significantly increased with LED treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment protects cell death in the in vitro stroke model. -- Abstract: Objective: We previously reported that 710 nm Light-emitting Diode (LED) has a protective effect through cellular immunity activation in the stroke animal model. However, whether LED directly protects neurons suffering from neurodegeneration was entirely unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neuronal protection and neuronal outgrowth in an in vitro stroke model. Materials and methods: Primary cultured rat cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation and normal conditions. An LED array with a peak wavelength of 710 nm was placed beneath the covered culture dishes with the room light turned off and were irradiated accordingly. LED treatments (4 min at 4 J/cm{sup 2} and 50 mW/cm{sup 2}) were given once to four times within 8 h at 2 h intervals for 7 days. Mean neurite density, mean neurite diameter, and total fiber length were also measured after microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunostaining using the Axio Vision program. Synaptic marker expression and MAPK activation were confirmed by Western blotting. Results: Images captured after MAP2 immunocytochemistry showed significant (p < 0.05) enhancement of post-ischemic neurite outgrowth with LED treatment once and twice a day. MAPK activation was enhanced by LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells. The levels of synaptic markers such as PSD 95, GAP 43, and synaptophysin significantly increased with LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that LED treatment may promote synaptogenesis through MAPK activation and subsequently protect cell death in the in vitro stroke model.

  9. EFFECTS OF UNRESOLVED MAGNETIC FIELD ON Fe I 617.3 AND 630.2 nm LINE SHAPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscuoli, S.; Ermolli, I.; Giorgi, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy)] [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Uitenbroek, H. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunpsot, NM 88349 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunpsot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The contribution of the quiet Sun to solar irradiance variability, either due to changes of the solar effective temperature or to the presence of unresolved magnetic field, is still poorly understood. In this study we investigate spectral line diagnostics that are sensitive to both temperature variations and the presence of small-scale unresolved magnetic features in these areas of the solar atmosphere. Specifically, we study the dependence on the magnetic flux density of three parameters describing the shape of two magnetically sensitive Fe I lines, at 630.2 nm and 617.3 nm, namely the line core intensity (IC), the FWHM, and the equivalent width (EQW). To this end we analyze observations of active region NOAA 11172, acquired with Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer at the Dunn Solar Telescope, as well as results from numerical synthesis. Our results show that IC is sensitive to both temperature and magnetic flux density variations, FWHM is mostly affected by magnetic field changes, and EQW is mostly sensitive to temperature. Variations of a few percent of the measured line parameters are found in observational data that were spatially degraded to represent quiet-Sun, disk-center, medium-resolution observations. It is therefore possible to disentangle magnetic from pure thermodynamic effects by the comparison of temporal variations of the EQW and the FWHM of either of the two Fe I lines.

  10. Silica–silica Polyimide Buffered Optical Fibre Irradiation and Strength Experiment at Cryogenic Temperatures for 355 nm Pulsed Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takala, E; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Bremer, J; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    A controlled UV-light delivery system is envisioned to be built in order to study the stability properties of superconducting strands. The application requires a wave guide from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Hydrogen loaded and unloaded polyimide buffered silica–silica 100 microm core fibres were tested at cryogenic temperatures. A thermal stress test was done at 1.9 K and at 4.2 K which shows that the minimal mechanical bending radius for the fibre can be 10 mm for testing (transmission was not measured). The cryogenic transmission loss was measured for one fibre to assess the magnitude of the transmission decrease due to microbending that takes place during cooldown. UV-irradiation degradation measurements were done for bent fibres at 4.2 K with a deuterium lamp and 355 nm pulsed lasers. The irradiation tests show that the fibres have transmission degradation only for wavelengths smaller than 330 nm due to the two photon absorption. The test demonstrates that the fibres are suitable for the ...

  11. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; et al

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore »by hydrogen (H?-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  12. Ionic transport through sub-10 nm diameter hydrophobic high-aspect ratio nanopores: experiment, theory and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Balme; Fabien Picaud; Manoel Manghi; John Palmeri; Mikhael Bechelany; Simon Cabello-Aguilar; Adib Abou-Chaaya; Philippe Miele; Emmanuel Balanzat; Jean Marc Janot

    2015-06-11

    Fundamental understanding of ionic transport at the nanoscale is essential for developing biosensors based on nanopore technology and new generation high-performance nanofiltration membranes for separation and purification applications. We study here ionic transport through single putatively neutral hydrophobic nanopores with high aspect ratio (of length L=6 \\mu m with diameters ranging from 1 to 10 nm) and with a well controlled cylindrical geometry. We develop a detailed hybrid mesoscopic theoretical approach for the electrolyte conductivity inside nanopores, which considers explicitly ion advection by electro-osmotic flow and possible flow slip at the pore surface. By fitting the experimental conductance data we show that for nanopore diameters greater than 4 nm a constant weak surface charge density of about 10$^{-2}$ C m$^{-2}$ needs to be incorporated in the model to account for conductance plateaus of a few pico-Siemens at low salt concentrations. For tighter nanopores, our analysis leads to a higher surface charge density, which can be attributed to a modification of ion solvation structure close to the pore surface, as observed in the molecular dynamics simulations we performed.

  13. Resonant cavity-enhanced photosensitivity in As[subscript 2]S[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass at 1550 nm telecommunication wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Juejun

    We report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of resonant cavity-enhanced photosensitivity in As[subscript 2]S[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass film at 1550?nm telecommunication wavelength. The measured ...

  14. Method to grow carbon thin films consisting entirely of diamond grains 3-5 nm in size and high-energy grain boundaries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlisle, John A.; Auciello, Orlando; Birrell, James

    2006-10-31

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) having an average grain size between 3 and 5 nanometers (nm) with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm. A method of manufacturing UNCD film is also disclosed in which a vapor of acetylene and hydrogen in an inert gas other than He wherein the volume ratio of acetylene to hydrogen is greater than 0.35 and less than 0.85, with the balance being an inert gas, is subjected to a suitable amount of energy to fragment at least some of the acetylene to form a UNCD film having an average grain size of 3 to 5 nm with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm.

  15. Re-thinking highest and best use : implementing smart development in support of smart growth : a case study in Santa Fe, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkcom, Jennifer K

    2006-01-01

    This paper answers the questions "where to develop?", "for whom to develop?", and "what to develop?" from a double bottom line perspective of profit making and social benefit, using a 3-acre property in Santa Fe, NM as an ...

  16. Generation of 30-50 nm Structures Using Easily Fabricated, Composite Teri W. Odom, Venkat R. Thalladi, J. Christopher Love, and George M. Whitesides*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    of tens of nanometers are useful in ultradense data storage, subwavelength optics, and devices This communication describes a method to generate simple nanostructures with critical dimensions down to 30 nm, over

  17. Quantum-correlated photon pairs generated in a commercial 45nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor microelectronics chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentry, Cale M; Wade, Mark W; Stevens, Martin J; Dyer, Shellee D; Zeng, Xiaoge; Pavanello, Fabio; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P; Popovi?, Miloš A

    2015-01-01

    Correlated photon pairs are a fundamental building block of quantum photonic systems. While pair sources have previously been integrated on silicon chips built using customized photonics manufacturing processes, these often take advantage of only a small fraction of the established techniques for microelectronics fabrication and have yet to be integrated in a process which also supports electronics. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum-correlated photon pair generation in a device fabricated in an unmodified advanced (sub-100nm) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, alongside millions of working transistors. The microring resonator photon pair source is formed in the transistor layer structure, with the resonator core formed by the silicon layer typically used for the transistor body. With ultra-low continuous-wave on-chip pump powers ranging from 5 $\\mu$W to 400 $\\mu$W, we demonstrate pair generation rates between 165 Hz and 332 kHz using >80% efficient WSi superconducting nano...

  18. Measurement of Rb 5P3/2 scalar and tensor polarizabilities in a 1064 nm light field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yun-Jhih; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We employ doubly-resonant two-photon excitation into the 74S Rydberg state to spectroscopically measure the dynamic scalar polarizability, alpha 0, and tensor polarizability, alpha 2, of rubidium 5P3/2. To reach the necessary high intensities, we employ a cavity-generated 1064 nm optical-lattice light field, allowing us to obtain intensities near 2x10^11 W/m^2. In the evaluation of the data we use a self-referencing method that renders the polarizability measurement largely free from the intensity calibration of the laser light field. We obtain experimental values alpha 0 =-1149 (pm 2.5 percent) and alpha 2 = 563 (pm 4.2 percent), in atomic units. Methods and results are supported by simulations.

  19. The 846 nm A' 32; +X 3Z; band system of jet-cooled V, Eileen M. Spain, Jane M. Behm,a) and Michael D. Morse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Michael D.

    The 846 nm A' 32; +X 3Z; band system of jet-cooled V, Eileen M. Spain, Jane M. Behm,a) and Michael October 1991; accepted 4 November 1991) The 846 nm band system of jet-cooled 5'V2 has been recorded using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy, and is assigned as the A '38; +X `2; band system. Both the w

  20. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarantopoulou, E. Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Cefalas, A. C.; Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Kakabakos, S.; Velentzas, A. D.

    2014-09-14

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm?˛) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, ?-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  1. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diver, Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  2. Santa Fe, NM 87506

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    am pleased to enclose Recommendation 2015-03, unanimously approved by the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board at its April 8, 2015 Combined Committee meeting in Pojoaque,...

  3. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ewsuk, Kevin G. (Albuquerque, NM); Arguello, Jr., Jose G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-01-31

    A method of designing a primary geometry, such as for a forming die, to be used in a powder pressing application by using a combination of axisymmetric geometric shapes, transition radii, and transition spaces to simulate the geometry where the shapes can be selected from a predetermined list or menu of axisymmetric shapes and then developing a finite element mesh to represent the geometry. This mesh, along with material properties of the component to be designed and powder, is input to a standard deformation finite element code to evaluate the deformation characteristics of the component being designed. The user can develop the geometry interactively with a computer interface in minutes and execute a complete analysis of the deformation characteristics of the simulated component geometry.

  4. ZERH Training: Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home is a high performance home which is so energy efficient, that a renewable energy system can offset all or most of its annual energy Consumption.US DOE Zero Energy...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)...

  6. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES),...

  7. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX (United States) Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)...

  8. Quantum-correlated photon pairs generated in a commercial 45nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor microelectronics chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cale M. Gentry; Jeffrey M. Shainline; Mark T. Wade; Martin J. Stevens; Shellee D. Dyer; Xiaoge Zeng; Fabio Pavanello; Thomas Gerrits; Sae Woo Nam; Richard P. Mirin; Miloš A. Popovi?

    2015-07-24

    Correlated photon pairs are a fundamental building block of quantum photonic systems. While pair sources have previously been integrated on silicon chips built using customized photonics manufacturing processes, these often take advantage of only a small fraction of the established techniques for microelectronics fabrication and have yet to be integrated in a process which also supports electronics. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum-correlated photon pair generation in a device fabricated in an unmodified advanced (sub-100nm) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, alongside millions of working transistors. The microring resonator photon pair source is formed in the transistor layer structure, with the resonator core formed by the silicon layer typically used for the transistor body. With ultra-low continuous-wave on-chip pump powers ranging from 5 $\\mu$W to 400 $\\mu$W, we demonstrate pair generation rates between 165 Hz and 332 kHz using >80% efficient WSi superconducting nanowire single photon detectors. Coincidences-to-accidentals ratios consistently exceeding 40 were measured with a maximum of 55. In the process of characterizing this source we also accurately predict pair generation rates from the results of classical four-wave mixing measurements. This proof-of-principle device demonstrates the potential of commercial CMOS microelectronics as an advanced quantum photonics platform with capability of large volume, pristine process control, and where state-of-the-art high-speed digital circuits could interact with quantum photonic circuits.

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire, Mark W.; Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S.; Cohen, Martin; Ribas, Ignasi; Catling, David C.

    2012-09-20

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  10. UV LED charge control of an electrically isolated proof mass in a Gravitational Reference Sensor configuration at 255 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; Alfauwaz, Abdul; Aljadaan, Ahmad; Almajeed, Mohammed; Alrufaydah, Muflih; Althubiti, Salman; Aljabreen, Homoud; Buchman, Sasha; Byer, Robert L; Conklin, John; DeBra, Daniel; Hanson, John; Hultgren, Eric; Saud, Turki Al; Shimizu, Seiya; Soulage, Michael; Zoellner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Precise control over the potential of an electrically isolated proof mass is necessary for the operation of devices such as a Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) and satellite missions such as LISA. We show that AlGaN UV LEDs operating at 255 nm are an effective substitute for Mercury vapor lamps used in previous missions because of their ability to withstand space qualification levels of vibration and thermal cycling. After 27 thermal and thermal vacuum cycles and 9 minutes of 14.07 g RMS vibration, there is less than 3% change in current draw, less than 15% change in optical power, and no change in spectral peak or FWHM (full width at half maximum). We also demonstrate UV LED stimulated photoemission from a wide variety of thin film carbide proof mass coating candidates (SiC, Mo2C, TaC, TiC, ZrC) that were applied using electron beam evaporation on an Aluminum 6061-T6 substrate. All tested carbide films have measured quantum efficiencies of 3.8-6.8*10^-7 and reflectivities of 0.11-0.15, which compare favor...

  11. O({sup 3}P{sub J}) formation and desorption by 157-nm photoirradiation of amorphous solid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSimone, Alice J.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2014-03-07

    Photodissociation of amorphous solid water (ASW) deposited on a thinly oxidized copper substrate at 82 K was studied by measuring O({sup 3}P{sub J=2,1,0}) photoproducts detected with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. For each spin-orbit state, the oxygen atom time-of-flight spectrum was measured as a function of H{sub 2}O exposure, which is related to ice thickness, and 157-nm irradiation time. Four Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions with translational temperatures of 10?000 K, 1800 K, 400 K, and 82 K were found to fit the data. The most likely formation mechanisms are molecular elimination following ionization of water and ion-electron recombination, secondary recombination of hydroxyl radicals, and photodissociation of adsorbed hydroxyl radicals. Evidence for O-atom diffusion through bulk ASW was found for H{sub 2}O exposures of at least 5 Langmuir (1 L = 10{sup ?6} Torr?s). The cross sections for O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) depletion were 1.3 × 10{sup ?19} and 6.5 × 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} for 1 and 5 L, respectively.

  12. Few-photon imaging at 1550 nm using a low-timing-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, H; You, L; Chen, S; Zhang, W; Wu, J; Wang, Z; Xie, X

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a laser depth imaging system based on the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, which was incorporated with a low-jitter superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD), operated at the wavelength of 1550 nm. A sub-picosecond time-bin width was chosen for photon counting, resulting in a discrete noise of less than one/two counts for each time bin under indoor/outdoor daylight conditions, with a collection time of 50 ms. Because of the low-jitter SNSPD, the target signal histogram was significantly distinguishable, even for a fairly low retro-reflected photon flux. The depth information was determined directly by the highest bin counts, instead of using any data fitting combined with complex algorithms. Millimeter resolution depth imaging of a low-signature object was obtained, and more accurate data than that produced by the traditional Gaussian fitting method was generated. Combined with the intensity of the return photons, three-dimensional reconstruction overlaid with re...

  13. Towards Next Generation TATB-based Explosives by Understanding Voids and Microstructure from 10 nm to 1 cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Overturf, G

    2009-03-26

    TATB-based explosives have been investigated on length scales spanning several orders of magnitude, from just under 10 nm to larger than 1 cm. This has been accomplished using a combination of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS), and x-ray computed tomography (XRCT). USAXS determines distributions the smallest structures including hot-spot voids from hundreds of nanometers to a few microns, USANS extends this range to about 10 microns, and two variants of XRCT cover sizes from microns to centimeters. Several examples are presented for LX-17, a triaminotrinitrobenzene based plastic bonded explosive using Kel-F 800. As an extension of previous USAXS results, in these proceedings, an alternate binder results in a more uniform microstructure for the PBX, useful towards design of next-generation TATB-based explosives. These data are an important step to understanding microstructural mechanisms that affect the mechanical properties of TATB-based explosives, and provide complete a comprehensive characterization of the structure of LX-17 from nanometers to centimeters that can be used as empirical input to computational models of detonation, and in determining the relationship between voids and microstructure to detonation properties.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Stability of Airglow Measured in the Meinel Band Window at 1191.3 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Hien T; Battle, John; Bock, James J; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Philip; Meek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on the temporal and spatial fluctuations in the atmospheric brightness in the narrow band between Meinel emission lines at 1191.3 nm using an R=320 near-infrared instrument. We present the instrument design and implementation, followed by a detailed analysis of data taken over the course of a night from Table Mountain Observatory. The absolute sky brightness at this wavelength is found to be 5330 +/- 30 nW m^-2 sr^-1, consistent with previous measurements of the inter-band airglow at these wavelengths. This amplitude is larger than simple models of the continuum component of the airglow emission at these wavelengths, confirming that an extra emissive or scattering component is required to explain the observations. We perform a detailed investigation of the noise properties of the data and find no evidence for a noise component associated with temporal instability in the inter-line continuum. This result demonstrates that in several hours of ~100s integrations the noise performance of the instrument ...

  15. The photospheric solar oxygen project: IV. 3D-NLTE investigation of the 777 nm triplet lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen, M; Caffau, E; Ludwig, H -G; Bonifacio, P; Cayrel, R; Ku?inskas, A; Livingston, W C

    2015-01-01

    The solar photospheric oxygen abundance is still widely debated. Adopting the solar chemical composition based on the "low" oxygen abundance, as determined with the use of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical model atmospheres, results in a well-known mismatch between theoretical solar models and helioseismic measurements that is so far unresolved. We carry out an independent redetermination of the solar oxygen abundance by investigating the center-to-limb variation of the OI IR triplet lines at 777 nm in different sets of spectra with the help of detailed synthetic line profiles based on 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres and 3D non-LTE line formation calculations with NLTETD. The idea is to simultaneously derive the oxygen abundance,A(O), and the scaling factor SH that describes the cross-sections for inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen relative the classical Drawin formula. The best fit of the center-to-limb variation of the triplet lines achieved with the CO5BOLD 3D solar model is clearly...

  16. Strawberry Varieties in Southwest Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Ernest

    1937-01-01

    , and Thompson. Varieties with good plant pro- duction with records for one year only are Bederarena, Cape Blanco, and Early Bird. Generally poor plant producers are Aberdeen, Beaver, Bellmar, Big Joe, Brandywine, Catskill, Chesapeake, Cooper, Ellinore... ............................................ Rederarena Bellmar.. ................................ Big Blossom. Big Joe. ...................... Big Lagoon ..................... Blakeniore Brandywine Cape Blanco Cape.R/lendocino Catsk~ll.. Champion Klondike ...................... Chesapeake...

  17. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Wheeler Company, Strawberry Valley, California. 1 I ncreasing criticism is being directed at logging operations

  18. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    evaluating the design trends and market preferences that affect the types of floor foundations. In an earlier-space construction, and for their opinions about the new plenum design. The six markets selected were considered Among Architects and Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Attitudes Toward New Design

  19. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 76 /1971 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vegetation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2--Key to Vegetation Types

  20. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF AGRICULTURE P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 SPECIFIC GRAVITY VARIATION IN ROBUSTA EUCALYPTUS grown eucalyptus (Eucalyptus robusta Sm.) is an important timber species in Hawaii. The density, or specific stands of robusta eucalyptus growing along the northeast coast of the island of Hawaii were selected

  1. Desert Southwest Region Ten Year...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carcinogenic characteristics, especially the penta and creosote, and the arsenic is a poison that has proven to cause adverse health effects. Many jurisdictions now consider...

  2. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2015 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Baton Rouge, LA 70817 jnovak@PIDC.com Lin Luo The Dow Chemical Company 2301 Brazosport Blvd., B-251 University Chair #12;3 3 2015 PROGRAM All talks & breaks will be held in Melcher Hall, Room 150 7:30 AM Registration ­ Victor Johnston, Treasurer (& helpers) 8:25 AM Welcoming Remarks ­ Dan Shantz, Chair 8:30 AM Bob

  3. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2010 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    :35 AM Prof. Kerry Dooley (LSU, Baton Rouge, LA) "Perspectives on Catalytic Oxidative Desulfurization" 9' Nanocatalysts for Electrochemical Energy Conversion: The Challenges for Synthesis and Characterization" 1:45 PM Hall ­ McMurtry Auditorium 4:00 PM Adjourn #12;Perspectives on Catalytic Oxidative Desulfurization

  4. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES) Current cost estimates planning and economics research unit, with headquarters at the Forest Fire Laboratory, Riverside, Calif. He

  5. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Radiation.211:614 Retrieval Terms: insolation; reproduction; snow management; environ mental planning. Solar radiation environmental factor. Incident solar radia tion creates a secondary form of radiation which af fects the forest

  6. Sunzia Southwest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model for theSunLan SolarKoreaSuntechnicsSunwattSunworx

  7. UV LED charge control of an electrically isolated proof mass in a Gravitational Reference Sensor configuration at 255 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karthik Balakrishnan; Ke-Xun Sun; Abdul Alfauwaz; Ahmad Aljadaan; Mohammed Almajeed; Muflih Alrufaydah; Salman Althubiti; Homoud Aljabreen; Sasha Buchman; Robert L Byer; John Conklin; Daniel DeBra; John Hanson; Eric Hultgren; Turki Al Saud; Seiya Shimizu; Michael Soulage; Andreas Zoellner

    2012-02-03

    Precise control over the potential of an electrically isolated proof mass is necessary for the operation of devices such as a Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) and satellite missions such as LISA. We show that AlGaN UV LEDs operating at 255 nm are an effective substitute for Mercury vapor lamps used in previous missions because of their ability to withstand space qualification levels of vibration and thermal cycling. After 27 thermal and thermal vacuum cycles and 9 minutes of 14.07 g RMS vibration, there is less than 3% change in current draw, less than 15% change in optical power, and no change in spectral peak or FWHM (full width at half maximum). We also demonstrate UV LED stimulated photoemission from a wide variety of thin film carbide proof mass coating candidates (SiC, Mo2C, TaC, TiC, ZrC) that were applied using electron beam evaporation on an Aluminum 6061-T6 substrate. All tested carbide films have measured quantum efficiencies of 3.8-6.8*10^-7 and reflectivities of 0.11-0.15, which compare favorably with the properties of previously used gold films. We demonstrate the ability to control proof mass potential on an 89 mm diameter spherical proof mass over a 20 mm gap in a GRS-like configuration. Proof mass potential was measured via a non-contact DC probe, which would allow control without introducing dynamic forcing of the spacecraft. Finally we provide a look ahead to an upcoming technology demonstration mission of UV LEDs and future applications toward charge control of electrically isolated proof masses.

  8. University of Texas, Austin Austin, TX 78712

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    with the Department of Energy, to fund a study through the World Technology Evaluation Consortium WTEC that would waste, 3 energy, and 4 carbon emissions. Manufacturing is also a heavy user of water, and there have any other country in the world. This is true both on an absolute scale as well as a per capita scale 2

  9. Vulnerability Assessment for Hood County, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldalbahi, Farisal; Cousins, Tiffany; Franks, Kristie; Hamidah, Nur; Herring, Kalen; Kirimli, Ridvan; Rojas, Ricardo Maga; McCharen, Robert; Paiz-Tabash, William; Phillips, Ellen; Thapa, Jeewasmi; Wallick, Andrew; Yan, Wenqian; Zhang, Yixun

    2015-01-01

    Looking forward, we mapped the 100-year and 500-year floodplains in the County. A 100-year floodplain indicates areas that have a 1% chance each year of flooding. The majority of the floodplain follows the Brazos River, as would be expected, and its...

  10. Alamo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View...

  11. Helping TxDOT Build Better Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute (TTI) researchers work directly with urban and rural communities around Texas to put into practiceYEARS OF RESEARCHER TTI Helps Texas Communities Meet Transportation Challenges #12;2 Publisher://www.facebook.com/ttitamu http://twitter.com/TTI Follow TTI on: 3 TTI Helps Texas Communities Meet Transportation Challenges 4

  12. Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

    2012-07-31

    This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

  13. Penitas, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubic Feet) Annual Download Series History Download Series

  14. Penitas, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubic Feet) Annual Download Series History Download

  15. Roma, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3 November 2013 IndependentYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun4Year20,042

  16. Alamo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670Same0 1 2 2State Offshore

  17. Alamo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670Same0 1 2 2State

  18. Clint, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948CaliforniaFeet) (Million CubicYear Jan..

  19. Hidalgo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanThousand CubicHealthYear-Month Week 1 Week

  20. Hidalgo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanThousand CubicHealthYear-Month Week 1 Week0

  1. CleanTX Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal Technologies Place: FloridaClean EnergyClean

  2. ~txF7D.ptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotion toCoal_Budget_Fact_Sheet.pdf More Documents &ER-B-00-03 +

  3. Microsoft Word - abstract-lacognata-tx_2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework uses concrete7 Assessment ofLana Cox (803)7-3373MysteryTHE FLUORINE

  4. TX, RRC District 1 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome Pageper ThousandTABLE OF39852326 144

  5. TX, RRC District 10 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome Pageper ThousandTABLE98 2437,5949 35

  6. TX, RRC District 5 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome Pageper909 2,235Changes,800 1 29 12 28

  7. TX, RRC District 6 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome Pageper909 2,235Changes,8002 11 16 32

  8. TX, RRC District 8 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,206 7,039 7,738

  9. TX, RRC District 9 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,206 7,03979010,90411,5225 21 20

  10. TX, State Offshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0 1 0 0 0 1996-2014 Lease

  11. Deep Trench Capacitor based Step-up and Step-down DC/DC Converters in 32nm SOI with Opportunistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    Deep Trench Capacitor based Step-up and Step-down DC/DC Converters in 32nm SOI with Opportunistic domains. Using ultra-high density deep trench capacitors, we are able to achieve an output power density-power domain scenario by implementing a bi-directional opportunistic current borrowing scheme. Deep trench

  12. Renewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close MENA's Water Gap 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Renewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close MENA's Water Gap 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy 45 Renewable Energy and renewable energy to climate change impacts on water and agriculture sectors. Dr. Debele has published

  13. Primary and Secondary Dissociation from Allyl Iodide Excited at 193 nm: Centrifugal Effects in the Unimolecular Dissociation of the Allyl Radical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Primary and Secondary Dissociation from Allyl Iodide Excited at 193 nm: Centrifugal Effects. The stability is due to centrifugal effects caused by significant rotational energy imparted to the allyl of the centrifugal barrier on the unimolecular dissociation of the allyl radical. We first review previous work

  14. A 19.1dBm Segmented Power-Mixer Based Multi-Gbps mm-Wave Transmitter in 32nm SOI CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajimiri, Ali

    A 19.1dBm Segmented Power-Mixer Based Multi-Gbps mm-Wave Transmitter in 32nm SOI CMOS Kaushik Abstract -- A high-power, fully-integrated, mm-wave power mixer based transmitter capable of generating case segmentation at 30% higher supply voltage. Index Terms -- mm-wave, , Power Mixer, CMOS Power

  15. HPC Resiliency Summit: Workshop on Resiliency for Petascale HPC, Los Alamos Computer Science Symposium, Santa Fe, NM, 10/15/2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    HPC Resiliency Summit: Workshop on Resiliency for Petascale HPC, Los Alamos Computer Science Summit: Workshop on Resiliency for Petascale HPC, Los Alamos Computer Science Symposium, Santa Fe, NM, 10 Resiliency Summit: Workshop on Resiliency for Petascale HPC, Los Alamos Computer Science Symposium, Santa Fe

  16. Stark Width and Shift Measurements for the 696.543nm ArI Line using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing (DFWM) Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal equilibrium argon arc plasma. DFWM spectroscopy has been used for line pro˘le measurements as well.543 nm) in an electric argon arc plasma using degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) spectroscopy. DFWM as for plasma diagnostics. At high laser intensities, the relationship between DFWM signal intensity and plasma

  17. Emission Spectroscopy of Dissociative Allyl Iodide and Allyl Alcohol Excited at 199.7 nm B. F. Parsons, D. E. Szpunar, and L. J. Butler*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Emission Spectroscopy of Dissociative Allyl Iodide and Allyl Alcohol Excited at 199.7 nm B. F investigated the emission spectroscopy of allyl iodide, CH2dCHCH2I, and allyl alcohol, CH2dCHCH2- OH, excited). The emission spectrum is dominated by activity in the CH2 wag and the CdC stretch, reflecting the dynamics

  18. Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520525 nm employing graded growth-temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520­525 nm employing current spreading and light extraction in GaN-based light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061107 (2012) Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061106 (2012

  19. Fast Purcell-enhanced single photon source in 1,550-nm telecom band from a resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birowosuto, M D; Matsuo, S; Taniyama, H; van Veldhoven, P J; Nötzel, R; Notomi, M; 10.1038/srep00321

    2012-01-01

    High-bit-rate nanocavity-based single photon sources in the 1,550-nm telecom band are challenges facing the development of fibre-based long-haul quantum communication networks. Here we report a very fast single photon source in the 1,550-nm telecom band, which is achieved by a large Purcell enhancement that results from the coupling of a single InAs quantum dot and an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. At a resonance, the spontaneous emission rate was enhanced by a factor of 5 resulting a record fast emission lifetime of 0.2 ns at 1,550 nm. We also demonstrate that this emission exhibits an enhanced anti-bunching dip. This is the first realization of nanocavity-enhanced single photon emitters in the 1,550-nm telecom band. This coupled quantum dot cavity system in the telecom band thus provides a bright high-bit-rate non-classical single photon source that offers appealing novel opportunities for the development of a long-haul quantum telecommunication system via optical fibres.

  20. Fast Purcell-enhanced single photon source in 1,550-nm telecom band from a resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Birowosuto; H. Sumikura; S. Matsuo; H. Taniyama; P. J. van Veldhoven; R. Nötzel; M. Notomi

    2012-03-28

    High-bit-rate nanocavity-based single photon sources in the 1,550-nm telecom band are challenges facing the development of fibre-based long-haul quantum communication networks. Here we report a very fast single photon source in the 1,550-nm telecom band, which is achieved by a large Purcell enhancement that results from the coupling of a single InAs quantum dot and an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. At a resonance, the spontaneous emission rate was enhanced by a factor of 5 resulting a record fast emission lifetime of 0.2 ns at 1,550 nm. We also demonstrate that this emission exhibits an enhanced anti-bunching dip. This is the first realization of nanocavity-enhanced single photon emitters in the 1,550-nm telecom band. This coupled quantum dot cavity system in the telecom band thus provides a bright high-bit-rate non-classical single photon source that offers appealing novel opportunities for the development of a long-haul quantum telecommunication system via optical fibres.

  1. 10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC- purified mixture was desalted on the same column (methanol was removed on a rotary evaporator, and the sample loaded in H2O and eluted with 90% methanol) and lyophilized, yielding the purified Nvoc

  2. Sub-50 nm scratch-proof DLC molds for reversal nanoimprint lithography L. Tao, C. T. Nelson, K. Trivedi, S. Ramachandran, M. Goeckner, L. Overzet, and Walter Hua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wenchuang "Walter"

    Sub-50 nm scratch-proof DLC molds for reversal nanoimprint lithography L. Tao, C. T. Nelson, K of the industry is related to the mold life time that significantly affects cost of ownership and manufacturing reproducibility. Nowadays, most often used Si or glass molds that are very expensive can be damaged after certain

  3. Exceptional activity of sub-nm Pt clusters on CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen production: A combined of experimental and first-principles study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Qiyuan; Su, Dong; Xiong, Shangmin; Shen, Peichuan; Zhao, Shen; Li, Yan; Orlov, Alexander

    2014-12-24

    In this work we have explored a new concept of substantially increasing photocatalytic activity for H? production of conventional semiconductors by modifying them with sub-nm Pt particles. By combining both experimental and theoretical approaches, we have also developed new mechanistic insights into the 17 times increase in photocatalytic activity of Pt modified CdS catalysts.

  4. SEEDED VISA: A 1064nm LASER-SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE M. Dunning, G. Andonian, E. Hemsing, S. Reiche, J. Rosenzweig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SEEDED VISA: A 1064nm LASER-SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE BNL ATF M. Dunning, G. Andonian, E. Hemsing Free Electron Laser (FEL) using the VISA undulator and a Nd:YAG seed laser will be performed for a short Rayleigh length FEL amplifier at 1 micron to allow for high power transmission with min- imal

  5. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  6. The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

  7. Promotion of Renewable Energies for Water Production through Desalination 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Promotion of Renewable Energies for Water Production through Desalination 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy 11 Promotion of Renewable with is ProDes (Promotion of Renewable Energy for Water production through Desalination), which brought

  8. Single-domain magnetic pillar array of 35 nm diameter and 65 Gbits/ik2 density for ultrahigh density quantum magnetic storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    density quantum magnetic storage Stephen Y Chou, Mark S. Wei, Peter R. Krauss, and Paul 6. FischerSingle-domain magnetic pillar array of 35 nm diameter and 65 Gbits/ik2 density for ultrahigh is 65 Gbits/in.2-over two orders of magnitude greater than the state-of-the-art magnetic storage density

  9. Near-resonance enhanced O2 detection for dual-broadband pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering with an ultraviolet-visible setup at 266 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, Martin; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2005-07-01

    Broadband and dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are widely established tools for nonintrusive gas diagnostics. Up to now the investigations have been mainly performed for electronic nonresonant conditions of the gas species of interest. We report on the enhancement of the O2-N2 detection limit of dual-broadband pure rotational CARS by shifting the wavelength of the narrowband pump laser from the commonly used 532-266 nm. This enhancement is caused when the Schumann-Runge absorption band is approached near 176 nm. The principal concept of this experiment, i.e., covering the Raman resonance with a single- or dual-broadband combination of lasers in the visible range and moving only the narrowband probe laser near or directly into electronic resonant conditions in the UV range, should also be applicable to broadband CARS experiments to directly exploit electronic resonance effects for the purpose of single-shot concentration measurements of minority species. To quantify the enhancement in O2 sensitivity, comparative measurements at both a 266 and a 532 nm narrowband pump laser wavelength are presented, employing a 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyram (DCM) dye laser as a broadband laser source at 635 nm. An increase of approximately 13% in the ratio of the rotational CARS cross sections of O2 and N2 was obtained. The broad spectral width of the CARS excitation profile was approximately equal for both setups. Further enhancement should be achievable by shifting the narrowband pump laser closer toward 176 nm, for example, with a frequency-doubled optical parametric oscillator or an excimer laser. The principal concept of this experiment should also be applicable to broadband CARS experiments to directly exploit electronic resonance effects of the narrowband pump laser with electronic transitions of minority species for the purpose of single-shot concentration measurements of those species.

  10. Linear and nonlinear transmission of Fe{sup 2+}-doped ZnSe crystals at a wavelength of 2940 nm in the temperature range 20–220 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Il'ichev, N N; Pashinin, P P; Gulyamova, E S; Bufetova, G A; Shapkin, P V; Nasibov, A S

    2014-03-28

    The linear and nonlinear transmission of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe crystals is measured at a wavelength of 2940 nm in the temperature range 20 – 220 °C. It is found that, with increasing temperature from 20 °C to 150 – 220 °C, the transmission of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe crystals decreases in the case of incident radiation with an intensity of ?5.5 MW cm{sup -2} and increases in the case of radiation with an intensity of 28 kW cm{sup -2}. At a temperature of 220 °C, the linear transmission almost coincides with the nonlinear transmission. The transmission spectra of Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe crystals at temperatures of 22 and 220 °C in the wavelength range 500 – 7000 nm are presented. (active media)

  11. Generation of heralded single photons beyond 1100 nm by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a side-stressed femtosecond laser-written waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhizhong; Helt, L G; Ams, Martin; Withford, Michael J; Steel, M J

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a monolithically integrable heralded photon source in a femtosecond laser direct written glass waveguide. The generation of photon pairs with a wide wavelength separation requires a concomitant large birefringence in the normal dispersion regime. Here, by incorporation of side-stress tracks, we produce a waveguide with a birefringence of $1.64\\times~10^{-4}$ and propagation loss as low as 0.21 dB/cm near 980~nm. We measure photon pairs with 300~nm wavelength separation at an internal generation rate exceeding $5.05\\times10^6$/s. The second order correlations indicate that the generated photon pairs are in a strongly non-classical regime.

  12. Optimized Bose-Einstein-condensate production in a dipole trap based on a 1070-nm multifrequency laser: Influence of enhanced two-body loss on the evaporation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Lauber; Johannes Kueber; Oliver Wille; Gerhard Birkl

    2011-10-24

    We present an optimized strategy for the production of tightly confined Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) of 87Rb in a crossed dipole trap with direct loading from a magneto-optical trap. The dipole trap is created with light of a multifrequency fiber laser with a center wavelength of 1070nm. Evaporative cooling is performed by ramping down the laser power only. A comparison of the resulting atom number in an almost pure BEC to the initial atom number and the value for the gain in phase space density per atom lost confirm that this straightforward strategy is very efficient. We observe that the temporal characteristics of evaporation sequence are strongly influenced by power-dependent two-body losses resulting from enhanced optical pumping to the higher-energy hyperfine state. We characterize these losses and compare them to results obtained with a single-frequency laser at 1030nm.

  13. Optimized Bose-Einstein-condensate production in a dipole trap based on a 1070-nm multifrequency laser: Influence of enhanced two-body loss on the evaporation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauber, Thomas; Wille, Oliver; Birkl, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We present an optimized strategy for the production of tightly confined Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) of 87Rb in a crossed dipole trap with direct loading from a magneto-optical trap. The dipole trap is created with light of a multifrequency fiber laser with a center wavelength of 1070nm. Evaporative cooling is performed by ramping down the laser power only. A comparison of the resulting atom number in an almost pure BEC to the initial atom number and the value for the gain in phase space density per atom lost confirm that this straightforward strategy is very efficient. We observe that the temporal characteristics of evaporation sequence are strongly influenced by power-dependent two-body losses resulting from enhanced optical pumping to the higher-energy hyperfine state. We characterize these losses and compare them to results obtained with a single-frequency laser at 1030nm.

  14. Demonstrating 1 nm-oxide-equivalent-thickness HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure with unpinning Fermi level and low gate leakage current density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinh, Hai-Dang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Lin, Yueh-Chin; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Luc, Quang-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Duong, Quoc-Van; Nguyen, Manh-Nghia [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)] [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Wang, Shin-Yuan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yi Chang, Edward [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the band alignment, interface, and electrical characteristics of HfO{sub 2}/InSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure have been investigated. By using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the conduction band offset of 1.78 ± 0.1 eV and valence band offset of 3.35 ± 0.1 eV have been extracted. The transmission electron microscopy analysis has shown that HfO{sub 2} layer would be a good diffusion barrier for InSb. As a result, 1 nm equivalent-oxide-thickness in the 4 nm HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure has been demonstrated with unpinning Fermi level and low leakage current of 10{sup ?4} A/cm{sup ?2}. The D{sub it} value of smaller than 10{sup 12} eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2} has been obtained using conduction method.

  15. High-Resolution PFPE-based Molding Techniques for Nanofabrication of High-Pattern Density, Sub-20 nm Features: A Fundamental Materials Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Stuart S.; Retterer, Scott; Lopez, Rene; Ruiz, Ricardo; Samulski, Edward T.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2010-04-14

    Several perfluoropolyether (PFPE)-based elastomers for high-resolution replica molding applications are explored. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface tension values (<25 mN/m). Using large area (>4 in.{sup 2}) master templates, we experimentally show the relationship between mold resolution and material properties such as modulus and surface tension for materials used in this study. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus PFPE tetramethacrylate (TMA) composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nanograting structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  16. Simultaneous near-field and far-field imaging of the 11.9-nm Ni-like Sn soft-x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, F.; Braud, M.; Balmer, J.E.; Nilsen, J.; Bajt, S.

    2004-07-01

    We report on two-dimensional near-field imaging experiments of the 11.9-nm Sn x-ray laser that were performed with a set of Mo/Y multilayer mirrors having reflectivities of up to {approx}45% at normal and at 45 deg. incidence. Second-moment analysis of the x-ray laser emission was used to determine values of the x-ray beam propagation factor M{sup 2} for a range of irradiation parameters. The results reveal a reduction of M{sup 2} with increasing prepulse amplitude. The spatial size of the output is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than previously measured for the 14.7-nm Pd x-ray laser, while the distance of the x-ray emission with respect to the target surface remains roughly the same.

  17. Air fluorescence measurements in the spectral range 300-420 nm using a 28.5 GeV electron beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Abbasi; T. Abu-Zayyad; K. Belov; J. Belz; Z. Cao; M. Dalton; Y. Fedorova; P. Huentemeyer; B. F. Jones; C. C. H. Jui; E. C. Loh; N. Manago; K. Martens; J. N. Matthews; M. Maestas; J. Smith; P. Sokolsky; R. W. Springer; J. Thomas; S. Thomas; P. Chen; C. Field; C. Hast; R. Iverson; J. S. T. Ng; A. Odian; K. Reil; D. Walz; D. R. Bergman; G. Thomson; A. Zech; F-Y. Chang; C-C. Chen; C-W. Chen; M. A. Huang; W-Y. P. Hwang; G-L. Lin

    2007-08-23

    Measurements are reported of the yield and spectrum of fluorescence, excited by a 28.5 GeV electron beam, in air at a range of pressures of interest to ultra-high energy cosmic ray detectors. The wavelength range was 300 - 420 nm. System calibration has been performed using Rayleigh scattering of a nitrogen laser beam. In atmospheric pressure dry air at 304 K the yield is 20.8 +/- 1.6 photons per MeV.

  18. Comparison of 20 nm silver nanoparticles synthesized with and without a gold core. Structure, dissolution in cell culture media, and biological impact on macrophages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Wang, Chongmin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.; Smith, Jordan N.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Thrall, Brian D.; Chen, Shu; Alexandra, Porter E.; et al

    2015-07-15

    Widespread use of silver nanoparticles raises questions of environmental impact and toxicity. Both silver particles and silver ions formed by particle dissolution may impact biological systems. Therefore it is important to understand the characteristics of silver nanoparticles and their stability in relevant media. The synthesis route can impact physical and chemical characteristics of the particles and we report the characterization and solution stability of three types of silver nanoparticles (20 nm particles with and without gold cores and 110 nm particles with gold cores) in cell culture media with serum proteins: FBS10%/RPMI. These nanoparticles were synthesized in aqueous solution andmore »characterized using both in situ and ex situ analysis methods. Dissolution studies were carried at particle concentrations from 1 µg/ml to 50 µg/ml. Particles with gold cores had smaller crystallite size and higher apparent solubility than pure silver particles. A dissolution model was found to describe the time variation of particle size and amount of dissolved silver for particle loadings above 9 µg/ml. An effective solubility product obtained from fitting the data was higher for the 20 nm gold core particles in comparison to the pure silver or 110 nm particles. Dissolution of the nanoparticles was enhanced by presence of serum proteins contained in fetal bovine serum. In addition, the protocol of the dispersion in the medium was found to influence particle agglomeration and dissolution. Results show that particle structure can impact the concentration of dissolved silver and the dose to which cells would be exposed during in vitro studies.« less

  19. A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm 0.4 0.35 In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic-mail:ykwon@snu.ac.kr) Abstract -- In this work, we demonstrate a compact 77GHz single-chip transceiver for an automotive radar at the transmitter and a 5dB conversion gain at the receiver. Index Terms -- Automotive radar, 77GHz, MHEMT, MMIC

  20. The formation of IRIS diagnostics VI. The Diagnostic Potential of the C II Lines at 133.5 nm in the Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathore, Bhavna; Leenaarts, Jorrit; De Pontieu, Bart

    2015-01-01

    We use 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic models to investigate how the thermodynamic quantities in the simulation are encoded in observable quantities, thus exploring the diagnostic potential of the 133.5 nm lines. We find that the line core intensity is correlated with the temperature at the formation height but the correlation is rather weak, especially when the lines are strong. The line core Doppler shift is a good measure of the line-of-sight velocity at the formation height. The line width is both dependent on the width of the absorption profile (thermal and non-thermal width) and an opacity broadening factor of 1.2-4 due to the optically thick line formation with a larger broadening for double peak profiles. The 133.5 nm lines can be formed both higher and lower than the core of the Mg II k line depending on the amount of plasma in the 14-50 kK temperature range. More plasma in this temperature range gives a higher 133.5 nm formation height relative to the Mg II k line core. The synthetic line profiles ...

  1. Interaction of silicon photonic crystal nanocavities with colloidal lead sulphide nanocrystals for enhanced spontaneous emissions near 1550 nm at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, R; Gao, J; Wong, C W; Yang, X; Bose, Ranojoy; Chatterjee, Rohit; Gao, Jie; Wong, Chee Wei; Yang, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    We observe the weak coupling of lead sulphide nanocrystals to localized defect modes of 2-dimensional silicon nanocavities through enhancement of spontaneous emission. Cavity resonances characterized with the nanocrystals agree with cold-cavity measurements using integrated waveguides, but linewidths are broadened, perhaps due to limits of resolution in measurements. Selective isolation of nanocrystals only at the cavity further suppresses background photoluminescence. The theoretical enhancement is near 7, and the calculated Purcell factor is 65. These novel light sources operate near 1550 nm wavelengths at room temperature, permitting integration with current fiber communications networks.

  2. Towards sub-200?nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low ?m range. Deposition of a protective layer (50?nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ?300?nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  3. Holographic recording and characterization of photorefractive Bi{sub 2}TeO{sub 5} crystals at 633?nm wavelength light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, Ivan de

    2014-04-28

    We report on the holographic recording on photorefractive Bi{sub 2}TeO{sub 5} crystals using ?=633 nm wavelength light. We studied the behavior of this material under the action of this low photonic energy light and found out the presence of a fast and a slow hologram, both of photorefractive nature and exhibiting rather high diffraction efficiencies. The faster and the slower holograms are based on the excitation and diffusion of oppositely charged carriers (likely electrons and holes). Relevant parameters for the photoactive centers responsible for both kind of holograms were characterized using purely holographic techniques. No evidences of non-photosensitive ionic charge carriers being involved in the recording process at room temperature nor self-fixing effects were found.

  4. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  5. NM Invest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFE Baterias Industriais Jump to: navigation,Invest

  6. NM, East Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.82 (MillionandIndustrialYear1371,024,08247460149

  7. NM, West Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009 2,851 2,410 2,851 3,84720 21 260 0 0

  8. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  9. Identifying and Characterizing the Volume and Quality of Tributaries and Springs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzer, Wayne; Hart, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Creek and Taiban Creek near Fort Sumner, NM; the Rio Hondo near Roswell, NM; Rio Felix south of Roswell, NM; Rio Penasco near Artesia, NM; the intermittent Delaware River just west of Red Bluff Reservoir; Salt Creek in Reeves County, TX; Toyah Creek...

  10. Space Sci Rev (2008) 141: 13 DOI 10.1007/s11214-008-9474-5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    2008-01-01

    storms, which can last several days. At times of increased power input, mag- netic storms wreak havoc on astronauts, satellites, space-based telecommunication systems and ground power distribution systems. During the J.L. Burch ( ) Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX, USA e-mail: JBurch

  11. The flow of liquid PDMS (10:1 v/v base to cross-linker ratio) in open, rectangular silicon micro channels, with and without a hexa-methyl-di-silazane (HMDS) or poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) (120 nm) coat,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    channels, with and without a hexa-methyl-di-silazane (HMDS) or poly-tetra-fluoro-ethylene (PTFE) (120 nm

  12. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  13. Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy of $^4He$ $2^3P-3^{1,3}D$ transitions at 588 nm with a one-watt compact laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Feng, Yan; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy of helium $2^3P-3^{1,3}D$ transitions in an rf discharged sealed-off cell using a compact laser system at 588 nm. An external cavity diode laser at 1176 nm was constructed to seed a Raman fiber amplifier. Laser power of more than one watt at 588 nm was produced by frequency doubling of the fiber amplifier output using a MgO:PPLN crystal. A doubling efficiency of 23 % was achieved. The power-dependent spectra of the $2^3P-3^3D$ transitions were investigated. Furthermore, the Doppler-free spectrum of the spin-forbidden $2^3P-3^1D$ transitions was observed for the first time. Our results are crucial towards precision test of QED atomic calculations, especially for improving the determination of the helium $3^1D-3^3D$ separation.

  14. Determination of the quenching rate of the O([sup 1]D) by O([sup 3]P) from rocket-borne optical (630 nm) and electron density data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobral, J.H.A.; Takahashi, H.; Abdu, M.A.; Muralikrishna, P.; Sahai, Y.; Zamlutti, C.J.; Paula, E.R. de; Batista, P.P. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil))

    1993-05-01

    The authors report on a quenching rate determination for O([sup 1]D) by O([sup 3]P), done by means of photometer and plasma probe data from a rocket borne experiment. Oxygen emission at 630 and 557 nm plays a major role in modeling space plasma effects. These states are created by dissociative recombination of O[sub 2][sup +]. It was recently observed that the reaction of O([sup 1]D) and O([sup 3]P) is an important rate for the deactivation process contributing to the 630 nm nightglow emission. The experiment measured 630 nm emission and electron density, and model neutral constituents concentrations, and then fit a rate constant to the input data.

  15. Importance of energy efficiency in the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrons, R.

    1998-06-01

    As part of the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) in FY97, an energy conservation report (ECR) was completed. The original energy baseline for the building, established in Title 1 design, was 595,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr, site energy use. Following the input of several reviewers and the incorporation of the various recommendations into the Title 2 design, the projected energy consumption was reduced to 341,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr. Of this reduction, it is estimated that about 150,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr resulted from inclusion of more energy efficient options into the design. The remaining reductions resulted from better accounting of energy consumption between Title 1 ECR and the final ECR. The energy efficient features selected by the outcome of the ECR were: (1) Energy Recovery system, with evaporative cooling assist, for the Exhaust/Make-up Air System; (2) Chilled Water Thermal Storage system; (3) Premium efficiency motors for large, year-round applications; (4) Variable frequency drives for all air handling fan motors; (4) Premium efficiency multiple boiler system; and (5) Lighting control system. The annual energy cost savings due to these measures will be about $165,000. The estimated annual energy savings are two million kWhrs electric, and 168,000 therms natural gas, the total of which is equivalent to 23,000 million BTUs per year. Put into the perspective of a typical office/light lab at SNL/NM, the annual energy savings is equal the consumption of a 125,000 square foot building. The reduced air emissions are approximately 2,500 tons annually.

  16. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should cease until the condor(s) leaves on its own. The Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife (928-871-6450), or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (602-242-0210),...

  17. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    EIA EIS EDR EEA FERC HP IOU IRC ISO LMP LBNL LSE MISO MP MROwith the ISO/RTO Council (IRC) on two initiatives to advancein ISO/RTO Council (IRC) DR activities Set specific goals

  18. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection for Demand-side Management for QualifyingPrepared by Demand-side Management Task Force of the

  19. Sugar Beets in Southwest Texas: Production Potentials. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiteley, E. L.; Cowley, W. R.

    1969-01-01

    . Zavala County: The trial in Zavala County n.. conducted on the Joe Byrd Farm 17 miles northea5; - Crystal City. The soil type was Blanco silty loam; irrigatic- was supplied from a 1,100-foot Carrizo well. The s~te 1.1: been heavily fertilized...

  20. Boston Urban Farm : mending the Southwest Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Timothy Eric

    1990-01-01

    This work studies Boston's segregated nature in terms of race and class especially as this coincides with the physical form of the city. Known for its strong neighborhoods, Boston cannot escape definite boundaries between ...