Sample records for nm actual scientific

  1. Publications New NM FS Scientific Reports Published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf of Mexico estuarine inventory and study- Texas: Area description." September 1975. 129 p. ABSTRACT and benthic properties; pop- ulations and economic development; pollution; and navigation projects hunting. Pollution from domestic and in- dustrial sources has forced the closing of about 325,090 acres

  2. EXPLORATION Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013 President's Budget Request 3,821.2 3,712.8 3,932.8 4,076.5 4,076.5 4 Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013EXPLORATION EXP-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

  3. SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.6 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 Crosscutting Space Tech Development 120.4 187.7 293.8 272.1 266.6 259.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE

  4. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  5. Self-Supporting Budget Budget to Actual Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Self-Supporting Budget Budget to Actual Comparison System Administration University of Nevada Supporting Budgets ­ Budget to Actual Comparison Introduction

  6. ,"NM, East Proved Nonproducing Reserves"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292014 1:57:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: NM, East...

  7. Scientific Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNews PressThemes Scientific Impact

  8. Bennett and "Proxy Actualism" Michael Nelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalta, Edward N.

    Bennett and "Proxy Actualism" Michael Nelson Department of Philosophy University of California and Information Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 zalta@stanford.edu Abstract Karen Bennett has recently and addressing a worry that might have been the driving force behind Bennett's claim that Linsky and Zalta's view

  9. al uso actual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O 27 Do Concept Inventories Actually Measure Anything? Colin S. Wallace Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  10. Self-Supporting Budget Budget to Actual Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Self-Supporting Budget Budget to Actual Comparison System Administration University of Nevada-12 Self Supporting Budgets ­ Budget to Actual Comparison Introduction

  11. Transparent fluids for 157-nm immersion lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    - gineers. [DOI: 10.1117/1.1637366] Subject terms: 157-nm lithography; immersion fluid; perfluoropolyether

  12. Actual energy implementations and basic investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nockemann, C.; Wuestenberg, H. [BAM, Berlin (Germany). Federal Inst. of Materials Research and Testing

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The actual implementations in guaranteeing the reliability of NDE systems applied in service inspections in nuclear power plants will be presented. The difference between the American PDI (Performance Demonstration Initiative) which is based on blind trials and the European ENIQ (European Network for Inspection Qualification) approach which is based on a mixed procedure of physical modeling, experience data and test experiments will be discussed. The ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) has been adapted from the signal detection theory to NDE problems at BAM to be used for basic investigations and for the validation of new exceptional NDE systems where modeling and reference to standards is not yet possible. Examples of application will be shown and critical discussed especially concerning the influence of the grading unit raster.

  13. actual intec calcines: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material microstructures were studied for materials prepared from three (more) Bennett, Barbara, 1971- 2000-01-01 2 Introduction Actual Industrial Problems Mathematics...

  14. actuales clasificaciones del: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 117 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  15. anciano consideraciones actuales: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 64 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  16. actual del franciscanismo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  17. actual del huemul: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  18. actual del ultrasonido: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  19. actual del tabaquismo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  20. actuales sobre criterios: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 90 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  1. actuales para determinar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 98 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  2. actual del control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 147 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  3. actuales del metabolismo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 116 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  4. atpae desarrollo actual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 114 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  5. actual del estreptococo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  6. actual del rabdomiosarcoma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  7. aporte actual del: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 119 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  8. Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas and atmospheric aerosol assumptions underlying climate://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O

  9. Edison Electrifies Scientific Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recently accepted "Edison," a new flagship supercomputer designed for scientific productivity. Named in honor of American inventor Thomas Alva Edison, the Cray XC30 will be...

  10. actual situation analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    traffic participants. The proposed ASA includes all four levels of the traditional JDL (Joint Desel, Jrg 2 HOW TO APPLY ICA ON ACTUAL DATA ? EXAMPLE OF MARS HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE...

  11. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals remarkable predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society,...

  12. Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies Hadi with chip power reduc- tions. This paper examines how well process technology and mi- croarchitecture delivered on this assumption. This paper evalu- ates power and performance of native and Java workloads

  13. Kelly Scientific Resources Kelly Scientific Resources yy BIOTECHNOLOGY DRUG &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Kelly Scientific Resources Kelly Scientific Resources yy BIOTECHNOLOGY DRUG & PHARMACEUTICAL · What Kelly Scientific Resources or staffing agencies are and how they work?they work? · How to work Role: ­ Northern California Recruiting and Business efforts for Kelly Scientific Resources ­ Promote

  14. Scientific/Techical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie (Butch) Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  15. SCIENCE: JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE (JWST) Budget Authority Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Prior FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 BTC Total FY 2013 President's Budget TELESCOPE (JWST) Formulation Development Operations JWST-2 FY 2013 BUDGET Budget Authority Actual Estimate (in $ millions) Prior FY 2011 FY 2012 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 BTC Total FY 2013 President

  16. Estimating the Actual Cost of Transmission System Congestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the utility's generation, load and tie-line flows over the study time period. Due to the common lack by most be used by a utility to estimate the actual cost of congestion on its transmission system using limited interconnected grid (i.e., the Eastern Interconnect), costs for the utility's generators, and then hourly values

  17. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

  18. Do Concept Inventories Actually Measure Anything? Colin S. Wallace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Do Concept Inventories Actually Measure Anything? Colin S. Wallace University of Colorado Society. All rights reserved. Abstract Although concept inventories are among the most frequently used it to the Star Properties Concept Inventory. We also use IRT to explore an important psychometrics debate

  19. COORDINATING ADVICE AND ACTUAL TREATMENT Thomas A. Russ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russ, Thomas A.

    . Unfortunately, this information is not always immediately available. For example, the exact fluid infused via an intravenous line can only be determined after someone checks the infusion bottle to determine how much fluid differ in timing and exact amount from what is actually done. For example, an infusion order might call

  20. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowker, Geof (Santa Clara University) [Santa Clara University

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  1. SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses and cancert-A T. w- - SIR- In February 1990, the Soviet. Nikipelov et al. published in g Priroda (Nature)' the radiation doses for each year, averaged over environmental impact on the Gulf waters is rapidly ex- ported to the Arabian Sea and then to the Indian Ocean

  2. 28-nm laser damage testing of LIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltyn, S.R.; Newman, B.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested several samples of LIF, both single crystal and press forged, for damage resistance to 10-ns 248-nm pulses at 35 pps. The damage thresholds - the highest levels at which no damage could be produced - ranged from 4 to 6 J/cm/sup 2/ although some test sites survived irradiation at approx. 30 J/cm/sup 2/. We observed that bulk damage is the primary failure mechanism in single crystal and press forged samples and that both types exhibit the same resistance to laser damage.

  3. Home energy ratings systems: Actual usage may vary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Home energy ratings (HERS) attempt to predict typical energy costs for a given residence and estimate the savings potentials of various energy retrofits. This article discusses where the ratings could be improved to more accurately predict the actual energy consumption. Topics covered include the following: is HERS on target (scores, energy predictions, recommended energy improvements); why HERS aren`t perfect; improvements in HERS; the possibility that home energy ratings systems will become market driven. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Visit on Crystalline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WorkshopsScientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development Scientific Visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development Many thanks to all participants at the Scientific...

  5. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  6. Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

  7. Comparison of CHEERS energy use predictions with actual utility bills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, B.A.; Hunt, M.B.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The usefulness of Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS) is primarily derived from the accurate analysis of the present energy efficiency of a home and the cost effectiveness of the measures that are recommended for improving its efficiency. The Energy Efficient Mortgage is predicated on the concept that the mortgage money spent to improve the efficiency of a home will cost less per months to finance that the utility bill savings that are generated. Computer simulation programs are used to estimate the annual energy used for heating, cooling and domestic hot water. A large sample of rated homes in San Jose California was analyzed to compare predicted energy sue with actual bills. The HERS predictions for both heating and cooling were found to significantly overestimate the energy use of low rated homes compared to efficient homes. Cooling energy use of low rated homes with air conditioning was actually lower than for efficient homes with air conditioning. Significant correlation between family characteristics and home efficiency are thought to be part of the reason for this dilemma. A number of areas are proposed for further work to improve the HERS estimates.

  8. Scientific Impact | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNews PressThemes Scientific

  9. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan Bishop selectedScientific

  10. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan BishopScientific Advisory

  11. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP) NPBiogenic AerosolsScientific

  12. Scientific Advisory Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP) NPBiogenicScientific Advisory

  13. UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCIENTIFIC DIVING SAFETY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    ............................................................................................................................ 43 Section 13 Scientific Cave and Cavern Diving Standard

  14. Frequency stabilization for a 486nm dye-ring laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sievers, Charles A. (Charles Anders), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For my thesis, I worked towards using two reference cavities to provide frequency stabilization to a 486nm dye-ring laser. After a doubling cavity doubles the frequency to 243nm, the laser beam is used to excite ground ...

  15. High Plains Corporation's Portales, NM Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subcontract Zxe

    NREL to evaluate the opportunity for converting all or part of the High Plains Portales, NM ethanol facility to biomass feed. The Portales plant, owned by High Plains, currently produces about 10 million gallons per year of ethanol from milo feed. SWAN Biomass conversion technology is the basis for the new process design. SWAN first evaluated possible biomass feedstocks available close to the existing facility. Cotton gin trash was found to be abundant in the area, available for the cost of hauling, and suitable as a feedstock for the manufacture of ethanol. SWAN then optimized the design of the biomass plant, and performed extensive economic evaluations tailored to the specifics of the feedstock, facility site and owner. Weatherly, Inc., a process engineering company with expertise in the design and construction of ethanol plants, reviewed the existing equipment at Portales, and estimated the costs for modifying that equipment to allow the plant to run on biomass. High Plains supported both efforts, and investigated means for implementing the new technology. The proposed modifications would cost $30 million. Most of the capital cost would be for biomass pretreatment equipment and the large fermentation vessels needed to convert biomass in high yield. The modified facility would produce 11.3 million gallons per year of ethanol from 725 tons/day of cotton gin

  16. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  17. Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new development is prohibited in these areas.

  18. Scientific and Technical Information Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing DOE's scientific and technical information. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1B.

  19. ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t GOLDD+ XRF Analyzer The Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t x-ray tube-based x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer with GOLDD+ technology is purpose versatile x-ray tubes ever used in a handheld XRF instrument. When this power is harnessed to our

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - actual results satellitenexperiment Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The actual case here corresponds to the minor windows (U0.5) case in Table 6. Table A1: Load and energy... .96) 6343.77 (3316.14) 933.65 (901.44) Major windows (Actual) Diff. - -...

  1. Acquisition of Scientific Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noland, Lynn [Director, Sponsored Programs] [Director, Sponsored Programs

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Whitworth University constructed a 63,00 sq. ft. biology and chemistry building which opened in the Fall of 2011. This project provided for new state-of-the-art science instrumentation enabling Whitworth students to develop skills and knowledge that are directly transferable to practical applications thus enhancing Whitworth student's ability to compete and perform in the scientific workforce. Additionally, STEM faculty undertake outreach programs in the area schools, bringing students to our campus to engage in activities with our science students. The ability to work with insturmentation that is current helps to make science exciting for middle school and high school students and gets them thinking about careers in science. 14 items were purchased following the university's purchasing policy, that benefit instruction and research in the departments of biology, chemistry, and health sciences. They are: Cadaver Dissection Tables with Exhaust Chamber and accessories, Research Microscope with DF DIC, Phase and Fluorescence illumination with DP72 Camera, Microscope with Fluorescence, Microcomputer controlled ultracentrifuge, Ultracentrifuge rotor, Variable Temperature steam pressure sterilizer, Alliance APLC System, DNA Speedvac, Gel Cocumentation System, BioPac MP150, Glovebox personal workstation,Lyophilizer, Nano Drop 2000/2000c Spectrophotometer, C02 Incubator.

  2. Scientific Visualization, Seeing the Unseeable

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LBNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in bo... June 24, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

  3. New Materials for 157 nm Photoresists: Characterization and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    . The current Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) Roadmap indicates the 100 nm technology node will be reached by 2005; however, many semiconductor manufacturers foresee the need for a technology enabling 100 by 2005. Therefore, 157 nm lithography is viewed as a potential bridge across the gap between optical

  4. RF power potential of 45 nm CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Christopher

    This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS devices with varying device widths and layouts. We find that 45 nm CMOS can deliver a peak output power density of around 140 mW/mm with ...

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Anions at 118.2 nm: Observation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at 118.2 nm (10.488 eV) by tripling the third harmonic output (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser in a XeAr cell. Our study focuses on a set of...

  6. DOE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Record Disposition Schedule items listed below are have been consolidated from DOE Records Schedules previously approved over the last 35 years. They apply specifically to those scientific and...

  7. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has

  8. Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

  9. Scientific Analysis Is Essential to Assess Biofuel Policy Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land-use change (LUC) estimated by economic models has sparked intense international debate. Models estimate how much LUC might be induced under prescribed scenarios and rely on assumptions to generate LUC values. It is critical to test and validate underlying assumptions with empirical evidence. Furthermore, this modeling approach cannot answer if any specific indirect effects are actually caused by biofuel policy. The best way to resolve questions of causation is via scientific methods. Kim and Dale attempt to address the question of if, rather than how much, market-induced land-use change is currently detectable based on the analysis of historic evidence, and in doing so, explore some modeling assumptions behind the drivers of change. Given that there is no accepted approach to estimate the global effects of biofuel policy on land-use change, it is critical to assess the actual effects of policies through careful analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Decision makers need a valid scientific basis for policy decisions on energy choices.

  10. Photodissociation dynamics of CIN3 at 193nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncher, Scott J.; Sveum, Niels E.; Moore, David T.; Bartlett,Nate D.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Photofragment translational spectroscopy was used to identify the primary and secondary reaction pathways in 193 nm photodissociation of chlorine azide (ClN{sub 3}) under collision-free conditions. Both the molecular elimination (NCl+N{sub 2}) and the radical bond rupture channel (Cl+N{sub 3}) were investigated and compared with earlier results at 248 nm. The radical channel strongly dominates, just as at 248 nm. At 193 nm, the ClN{sub 3} ({tilde C} {sup 1}A{double_prime}) state is excited, rather than the {tilde B} {sup 1}A{prime} state that is accessed at 248 nm, resulting in different photofragment angular distributions. The chlorine translational energy distribution probing the dynamics of the radical bond rupture channel shows three distinct peaks, with the two fastest peaks occurring at the same translational energies as the two peaks seen at 248 nm that were previously assigned to linear and 'high energy' N{sub 3}. Hence, nearly all the additional photon energy relative to 248 nm appears as N{sub 3} internal excitation rather than as translational energy, resulting in considerably more spontaneous dissociation of N{sub 3} to N{sub 2}+N.

  11. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  12. albuquerque nm 1st: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales relacionadas con Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: actuales relacionadas con Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Departamento de Fsica (EPS) Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Summary: fsica relacionada con la implosin de los...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - adventicia estado actual Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 3 mediante Bsqueda Tab David F. Torres Sola Summary: cogerlo si dicho vecino es mejor que la mejor solucin actual. 12;Estado...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal estado actual Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 4 mediante Bsqueda Tab David F. Torres Sola Summary: cogerlo si dicho vecino es mejor que la mejor solucin actual. 12;Estado...

  16. actual del no-acceso: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 110 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  17. actual hanford 241-aw-101: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or generate figures Goldberg, Robert B. 85 This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate...

  18. Scientific and Technical Information Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities to ensure that scientific and technical information (STI) is identified, processed, disseminated, and preserved in a manner that (a) enables the scientific community and the public to locate and use the unclassified and unlimited STI resulting from DOE's research and related endeavors and (b) ensures access to classified and sensitive unclassified STI is protected according to legal or Departmental requirements. Cancels DOE O 241.1. Canceled by DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

  19. Scientific Cornerstones | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan BishopScientificScientific

  20. NASA FY 2015 Budget Request for Science Actuals Enacted Notional Notional Notional Notional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    NASA FY 2015 Budget Request for Science Actuals Enacted Notional Notional Notional Notional 1 FY,123M $5,174M The FY 2015 budget provides $4,972 million to the Science Mission Directorate. The budget accounts. 8-1 #12;NASA FY 2015 Budget Request for Aeronautics Research Actuals Enacted Notional Notional

  1. Final Technical and Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjay Krishna (PI) and Diana Huffaker (Co-PI)

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to study the ultrafast carrier dynamics of in two types of semiconductor quantum dots: self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) and patterned quantum dots (PQDs) and to correlate these dynamics with the shape, size and material composition of the dots, thereby obtaining a fundamental scientific understanding of these nanoscale systems.

  2. APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogina, Mladen

    APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Brijuni, Croatia June 23{27, 2003. y x Runge's example; Organized by: Department of Mathematics, Unversity of Zagreb, Croatia. Miljenko Maru#20;si#19;c, chairman;simir Veseli#19;c Andro Mikeli#19;c Sponsors: Ministry of Science and Technology, Croatia, CV Sistemi d

  3. Scientific and Technical Information Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this directive is to ensure that STI is appropriately managed as part of the DOE mission to enable the advancement of scientific knowledge and technological innovation. Cancels DOE O 241.1A and DOE O 241.1A Chg 1.

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-h | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a Nonpoint7-FD-a9-AK-a9-NM-df <NM-h

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a20-AK-a WellAK-g3-NM-b State RightNM-f

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/11-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎-CA-a)1-NM-a State1-NM-d

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a <3-FD-d Foresto3-NM-d State BusinessNM-e

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a4-WA-a7-CA-e8-HI-a TransmissionNM-c8-NM-d

  9. Measurement of differential and actual recombination parameters on crystalline silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, for the first time, measurements of differential and actual recombination parameters on crystalline silicon wafers are directly compared. In order to determine the differential bulk lifetime and the differential surface recombination velocity (SRV), small-signal light-biased microwave-detected photoconductance decay (MW-PCD) and modulated free-carrier adsorption (MFCA) measurements are performed. The results obtained by these widespread techniques are compared with quasi-steady-state photoconductance (QSSPC) measurements, which directly determine the actual recombination parameters. On high-resistivity (1,000 {Omega}cm) float-zone (FL) n-type silicon at high injection levels, it is shown that the differentially measured Auger lifetime is a factor of three smaller than the actual Auger lifetime. This finding is in excellent agreement with the theory derived in this work. Thermally oxidized low-resistivity ({approximately}1 {Omega}cm) p-Si wafers serve as an experimental vehicle to compare the differential and the actual injection-level dependent SRV of the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface under low-injection conditions. Using two different integration procedures, the actual SRV is calculated from the differentially measured quantity. The actual SRV measured by the QSSPC technique is found to match perfectly the actual SRV obtained by integration.

  10. Providing the Scientific Foundations for Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waste and process con- ditions enables decisions around new treatment operations. These decisions could at Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Using a combination of bench-, engineering-, and pilotProviding the Scientific Foundations for Environmental Management #12;Advancements in scientific

  11. IT Licentiate theses Scientific Computing on Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    IT Licentiate theses 2013-002 Scientific Computing on Hybrid Architectures MARCUS HOLM UPPSALA of Licentiate of Philosophy in Scientific Computing c Marcus Holm 2013 ISSN 1404-5117 Printed by the Department

  12. Should we train scientific generalists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarma, Gopal

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine the topic of training scientific generalists. To focus the discussion, I propose the creation of a new graduate program, analogous in structure to existing MD/PhD programs, aimed at training a critical mass of scientific researchers with substantial intellectual breadth. In addition to completing the normal requirements for a PhD, students would undergo an intense, several year training period designed to expose them to the core vocabulary of multiple subjects at the graduate level. After providing some historical and philosophical context for this proposal, I outline how such a program could be implemented with little institutional overhead by existing research universities. Finally, I discuss alternative possibilities for training generalists by taking advantage of contemporary developments in online learning and open science.

  13. Statistical Leakage Estimation in 32nm CMOS Considering Cells Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Statistical Leakage Estimation in 32nm CMOS Considering Cells Correlations Smriti Joshi 1 *, Anne into account input states and process variations is proposed. The statistical leakage estimation is based components in a device depend on the transistor geometry and threshold voltage, statistical variation

  14. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  15. NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009-Transferring from New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2010 NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009- 2010 11/9/2010 Transferring from New Mexico Junior College to the University of New Mexico #12;NMJC Course UNM Equivalent Important UNM Phone Numbers................................................................................................... http://advisement.unm.edu/ The University of New Mexico and New Mexico Junior College work closely

  16. Actual application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    importance that the Japanese attach to this technology. Today, it is clear that the Japanese lead the world technologies in japan. Electron Beam Ma1erials Processing In the United States, electron beam technology b egan) Electron Beam and Laser Beam Materials Processing in Japan japan has become a world leader in high-power EB

  17. Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

  18. Costs and business models in scientific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Costs and business models in scientific research publishing A report commissioned by the Wellcome Trust DP-3114.p/100/04-2004/JM #12;Costs and business models in scientific research publishing A report, Cambridgeshire CB4 9ZR, UK Tel: +44 (0)1223 209400 Web: www.sqw.co.uk #12;Costs and business models in scientific

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - actual icpp dissolved Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: actual icpp dissolved Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RAC Report No. 4-CDC-Task Order 1-1999-Final FINAL REPORT Summary: and chromium concentrations in air from suspension...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - actual ineel sodium-bearing Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: actual ineel sodium-bearing Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 RAC Report No. 4-CDC-Task Order 1-1999-Final FINAL REPORT Summary: Dose Reconstruction Study at the INEEL Centers for...

  1. The Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice Principles of good scientific teaching and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rooij, Robert

    The Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice Principles of good scientific teaching and research 2004, revision 20121 Association of Universities in the Netherlands 1 The code of conduct for Scientific Practice 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS The Netherlands Code of Conduct for Scientific Practice Preamble 3

  2. Public Service Co of NM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to:USGSMeanReservoirTempUtility, Inc. (Pennsylvania)NM

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/11-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎-CA-a)1-NM-a State

  4. Scientific Labs | Neutron Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlanExchange ProgramScientific Labs

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking Work on CriegeeElectronicsAssociationScaledandScientific

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for US PatentOperational EnergyScientific Research PMTF Computer

  7. Scientific Programs | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)Data MovementScientific Programs

  8. ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations DuringALS DoctoralALS RevealsScientific

  9. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  10. Sub-30 nm InAs Quantum-Well MOSFETs with Self-aligned Metal Contacts and Sub-1 nm EOT HfO2 Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, JesĂșs A.

    performance, ability to harmoniously scale down to sub-30 nm gate length dimensions and CMOS. MOSFETs with gate length dimensions in the 20-30 nm range and outstanding electrical characteristics that yields an undercut spacer is etched through highly

  11. Parallel Processing Letters World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accepted practice is to page-align buffer memory for best performance, our studies show that the actual give the best possible performance, and, in some cases, actually yields the worst possible performance-purpose performance tests in order to drill down to the source of the problem and more precisely characterize various

  12. Photo Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheStevenAdministration Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities |

  13. NM Underground Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurrInformation NAMA-ProgrammeNF EnergyNM Stat. 62-9

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tract OO - NM 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison- NY 38KerrTract OO - NM 06

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Gnome Site - NM 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co -0-19Gas Buggy Site - NM

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakum CountyPzero-FD-b34-HI-b4-MT-cNM-a Nonpoint

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakum CountyPzero-FD-b34-HI-b4-MT-cNM-a

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a Nonpoint7-FD-a9-AK-a9-NM-d

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a Nonpoint7-FD-a9-AK-a9-NM-df <

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-j | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a Nonpoint7-FD-a9-AK-a9-NM-df

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a20-AK-a WellAK-g3-NM-b State Right of

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a20-AK-a WellAK-g3-NM-b State Right

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakumNV-a20-AK-a WellAK-g3-NM-b State

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-a Drilling andNM-b Construction Storm Water

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-a Drilling7-HI-ce < RAPID‎ |8-NM-b

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/1-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎-CA-a Land-ID-a Land-NM-a

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/11-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎ | Geothermal‎-CA-a)1-NM-a State Cultural

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎ |1-TX-a State12-ID-a State12-NM-a State

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎ |1-TX-a13-ID-a State14-FD-c4-MT-a4-NM-c

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/15-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎RAPID/Roadmap/15-CA-b < RAPID‎b5-NM-a

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/15-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado < RAPID‎RAPID/Roadmap/15-CA-b <NM-c <

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a < RAPID‎ |18-MT-b Hazardous Waste8-NM-b

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-i | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a < RAPID‎g < RAPID‎NM-i Change in

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/20-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a < RAPID‎gWA-c TransferNM-a <

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a <3-FD-d Foresto3-NM-d State Business

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/5-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a4-WA-a State Exploration Process5-NM-a

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a4-WA-a State6-CO-bc < RAPID‎ |6-NM-a

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColorado <17-HI-a4-WA-a7-CA-e8-HI-a TransmissionNM-c

  19. Davide Pettenella AGORA international scientific workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    &D investments) · Legal protection (patents, marks of origin, ...) Wild and domesticated products16-04-2013 1 Davide Pettenella AGORA international scientific workshop "Marketing of forest

  20. Parallel Processing Letters World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Russ

    Parallel Processing Letters © World Scientific Publishing Company THE OPERATIONS DASHBOARD essential operational services, it is imperative that grid administrators can troubleshoot the problems

  1. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  2. Scientific Data Management Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (SDM/ISIC): Scientific Process Automation (SPA), FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram Ludaescher; Ilkay Altintas

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report from SDSC and UC Davis on DE-FC02-01ER25486, Scientific Data Management Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (SDM/ISIC): Scientific Process Automation (SPA).

  3. Proposed scientific activities for the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) has been organized for the purpose of investigating a hydrothermal system at depths and temperatures greater than has been done before. Plans are to deepen an existing well or to drill a new well for research purposes for which temperatures of 300/sup 0/C will be reached at a depth of less than 3.7 km and then deepen that well a further 1.8 km. This report recounts the Congressional history of the appropriation to drill the hole and other history through March 1984, gives a review of the literature on the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and its relationship to other geothermal systems of the Salton Trough, and describes a comprehensive series of investigations that have been proposed either in the well or in conjunction with the SSSDP. Investigations in geophysics, geochemistry and petrology, tectonics and rock mechanics, and geohydrology are given. A tabulation is given of current commercial and state-of-the-art downhole tools and their pressure, temperature, and minimum hole size limitations.

  4. Enrolment Report 2005-06: Actual and Projected Enrolments A. Preamble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrolment Report 2005-06: Actual and Projected Enrolments A. Preamble In previous years, current the planning and funding of enrolment growth during that period can be found in Appendix A. C. 2005-06-time. In terms of full-time equivalents, the 2005-06 level of 60,973 FTEs represents an 82% increase in enrolment

  5. A COGNITIVE-SYSTEMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF MASLOW'S THEORY OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toint, Philippe

    A COGNITIVE-SYSTEMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF MASLOW'S THEORY OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION by Francis Heylighen1-order, cognitive-sys- temic framework. A hierarchy of basic needs is derived from the ur- gency of perturbations: material, cognitive and subjective. Material and/or cognitive incompetence during child- hood create

  6. problem that seller prosumers actually supply insufficient energy Simulation results have shown that this strategy significantly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, K. J. Ray

    problem that seller prosumers actually supply insufficient energy Simulation results have shown user cooperation [18], [19]. Among them, a seller prosumer in a trade is likely to have insufficient sufficient energy to the buyer as it has owners, the autonomous prosumers are assumed to be selfish levels

  7. SAMPLE GENERAL TERMS WHEN PURCHASING SERVICES* ACTUAL TERMS REQUIRED WILL BE DETERMINED BY CONTRACTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    1 SAMPLE GENERAL TERMS WHEN PURCHASING SERVICES* ACTUAL TERMS REQUIRED WILL BE DETERMINED Contracts and Procurement (x4532) if you have questions regarding purchasing services. 1. Independent Status in an independent capacity and not as officers or employees or agents of the State of California. While Contractor

  8. Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 1 Scientific Discovery Learning with Computer Simulations 2 Abstract Scientific discovery learning is a highly self-directed and constructivistic form of learning. A computer simulation is a type of computer-based environment that is very

  9. Rules to Ensure Good Scientific Practice at DESY Procedures in Case of Scientific Misconduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resolution, and quality assurance to the scientific work units, and guarantee their implementation. SpecificRules to Ensure Good Scientific Practice at DESY and Procedures in Case of Scientific Misconduct Version: October 17, 2006 Preamble The directorate of DESY has adopted the rules decided upon by the HGF

  10. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment HDF5-Fast fundamental Computer Science technologies and their application in production scientific research tools. Our technology ­ index, query, storage and retrieval ­ and use of such technology in computational and computer

  11. Educational Interventions to Advance Children's Scientific Thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klahr, David

    , and an assessment process. Here we describe some ways in which re- search in cognitive development has advanced our for Classifying Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific hypotheses (cell A) assesses young

  12. PROCEEDINGS JOINT INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC DIVING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schizas, Nikolaos

    , and the advancement of standards for scientific diving practices, certifications, and operations. Divers Alert Network THE MESOPHOTIC ZONE: DIVING OPERATIONS AND SCIENTIFIC HIGHLIGHTS OF THREE RESEARCH CRUISES ACROSS PUERTO RICO diving techniques and logistical arrangements are required to conduct in situ surveys and sampling

  13. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    successful scientific, commercial, and national security endeavors. · It is the limiting or the enablingNational Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Science Driven Analytics Wes Bethel, and that are predictable and repeatable. · Astrophyics: CMB/Planck ­ satellite mission to collect data; size estimated

  14. Scientific Foundations of Computer Graphics Thomas Larsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsson, Thomas

    Scientific Foundations of Computer Graphics Thomas Larsson Department of Computer Engineering M It is apparent that computer graphics has become a well-known tech- nology that is used in a broad spectra and medical science the importance of computer graphics is evident. But what are the scientific foundations

  15. Conservativism in Scientific Research A New Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Kevin

    of Philosophy Carnegie Mellon University #12;#12;The scientific state of nature Scientific progress on a broad conservative influences? #12;A new problem · Trying out radical ideas runs some risk · Working on obvious advancements runs very little risk · There is some incentive to leaving the risk taking to others · This has

  16. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  17. Correlating Pulses from Two Spitfire, 800nm Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, Eric R.; Mcguinness, C.; Zacherl, W.D.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The E163 laser acceleration experiments conducted at SLAC have stringent requirements on the temporal properties of two regeneratively amplified, 800nm, Spitfire laser systems. To determine the magnitude and cause of timing instabilities between the two Ti:Sapphire amplifiers, we pass the two beams through a cross-correlator and focus the combined beam onto a Hamamatsu G1117 photodiode. The photodiode has a bandgap such that single photon processes are suppressed and only the second order, two-photon process produces an observable response. The response is proportional to the square of the intensity. The diode is also useful as a diagnostic to determine the optimal configuration of the compression cavity.

  18. High power terahertz generation using 1550?nm plasmonic photomixers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Christopher W. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Preu, Sascha [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University Darmstadt, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1550?nm plasmonic photomixer operating under pumping duty cycles below 10%, which offers significantly higher terahertz radiation power levels compared to previously demonstrated photomixers. The record-high terahertz radiation powers are enabled by enhancing the device quantum efficiency through use of plasmonic contact electrodes, and by mitigating thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels through use of a low duty cycle optical pump. The repetition rate of the optical pump can be specifically selected at a given pump duty cycle to control the spectral linewidth of the generated terahertz radiation. At an average optical pump power of 150 mW with a pump modulation frequency of 1 MHz and pump duty cycle of 2%, we demonstrate up to 0.8 mW radiation power at 1 THz, within each continuous wave radiation cycle.

  19. Fabrication of sub-15?nm aluminum wires by controlled etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan-Wall, T.; Hughes, H. J.; Hartman, N.; Markovi?, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); McQueen, T. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method for the fabrication of uniform aluminum nanowires with diameters below 15?nm. Electron beam lithography is used to define narrow wires, which are then etched using a sodium bicarbonate solution, while their resistance is simultaneously measured in-situ. The etching process can be stopped when the desired resistance is reached, and can be restarted at a later time. The resulting nanowires show a superconducting transition as a function of temperature and magnetic field that is consistent with their smaller diameter. The width of the transition is similar to that of the lithographically defined wires, indicating that the etching process is uniform and that the wires are undamaged. This technique allows for precise control over the normal state resistance and can be used to create a variety of aluminum nanodevices.

  20. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

  1. The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics, Professor and Extension Economist? Management, The Texas A&M System; and Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture?s (USDA) Risk..., levels of coverage, price elections, applicable premium rates and subsidy amounts. The special provisions list program calendar dates and contain general and special statements that may further define, limit or modify coverage. MPCI?s Actual...

  2. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  3. Dose Rate Analysis Capability for Actual Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The approved contents for a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed spent nuclear fuel casks are typically based on bounding used nuclear fuel (UNF) characteristics. However, the contents of the UNF canisters currently in storage at independent spent fuel storage installations are considerably heterogeneous in terms of fuel assembly burnup, initial enrichment, decay time, cladding integrity, etc. Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF ST&DARDS) is an integrated data and analysis system that facilitates automated cask-specific safety analyses based on actual characteristics of the as-loaded UNF. The UNF-ST&DARDS analysis capabilities have been recently expanded to include dose rate analysis of as-loaded transportation packages. Realistic dose rate values based on actual canister contents may be used in place of bounding dose rate values to support development of repackaging operations procedures, evaluation of radiation-related transportation risks, and communication with stakeholders. This paper describes the UNF-ST&DARDS dose rate analysis methodology based on actual UNF canister contents and presents sample dose rate calculation results.

  4. 229 nm UV Photochemical Degradation of Energetic Molecules Luling Wang, David Tuschel, Sanford A. Asher*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    229 nm UV Photochemical Degradation of Energetic Molecules Luling Wang, David Tuschel, Sanford A photochemical degradation of energetic molecules upon UV resonance Raman (UVRR) excitation of the 229 nm UVRR degradation quantum yields of UV resonance Raman, photodegradation, explosive detection

  5. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00...

  6. Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

  7. FY09 assessment of mercury reduction at SNL/NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment takes the result of the FY08 performance target baseline of mercury at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, and records the steps taken in FY09 to collect additional data, encourage the voluntary reduction of mercury, and measure success. Elemental (metallic) mercury and all of its compounds are toxic, and exposure to excessive levels can permanently damage or fatally injure the brain and kidneys. Elemental mercury can also be absorbed through the skin and cause allergic reactions. Ingestion of inorganic mercury compounds can cause severe renal and gastrointestinal damage. Organic compounds of mercury such as methyl mercury, created when elemental mercury enters the environment, are considered the most toxic forms of the element. Exposures to very small amounts of these compounds can result in devastating neurological damage and death.1 SNL/NM is required to report annually on the site wide inventory of mercury for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program, as the site's inventory is excess of the ten pound reportable threshold quantity. In the fiscal year 2008 (FY08) Pollution Prevention Program Plan, Section 5.3 Reduction of Environmental Releases, a performance target stated was to establish a baseline of mercury, its principle uses, and annual quantity or inventory. This was accomplished on July 29, 2008 by recording the current status of mercury in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 149 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Committee and the Pollution Prevention and Safety Panel. #12;Leg 149 Scientific Prospectus Page 3 ABSTRACT western Iberia to determine the changes in the physical and petrological nature of the acoustic basement

  9. Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Secretarial policy statement is intended to enhance our culture by establishing a unified framework for scientific integrity. This policy applies to all DOE Federal employees. This policy will be reviewed annually.

  10. Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Science and Technology are the foundation of all Department of Energy (DOE) activities, so it is essential that we be committed to developing and maintaining a culture that fosters the highest levels of scientific integrity.

  11. Enabling scientific data on the web 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milowski, Raymond Alexander

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific data does not exist on the Web in the same way as the written word; reviews, media, wikis, social networks, and blogs all contribute to the interconnected nature of ordinary language on the Web. Network ...

  12. Efficient Versioning for Scientific Array Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seering, Adam

    In this paper, we describe a versioned database storage manager we are developing for the SciDB scientific database. The system is designed to efficiently store and retrieve array-oriented data, exposing a "no-overwrite" ...

  13. Autonomous patterns and scientific realism Katherine Brading*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brading, Katherine

    Autonomous patterns and scientific realism Katherine Brading* 1. Introduction Taking Bogen and wind up, if you are a realist, with "the world". Everything from the data up (indicated in black

  14. Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits December 2, 2011 - 2:01pm Addthis This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have...

  15. RICE UNIVERSITY 461nm Laser For Studies In Ultracold Neutral Strontium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Thomas C.

    RICE UNIVERSITY 461nm Laser For Studies In Ultracold Neutral Strontium by Aaron D Saenz A Thesis Houston, Texas July, 2005 #12;ABSTRACT 461nm Laser For Studies In Ultracold Neutral Strontium by Aaron D Saenz A 461 nm laser was constructed for the purposes of studying ultracold neutral strontium

  16. header for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    new radiation damage mechanisms in previously accepted optical materials. For 157 nm pellicles, newheader for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV Absorbance With the introduction of 157 nm as the next optical lithography wavelength, the need for new pellicle and photoresist

  17. Science Adventure: Girls Scientific Salon | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Science Adventure: Girls Scientific Salon Science Adventure: Girls Scientific Salon April 6, 2013 1:00PM EDT Lederman Science Center Students , Grades 4 - 7 (In or Completed)...

  18. PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

  19. 2014 call for the NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) program 2014 Call for NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) Program Due December 8 November 18, 2013 by...

  20. FY 2014 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2014 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA The...

  1. advancing scientific understanding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interventions in Science Education Scientific thinking can be characterized in terms of two of the scientific enter- prise" (row 2). (6). Research on domain-specific...

  2. Passively mode locked c.w. dye lasers operating from 490 nm to 800 nm P. M. W. French, J. A. R. Williams and J. R. Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1651 Passively mode locked c.w. dye lasers operating from 490 nm to 800 nm P. M. W. French, J. A. R Rhodamine 6G et DODCI. Abstract. 2014 Passively mode locked c.w. dyes lasers now represent an important/passive dyes other than the standard combination of Rhodamine 6G and DODCI. Revue Phys. Appl. 22 (1987) 1651

  3. Demonstration of an 8.85 nm Gain-Saturated Table-Top Soft X-Ray Laser and Lasing down to 7.4 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Jorge, Rocca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the efficient generation of a gain-saturated 8.85 nm wavelength table-top soft x-ray laser operating at 1 Hz repetition rate and the observation of lasing at wavelengths as short as 7.36 nm in lanthanide ions.

  4. Automation of Network-Based Scientific Workflows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altintas, I. [University of California, La Jolla; Barreto, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Cheng, Z. [North Carolina State University; Critchlow, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Khan, A. [University of Utah; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ligon, J. [North Carolina State University; Ludaescher, B. [University of California, Davis; Mouallem, P. A. [North Carolina State University; Parker, S. [University of Utah; Podhorszki, Norbert [University of California, Davis; Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Silva, C. [University of Utah; Vouk, M. A. [North Carolina State University

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive, end-to-end, data and workflow management solutions are needed to handle the increasing complexity of processes and data volumes associated with modern distributed scientific problem solving, such as ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments. The key to the solution is an integrated network-based framework that is functional, dependable, fault-tolerant, and supports data and process provenance. Such a framework needs to make development and use of application workflows dramatically easier so that scientists' efforts can shift away from data management and utility software development to scientific research and discovery An integrated view of these activities is provided by the notion of scientific workflows - a series of structured activities and computations that arise in scientific problem-solving. An information technology framework that supports scientific workflows is the Ptolemy II based environment called Kepler. This paper discusses the issues associated with practical automation of scientific processes and workflows and illustrates this with workflows developed using the Kepler framework and tools.

  5. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  6. 1 Lesson 9(A) Scientific Notation Definition: A number is in scientific ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990 the National Health Care expenditures was $695,600,000,000. (Source: U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) Write this in scientific.

  7. U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodolog...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    several scientific teams and is based on a combination of analyses of high resolution videos taken by ROVs, acoustic technologies, and measurements of oil collected by the oil...

  8. Actinide partitioning from actual ICPP dissolved zirconium calcine using the TRUEX solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TRansUranic EXtraction process (TRUEX), as developed by E.P. Horwitz and coworkers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), is being evaluated as a TRU extraction process for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) wastes. A criteria that must be met during this evaluation, is that the aqueous raffinate must be below the 10 nCi/g limit specified in 10 CFR 61.55. A test was performed where the TRUEX solvent (0.2 M octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO), and 1.4 M tributylphosphate (TBP) in an Isopar-L diluent) was contacted with actual ICPP dissolved zirconium calcine. Two experimental flowsheets were used to determine TRU decontamination factors, and TRU, Zr, Fe, Cr, and Tc extraction, scrub, and strip distribution coefficients. Results from these two flowsheets show that >99.99% of the TRU alpha activity was removed from the acidic feed after three contacts with the TRUEX solvent (fresh solvent being used for each contact). The resulting aqueous raffinate solution contained an approximate TRU alpha activity of 0.02 nCi/g, which is well below the non-TRU waste limit of 10 nCi/g specified in 10 CFR 61.55. Favorable scrub and strip distribution coefficients were also observed for Am-241, Pu-238, and Pu-239, indicating the feasibility of recovering these isotopes from the TRUTEX solvent. A solution of 0.04 M 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in 0.04 M HNO{sub 3} was used to successfully strip the TRUs from the TRUEX solvent. The results of the test using actual ICPP dissolved zirconium calcine, and subsequent GTM evaluation, show the feasibility of removing TRUs from the dissolved zirconium calcine with the TRUEX solvent and the deleterious effects zirconium poses with the ICPP zirconium calcine waste. Test results using actual ICPP zirconium calcine reveal the necessity of preventing zirconium from following the TRUs.

  9. ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: ? Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. ? Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was independent of added glycolate concentration. The change in soluble plutonium content was dependent on the added glycolate concentration, with higher levels of glycolate (5 g/L and 10 g/L) appearing to suppress the plutonium solubility. The inclusion of glycolate did not change the dissolution of or sorption onto actual-waste 2H-evaporator pot scale to an extent that will impact Tank Farm storage and concentration. The effects that were noted involved dissolution of components from evaporator scale and precipitation of components onto evaporator scale that were independent of the level of added glycolate.

  10. Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

  11. Figure ES5. Actual Annual Energy Growth - All Effects Are Included

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec. 31ES5 Figure ES5. Actual

  12. File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to:

  13. Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calheiros, Rodrigo N.

    World Scientific Publishing Company http://ejournals.wspc.com.sg/ppl/ppl.shtml SCHEDULING AND MANAGEMENT

  14. The scientific case for eInfrastructure in Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgaker, Trygve

    The scientific case for eInfrastructure in Norway The eInfrastructure Scientific Opportunities Panel #12;2 3 The scientific case for eInfrastructure in Norway The eInfrastructure Scientific Opportunities Panel Appointed by the Research Council of Norway Galen Gisler (chair) Physics of Geological

  15. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

  16. Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

  17. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  18. Scientific Drilling, Number 1, 2005 Scientific ocean drilling started in the early 1960s with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Scientific Drilling, Number 1, 2005 Scientific ocean drilling started in the early 1960s, or the Moho). This project, known as Mohole, was succeeded by the Deep Sea Drilling Project, the International Phase of Ocean Drilling, the Ocean Drilling Program, and the current Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  19. Scientific note A scientific note on the partial nucleotide sequence of a US strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Scientific note A scientific note on the partial nucleotide sequence of a US strain of Kashmir bee bee virus / nucleotide sequence / RT-PCR Kashmir bee virus (KBV) was first isolated from a diseased sequence of the amplified product. The BLASTN search of the Nucleotide Sequence Database at the National

  20. Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glinert, E.P. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. (Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Becker, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

    1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP) NPBiogenicScientificScientific

  2. Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

    1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

  3. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

  4. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, W.; Kim, J.; Rekawa, S.; Fischer, P.; Anderson, E. H.

    2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To extend soft x-ray microscopy to a resolution of order 10 nm or better, we developed a new nanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. The new process, based on the double patterning technique, has enabled us to fabricate high quality gold zone plates with 12 nm outer zones. Testing of the zone plate with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope, XM-1, in Berkeley, showed that the lens clearly resolved 12 nm lines and spaces. This result represents a significant step towards 10 nm resolution and beyond.

  5. Defects of a phosphosilicate glass exposed to the 193-nm radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larionov, Yu V; Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Induced absorption is measured in a hydrogen-unloaded phosphosilicate glass (PSG) in spectral ranges from 140 to 850 nm and from 1000 to 1700 nm before and after its exposure to the 193-nm radiation. It is shown that the induced-absorption bands in the range between 140 and 300 nm do not coincide with the bands observed earlier after exposing a PSG to X-rays. It is assumed that the photorefractive effect in the PSG is related to variations induced in the glass network rather than to defects responsible for the induced-absorption bands. (fiber and integrated optics)

  6. Restructuring the Uranium Mining Industry in Romania: Actual Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, P.D.; Petrescu, S.T. [Institute for Rare and Radioactive Metals, 68 Dionisie Lupu St., Sector 1, Bucharest (Romania); Iuhas, T.F. [Uranium National Company, 78 Carol I Blvd, RO-70132 Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium prospecting in Romania has started some 50 years ago, when a bilateral agreement between Romania and the former Soviet Union had been concluded and a joint Romanian-Soviet enterprise was created. The production started in 1952 by the opening of some deposits from western Transylvania (Bihor and Ciudanovita). From 1962 the production has continued only with Romanian participation on the ore deposit Avram Iancu and from 1985 on the deposits from Eastern Carpathians (Crucea and Botusana). Starting with 1978 the extracted ores have been completely processed in the Uranium Ore Processing Plant from Feldioara, Brasov. Complying with the initial stipulations of the Nuclear National Program launched at the beginning of the 1980's, the construction of a nuclear power station in Cernavoda has started in Romania, using natural uranium and heavy water (CANDU type), having five units of 650 MW installed capacity. After 1989 this initial Nuclear National Program was revised and the construction of the first unit (number 1) was finalized and put in operation in 1996. In 2001 the works at the unit number 2 were resumed, having the year 2005 as the scheduled activating date. The future of the other 3 units, being in different construction phases, hasn't been clearly decided. Taking into consideration the exhaustion degree of some ore deposits and from the prospect of exploiting other ore deposits, the uranium industry will be subject of an ample restructuring process. This process includes workings of modernization of the mines in operation and of the processing plant, increasing the profitableness, lowering of the production costs by closing out and ecological rehabilitation of some areas affected by mining works and even new openings of some uraniferous exploitations. This paper presents the actual situation and the prospects of uranium mining industry on the base of some new technical and economical strategic concepts in accordance with the actual Romanian Program for Nuclear Energetics. (authors)

  7. Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living Space in Summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living and total heat exchanger in terms of both energy conservation and thermal comfort in summer. 1. COP

  8. Submitted to ApJ Letters, June 29, 2005 Are Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Novae Actually from Supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    Submitted to ApJ Letters, June 29, 2005 Are Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Novae Actually stellar nucleosynthesis and mixing. The best-studied presolar phase, silicon carbide (SiC), exhibits

  9. 38 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN October 2008 Sustainable Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPINION 38 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN October 2008 Sustainable Developments According to recent statistics alternatives. The first is a redesigned, far more energy-efficient vehicle that uses low-carbon-emitting energy. Public funding for technological research, development and demonstration and for supporting

  10. The scientific model concept and realism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Deke Cainas

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is two-fold. First, while the model concept frequently is mentioned in the philosophical literature on scientific knowledge, it rarely is addressed as a focus for methodology. My aim is to support the view that models...

  11. C12 technical scientific notation 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and r is the distance between them This expression is known as Newton's Law of Gravitation If you useC12 technical supplement scientific notation 2 density, unit conversion 3 gravitational force 4 light:wavelengths, etc 5 thermal radiation (overview) 6 thermal radiation (stefan-boltzmann law) 7

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  11. Evolutionary Robotics: A New Scientific Tool for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an artificial analogue of natural Darwinian evolution to the design of robots or simulated agents designed minimal insectlike robots in an incremental fashion explicitly modeled on the process of naturalEvolutionary Robotics: A New Scientific Tool for Studying Cognition Inman Harvey Ezequiel Di Paolo

  12. Economic Approaches to Understanding Scientific Norms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strevens, Michael

    Economic Approaches to Understanding Scientific Norms Michael Strevens To appear in Episteme A A theme of much work taking an "economic approach" to the study of sci- ence is the interaction between of formal methods, proponents of the economic approach offer what are in substantive terms profoundly

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    designed bare rock guide base and use new drilling technology. The drillship JOIDES Resolution is scheduledOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE KANE FRACTURE ZONE Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469

  14. 2006 XSD Scientific Software User Survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jemian, P. R.

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the 2006 XSD Scientific Software workshop, our committee sent a survey on June 16 to 100 users in the APS user community. This report contains the survey and the responses we received. The responses are presented in the order received.

  15. Scientific Data Analysis via Statistical Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    observations and simulations. Statistical machine learning algorithms have enormous potential to provide data, and the analysis of hurricanes and tropical storms in climate simulations. #12;Supervised Learning for SupernovaScientific Data Analysis via Statistical Learning Raquel Romano romano at hpcrd dot lbl dot gov

  16. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Visualization Tools and Techniques quotas)!! · Dual IR4 graphics accelerators. · Dual GigE channels to HPSS (use hsi to move data) Alternative implementation: SGI's Vizserver · Uses escher's graphics hardware to accelerate rendering

  17. ----PLEASE POST-----UH Scientific Diver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegner, Tracy N.

    ----PLEASE POST----- UH Scientific Diver Qualification Course January 21, 2014 ­ May 07, 2014 for Diving Accidents; Diving Rescue and Accident Management; Applied Physics and Physiology; Equipment Design. Divers must provide own SCUBA equipment meeting UHDSP regulations, or make prior arrangements with UHDSP

  18. ----PLEASE POST-----UH Scientific Diver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegner, Tracy N.

    ----PLEASE POST----- UH Scientific Diver Qualification Course January 20, 2015 ­ May 09, 2015 for Diving Accidents; Diving Rescue and Accident Management; Applied Physics and Physiology; Equipment Design. Divers must provide own SCUBA equipment meeting UHDSP regulations, or make prior arrangements with UHDSP

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 181 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this publication may be obtained from the ODP Publications Home Page on the World Wide Web at http K. Graber #12;Leg 181 Scientific Prospectus Page 3 ABSTRACT The circulation of cold, deep Antarctic the world ocean through the Southwest Pacific Gateway as a thermohaline drive Deep Western Boundary Current

  1. Forensic familial searching: scientific and social implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forensic familial searching: scientific and social implications Nanibaa' A. Garrison1 , Rori V. Rohlfs2 and Stephanie M. Fullerton3 Familial searching in forensic genetic testing is raising concerns Published online 4 June 2013 In July 2010, a new forensic technique called familial searching gained public

  2. Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

  3. Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

  4. High power CW dye laser emission around 888 nm M. Leduc and G. Trenec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    355 High power CW dye laser emission around 888 nm M. Leduc and G. Trenec Laboratoire de report a maximum output power of 1.5 W at 888 nm from a HITC jet stream dye laser pumped by a Kr+ laser above previously reported results. Good stability of the dye solution is observed over months

  5. Passively modelocked 832 nm vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    , focused into an optical spot with dimensions of 100 Ă? 200 mm. The SESAM consisted of an AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As DBR, a spacer layer of GaAs0.75P0.25, a 4.8 nm GaAs quantum well and a 2 nm-thick capping layer of Ga

  6. Magnetization switching in 70-nm-wide pseudo-spin-valve nanoelements Xiaobin Zhua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GrĂŒtter, Peter

    Fe, respectively, in this case separated by a spacer layer. The individual elements have dimensions of 70 nm 550 nm with submicron or deep- submicron dimensions.4,5 These PSV or MTJ elements con- sist of asymmetric sandwiches is magnetically hard. For elements with micron-scale dimensions, interactions between the layers can lead

  7. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  8. Faraday and Cotton-Mouton Effects of Helium at = 1064 nm A. Cad`ene1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Faraday and Cotton-Mouton Effects of Helium at = 1064 nm A. Cad`ene1 , D. Sordes1 , P. Berceau1 of the Faraday and the Cotton-Mouton effects of helium gas at = 1064 nm. Our apparatus is based on an up and Cotton-Mouton effect. Our measurements give for the first time the experimental value of the Faraday

  9. Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

  10. iCons, 2011 Top 10 Scientific Achievements: Lesson Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    by negative (i.e. what's /not/ scientific). Example to help clarify might be Fire / Internal Combustion Engine.e. what's /not/ scientific). Example to help clarify might be Fire / Internal Combustion Engine

  11. www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 Pumping carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 CREDIT CanWe Bury GLOBAL WARMING? Pumping carbon dioxide is then pumped two kilometers below ground. COPYRIGHT 2005 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, INC. #12;adapt

  12. Columbia River Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia River Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for Fish and Wildlife and Conservation Council #12;i Columbia River Food Webs: Developing a Broader Scientific Foundation for Fish

  13. OSTI Publications | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Publications October 2014 Office of Scientific and Technical Information 2015-2019 Strategic Plan (922-KB PDF) The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical...

  14. Scientific Drilling at Sulphur Springs, Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hole VC-2A Abstract A scientific core hole has been drilled into the western ring fracture zone of the Valles Caldera, N.Mex. Hole VC-2A, the second scientific core hole in the...

  15. Knowledge Annotations in Scientific Workflows: An Implementation in Kepler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo

    collection, model building, and simulation expertise, are working together to perform groundwater modeling. We evaluated the scientific process being used by the groundwater modeling team to understand how annotations. Key words: Scientific Workflows, Knowledge Annotations, Kepler 1 Introduction When scientists

  16. Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

  17. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  18. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

  19. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

  20. Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, J. G.

    Climate Change: Some Scientific and Political Realities Jim Crawford Trane jim.crawford@trane.com www.trane.com Abstract Atmospheric scientists tell us that mankind is changing the climate, and is setting in motion forces that can... make essentially irreversible changes in the climate of the future. Naysayers dispute whether mankind is even capable of changing the climate. Today we are hearing more from the scientists and less from the naysayers. This presentation will review...

  1. Center for BrainHealtH Scientific exploration at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Center for BrainHealtH #12;#12;Scientific exploration at BrainHealth is leading edge, innovative and transformative. leading tHe way in tHiS century'S greateSt ScientiFic cauSe The Center for Brain significant cause of the century: To understand, protect and heal the brain. Scientific exploration at Brain

  2. Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Conrad

    Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic Department of Computer Science analyzes scientific aspects of Computer Science. First it defines science and scientific method in general. It gives a dis- cussion of relations between science, research, development and technology. The existing

  3. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scientific criteria? Page 198909800 Idaho Supplementation Studies IDFG / NPT / SBT Mountain Snake Salmon $1Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Ecosystem Science Section, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Scientific Peer Review

  4. Web Based Simulations for Virtual Scientific Experiment: Methodology and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . These are the keywords. Web based simulation, Virtual Scientific Experiment, e-learning 1. INTRODUCTION Until now Technology for Enhanced Learning 1 #12;Web Based Simulations for Virtual Scientific Experiment: MethodologyWeb Based Simulations for Virtual Scientific Experiment: Methodology and Tools Giovannina Albano

  5. Photodissociation dynamics of ClN{sub 3} at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncher, Scott J.; Sveum, Niels E.; Moore, David T.; Bartlett, Nate D.; Neumark, Daniel M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Photofragment translational spectroscopy was used to identify the primary and secondary reaction pathways in 193 nm photodissociation of chlorine azide (ClN{sub 3}) under collision-free conditions. Both the molecular elimination (NCl+N{sub 2}) and the radical bond rupture channel (Cl+N{sub 3}) were investigated and compared with earlier results at 248 nm. The radical channel strongly dominates, just as at 248 nm. At 193 nm, the ClN{sub 3} (C-tilde{sup 1}A{sup ''}) state is excited, rather than the B-tilde{sup 1}A{sup '} state that is accessed at 248 nm, resulting in different photofragment angular distributions. The chlorine translational energy distribution probing the dynamics of the radical bond rupture channel shows three distinct peaks, with the two fastest peaks occurring at the same translational energies as the two peaks seen at 248 nm that were previously assigned to linear and 'high energy' N{sub 3}. Hence, nearly all the additional photon energy relative to 248 nm appears as N{sub 3} internal excitation rather than as translational energy, resulting in considerably more spontaneous dissociation of N{sub 3} to N{sub 2}+N.

  6. International Amaldi Conferences of Academies of Sciences and National Scientific Societies on Scientific Questions of Global Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    advice in questions of security policy, x the role of the nuclear option in regional conflicts, x methods on Scientific Questions of Global Security on Scientific Questions of Global Security 14-16 March 2008, DESY, Hamburg

  7. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  8. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  9. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

  10. STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burket, P

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

  11. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  12. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  13. Comprehensive inverse modeling for the study of carrier transport models in sub-50nm MOSFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djomehri, Ihsan Jahed, 1976-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct quantitative 2-D characterization of sub-50 nm MOSFETs continues to be elusive. This research develops a comprehensive indirect inverse modeling technique for extracting 2-D device topology using combined log(I)-V ...

  14. Electrode Placement and the Fabrication of Sub-100-nm Nanopore Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzales, Jacob D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The anodization of aluminum films grown on silicon substrates under controlled conditions is used to fabricate porous alumina arrays. Such porous arrays are used as sensors or lithography masks for fabrication of sub-100-nm nanodot arrays...

  15. Carbon nanotube assisted formation of sub-50 nm polymeric nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia-Hua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel processing method was developed for sub-50 nm structures by integrating quantum dots (QDs) on patterned polymer substrates. Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMa) was prepared by the initiated chemical vapor ...

  16. High energy femtosecond fiber laser at 1018 nm and high power Cherenkov radiation generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongyu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two novel laser systems for ultrafast applications have been designed and built. For the seeding of a high energy cryogenically cooled Yb:YLF laser, a novel 1018 nm fiber laser system is demonstrated. It produces >35 nJ ...

  17. Effects of 810-nm Laser on Murine Bone-Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to Investigate the effect of 810-nm low level laser therapy (LLLT) on dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Background data: LLLT can enhance wound healing and increase cell proliferation ...

  18. Scientific Advisory Committee | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlan BishopScientific

  19. Scientific Exchange Application | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlanExchange Program / Scientific

  20. FWP Scientific Publications | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey FTCPAprilTheScientific

  1. Scientific Advisory Committee | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP) NPBiogenicScientific

  2. Scientific Exchange Program | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)Data Movement enabled byScientific

  3. Scientific Themes | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)Data MovementScientificThemes

  4. DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

  5. DEFINITION OF USABLE SPACE "Usable Space" is the actual space to be occupied by the Company. It is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEFINITION OF USABLE SPACE "Usable Space" is the actual space to be occupied by the Company. It is determined as follows: If the space is on a single-tenancy floor, compute the inside gross area by measuring. If the space is on a multiple-tenancy floor, measure from the exterior building walls as above and to the room

  6. General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project depending upon the scope, complexity, and specific features. Time periods indicated will vary depending on the nature of the project and needs of the user group

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Evaluation of Energy Performance of UBC's Residential Buildings Using Actual Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    actual energy consumption data. The primary objective of this study is to analyze electricity and gas and put a great effort into trying to get energy consumption data by contacting strata councils Records for providing energy consumption data and architectural drawings of Faculty and Staff Housing

  8. The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption of buildings to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    's area (Gross Square Feet or GSF). The report card accounts for all forms of energy used in a building.e. kBtu) and is divided by the building's area to proved a unit of energy intensity which is expressedThe Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption

  9. This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground affecting corporate climate strategies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This study explores how the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) actually works on the ground@bookpoint.co.uk May 2013 322 pages Hardback 978-1-4094-6078-7 ÂŁ60.00 Corporate Responses to EU Emissions Trading at The Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway `With greenhouse gas emissions trading schemes emerging worldwide

  10. An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers...

  11. National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

  12. SDS: A Framework for Scientific Data Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Bin; Byna, Surendra; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale scientific applications typically write their data to parallel file systems with organizations designed to achieve fast write speeds. Analysis tasks frequently read the data in a pattern that is different from the write pattern, and therefore experience poor I/O performance. In this paper, we introduce a prototype framework for bridging the performance gap between write and read stages of data access from parallel file systems. We call this framework Scientific Data Services, or SDS for short. This initial implementation of SDS focuses on reorganizing previously written files into data layouts that benefit read patterns, and transparently directs read calls to the reorganized data. SDS follows a client-server architecture. The SDS Server manages partial or full replicas of reorganized datasets and serves SDS Clients' requests for data. The current version of the SDS client library supports HDF5 programming interface for reading data. The client library intercepts HDF5 calls and transparently redirects them to the reorganized data. The SDS client library also provides a querying interface for reading part of the data based on user-specified selective criteria. We describe the design and implementation of the SDS client-server architecture, and evaluate the response time of the SDS Server and the performance benefits of SDS.

  13. 4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm Molecular Writing Resolution", Small, 2005, ASAP. Patent the first "nano-fountain pen" capable of depositing organic ink molecules in patterns as small as 40 nm

  14. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 138, 054301 (2013) Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumark, Daniel M.

    the photodissociation of the methyl perthiyl radical CH3SS at 248 nm. The radical was produced by flash pyrolysis

  15. August 20, 2009 0:58 International Journal of Electronics IJEADC-90nm International Journal of Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    variation of 10.5% in the INL and 5.7% in the DNL, with both INL and DNL being less than 0.5LSB. The 90nm, the ADC has also been presented using 45nm Predictive Technology Models (PTM). At 45nm, INL = 0.46LSB, DNL

  16. High power single-crystal fiber CW 946 nm laser and blue generation based on Rubidium-doped PPKTP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for high power, continuous wave and polarized laser at 946 nm (fig1.c). We demonstrate a polarized laser. Laurell, "High-power, continous-wave, second harmonic generation at 532 nm in periodically poled KTiOPO4(b)(a) (c) High power single-crystal fiber CW 946 nm laser and blue generation based on Rubidium

  17. Lakeside: Merging Urban Design with Scientific Analysis

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Guzowski, Leah; Catlett, Charlie; Woodbury, Ed

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago are developing tools that merge urban design with scientific analysis to improve the decision-making process associated with large-scale urban developments. One such tool, called LakeSim, has been prototyped with an initial focus on consumer-driven energy and transportation demand, through a partnership with the Chicago-based architectural and engineering design firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Clean Energy Trust and developer McCaffery Interests. LakeSim began with the need to answer practical questions about urban design and planning, requiring a better understanding about the long-term impact of design decisions on energy and transportation demand for a 600-acre development project on Chicago's South Side - the Chicago Lakeside Development project.

  18. Lakeside: Merging Urban Design with Scientific Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, Leah; Catlett, Charlie; Woodbury, Ed

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago are developing tools that merge urban design with scientific analysis to improve the decision-making process associated with large-scale urban developments. One such tool, called LakeSim, has been prototyped with an initial focus on consumer-driven energy and transportation demand, through a partnership with the Chicago-based architectural and engineering design firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Clean Energy Trust and developer McCaffery Interests. LakeSim began with the need to answer practical questions about urban design and planning, requiring a better understanding about the long-term impact of design decisions on energy and transportation demand for a 600-acre development project on Chicago's South Side - the Chicago Lakeside Development project.

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  20. climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    north over Suriname: ozone observations in Paramaribo 65 Current projects Predictability Research 77, Surinam, with generous financial support from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research

  1. annual scientific session: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Scientific Council DESY, Hamburg, October 28, 1999 Physics Websites Summary: , October 28, 1999 S. Levonian, H1 12; HERA performance 15; Difficult machine, requires...

  2. Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tuesday, June 10 2014 Next Items Refreshed National Library of Energy(Beta) Takes on Expanded Role in Disseminating Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Information...

  3. Scientific Workflows Composition and Deployment on SOA Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Kulkarni, Anand V.

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific workflows normally consist of multiple applications acquiring and transforming data, running data intensive analyses and visualizing the results for scientific discovery. To compose and deploy such scientific workflows, an SOA platform can provide integration of third-party components, services, and tools. In this paper, we present our application of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to compose and deploy systems biology workflows. In developing this application, our solution uses MeDICi a middleware framework built on SOA platforms as an integration layer. We discuss our experience and lessons learnt about this solution that are generally applicable to scientific workflows in other domains.

  4. Laws, Policies, and Schedules | Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    agencies that conduct scientific research to develop agency specific policies and procedures regarding the public release of data and results of research. American COMPETES...

  5. News You Can Use | Scientific and Technical Information Program

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discovery, and retrieval. Creating stable pathways to these datasets makes the scientific process more accessible and the research more replicable for future discoveries. Read the...

  6. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy 40aamssistein.ppt More Documents &...

  7. annual international scientific: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    changes's Regional Meteorological Training Centers (RMTCs) and a handful of universities in North, Central, and South 5 Building and Sustaining International Scientific...

  8. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

  9. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

  10. Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

  11. Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Brian E. Riddell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Brian E. Riddell Appointed to Board: 1996:\\my documents\\ww\\isab\\riddell resume.doc (Chip Mcconnaha) #12;

  12. Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey A. Newman

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final scientific report for the University of Pittsburgh portion of the collaborative grant, 'Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments'

  13. The SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool: learning a the 22-nm node and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Hudyma, Russ; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Montgomery, Warren; Roller, John; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to playa dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET operating as a SEMATECH resist and mask test center. Here we present an update summarizing the latest resist test and characterization results. The relatively small numerical aperture and limited illumination settings expected from 1st generation EUV production tools make resist resolution a critical issue even at the 32-nm node. In this presentation, sub 22 nm half pitch imaging results of EUV resists are reported. We also present contact hole printing at the 30-nm level. Although resist development has progressed relatively well in the areas of resolution and sensitivity, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of system-level contributors to the LER observed from the SEMA TECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  14. Gd plasma source modeling at 6.7 nm for future lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Otsuka, Takamitsu [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Research Institute of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan)

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas containing gadolinium have been proposed as sources for next generation lithography at 6.x nm. To determine the optimum plasma conditions, atomic structure calculations have been performed for Gd{sup 11+} to Gd{sup 27+} ions which showed that n = 4 - n = 4 resonance transitions overlap in the 6.5-7.0 nm region. Plasma modeling calculations, assuming collisional-radiative equilibrium, predict that the optimum temperature for an optically thin plasma is close to 110 eV and that maximum intensity occurs at 6.76 nm under these conditions. The close agreement between simulated and experimental spectra from laser and discharge produced plasmas indicates the validity of our approach.

  15. Lasing characteristics of Er/sup 3 +/-doped silica fibers from 1553 up to 1603 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Y.; Nakazawa, M.

    1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser oscillations from 1553 up to 1603 nm have been demonstrated in Er/sup 3 +/-doped silica fibers with a doping rate of 2500 ppm. Wide changes in laser oscillation wavelengths are due to broad splitting of the upper sublevels in the /sup 4/I/sub 152/ manifold, caused by the random structure of the silica matrix. It has been shown that unpumped parts of the Er/sup 3 +/ ions in the end pumped fiber laser configuration play an important role in the wavelength changes of the laser oscillation. For an absorbed pump power of 320 mW at 514 nm, output power of 0.5 mW was obtained at 1603 nm.

  16. Photoinduced absorption and refractive-index induction in phosphosilicate fibres by radiation at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybaltovsky, A A; Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Lanin, Aleksei V; Semenov, S L; Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gur'yanov, A N; Khopin, V F [Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoinduced room-temperature-stable increase in the refractive index by {approx}5x10{sup -4} at a wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m was observed in phosphosilicate fibres without their preliminary loading with molecular hydrogen. It is shown that irradiation of preliminary hydrogen-loaded fibres by an ArF laser at 193 nm enhances the efficiency of refractive-index induction by an order of magnitude. The induced-absorption spectra of preforms with a phosphosilicate glass core and optical fibres fabricated from them are studied in a broad spectral range from 150 to 5000 nm. The intense induced-absorption band ({approx}800 cm{sup -1}) at 180 nm is found, which strongly affects the formation of the induced refractive index. The quantum-chemical model of a defect related to this band is proposed. (optical fibres)

  17. Photoionization rates of Cs Rydberg atoms in a 1064-nm far-off-resonance trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallant, J.; Booth, D.; Shaffer, J. P. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental measurements of photoionization rates of nD{sub 5/2} Rydberg states of Cs (50{<=}n{<=}75) in a 1064-nm far off-resonance dipole trap are presented. The photoionization rates are obtained by measuring the lifetimes of Rydberg atoms produced inside of a 1064-nm far off-resonance trap and comparing the lifetimes to corresponding control experiments in a magneto-optical trap. Experimental results for the control experiments agree with recent theoretical predictions for Rydberg state lifetimes and measured photoionization rates are in agreement with transition rates calculated from a model potential.

  18. A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

  19. Contexto Actual y Futuro de la Nucleoelectricidad Instrumentos de Poltica Ambiental en los Mercados Elctricos Liberalizados de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

    revisión de los efectos de la liberalización sobre el impacto ambiental de los sistemas eléctricos; (2) el anålisis y la comparación de metodologías para la evaluación del impacto ambiental de los sistemasContexto Actual y Futuro de la Nucleoelectricidad Instrumentos de Política Ambiental en los

  20. Patterns of intended and actual fertility among subgroups of foreign-born and native-born Latinas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Brandi Nicole

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    PATTERNS OF INTENDED AND ACTUAL FERTILITY AMONG SUBGROUPS OF FOREIGN-BORN AND NATIVE-BORN LATINAS A Thesis by BRANDI NICOLE BALLARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: ___________________________________ Rogelio Saenz...

  1. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, James [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - New York District 26 Federal Plaza, New York, New York 10278 (United States); Hays, David [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District 601 E. 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64106 (United States); Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  2. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131.e., this is energy that does not have to #12;Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference PHOTOVOLTAICS AS AN ENERGY SERVICES TECHNOLOGY: A CASE STUDY OF PV SITED AT THE UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS

  3. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldán-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Córdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Córdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  4. Measurements of the operating characteristics of a 1064 nm pumped KTP RISTRA OPO.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimmestad, Gary (Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA); Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Wood, Jack (Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA); Roberts, David (Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, GA)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the operating characteristics of a 1064 nm pumped potassium titanyl phosphte (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) were carried out at the Electro Optics Systems Laboratory of Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). The OPO was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and employs a nonplanar image-rotating geometry that is known by the acronym RISTRA, denoting Rotated Image Singly-Resonant Twisted RectAngle. The OPO was configured for pumping by the 1064 nm fundamental wavelength of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to generate a signal wavelength at 1627 nm and idler wavelength at 3074.8 nm. GTRI will be incorporate the OPO into a multi-wavelength lidar platform called the Integrated Atmospheric Characterization System (IACS). Prior to completion of the system design for the IACS platform, personnel at GTRI carried out a series of risk reduction experiments to measure the operating characteristics of the OPO. Sandia's role in this effort included technical assistance with numerical modeling of OPO performance, selection of nonlinear optical crystals, specification of cavity-mirror dielectric coatings, selection of vendors for optical components, and advice concerning integration of the RISTRA OPO into the IACS platform. This report describes results of the risk reduction measurements and it also provides some background information on the operating characteristics of RISTRA OPO's but is not intended to be a tutorial. A working knowledge of pulsed solid-state lasers, laser cavity modes, laser beam quality and beam propagation, and three-wave mixing in nonlinear crystals, is useful.

  5. High Accuracy 65nm OPC Verification: Full Process Window Model vs. Critical Failure ORC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    High Accuracy 65nm OPC Verification: Full Process Window Model vs. Critical Failure ORC Amandine of Mask Rule Checking (MRC) and Optical Rule Checking (ORC) have become indispensable tools for ensuring, a technique known as Critical Failure ORC (CFORC) was introduced that uses optical parameters from aerial

  6. Laser amplification at 18. 2 nm in recombining plasma from a laser-irradiated carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Corbett, R.; Hooker, C.J.; Key, M.H.; Kiehn, G.P.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Pert, G.J.; Regan, C.; Rose, S.J.; Sadaat, S.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet laser amplification has been observed for the C VI Balmer-..cap alpha.. transition at 18.2 nm, with use of a novel optical system to irradiate up to 1 cm length of carbon fiber target. The measurements were time resolved and indicated peak single-transit amplification of about 30 times.

  7. A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1 , Anosh Davierwalla2 , David Mann3 IBM, Burlington, VT Abstract -- A linear high output power CMOS direct conversion transmitter for wideĂ?5 QFN. Index Terms -- direct conversion, CMOS, WCDMA, transmitter, third order distortion cancellation

  8. 2007 Nature Publishing Group Self-formation of sub-60-nm half-pitch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studies of thin polymer films and termed fracture induced structuring (FIS), self-generates gratings. Specifically, FIS consists of three steps (Fig. 1)12,13. First, a coating of a polymer thin film (for example and cross- sections of FIS gratings. The half-pitch of the FIS grating was found to be as small as 60 nm

  9. 1-10 nM E2 E2 30 E2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawato, Suguru

    076 1. E2 E2 E2 E2 2. E2 E2 2 E2 1 1-10 nM E2 5), 7) E2 30 E2 7) E2 512076-0792011 Modulation of Learning and Memory slowly but also rapidly. Slow actions of estradiol (E2) occur via nuclear receptors (ER), while rapid E2

  10. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser emitting at 899 nm Marc Castaing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser emitting at 899 nm and below Marc Castaing Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l); published March 5, 2007 We present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first diode-pumped Nd, or diode- pumped solid-state (DPSS) lasers. Classical wave- lengths of frequency-doubled DPSS blue lasers

  11. Sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface modifications induced by long-pulse 1054 nm laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Chi

    spectrum from ultraviolet to visible and near-infrared (0.2­2 mm), high resistance to abrasion, thermal. Loomis a a Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA b Materials on the uncoated and coated surfaces. The individual damage effects of hotspots became less pronounced at high

  12. SCIENTIFIC & COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES OF THE FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used in ITER will be the same as those required in a power plant but additional R&D will be neededSCIENTIFIC & COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES OF THE FUSION SIMULATION PROJECT (FSP) SciDAC 2008 CONFERENCE of the Scientific and Technological Feasibility of Fusion Power · ITER is a truly dramatic step. For the first time

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Creativity and scientific discovery with infused design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Offer

    ORIGINAL PAPER Creativity and scientific discovery with infused design and its analysis with C of a theory. As a first step, we use infused design (ID) method to generate new concepts and methods. Keywords Design theory Á Creativity Á Infused design Á C­K theory Á Scientific discovery 1 Introduction

  14. EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is a new facility built to support scientific research that will enable cost-effective solutions to the U, and maximize the scientific benefit of that investment, the Performance Evaluation Management Plan (PEMP to maximize the benefit of the investment, and Target Outreach to cultivate new users and ultimately

  15. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Scientific Peer Review Group Members Jack Griffith, Ph. D., Consulting Fisheries Scientist, formerly Professor at Idaho State University. William Liss, Ph.D., Professor

  16. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Scientific Peer Review Group Members Jim Congleton, Ph.D., Emeritus Fisheries Professor, University of IdahoIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th of Fish and Wildlife Resources, University of Idaho, an expert in large river fisheries population

  17. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th the Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Master Plan for the Snake River Sockeye Program (#2007's responses to the Step 1 scientific review elements specified by the Council. Although this is a Step 1

  18. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th, University of Idaho, an expert in large river fisheries population dynamics, and salmon, trout and char Section, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Scientific Peer Review Group Members Jim

  19. Enhancing Patent Expertise through Automatic Matching with Scientific Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Enhancing Patent Expertise through Automatic Matching with Scientific Papers Kafil Hajlaoui of scientific papers, developed in the context of an international patents classification plan related in their task of evaluation of the originality and novelty of a patent, by of- fering to the latter the most

  20. ----PLEASE POST-----UH Scientific Diver In Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegner, Tracy N.

    ----PLEASE POST----- UH Scientific Diver In Training Qualification Course August 4, 2014 ­ August is then eligible to attend a UH Scientific Diver Qualification Course (SDQC). Training is in compliance to Physics and Physiology; Equipment Design, Function, Maintenance, and Field Troubleshooting; Dive Planning

  1. ----PLEASE POST-----UH Scientific Diver In Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegner, Tracy N.

    ----PLEASE POST----- UH Scientific Diver In Training Qualification Course June 16, 2014 ­ June 22 Scientific Diver Qualification Course (SDQC). Training is in compliance with the standards of the UH Diving Thursday, 3:00-9:00pm June 16 to June 19 Topics: Introduction to Physics and Physiology; Equipment Design

  2. Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malony, Allen D.

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of Scholar Mobility on Scientific Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying, Qiu Fang; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific literature till date can be thought of as a partially revealed landscape, where scholars keep unveiling hidden knowledge by exploring novel research topics. How do scholars explore the scientific landscape, i.e., choose research topics to work on? We propose an agent-based model of topic mobility behavior where scholars migrate across research topics on the space of science following different strategies, seeking different utilities. We use this model to study whether strategies widely used in current scientific community can provide a balance between individual scientific success and the efficiency and diversity of the whole academic society. Through extensive simulations, we provide insights into the roles of different strategies, such as choosing topics according to research potential or the popularity. Our model provides a conceptual framework and a computational approach to analyze scholars' behavior and its impact on scientific production. We also discuss how such an agent-based modeling appr...

  4. Technology Pathway Partnership Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, John C. Dr.; Godby, Larry A.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the scientific progress and results made in the development of high efficiency multijunction solar cells and the light concentrating non-imaging optics for the commercial generation of renewable solar energy. During the contract period the efficiency of the multijunction solar cell was raised from 36.5% to 40% in commercially available fully qualified cells. In addition significant strides were made in automating production process for these cells in order to meet the costs required to compete with commercial electricity. Concurrent with the cells effort Boeing also developed a non imaging optical systems to raise the light intensity at the photovoltaic cell to the rage of 800 to 900 suns. Solar module efficiencies greater than 30% were consistently demonstrated. The technology and its manufacturing were maturated to a projected price of < $0.015 per kWh and demonstrated by automated assembly in a robotic factory with a throughput of 2 MWh/yr. The technology was demonstrated in a 100 kW power plant erected at California State University Northridge, CA.

  5. Transfer Function Design for Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Huang

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    As computation scales beyond terascale, the scientific problems under study through computing are increasingly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge about the physical world. It is more pivotal than ever to quickly and reliably extract new knowledge from these complex simulations of ultra scale. In this project, the PI expanded the traditional notion of transfer function, which maps physical quantities to visual cues via table look-ups, to include general temporal as well as multivariate patterns that can be described procedurally through specialty mini programming languages. Their efforts aimed at answering a perpetual question of fundamental importance. That is "what a visualization should show". Instead of waiting for application scientists to initiate the process, the team at University of Tennessee worked closely with scientists at ORNL in a proactive role to envision and design elegant, powerful, and reliable tools that a user can use to specify "what is interesting". Their new techniques include visualization operators that revolve around correlation and graph properties, relative patterns in statistical distribution, temporal regular expressions, concurrent attribute subspaces and traditional compound boolean range queries. The team also paid special attention to ensure that all visualization operators are inherently designed with great parallel scalability to handle tera-scale datasets in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Success has been demonstrated with leading edge computational science areas include climate modeling, combustion and systems genetics.

  6. Verifying disarmament: scientific, technological and political challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in, and hopes for, nuclear disarmament in governments and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) around the world. If a nuclear-weapon-free world is to be achievable, verification and compliance will be critical. VerifYing disarmament would have unprecedented scientific, technological and political challenges. Verification would have to address warheads, components, materials, testing, facilities, delivery capabilities, virtual capabilities from existing or shutdown nuclear weapon and existing nuclear energy programs and material and weapon production and related capabilities. Moreover, it would likely have far more stringent requirements. The verification of dismantlement or elimination of nuclear warheads and components is widely recognized as the most pressing problem. There has been considerable research and development done in the United States and elsewhere on warhead and dismantlement transparency and verification since the early 1990s. However, we do not today know how to verifY low numbers or zero. We need to develop the needed verification tools and systems approaches that would allow us to meet this complex set of challenges. There is a real opportunity to explore verification options and, given any realistic time frame for disarmament, there is considerable scope to invest resources at the national and international levels to undertake research, development and demonstrations in an effort to address the anticipated and perhaps unanticipated verification challenges of disarmament now andfor the next decades. Cooperative approaches have the greatest possibility for success.

  7. Multicore Architecture-aware Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivasa, Avinash

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern high performance systems are becoming increasingly complex and powerful due to advancements in processor and memory architecture. In order to keep up with this increasing complexity, applications have to be augmented with certain capabilities to fully exploit such systems. These may be at the application level, such as static or dynamic adaptations or at the system level, like having strategies in place to override some of the default operating system polices, the main objective being to improve computational performance of the application. The current work proposes two such capabilites with respect to multi-threaded scientific applications, in particular a large scale physics application computing ab-initio nuclear structure. The first involves using a middleware tool to invoke dynamic adaptations in the application, so as to be able to adjust to the changing computational resource availability at run-time. The second involves a strategy for effective placement of data in main memory, to optimize memory access latencies and bandwidth. These capabilties when included were found to have a significant impact on the application performance, resulting in average speedups of as much as two to four times.

  8. InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBO = 3.4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBOGaAs base and a 75 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. These devices exhibit collector thickness for any HBT. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector

  9. Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET Characteristics.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET

  10. Scientific Research Data | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)Data MovementScientific Programsand

  11. A training program for scientific supercomputing users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  12. Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C. [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)] [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Faraday and Cotton-Mouton Effects of Helium at $\\lambda = 1064$ nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cadène, Agathe; Berceau, Paul; Fouché, Mathilde; Battesti, Remy; Rizzo, Carlo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the Faraday and the Cotton-Mouton effects of helium gas at $\\lambda =~1064$\\,nm. Our apparatus is based on an up-to-date resonant optical cavity coupled to longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This cavity increases the signal to be measured by more than a factor of 270\\,000 compared to the one acquired after a single path of light in the magnetic field region. We have reached a precision of a few percent both for Faraday effect and Cotton-Mouton effect. Our measurements give for the first time the experimental value of the Faraday effect at $\\lambda$=\\,1064\\,nm. This value is compatible with the theoretical prediction. Concerning Cotton-Mouton effect, our measurement is the second reported experimental value at this wavelength, and the first to agree at better than 1$\\sigma$ with theoretical predictions.

  14. Investigation of a Polarization Controller in Titanium Diffused Lithium Niobate Waveguide near 1530 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Won Ju

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF A POLARIZATION CONTROLLER IN TITANIUM DIFFUSED LITHIUM NIOBATE WAVEGUIDE NEAR 1530 NM WAVELENGTH A Dissertation by WON JU SUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... systems are being commercialized [1-3], and efforts for 400G modulators are being pursued [1, 4]. Various materials have been explored for high speed devices need [5, 6], and lithium niobate remains the most attractive choice currently [7]. Fiber...

  15. Rearrangement of a phosphosilicate glass network induced by the 193-nm radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larionov, Yu V [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR absorption and Raman spectra of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) are measured during its exposure to radiation at a wavelength of 193 nm. The obtained data demonstrate the complicated rearrangement dynamics of the glass network around phosphor atoms and of the glass network as a whole. The experimental dependences are explained by the model of the PSG network based on the concepts of the theory of rigidity percolation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramofContract atInc., Sagaponack,|NM, Production

  17. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lud?scher, Bertram [Professor

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Our contributions to advancing the state?of?the?art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas: Workflow development; Generic workflow components and templates; Provenance collection and analysis; Workflow reliability and fault tolerance.

  18. Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gateway to Scholarly Scientific Publications 2014-07-22 12:00 DOE Science Showcase: Biofuels 2014-07-22 12:24 Meet Tim Byrne 2014-07-22 12:24 OSTI Search Products 2014-07-22...

  19. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  20. Elink Footer | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website PoliciesImportant Links National Library of Energy BETA science.gov WorldWideScience.org...

  1. solvent-carbon-capture-scientific | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007567 Carbon Capture Scientific is developing and testing a novel,...

  2. Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE's missions," said Secretary Bodman. "This program opens up the world of high-performance computing to a broad array of scientific users. Through the use of these advanced...

  3. Managing Derived Data in the Gaea Scientific DBMS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Matthew

    Managing Derived Data in the Gaea Scientific DBMS \\Lambda Nabil I. Hachem, Ke Qiu, Michael Gennert of methods to manage the development, evolution, verification, and dissemination of algorithms. A third focus

  4. Independent Scientific Review Panel Retrospective Report 1997 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel Retrospective Report 1997 ­ 2005 ISRP 2005-14 August 31, 2005 graphics used in this report. #12;ISRP Retrospective Report 1997 - 2005 Executive Summary.....................................................................

  5. COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technical Challenges Dr. Georg Bollen Michigan State...

  6. Microfunctionalism: Connectionism and the Scientific Explanation of Mental States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    My goal in the present treatment is to sketch and compare two scientific approaches to understanding the mind. The first approach, that of classical cognitivism, depicts mind as a manipulator of chunky, quite high-level, ...

  7. Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tip: Explore DOE Scientific Research Data 2015-01-28 10:58 DOE Science Showcase: Protein Folding 2015-01-28 10:59 Most Viewed Documents from All OSTI Search Tools by Subject...

  8. www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 Entrepreneurial Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    had its eye on climate change, www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 Entrepreneurial Global Health Green Cars Alzheimer draws inspiration from nature's genius for building things at the nanoscale W hen one thinks of those

  9. Mass spec : the biography of a scientific instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calmes, Jordan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past century, the mass spectrometer has become commonplace in scientific fields ranging from chemistry to geology to environmental science. Its ability to identify compounds and determine concentrations of those ...

  10. Some applications of pipelining techniques in parallel scientific computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Yuanhua

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we study the applicability of pipelining techniques to the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. General principles for pipelining techniques are discussed and two applications, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization...

  11. Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Eric J. Loudenslager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Eric J. Loudenslager Appointed to Board: 1999:27-42. ________________________________________ c:\\my documents\\ww\\isab\\loudenslager resume.doc (Chip Mcconnaha) #12;

  12. Scientific Visualization Applications in Oil & Gas Exploration and Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

    Scientific Visualization Applications in Oil & Gas Exploration and Production SIBGRAPI 2009 #12 Property cross plots #12;Oil and gas production analysis and optimization SIBGRAPI 2009 Structural maps with property distributions Well schematics Production network Gas injection optimization Reservoir slices #12

  13. Essays on the production and commercialization of new scientific knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikard, Michaël

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific research frequently generates tremendous economic value. Yet, this value tends to be elusive and public and private organizations often struggle to obtain returns from their investment in science. This dissertation, ...

  14. Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stable 2014-03-26 08:58 In the OSTI Collections: Heat Pumps 2014-03-26 09:03 DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) 2014-03-26 13:42 DOE's Scientific and Technical...

  15. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | No. 22.000 Fermilab Scientific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Appointments Effective Date 1199 2.0 Effective Date 060906 3.0 Scope This policy covers all appointments for scientific staff at Fermilab. 4.0 Applicability All...

  16. Early experience improving the provisioning process to enhance scientific collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    1 Early experience improving the provisioning process to enhance scientific implemented to improve the provisioning process for researchers? We describe an approach for significantly improving the provisioning process based on Software

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - accept scientific workshop Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 66 Accelerating the scientific exploration process with scientific Ilkay Altintas1 Summary: in the previous years, and...

  18. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific & Technical Information September 23, 2014 Brian Hitson Named Director of the Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Brian A....

  19. Guide to the Management of Scientific and Technical Information

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide to the management of scientific and technical information (STI) provides nonmandatory guidelines for implementing the objective, requirements, and responsibilities of Department of Energy (DOE) O 241.1A, Scientific and Technical Information Management. Cancels DOE G 241.1-1. Canceled by DOE N 251.83. Best practices, instructions, and additional information are now accessible at www.osti.gov/stip.

  20. Scientific Solutions to Nuclear Waste Environmental Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley R.

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hidden Cost of Nuclear Weapons The Cold War arms race drove an intense plutonium production program in the U.S. This campaign produced approximately 100 tons of plutonium over 40 years. The epicenter of plutonium production in the United States was the Hanford site, a 586 square mile reservation owned by the Department of Energy and located on the Colombia River in Southeastern Washington. Plutonium synthesis relied on nuclear reactors to convert uranium to plutonium within the reactor fuel rods. After a sufficient amount of conversion occurred, the rods were removed from the reactor and allowed to cool. They were then dissolved in an acid bath and chemically processed to separate and purify plutonium from the rest of the constituents in the used reactor fuel. The acidic waste was then neutralized using sodium hydroxide and the resulting mixture of liquids and precipitates (small insoluble particles) was stored in huge underground waste tanks. The byproducts of the U.S. plutonium production campaign include over 53 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 large underground tanks at Hanford and another 34 million gallons stored at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This legacy nuclear waste represents one of the largest environmental clean-up challenges facing the world today. The nuclear waste in the Hanford tanks is a mixture of liquids and precipitates that have settled into sludge. Some of these tanks are now over 60 years old and a small number of them are leaking radioactive waste into the ground and contaminating the environment. The solution to this nuclear waste challenge is to convert the mixture of solids and liquids into a durable material that won't disperse into the environment and create hazards to the biosphere. What makes this difficult is the fact that the radioactive half-lives of some of the radionuclides in the waste are thousands to millions of years long. (The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for one-half of the material to undergo radioactive decay.) In general, the ideal material would need to be durable for approximately 10 half-lives to allow the activity to decay to negligible levels. However, the potential health effects of each radionuclide vary depending on what type of radiation is emitted, the energy of that emission, and the susceptibility for the human body to accumulate and concentrate that particular element. Consequently, actual standards tend to be based on limiting the dose (energy deposited per unit mass) that is introduced into the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the responsibility to establish standards for nuclear waste disposal to protect the health and safety of the public. For example, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed the EPA to establish radiation protection standards for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for nuclear wastes. The standards for Yucca Mountain were promulgated in 2008, and limit the dose to 15 millirem per year for the first 10,000 years, and 100 milirem per year between 10,000 years and 1 million years (40 CFR Part 197; http://www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca/2008factsheet.html). So, the challenge is two-fold: (1) develop a material (a waste form) that is capable of immobilizing the waste over geologic time scales, and (2) develop a process to convert the radioactive sludge in the tanks into this durable waste form material. Glass: Hard, durable, inert, and with infinite chemical versatility Molten glass is a powerful solvent liquid, which can be designed to dissolve almost anything. When solidified, it can be one of the most chemically inert substances known to man. Nature's most famous analogue to glass is obsidian, a vitreous product of volcanic activity; formations over 17 million years old have been found. Archaeologists have found man-made glass specimens that are five thousand years old.

  1. Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm Damien Sangla,1,2 Marc (Doc. ID 109884); published July 9, 2009 A Nd:YVO4 crystal was pumped directly into the emitting level nm for an absorbed pump power of 14.6 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 78.7%. We

  2. 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    . Here, we report that when using 785 nm excitation, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little

  3. 785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    using 785 nm excitation with 1 ”m spot size, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond films785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser School is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little work has been reported

  4. Experimental scaling law for mass ablation rate from a Sn plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    . INTRODUCTION Laser produced Sn plasma, in its role as an efficient extreme ultraviolet EUV x-ray sourceExperimental scaling law for mass ablation rate from a Sn plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser depth in planar Sn targets irradiated with a pulsed 1064 nm laser was investigated over laser

  5. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  6. Extreme ultraviolet source at 6.7 nm based on a low-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kanagawa, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Otsuka, Takamitsu [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), and Optical Technology Innovation Center (OpTIC), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Li Bowen; Kilbane, Deirdre; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for operation at {lambda} = 6.7 nm by optimizing the optical thickness of gadolinium (Gd) plasmas. Using low initial density Gd targets and dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed a maximum EUV conversion efficiency (CE) of 0.54% for 0.6% bandwidth (BW) (1.8% for 2% BW), which is 1.6 times larger than the 0.33% (0.6% BW) CE produced from a solid density target. Enhancement of the EUV CE by use of a low-density plasma is attributed to the reduction of self-absorption effects.

  7. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  8. Corrosion-resistant multilayer coatings for the 28-75 nm wavelength region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Fernandez-Perea, M; Al, E T

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion has prevented use of SiC/Mg multilayers in applications requiring good lifetime stability. We have developed Al-based barrier layers that dramatically reduce corrosion, while preserving high reflectance and low stress. The aforementioned advances may enable the implementation of corrosion-resistant, high-performance SiC/Mg coatings in the 28-75 nm region in applications such as tabletop EUV/soft x-ray laser sources and solar physics telescopes. Further study and optimization of corrosion barrier structures and coating designs is underway.

  9. Bulk and surface laser damage of silica by picosecond and nanosecond pulses at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Do, Binh T

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured bulk and surface dielectric breakdown thresholds of pure silica for 14 ps and 8 ns pulses of 1064 nm light. The thresholds are sharp and reproducible. For the 8 ns pulses the bulk threshold irradiance is 4.75 {+-} 0.25 kW/{mu}m{sup 2}. The threshold is approximately three times higher for 14 ps pulses. For 8 ns pulses the input surface damage threshold can be made equal to the bulk threshold by applying an alumina or silica surface polish.

  10. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance |DepartmentSystems Home |May,NM, Production

  12. Direct Patterning of CdSe Quantum Dots into Sub-100 nm Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, Meredith J.; Templeton, Joseph L.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordered, two-dimensional cadmium selenide (CdSe) arrays have been fabricated on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes using the pattern replication in nonwetting templates (PRINT) process. CdSe quantum dots (QDs) with an average diameter of 2.7 nm and a pyridine surface ligand were used for patterning. The PRINT technique utilizes a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric mold that is tolerant of most organic solvents, thus allowing solutions of CdSe QDs in 4-picoline to be used for patterning without significant deformation of the mold. Nanometer-scale diffraction gratings have been successfully replicated with CdSe QDs.

  13. NM Stat. 62-9 - The Utility Franchise | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurrInformation NAMA-ProgrammeNF EnergyNM Stat. 62-9 -

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Gas Buggy Site - NM 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co -0-19Gas Buggy Site - NM 14

  15. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NM.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to: navigation,storage planIL.pdf JumpMN.pdfND.pdfNM.pdf

  16. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M. [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  17. LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATION 4-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOWER COLUMBIA SALMON RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATION 4-1 4 Scientific Foundation for Recovery 4 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATION FOR RECOVERY & SUBBASIN PLAN December 2004 SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATION 4-2 4.1 Understanding Extinction and Recovery To recover

  18. Final Scientific/Technical Report for Project entitled "Mechanism of Uranium Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for Project entitled "Mechanism of Uranium Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis"

  19. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lud?scher, Bertram; Altintas, Ilkay

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past five years, our activities have both established Kepler as a viable scientific workflow environment and demonstrated its value across multiple science applications. We have published numerous peer-reviewed papers on the technologies highlighted in this short paper and have given Kepler tutorials at SC06,SC07,SC08,and SciDAC 2007. Our outreach activities have allowed scientists to learn best practices and better utilize Kepler to address their individual workflow problems. Our contributions to advancing the state-of-the-art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas. Progress in each of these areas is described in subsequent sections. Workflow development. The development of a deeper understanding of scientific workflows "in the wild" and of the requirements for support tools that allow easy construction of complex scientific workflows; Generic workflow components and templates. The development of generic actors (i.e.workflow components and processes) which can be broadly applied to scientific problems; Provenance collection and analysis. The design of a flexible provenance collection and analysis infrastructure within the workflow environment; and Workflow reliability and fault tolerance. The improvement of the reliability and fault-tolerance of workflow environments.

  20. General Critical Properties of the Dynamics of Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific fields are difficult to define and compare, yet there is a general sense that they undergo similar stages of development. From this point of view it becomes important to determine if these superficial similarities can be translated into a general framework that would quantify the general advent and subsequent dynamics of scientific ideas. Such a framework would have important practical applications of allowing us to compare fields that superficially may appear different, in terms of their subject matter, research techniques, typical collaboration size, etc. Particularh' important in a field's history is the moment at which conceptual and technical unification allows widespread exchange of ideas and collaboration, at which point networks of collaboration show the analog of a percolation phenomenon, developing a giant connected component containing most authors. Here we investigate the generality of this topological transition in the collaboration structure of scientific fields as they grow and become denser. We develop a general theoretical framework in which each scientific field is an instantiation of the same large-scale topological critical phenomenon. We consider whether the evidence from a variety of specific fields is consistent with this picture, and estimate critical exponents associated with the transition. We then discuss the generality of the phenomenon and to what extent we may expect other scientific fields — including very large ones — to follow the same dynamics.

  1. Adventures in supercomputing: Scientific exploration in an era of change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, E. [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Helland, B. [Krell Institute, Ames, IA (United States); Summers, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Students deserve the opportunity to explore the world of science surrounding them. Therefore it is important that scientific exploration and investigation be a part of each student`s educational career. The Department of Energy`s Adventures in Superconducting (AiS) takes students beyond mere scientific literacy to a rich embodiment of scientific exploration. AiS provides today`s science and math students with a greater opportunity to investigate science problems, propose solutions, explore different methods of solving the problem, organize their work into a technical paper, and present their results. Students learn at different rates in different ways. Science classes with students having varying learning styles and levels of achievement have always been a challenge for teachers. The AiS {open_quotes}hands-on, minds-on{close_quotes} project-based method of teaching science meets the challenge of this diversity heads on! AiS uses the development of student chosen projects as the means of achieving a lifelong enthusiasm for scientific proficiency. One goal of AiS is to emulate the research that takes place in the everyday environment of scientists. Students work in teams and often collaborate with students nationwide. With the help of mentors from the academic and scientific community, students pose a problem in science, investigate possible solutions, design a mathematical and computational model for the problem, exercise the model to achieve results, and evaluate the implications of the results. The students then have the opportunity to present the project to their peers, teachers, and scientists. Using this inquiry-based technique, students learn more than science skills, they learn to reason and think -- going well beyond the National Science Education Standard. The teacher becomes a resource person actively working together with the students in their quest for scientific knowledge.

  2. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant uncertainty existed about the quantum efficiency at 1550 nm the necessary operating temperature. This project has resulted in several conclusions after fabrication and measurement of the proposed structures. We have successfully demonstrated the Ge/Si proof-of-concept in producing high analog gain in a silicon region while absorbing in a Ge region. This has included significant Ge processing infrastructure development at Sandia. However, sensitivity is limited at low temperatures due to high dark currents that we ascribe to tunneling. This leaves remaining uncertainty about whether this structure can achieve the desired performance with further development. GM detection in InGaAs/InAlAs, Ge/Si, Si and pure Ge devices fabricated at Sandia was shown to overcome gain noise challenges, which represents critical learning that will enable Sandia to respond to future single photon detection needs. However, challenges to the operation of these devices in GM remain. The InAlAs multiplication region was not found to be significantly superior to current InP regions for GM, however, improved multiplication region design of InGaAs/InP APDs has been highlighted. For Ge GM detectors it still remains unclear whether an optimal trade-off of parameters can achieve the necessary sensitivity at 1550 nm. To further examine these remaining questions, as well as other application spaces for these technologies, funding for an Intelligence Community post-doc was awarded this year.

  3. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  4. Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Paul Ernest

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

  5. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Danna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dallmann, Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tyagi, Hush T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Nicholas A [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Toliver, Paul [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Chapman, Thomas E [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Runser, Robert J [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Mcnown, Scott R [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  6. Time and spectrum-resolving multiphoton correlator for 300–900?nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Thibault, Marilyne; Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department for Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kolenderski, Piotr, E-mail: kolenderski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute for Quantum Computing and Department for Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a single-photon sensitive spectrometer in the visible range, which allows us to perform time-resolved and multi-photon spectral correlation measurements at room temperature. It is based on a monochromator composed of two gratings, collimation optics, and an array of single photon avalanche diodes. The time resolution can reach 110 ps and the spectral resolution is 2?nm/pixel, limited by the design of the monochromator. This technique can easily be combined with commercial monochromators and can be useful for joint spectrum measurements of two photons emitted in the process of parametric down conversion, as well as time-resolved spectrum measurements in optical coherence tomography or medical physics applications.

  7. High-order harmonic generation in atomic hydrogen at 248 nm: Dipole-moment versus acceleration spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Chu, Shih-I

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the high-order harmonic-generation (HG) spectra of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm based on the Fourier transform of the expectation values of the induced dipole moment and acceleration. The calculations ...

  8. Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

  9. Ytterbium-doped fibre laser tunable in the range 1017 - 1040 nm with second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fibre laser has been tuned to shorter emission wavelengths (from 1040 to 1017 nm). The laser output power obtained has been compared to calculation results. We have studied frequency doubling of the laser in a KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystal with type II phase matching in the XY plane and demonstrated wavelength tuning in the range 510 - 520 nm. (lasers)

  10. Diode-pumped Nd:YVO4/Yb:S-FAP laser emitting at 985 and 492.5 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Diode-pumped Nd:YVO4/Yb:S-FAP laser emitting at 985 and 492.5 nm Marc Castaing,1,2, * François, 2008 For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, Yb:S-FAP crystals have been intracavity pumped by a Nd:YVO4 laser at 914 nm. This original pumping scheme allows efficient laser action on the three

  11. Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse-band 2% bandwidth conversion efficiency CE from a CO2 laser to 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet EUV light was investigated for Sn plasma. It was found that high in-band CE, 2.6%, is consistently obtained using a CO2 laser

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  13. climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    climate research and seismology department Biennial Scientific Report 2001­2002 #12;2 #12;3 Contents Preface Foreword Recent highlights On the role of cirrus clouds in climate 11 Pathways in the ocean 19 Monitoring of tropical processes relevant to climate change 29 Current projects Climate

  14. Department of Solar Energy & Environmental Physics Scientific Publications, 2005.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    Department of Solar Energy & Environmental Physics Scientific Publications, 2005. Ashkenazy Y of Solar Energy Engineering, 127, 138-145. Tsur Y. and Zemel A. (2005), Scarcity, growth and R&D. Journal and its ramifications for concentrator solar cell design and diagnostics. Applied Physics Letters, 86

  15. The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Robert

    The Transfer of Scientific Principles Using Concrete and Idealized Simulations Robert L. Goldstone the first simulation was manipulated. The elements either remained concrete throughout the simulation, remained idealized, or switched midway into the simulation from concrete to idealized or vice versa

  16. Development of scientific and geopolitical criteria to rank geoengineering schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Development of scientific and geopolitical criteria to rank geoengineering schemes · My background;Proliferation of schemes #12;>15 Years of press coverage on Geo-engineering but no science SO Do we know enough to rank schemes? #12;Ranking geo-engineering schemes Boyd (2008) Nature Geosciences #12;Rationale

  17. SCIENTIFIC NOTE Variations in daily quality assurance dosimetry from device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    SCIENTIFIC NOTE Variations in daily quality assurance dosimetry from device levelling, feet procedures are an essential part of radiotherapy medical physics. Devices such as the Sun Nuclear, DQA3 are effective tools for analysis of daily dosimetry including flatness, symmetry, energy, field size and central

  18. Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society Rock Varnish Author(s): Ronald I. Dorn Source: American;Rock Varnish Over thousandsofyears,a thincoatingofclay,cementedtorocksbymanganese and iron that appeared "smooth, black, and as ifcoated with plumbago." Indian legends explained that these rocks had been

  19. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) conduct a review of the Spring Chinook Hatchery Program of the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP). The LSRCP was authorized by Congress in 1976 to conduct fish hatchery operations to produce a return of 58,700 adult spring/summer Chinook salmon above Lower Granite Dam after

  20. The 8th International Scientific Conference Contemporary Business Environment Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The 8th International Scientific Conference Contemporary Business Environment Strategies: Novel hand, and the economic, financial, managerial, social, legal, and political environments on the other environment and similar topics relevant to the themes of the conference are welcome. It is stipulated

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EAST PACIFIC RISE Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 171A SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 171A SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BARBADOS ACCRETIONARY PRISM LOGGING WHILE DRILLING (LWD) Dr. J. Casey Moore Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 171A University of California, Santa Cruz Earth Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  3. Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Offers Public Access to Scholarly Scientific Publications 2014-08-04 10:32 DOE PAGES Beta Fact Card 2014-08-04 10:46 DOE Public Access Plan 2014-08-04 10:46 DOE PAGES Beta Flyer...

  4. Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters Ellen MosleyPolar/ByrdPolarhttp://bprc.osu.edu/ Understanding Climate Change Risks and Identifying Opportunities for Mitigation & Adaptation in Ohio Ohio State University, May 15, 2014 #12;Key Points Earth's climate is changing - the world is warming ­ that debate

  5. Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    INSIGHT: Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools Laura Paeglis, IWM and GeoHydrologic Tools #12;What is INSIGHT? · Interactive, web-based maps. · Evaluations of basins and their status as fully or overappropriated. · Educational tool for water managers and the public. · One

  6. EMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alternative energy sources. BER has a long history of determining the biological and environmental impact of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to foster high-impact science for the benefit of BER's scienceEMSL Strategic Plan to Maximize Scientific Impact of the Quiet Wing PEMP Notable Outcomes Goal 2

  7. Vipin Kumar SDM April 2010 0 Mining Scientific Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    Mining PhD student Rohit Gupta was selected to present his work on "Colorectal cancer despite colonoscopy© Vipin Kumar SDM ­ April 2010 0 Mining Scientific Data: Past, Present, and Future Vipin Kumar Geo-spatial data Homeland Security #12;© Vipin Kumar SDM ­ April 2010 2 Why Data Mining? Commercial

  8. A characterization of the scientific data analysis process. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springmeyer, R.R.; Blattner, M.M.; Max, N.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensible scientific visualization tools are often offered as data analysis tools. While images may be the goal of visualization, insight is the goal of analysis. Visualization tools often fail to reflect this fact both in functionality and in their user interfaces, which typically focus on graphics and programming concepts rather than on concepts more meaningful to end-user scientists. This paper presents a characterization which shows how data visualization fits into the border process of scientific data analysis. We conducted an empirical study, observing scientists from several disciplines while they analyzed their own data. Examination of the observations exposed process elements outside conventional image viewing. For example, analysts queried for quantitative information, made a variety of comparisons, applied math, managed data, and kept records. The characterization of scientific data analysis reveals activity beyond that traditionally supported by computer. It offers an understanding which has the potential to be applied to many future designs, and suggests specific recommendations for improving the support of this important aspect of scientific computing.

  9. REMOTE TRANSFER OF SCIENTIFIC REASONING-AND PROBLEM-SOLVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klahr, David

    reasoning (Brown & Kane, 1990 AU :1; Chen & Siegler, 2000; Chen, Sanchez, & Campbell, 1997), scientific ELEMENTS BETWEEN PROBLEMS D. EXECUTING A LEARNED SOLUTION VI. DEVELOPMENTAL DIFFERENCES VII. EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS A. ROLE OF ANALOGY B. EXPLICIT INSTRUCTION C. IMPLICIT FEEDBACK AND SELF-EXPLANATIONS D. LEARNING

  10. SANDBOX: A VIRTUAL REALITY INTERFACE TO SCIENTIFIC DATABASES ANDREW JOHNSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    SANDBOX: A VIRTUAL REALITY INTERFACE TO SCIENTIFIC DATABASES by ANDREW JOHNSON DISSERTATION: Adviser Date #12; c COPYRIGHT BY ANDREW JOHNSON 1994 All Rights Reserved #12;Dedication I dedicate; Narendra Goel, John Norman, and Don Strebel for their insight into the FIFE database; and Larry Cathey

  11. Access to NIH Grant and Application Data For Scientific Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Access to NIH Grant and Application Data For Scientific Research In keeping with the President's Open Government Directive (http://www.whitehouse.gov/open/documents/open-government-directive), NIH Reporting Tools (RePORT) website (http://report.nih.gov/). NIH also makes the RePORT Expenditures

  12. Oklahoma State University Policy and Procedures COMPLAINTS OF SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    June 2007 INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL STATEMENT 1.01 Complaints of scientific misconduct directed research. It does not include honest differences in interpretations or judgments of data. 2.06 "Fabrication for Research shall consult with the Office of Legal Counsel to the Board of Regents prior to making

  13. Part 2 : Scientific Information Main applicant: Nierstrasz, Oscar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JĂ€ger, Gerhard

    in the development process. -- Agile Modeling. A key bottleneck to effective software assessment is the rapidPart 2 : Scientific Information Main applicant: Nierstrasz, Oscar Project title: Agile Software 30, 2012 @ 12:07 i #12;SNF Proposal -- Agile Software Assessment ii 1 Summary of the research plan

  14. Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acacio, Manuel

    Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla J. FernÂŽandez, M.E. Acacio Tesla computing solutions. The former is a re- cent heterogeneous chip-multiprocessor (CMP) architecture, multicore, Cell BE, NVIDIA Tesla, CUDA 1 Introduction Nowadays, multicore architectures are omnipresent

  15. Original scientific paper UDC 551.555.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belusic, Danijel

    Original scientific paper UDC 551.555.4 Mesoscale airflow structure over the northern Croatian the Croatian coast as well as a large degree of consistence with the MAP measurements offshore. The model. For this purpose they calculated the Bora wind stress along the Croatian coast based on 10-year data. They obtained

  16. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th conditions. Conditions one and two pertained to the relationship of JCAPE to the Idaho Supplementation Study. These conditions were addressed as part of the ISRP's Idaho Supplementation Study review (ISRP 2003

  17. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Loudenslager, ISRP Chair Subject: Response Request for Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Accord proposal, Idaho Nutrient Enhancement Project (2008-607-00) Background At the Council's July 9, 2010 request

  18. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th specific conditions. Conditions one and two pertained to the relationship of JCAPE to the Idaho recommendation regarding the Idaho Supplementation Study in 2003; consequently, the Council did not request

  19. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 isrp@nwppc.org Review of Idaho Supplementation Studies (IDFG 2003-8 May 22, 2003 #12;ISRP 2003-8 ISS Review i ISRP Review of Idaho Supplementation Studies Contents

  20. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th, 2009 To: W. Bill Booth, Council Chair From: Eric Loudenslager, ISRP Chair Subject: Review of Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Revised Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation projects (1995-057-00 and -01

  1. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Preliminary Review to ISRP comments requested Report Page # 24001 Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research Idaho Fish and Game No and conserve high priority bull and westslope cutthroat trout habitat in Trestle Creek. Idaho Department

  2. Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company SCHEDULING ISSUES Department, University of Idaho Moscow, Idaho 83844-1010, USA and AZAD AZADMANESH Computer Science Department, University of Nebraska at Omaha Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0500, USA and MILES McQUEEN Idaho National Engineering

  3. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th' Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Project 199505702 Background At the Council's April 24, 2007 request, the ISRP reviewed a revised proposal for the Shoshone- Bannock Tribes' Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation

  4. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Chair Subject: Final Review of Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Accord proposal, Idaho Nutrient Idaho Department of Fish and Game's (IDFG) response to a preliminary ISRP review of the Accord proposal

  5. Curriculum of scientific and didactic activity Stefano Lisini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Curriculum of scientific and didactic activity Stefano Lisini Address Dott. Stefano Lisini in Clarinet and in 1990 diplome in didactic of music. From 1990 to 2000 I worked as a professional musician didactic in Mathe- matical Analysis at Universit`a degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale, Italy. · A.Y. 2002

  6. A Generic Grid Interface for Parallel and Adaptive Scientific Computing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    A Generic Grid Interface for Parallel and Adaptive Scientific Computing. Part I: Abstract Framework definition of a grid for al- gorithms solving partial differential equations. Unlike previous ap- proaches [2, 3], our grids have a hierarchical structure. This makes them suitable for geometric multigrid

  7. Exploring Mercury: Scientific Results from the MESSENGER Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    #12;Exploring Mercury: Scientific Results from the MESSENGER Mission Larry R. Nittler Carnegie-Cahill · MESSENGER Science Team, Engineers, Mission Operations (APL) #12;Mars Mercury · Naked-eye planet, but very difficult to observe due to proximity to Sun May 12, 2011, from NZ (M. White, Flickr) Mercury Venus Jupiter

  8. NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Graphene and artificial graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbondandolo, Alberto

    NEST Scientific Report 2007-2009 Graphene 43 Graphene and artificial graphene T his area-layer graphene behave like massless fermions. Graphene is a first remarkable and clean example of the impact of a potential with honeycomb structure on the electronic states and dynamics. In graphene the crystalline

  9. SCIENTIFIC HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Petrus C.

    scientific results from the ESA/NASA SOHO mission, with a special emphasis on remote sensing observations are \\Gamma to study the solar interior, using the techniques of helioseismology, \\Gamma to study the heating to investigate the solar wind and its acceleration processes, again by remote sensing, and by in situ particle

  10. An Analysis of Scientific Literature Related to the Florida Panther

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beier, Paul

    R. Vaughan Michael J. Conroy Howard Quigley December 2003 Bureau of Wildlife Diversity Conservation Michael J. Conroy3 Howard Quigley4 1School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ 86011, P., M. R. Vaughan, M. J. Conroy, and H. Quigley. 2003. An analysis of scientific literature related

  11. Calendar | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    15:31 17 18 19 Communications 2014-09-19 16:02 20 39 21 22 Sources for Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Reports 2014-09-22 09:38 sowerst@osti.gov 2014-09-22 09:56...

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 171B SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the World Wide Web at http://www-odp.tamu.edu/publications. D I S C L A I M E R This publication and the Pollution Prevention and Safety Panel. #12;Leg 171B Scientific Prospectus Page 3 ABSTRACT The origin of deep in which deep-water formation and global temperature gradients may have been much different from well

  13. Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallis, George

    that occurred on a production site of EGEE and the troubleshooting process for each case. Finally, we proposeParallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company FAILURE MANAGEMENT IN GRIDS infrastructure [1] in the context #12;Parallel Processing Letters of a drug-design effort [12], indicate

  14. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  15. Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

  16. Patient perceptions of 595 nm pulsed dye laser through glass compression in the treatment of thick port wine stains and superficial venous malformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klapman, Marvin H; Sosa, Valentina B; Mattson-Gates, Gail F; Baker, Cynthia N; Ong, Victor L; Yao, Janis F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23. PubMed 2. Boffa MJ. Pulsed dye laser treatment of thick/Patient perceptions of 595 nm pulsed dye laser through glasswith the 595 nm pulse dye laser, we have sometimes

  17. 595 nm long pulsed dye laser with a hydrocolloid dressing for the treatment of hypergranulation tissue on the scalp in postsurgical defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Megan N; Landau, Jennifer M; Goldberg, Leonard H; Marquez, Denise; Vergilis-Kalner, Irene J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and L.H. Goldberg, Pulsed dye laser for the treatment of595 nm long pulsed dye laser with a hydrocolloid dressingtreated with a 595 nm pulsed dye laser and hydrocolloid

  18. A Multi-chain Measurements Averaging TDC Implemented in a 40 nm FPGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Shen; Shubin Liu; Binxiang Qi; Qi An; Shengkai Liao; Chengzhi Peng; Weiyue Liu

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision and high resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented in a 40 nm fabrication process Virtex-6 FPGA is presented in this paper. The multi-chain measurements averaging architecture is used to overcome the resolution limitation determined by intrinsic cell delay of the plain single tapped-delay chain. The resolution and precision are both improved with this architecture. In such a TDC, the input signal is connected to multiple tapped-delay chains simultaneously (the chain number is M), and there is a fixed delay cell between every two adjacent chains. Each tapped-delay chain is just a plain TDC and should generate a TDC time for a hit input signal, so totally M TDC time values should be got for a hit signal. After averaging, the final TDC time is obtained. A TDC with 3 ps resolution (i.e. bin size) and 6.5 ps precision (i.e. RMS) has been implemented using 8 parallel tapped-delay chains. Meanwhile the plain TDC with single tapped-delay chain yields 24 ps resolution and 18 ps precision.

  19. Stress-induced piezoelectric field in GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tawfik, Wael Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511 (Egypt); Hyeon, Gil Yong; Lee, June Key, E-mail: junekey@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the influence of the built-in piezoelectric field induced by compressive stress on the characteristics of GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) prepared on sapphire substrates of different thicknesses. As the sapphire substrate thickness was reduced, the compressive stress in the GaN layer was released, resulting in wafer bowing. The wafer bowing-induced mechanical stress altered the piezoelectric field, which in turn reduced the quantum confined Stark effect in the InGaN/GaN active region of the LED. The flat-band voltage was estimated by measuring the applied bias voltage that induced a 180° phase shift in the electro-reflectance (ER) spectrum. The piezoelectric field estimated by the ER spectra changed by ?110?kV/cm. The electroluminescence spectral peak wavelength was blue-shifted, and the internal quantum efficiency was improved by about 22% at a high injection current of 100?mA. The LED on the 60-?m-thick sapphire substrate exhibited the highest light output power of ?59?mW at an injection current of 100?mA, with the operating voltage unchanged.

  20. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  1. UV wavelengths are between 100-400nm They are widely used in the lab for cross-linking, microscopy, germicidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    for photolithography (365nm used primarily) · How to Limit Danger ­ Whenever you switch to use the fluorescent bulb

  2. Page 312 Courses: Environmental Studies and Planning (ENSP) Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    -2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3) An examination of philosophical issues; concepts of extending and Critical Thinking). ENSP 307 ENviroNmENtal hiStory (4) History of the American environment and the ways). ENSP 308 ENviroNmENtal litEraturE (3) A survey of great American environmental books, including H. D

  3. Morphological Stability and Specific Resistivity of sub-10 nm Silicide Films of Ni1 xPtx on Si Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S; Yang, B; Zhu, Y; Rossnagel, S; Gaudet, S; Kellock, A; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter studies the morphological stability and specific resistivity of sub-10 nm silicide films of Ni, Ni{sub 0.95}Pt{sub 0.05}, and Ni{sub 0.9}Pt{sub 0.1} formed on Si(100) substrate. When the deposited metal films are below 1 to 4 nm in thickness depending on the Pt content, the resultant silicide films tend to become epitaxially aligned to the Si substrate and hence exhibit an extraordinary morphological stability up to 800 C. The presence of Pt in the silicides increases the film resistivity through alloy scattering, but alleviates, owing to a reduced electron mean free path, the frequently encountered sharp increase in resistivity in the sub-10 nm regime.

  4. Broadband superluminescent diodes with bell-shaped spectra emitting in the range from 800 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreeva, E V; Il'ichenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Lapin, P I [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company 'M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum-well superluminescent diodes (SLD) with extremely thin active (AlGa)As and (InGa)As layers and centre wavelengths about 810, 840, 860 and 880 nm are experimentally studied. Their emission spectrum possesses the shape close to Gaussian, its FWHM being 30 – 60 nm depending on the length of the active channel and the level of pumping. Under cw injection, the output power of light-emitting modules based on such SLDs can amount to 1.0 – 25 mW at the output of a single-mode fibre. It is demonstrated that the operation lifetime of these devices exceeds 30000 hours. Based on the light-emitting modules the prototypes of combined BroadLighter series light sources are implemented having a bell-shaped spectrum with the width up to 100 nm. (optical radiation sources)

  5. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50?nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attota, Ravikiran, E-mail: Ravikiran.attota@nist.gov; Dixson, Ronald G. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30?nm–40?nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22?nm (k?=?2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  6. Electron Transport Behavior on Gate Length Scaling in Sub-50 nm GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jaeheon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kangnam University, 111 Gugal-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-city, Gyeonggi-do, Korea 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Short channel GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) have been fabricated with gate length to 20 nm, in order to examine the characteristics of sub-50 nm MESFET scaling. Here the rise in the measured transconductance is mainly attributed to electron velocity overshoot. For gate lengths below 40 nm, however, the transconductance drops suddenly. The behavior of velocity overshoot and its degradation is investigated and simulated by using a transport model based on the retarded Langevin equation (RLE). This indicates the existence of a minimum acceleration length needed for the carriers to reach the overshoot velocity. The argument shows that the source resistance must be included as an internal element, or appropriate boundary condition, of relative importance in any model where the gate length is comparable to the inelastic mean free path of the carriers.

  7. Scientific Drilling (1989) 1: 21-26 0 Springer-Veriag1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific Drilling (1989) 1: 21-26 Scientific Drilling 0 Springer-Veriag1989 Shear-wave splitting Anisotropy Project, British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3LA, Scotland

  8. The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  10. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  11. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  12. NREL: News Feature - The (Scientific) Flight of the Falcon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National NuclearoverAcquisitionEnergy153014The (Scientific)

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis scientific computing Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of - Energy and Geoscience Institute, Geothermal Research Group Collection: Renewable Energy ; Geosciences 11 Advanced Research in High Performance Scientific Computing...

  14. Scientific and Technical Information | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Affairs Grants & Contracts Support Human Resources and Administration Information Technology and Services Program Direction and Analysis Scientific and Technical Information...

  15. Using Advanced Scientific Diving Technologies to Assess the Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, John A.; Williams, Greg D.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Blanton, Michael L.

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific diving can provide unique information for addressing complex environmental issues in the marine environment and is applied to a variety of increasingly important issues throughout Puget Sound, including habitat degradation, endangered species, biological availability of contaminants, and the effects of overwater structures and shoreline protection features. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory uses trained scientific divers in conjunction with advanced technologies to collect in-situ information best obtained through direct observation and requiring minimal environmental disturbance. For example, advances in underwater communications allow divers to discuss observations and data collection techniques in real time, both with each other and with personnel on the surface. Other examples include the use of Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON), an underwater camera used to capture digital images of benthic structures, fish, and organisms during low light and high turbidity levels; the use of voice-narrated underwater video; and the development of sediment collection methods yielding one-meter cores. The combination of using trained scientific SCUBA divers and advanced underwater technologies is a key element in addressing multifaceted environmental problems, resulting in a more comprehensive understanding of the underwater environment and more reliable data with which to make resource management decisions.

  16. Managing scientific software complexity with Bocca and CCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Allan A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Norris, Boyana [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Armstrong, Robert C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In high-performance scientific software development, the emphasis is often on short time to first solution. Even when the development of new components mostly reuses existing components or libraries and only small amounts of new code must be created, dealing with the component glue code and software build processes to obtain complete applications is still tedious and error-prone. Component-based software meant to reduce complexity at the application level increases complexity to the extent that the user must learn and remember the interfaces and conventions of the component model itself. To address these needs, we introduce Bocca, the first tool to enable application developers to perform rapid component prototyping while maintaining robust software-engineering practices suitable to HPC environments. Bocca provides project management and a comprehensive build environment for creating and managing applications composed of Common Component Architecture components. Of critical importance for high-performance computing (HPC) applications, Bocca is designed to operate in a language-agnostic way, simultaneously handling components written in any of the languages commonly used in scientific applications: C, C++, Fortran, Python and Java. Bocca automates the tasks related to the component glue code, freeing the user to focus on the scientific aspects of the application. Bocca embraces the philosophy pioneered by Ruby on Rails for web applications: start with something that works, and evolve it to the user's purpose.

  17. Development of an Electrostatic Energy Analyzer (ESA) for the EQUARS Scientific Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of an Electrostatic Energy Analyzer (ESA) for the EQUARS Scientific Satellite R. S of an electrostatic energy analyzer to be launched onboard the EQUARS Scientific Satellite. The instrument of scientific instrument: ESA: Electrostatic Energy Analyzer 2. Physical parameters to be measured: Electron

  18. Scientific Drilling, No. 13, April 2012 35 Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Drilling, No. 13, April 2012 35 Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress Test in Scientific Ocean Drilling by Moe Kyaw Thu, Takatoshi Ito, Weiren Lin, Mai-Linh Doan, David Tobindoi:10.2204/iodp.sd.13.06.2011 Progress Reports Introduction Scientific ocean drilling's first in situ

  19. Category 1: Epistemology (EPIST) Scientific knowledge is the most objective form of knowledge.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobern, William W.

    ) Science helps develop our natural resources such as coal, gas, oil, and solar energy. Scientific knowledge today because of scientific knowledge. The development of our natural resources, such as coal, gas, oil knowledge is the truest form of knowledge. Alpha = 0.7475 Category 2: Scientific & the Economy (ECON

  20. 2009 fault tolerance for extreme-scale computing workshop, Albuquerque, NM - March 19-20, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, D. S.; Daly, J.; DeBardeleben, N.; Elnozahy, M.; Kramer, B.; Lathrop, S.; Nystrom, N.; Milfeld, K.; Sanielevici, S.; Scott, S.; Votta, L.; Louisiana State Univ.; Center for Exceptional Computing; LANL; IBM; Univ. of Illinois; Shodor Foundation; Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center; Texas Advanced Computing Center; ORNL; Sun Microsystems

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the third in a series of petascale workshops co-sponsored by Blue Waters and TeraGrid to address challenges and opportunities for making effective use of emerging extreme-scale computing. This workshop was held to discuss fault tolerance on large systems for running large, possibly long-running applications. The main point of the workshop was to have systems people, middleware people (including fault-tolerance experts), and applications people talk about the issues and figure out what needs to be done, mostly at the middleware and application levels, to run such applications on the emerging petascale systems, without having faults cause large numbers of application failures. The workshop found that there is considerable interest in fault tolerance, resilience, and reliability of high-performance computing (HPC) systems in general, at all levels of HPC. The only way to recover from faults is through the use of some redundancy, either in space or in time. Redundancy in time, in the form of writing checkpoints to disk and restarting at the most recent checkpoint after a fault that cause an application to crash/halt, is the most common tool used in applications today, but there are questions about how long this can continue to be a good solution as systems and memories grow faster than I/O bandwidth to disk. There is interest in both modifications to this, such as checkpoints to memory, partial checkpoints, and message logging, and alternative ideas, such as in-memory recovery using residues. We believe that systematic exploration of these ideas holds the most promise for the scientific applications community. Fault tolerance has been an issue of discussion in the HPC community for at least the past 10 years; but much like other issues, the community has managed to put off addressing it during this period. There is a growing recognition that as systems continue to grow to petascale and beyond, the field is approaching the point where we don't have any choice but to address this through R&D efforts.

  1. Crowder College MARET Center Facility Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rand, Amy

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was a research facility construction project and did not include actual research. The new facility will benefit the public by providing training opportunities for students, as well as incubator and laboratory space for entrepreneurs in the areas of alternative and renewable energies. The 9,216 -square-foot Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center was completed in late 2011. Classes in the MARET Center began in the spring 2012 semester. Crowder College takes pride in the MARET Center, a focal point of the campus, as the cutting edge in education, applied research and commercial development in the growing field of green technology.

  2. The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar Changwoo Nahm,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar cells Changwoo Nahm,1 nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). At the optimum Au/TiO2 mass ratio of 0.05, the power nanoparticles were also introduced to the electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the solar-cell

  3. Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related primarily to pigmenta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (400­1000 nm) is related physiology and relationships between plants and their growth environment. We studied reflectance of two co collected from 24 sites and white spruce from 30 sites. Overall, reflectance spectra of the two species were

  4. Atomic absorption monitor for deposition process control of aluminum at 394 nm using frequency-doubled diode laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejer, Martin M.

    Atomic absorption monitor for deposition process control of aluminum at 394 nm using frequency November 1995 A monitor for Al vapor density based on atomic absorption AA using a frequency of atomic absorption AA as a monitor for thickness and composition control in physical vapor deposi- tion

  5. High resolution photoelectron images and D{sup +} photofragment images following 532-nm photolysis of D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W.; Neyer, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Heck, A.J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-resonant ionization and dissociation of D{sub 2} by intense 532-nm laser light is studied by a variation of the ``Ion Imaging`` technique called ``Velocity Mapping``. Images of the both the photoelectrons and D{sup +} photofragments are obtained and analyzed at two different laser intensities. Results are compared to previous studies and several differences are discussed.

  6. Dynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas for a monochromatic 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    the critical density, a narrower EUV x-ray spectrum and a higher conversion efficiency from laserDynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas for a monochromatic 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet source-0417 ABSTRACT Dynamics of laser-produced Sn-based plasmas were investigated for a monochromatic EUV lithography

  7. Long-period fiber grating inscription under high-intensity 352 nm femtosecond irradiation: Three-photon absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikogosyan, David N.

    Long-period fiber grating inscription under high-intensity 352 nm femtosecond irradiation: Three invented in the mid- 1990s [1]. They represent a periodic change of refractive index in an optical fiber.N. Nikogosyan). Optics Communications 255 (2005) 81­90 www.elsevier.com/locate/optcom #12;recording techniques

  8. June 15, 2004 / Vol. 29, No. 12 / OPTICS LETTERS 1357 Highly coherent light at 13 nm generated by use of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Randy

    , and in developing new types of nano- probe. However, many EUV sources, such as synchrotrons and undulators1 and high Bartels et al. demonstrated that EUV light produced by HHG in gas-filled hollow waveguides exhibits full spatial coherence at wavelengths around 30 nm.3 The extended propagation length in the hollow

  9. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  10. High-order harmonic generation in atomic hydrogen at 248 nm: Dipole-moment versus acceleration spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Chu, Shih-I

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the high-order harmonic-generation (HG) spectra of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm based on the Fourier transform of the expectation values of the induced dipole moment and acceleration. The calculations were performed by extending a...

  11. South Of Espanola; North Of Pojoaque At Intersection of NM399 and US 84/285 Turn onto 399(WSW),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    will be on your left, Go to third house on right (#18 on fence), 1.5 story adobe with passive solar Windows facing at Affordable Price Or Possible Lease or Lease to Purchase 18 Terrace Farm Rd LaMesilla, NM 2 story passive the Puye Ruins on Santa Clara Pueblo. House is oriented with huge solar windows facing due south toward

  12. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  13. Scientific Certainty Argumentation Methods (SCAMs): Science and the Politics of Doubt*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freudenburg, Wm R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conclude that actual levels of global warming are proving towarming is real and anthropogenic, with global concentrations of carbon dioxide having reached the highest levels

  14. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  15. Lester to lead ORISE's scientific and technical peer review program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C HLester to lead ORISE's scientific

  16. Scientific and Technical Information Publications FAQ's | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2)Science HighlightAlanExchange ProgramScientific

  17. Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperiments |Anhui Kangyuan Electric PowerAnkur Scientific

  18. NERSC Role in Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine Yelick

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Opticalhttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate -News,Advanced Scientific

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Scientific Visit on Crystalline Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for US PatentOperational EnergyScientific Research PMTF

  20. Scientific Societies, E-print Network -- Energy, science, and technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)Data MovementScientific