Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fisher Scientific Fisher Scientific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The furnace is heated by electric resistance elements ... nearest Fisher scientific Service District Office. ... Failure to heat Heating program not entered or ...

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Scientific Access  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Access The APS is a open user facility that makes beam time available to the international scientific community through a peer-reviewed proposal process. Two access...

3

Scientific Awards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nominations Scientific Awards Awards Program achievement aocs application award Awards baldwin distinguished division memorial nomination poster program recognizing research service ...

4

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Scientific Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science & Education: Science & Education: Science Highlights Conferences Seminars & Meetings Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Subscribe to APS Recent Publications rss feed Scientific Software Scientists and researchers at the APS develop custom scientific software to help with acquisition and analysis of beamline data. Several packages are available for a variety of platforms and uses. General Diffraction Powder Diffraction Crystallography Synchrotron Radiation / Optical Elements Time-Resolved EXAFS Visualization / Data Processing Detector Controls General Diffraction fprime FPRIME/Absorb This provides utilities for computing approximate x-ray scattering cross sections (f, f' and f") for individual elements using the Cromer & Liberman

6

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tract OO - NM 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tract OO - NM 06 Tract OO - NM 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL TRACT OO (NM.06 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Site was released by the AEC for sale and unrestricted use in 1976 Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Los Alamos , New Mexico NM.06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NM.06-1 Site Operations: Site consists of an area of 3.85 acres on the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory compound. This tract of land was a location for a fire alarm equipment building and part of power plant and several warehouses. NM.06-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiological survey report declares the area to be free of residual radioactive contamination from site operations NM.06-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None

7

Scientific Working Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TWGDAM 1988). SWGDOG, Scientific Working Group on Dogs and Orthogonal Detection Guidelines, 2004. SWGTOX, Scientific ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Scientific Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contributions of the Tevatron contributions of the Tevatron experiments and accelerator complex Scientific Highlights Collider experiments The Tevatron's collider program began proton-antiproton collisions in 1985 and has led to about 1,000 Ph.D. degrees and about a paper a week through work on the CDF and DZero experiments. Discovered: * the top quark and determined its mass to a high precision * two distinct production mechanisms for the top quark: pair and single production * five B baryons (2 cascade, 1 omega and 2 sigma _b) * B c meson * Y(4140), a new quark structure * B s oscillations Observed: * strongest evidence yet for violation of matter-antimatter

9

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIÑAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morán; Jesús Favela; Ana María Martínez Enríquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Category:Albuquerque, NM | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Albuquerque, NM" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 66 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 65 KB SVHospital Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVHospital Albuquerque... 80 KB SVLargeHotel Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVLargeHotel Albuquerq... 64 KB SVLargeOffice Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVLargeOffice Albuquer... 82 KB SVMediumOffice Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png SVMediumOffice Albuque... 69 KB SVMidriseApartment Albuquerque NM Public Service Co of NM.png

11

Strategic plan for scientific computing  

SciTech Connect

Computing technology continues to undergo rapid and dramatic changes. Technological improvements in both hardware and software continue to permit analysts to model problems much more realistically than heretofore practicable. New visualization technologies vastly increase our ability to understand the results of those complex models. The mission of SRS is also undergoing very rapid change as a result of international events. While the typical demands of reactor oriented calculations may decline, environmental regulations require us to study new classes of problems in ever increasing detail. Hence, the computational workload is actually increasing rapidly. At the same time, the budget constraints demand a continued increase in cost effectiveness of scientific computing. A comprehensive strategy for scientific computing is required to adapt to these changes and still produce timely solutions to ensure continued safe operation of SRS facilities. An important goal of this strategy is to ensure that productivity gains available with new systems and technologies are truly achieved.

Church, J.P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NEHRP - Scientific Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scientific Data. Chile Earthquake Reconnaissance Meeting Earthquake engineering implications of the February 27, 2010 Chilean earthquake. ...

13

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

14

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

15

Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers | Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers Print page Print page Email page Email page Roles and Responsibilities Last updated: February 17...

16

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

18

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

19

Sandia National Laboratory (NM) Former Workers, Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (NM) Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects...

20

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chupadera Mesa NM Site - NM 04  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Chupadera Mesa NM Site - NM 04 Chupadera Mesa NM Site - NM 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Chupadera Mesa, NM Alternate Name(s): None Location: Approximately 28 miles northeast of the Trinity nuclear test site on the White Sands Missile Range, Northeast of Bingham, New Mexico NM.04-5 Historical Operations: Received the deposition of longer-lived radionuclides in the fallout from the nuclear test, primarily cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-239, cobalt-60, and europium-155. NM.04-2 NM.04-5 Eligibility Determination: No further action required. Radiation levels below cleaunup criteria. NM.04-1 NM.04-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NM.04-3 NM.04-4 Site Status: NA - No Further Action Required NM.04-1 NM.04-2 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

22

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01 Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Bayo Canyon, NM Alternate Name(s): Bayo Canyon Area Bayo Canyon (TA-10) Site NM.01-2 Location: Canyon in the Pajarito Plateau Region in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos, NM NM.01-3 Historical Operations: Used in 1944-1961 by the MED and later AEC at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a firing site for conventional and high-explosives experiments involving natural and depleted uranium, strontium, and lanthanum as a radiation source for blast diagnosis. NM.01-3 NM.01-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NM.01-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NM.01-3 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis NM.01-5 NM.01-6 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

23

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis High Pressure LiquidSoft-Matter Surface Scattering Powder Diffraction SAXS Surface & Interface Scattering XAS X-ray Micros.Imaging Scientific Interest Groups...

24

Review of technology for 157-nm lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the critical issues facing the implementation of 157-nm lithography as a sub-100-nm technology. The status of the present technology for mask materials, pellicles, optical materials, coatings, and resists is presented.

A. K. Bates; M. Rothschild; T. M. Bloomstein; T. H. Fedynyshyn; R. R. Kunz; V. Liberman; M. Switkes

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Scientific Software Bakari Jacobs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Division, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of Energy. The workScientific Software Bakari Jacobs Livingstone College Research Alliance in Math and Science Alliance in Math and Science program is sponsored by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational

26

APS Scientific Advisory Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) The SAC is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: To evaluate the scientific output and facility utilization for all APS sectors. To examine performance and recommend appropriate beamtime allocation for existing Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). To evaluate Letters of Intent and scientific proposals for new and reconstituted CATs. To provide advice to and review decisions by APS management on special operations support for CATs. To review Special Program proposals, a new mode of access that will guarantee 10-30% the beam time per year on any sector for a finite period of time. To assist the APS with development of policies and other issues as appropriate. SAC members Participants in the Scientific Advisory Committee.

27

157-nm lithography with high numerical aperture lens for sub-70 nm node  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For sub-70 nm semiconductor devices, 157 nm lithography using F2 lasers is one of the most important technologies. Several candidates for critical components of 157 nm lithography, such as the exposure tool, resist materials and processing ... Keywords: 157 nm lithography, F2 laser, fluoropolymer resist, phase-shifting mask

Toshiro Itani; Wataru Wakamiya; Julian Cashmore; Malcolm Gower

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

29

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

30

JGI - Scientific Posters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Publications News and Publications News Releases Science Highlights JGI in the News Notable Scientific Publications Scientific Posters The Primer Templates and Logos Scientific Posters Note: neither these posters nor their contents may be reproduced except by permission of JGI. Illumina Production Sequencing at the DOE Joint Genome Institute - Workflow and Optimizations (Bay Area Illumina User Meeting 2011) Angela Tarver, Alison Fern, Matthew San Diego, Megan Kennedy, Matthew Zane, Christopher Daum, Christopher Hack, Eric Tang, Shweta Deshpande, Jan-Fang Cheng, Simon Roberts, Melanie Alexandre, Miranda Harmon-Smith, Susan Lucas Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi (DOE JGI User Meeting 2011) Robert W. Riley, Asaf Salamov, Igor Grigoriev, David

31

JGI - Scientific Posters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Publications News and Publications News Releases Science Highlights JGI in the News Notable Scientific Publications Scientific Posters The Primer Templates and Logos Scientific Posters - Archive Note: neither these posters nor their contents may be reproduced except by permission of JGI. JGI Sequencing Projects: Statistics and Timelines (JGI User Meeting 2007) Tijana Glavina del Rio, Kerrie Barry, Lynne Goodwin, Miranda Harmon-Smith, Harris Shapiro, Susan Lucas and David Bruce. What's new in project management? A Look at the JGI Project Management Office (JGI User Meeting 2007) David Bruce, Lynne Goodwin, Kerrie Barry, Susannah Tringe, Tijana Glavina del Rio Comparison of Protocols for Isolating Large Insert Clone DNA that is Suitable for High Throughput Library Construction (JGI User Meeting 2007)

32

Scientific Innovation Through Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.emsl.pnl.gov www.emsl.pnl.gov National asset for high- impact science As a national scientific user facility, EMSL provides scientific solutions to scientists from universities, industry, and government who seek out our unique capabilities and scientific expertise for their most challenging research objectives. At EMSL, we collaborate with these scientists-our users-to enable discovery and innovative solutions for the nation's energy, environmental, and national security problems. EMSL user projects by funding source in FY11. ACCELERATING INNOVATION ACROSS AMERICA PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION User facilities provide training ground for educating next generation of scientists EMSL supports postdoctoral researchers, as well as graduate, undergraduate, and high school

33

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

34

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

35

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

36

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

37

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

JGI - Notable Scientific Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notable Scientific Publications Notable Scientific Publications May 5, 2013 Nonhybrid, finished microbial genome assemblies from long-read SMRT sequencing data. (Nature Methods.) We present a hierarchical genome-assembly process (HGAP) for high-quality de novo microbial genome assemblies using only a single, long-insert shotgun DNA library in conjunction with Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing. Our method uses the longest reads as seeds to recruit all other reads for construction of highly accurate preassembled reads through a directed acyclic graph–based consensus procedure, which we follow with assembly using off-the-shelf long-read assemblers. March 24, 2013 The high-quality draft genome of peach (Prunus persica) identifies unique patterns of genetic diversity, domestication and genome evolution. (Nature

39

Power Consumption at 40 and 45 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At 40 and 45 nm process nodes, power has become the primary factor for FPGA selection. This white paper details how Xilinx designed for this new reality in its recently introduced Spartan®-6 (45 nm) and Virtex®-6 (40 nm) FPGA families, achieving dramatic power reductions over previous generation Spartan-3A and Virtex-5 devices. Accomplishing such a significant reduction in power consumption required major engineering innovations. At 40 and 45 nm, transistor leakage increases exponentially, making static power a major challenge. Additionally, the desire for higher performance continues to drive core clock rates higher, increasing dynamic power. This white paper describes how Xilinx addressed theses challenges by using engineering innovations in Spartan-6 and Virtex-6 FPGAs that keep these families ahead of the curve. © 2009 Xilinx, Inc. XILINX, the Xilinx logo, Virtex, Spartan, ISE, and other designated brands included herein are trademarks of Xilinx in the United States and other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Matt Klein

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE * OSTI * Go Mobile Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and data and data by Lorrie Johnson on Mon, 5 Nov, 2012 WorldWideScience WorldWideScience.org now offers the capability to search scientific data collections. Six new data sources have been added to WWS.org, representing a significant milestone in improving access to scientific data from around the world. Users seeking scientific datasets can conduct a real-time, one-stop search and immediately gain access not only to the metadata but to the actual scientific data itself. WorldWideScience.org's unique federated searching capability meets many of the challenges users face in the discovery of scientific and numeric data. Unless users are very familiar with a particular data center or know that specific datasets exist, it is very difficult to identify and locate scientific data. WWS.org provides access to over 80 of the

42

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

43

HSQ double patterning process for 12 nm resolution x-ray zone plates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soft x-ray zone plate microscopy is a powerful nano-analytic technique used for a wide variety of scientific and technological studies. Pushing its spatial resolution to 10 nm and below is highly desired and feasible due to the short wavelength of soft x-rays. Instruments using Fresnel zone plate lenses achieve a spatial resolution approximately equal to the smallest, outer most zone width. We developed a double patterning zone plate fabrication process based on a high-resolution resist, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), to bypass the limitations of conventional single exposure fabrication to pattern density, such as finite beam size, scattering in resist and modest intrinsic resist contrast. To fabricate HSQ structures with zone widths in the order of 10 nm on gold plating base, a surface conditioning process with (3-mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane, 3-MPT, is used, which forms a homogeneous hydroxylation surface on gold surface and provides good anchoring for the desired HSQ structures. Using the new HSQ double patterning process, coupled with an internally developed, sub-pixel alignment algorithm, we have successfully fabricated in-house gold zone plates of 12 nm outer zones. Promising results for 10 nm zone plates have also been obtained. With the 12 nm zone plates, we have achieved a resolution of 12 nm using the full-field soft x-ray microscope, XM-1.

Chao, Weilun; Kim, Jihoon; Rekawa, Senajith; Fischer, Peter; Anderson, Erik H.

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training 2012 Training 2012 February 1-2, 2012 NERSC Oakland Scientific Facility Debugging with DDT Woo-Sun Yang NERSC User Services Group Why a Debugger? * It makes it easy to find a bug in your program, by controlling pace of running your program - Examine execution flow of your code - Check values of variables * Typical usage scenario - Set breakpoints (places where you want your program to stop) and let your program run - Or advance one line in source code at a time - Check variables when a breakpoint is reached 2 DDT * Distributed Debugging Tool by Allinea * Graphical parallel debugger capable of debugging - Serial - OpenMP - MPI - CAF - UPC - CUDA - NERSC doesn't have a license on Dirac * Intuitive and simple user interfaces * Scalable * Available on Hopper, Franklin and Carver

45

Scientific Data Movement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data Movement enabled by the DYNES ∗ Instrument Jason Zurawski Internet2 zurawski@internet2.edu Eric Boyd Internet2 eboyd@internet2.edu Tom Lehman ISI East tlehman@east.isi.edu Shawn McKee University of Michigan smckee@umich.edu Azher Mughal California Institute of Technology azher@hep.caltech.edu Harvey Newman California Institute of Technology newman@hep.caltech.edu Paul Sheldon Vanderbilt University paul.sheldon @vanderbilt.edu Steve Wolff Internet2 swolff@internet2.edu Xi Yang ISI East xyang@east.isi.edu ABSTRACT Scientific innovation continues to increase requirements for the computing and networking infrastructures of the world. Collaborative partners, instrumentation, storage, and processing facilities are often geographically and topo- logically separated, thus complicating the problem of end- to-end data management. Networking

46

Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transition 795-nm rubidium laser," Opt. Lett. 32, 2423- S.transition 795- nm rubidium laser using 3 He buffer gas",transition 795-nm Rubidium laser with He buffer gas" (

Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Throwback Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thursdays Celebrate Scientific Supercomputing A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center in A Cray-1 supercomputer arrives at the Magnetic...

48

ALS Scientific Advisory Committee Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This document was revised and approved December 18, 2008. I. FUNCTION AND REPORTING The ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) is advisory to the Berkeley Lab Director through...

49

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

50

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

51

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

52

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

53

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

54

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

55

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

56

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

57

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Trinity Test Site - NM 17  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Trinity Test Site - NM 17 Trinity Test Site - NM 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TRINITY TEST SITE (NM.17 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - U.S. Army controls site Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: missile range - 30 miles west of Carrizozo , White Sands , New Mexico NM.17-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NM.17-1 Site Operations: Detonation of the first atomic bomb occurred at this site. NM.17-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated NM.17-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Fission fragments NM.17-1 Radiological Survey(s): NM.17-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - U.S. Army controls site NM.17-1 Also see Documents Related to TRINITY TEST SITE NM.17-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist; Jones to File; Subject:

58

Social networking and scientific gateways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online social networking has significantly increased in popularity over the past several years, with sites such as Facebook now boasting over 300 million members. Scientific gateways have much to gain by incorporating social networking functionality. ... Keywords: Elgg, Facebook, Ning, scientific gateways, social networking

Roger Curry; Cameron Kiddle; Rob Simmonds

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sandia National Laboratory (NM), Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (NM), Former Production Workers Screening Projects...

60

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03 Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Acid/Pueblo Canyon, NM Alternate Name(s): Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (TA-45) Acid/Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon NM.03-3 Location: Canyons in the Pajarito Plateau Region in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos, NM NM.03-3 Historical Operations: Late 1943 or early 1944, head of the south fork of Acid Canyon received untreated liquid waste containing tritium and isotopes of strontium, cesium, uranium, plutonium, and americium discharged from main acid sewer lines and subsequently from the TA-3 plutonium treatment plant. NM.03-3 Eligibility Determination: Radiological Survey(s): Verification Surveys NM.03-5 NM.03-6 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis and Federal Register Notice NM.03-2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

63

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

64

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

65

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

66

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

67

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

68

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

69

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

70

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

71

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

72

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

73

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Scientific Labs | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Labs Scientific Labs SHARE SNS Scientific Labs Meilleur-lab-students-300.jpg Students in the SNS chemistry lab practice pipetting water. A new complex of laboratories is now open at SNS, providing a flexible, mobile environment where users can work efficiently. The labs, on the second floor of the SNS Central Laboratory and Office Building, are built with "green" operations in mind, as well as to optimize the available space for researchers' ever-changing scientific needs. With overhead utilities and mobile furniture, the complex's 13 labs allow staff to easily reconfigure the layout of equipment and quickly change an experiment's setup as needed. "We surveyed more than 900 users on what they needed, and they gave us a wish list," says Chrissi Schnell, the Neutron Scattering Science Division

75

DOE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL REPORTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Record Disposition Schedule items listed below are have been consolidated from DOE Records Schedules previously approved over the last 35 years. They apply specifically to those scientific and...

76

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) commemorated its 60-year contribution to accelerating scientific discovery through the preservation and...

78

Topco Scientific Company Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Topco Scientific Company Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Topco Scientific Company Ltd Place Taipei City, Taiwan Sector Solar Product String representation "Its principal a ......

79

Berkeley Lab Scientific Programs: Computing Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data-intensive, international scientific collaborations. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Located at Berkeley Lab, NERSC is the flagship...

80

STI Subject Categories | Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The subject category identifies the scientific discipline of the scientific and technical information (STI) product. An STI product can have multiple applicable categories....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sources for Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Reports You can find full-text scientific and technical reports produced since 1991 online at Information Bridge. If you...

82

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

On September 18, 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) commemorated its 60-year contribution to accelerating scientific...

83

Solar irradiance models and measurements: a comparison in the 220 nm to 240 nm wavelength band  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar irradiance models that assume solar irradiance variations to be due to changes in the solar surface magnetic flux have been successfully used to reconstruct total solar irradiance on rotational as well as cyclical and secular time scales. Modelling spectral solar irradiance is not yet as advanced, and also suffers from a lack of comparison data, in particular on solar-cycle time scales. Here we compare solar irradiance in the 220 nm to 240 nm band as modelled with SATIRE-S and measured by different instruments on the UARS and SORCE satellites. We find good agreement between the model and measurements on rotational time scales. The long-term trends, however, show significant differences. Both SORCE instruments, in particular, show a much steeper gradient over the decaying part of cycle 23 than the modelled irradiance or that measured by UARS/SUSIM.

Unruh, Yvonne C; Krivova, Natalie A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Types of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Types of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Types of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Print page Print page Email page Email page STI is produced and published in various media and formats, including textual, graphical, numeric, multimedia, digital data, technical reports, scientific/technical conference papers and presentations, theses and dissertations, computer software, journal manuscripts and citations, workshop reports, program documents, patents, and other types of technical data. Additionally, program documents encompass needs assessments, progress reports (e.g. semi-annual and annual summaries), workshop reports, etc. Note: "Announce" as used in the context below refers to when the submitter only provides OSTI with an announcement notice (AN 241.1, AN 241.3, AN 241.4, AN 241.5 and AN 241.6) and not the STI product itself. "Submit"

85

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

86

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

87

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

88

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

89

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

90

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

91

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

92

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

93

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

94

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

95

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

96

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

97

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

98

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

99

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

100

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

102

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

103

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

104

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

105

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

106

Scientific Analysis Is Essential to Assess Biofuel Policy Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use change (LUC) estimated by economic models has sparked intense international debate. Models estimate how much LUC might be induced under prescribed scenarios and rely on assumptions to generate LUC values. It is critical to test and validate underlying assumptions with empirical evidence. Furthermore, this modeling approach cannot answer if any specific indirect effects are actually caused by biofuel policy. The best way to resolve questions of causation is via scientific methods. Kim and Dale attempt to address the question of if, rather than how much, market-induced land-use change is currently detectable based on the analysis of historic evidence, and in doing so, explore some modeling assumptions behind the drivers of change. Given that there is no accepted approach to estimate the global effects of biofuel policy on land-use change, it is critical to assess the actual effects of policies through careful analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Decision makers need a valid scientific basis for policy decisions on energy choices.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Confidence in ASCI scientific simulations  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program calls for the development of high end computing and advanced application simulations as one component of a program to eliminate reliance upon nuclear testing in the US nuclear weapons program. This paper presents results from the ASCI program`s examination of needs for focused validation and verification (V and V). These V and V activities will ensure that 100 TeraOP-scale ASCI simulation code development projects apply the appropriate means to achieve high confidence in the use of simulations for stockpile assessment and certification. The authors begin with an examination of the roles for model development and validation in the traditional scientific method. The traditional view is that the scientific method has two foundations, experimental and theoretical. While the traditional scientific method does not acknowledge the role for computing and simulation, this examination establishes a foundation for the extension of the traditional processes to include verification and scientific software development that results in the notional framework known as Sargent`s Framework. This framework elucidates the relationships between the processes of scientific model development, computational model verification and simulation validation. This paper presents a discussion of the methodologies and practices that the ASCI program will use to establish confidence in large-scale scientific simulations. While the effort for a focused program in V and V is just getting started, the ASCI program has been underway for a couple of years. The authors discuss some V and V activities and preliminary results from the ALEGRA simulation code that is under development for ASCI. The breadth of physical phenomena and the advanced computational algorithms that are employed by ALEGRA make it a subject for V and V that should typify what is required for many ASCI simulations.

Ang, J.A.; Trucano, T.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luginbuhl, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners Place Frankfurt, Germany Zip 60325 Sector Renewable Energy Product String representation "SCAIAP speciali ... aned companies." is too long. References Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners is a company located in Frankfurt, Germany . References ↑ "Scientific Alternative Investment Advisory Partners" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Scientific_Alternative_Investment_Advisory_Partners&oldid=350688

109

Scientific Process Automation Improves Data Interaction  

SciTech Connect

This is an article written for the September 09 Scientific Computing magazine about the work of the Scientific Process Automation team of The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program. The SPA team is focused on developing and deploying automated workflows for a variety of computational science domains. Scientific workflows are the formalization of a scientific process that is frequently and repetitively performed.

Critchlow, Terence J.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nano- particles are typically 1 nm to 10 nm in size with a thou- sand to a million atoms. ... III. Tight-Binding Wave Functions for Quantum Dots ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

112

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

113

Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Managers Print page Print page Email page Email page The role of the STI Manager is to stay abreast of DOE's STI Program and coordinate the implementation of STIP best practices at their sites. In general, an STI Manager's responsibilities include: Providing oversight and coordination of contractor compliance with the Contractor Requirements Document of DOE Order 241.1B. - Coordinating the implementation of appropriate sensitivity reviews and release procedures. - Serving as Releasing Official or coordinating designation of Releasing Official(s), including notifying OSTI of such. - Ensuring STI and announcement notices are appropriately reviewed and marked. - Ensuring STI products and associated announcement notices are provided to

114

Microsoft PowerPoint - WAPA Transmission Developments in NM ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

authorities: NM, CO, WY, KS, ND, UT, SD & ID Tasked with planning and financing of transmission lines within their respective states RETA has the additional requirement that...

115

FAPAC-NM Executive Board | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Executive Board FAPAC-NM Executive Board "Promoting Equal Opportunity and Cultural Diversity for APAs in Government" Ligaya White Chairperson Administrative Support Assistant...

116

U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodolog...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific...

117

Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array  

SciTech Connect

A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ORISE: Scientific Peer Review Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Planning Woman participating in a peer review The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) begins the peer review planning process by analyzing the purpose of the funds to be distributed. Because each agency's needs are different, ORISE then designs and manages a flexible, scientific peer review process that can be modified based on a sponsor's regulatory, policy and operational requirements. ORISE's existing tools and systems, and knowledge of reviewing proposals from a government agency perspective, are helping to promote the quality and credibility of scientific information and funded research. ORISE's peer review planning process ensures each objective review is completed on schedule, within budget and with a high degree of process integrity.

119

Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Articles » 2014 » Protein Articles » 2014 » Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 01.06.14 Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory solve fiendishly complicated structures using X-ray savvy and serious computing power. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo The Coherent X-ray Imaging experimental station at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. Photo courtesy of Brad Plummer/SLAC In crystallography experiments at the Coherent X-ray Imaging experimental

120

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Curve Knowledge Investment Curve. Link to larger image. Pace of Scientific Discovery Percentage of R&D Funding for Sharing of Scientific Knowledge at 0%. If there were no sharing,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

October 20-22, 2009 Knowledge Investment Curve Pace of Scientific Discovery Percentage of R&D Funding for Sharing of Scientific Knowledge at 0%. If there were no sharing,...

122

Photo Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Photo Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities | National Nuclear Security Photo Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Photo Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities Home > About Us > Our Locations > Albuquerque Complex > Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM > Photo Album Of FAPAC - NM Activities

123

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 19, 2013-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

virus spread and evolution studied virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling November 19, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 19, 2013-Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are investigating the complex relationships between the spread of the HIV virus in a population (epidemiology) and the actual, rapid evolution of the virus (phylogenetics) within each patient's body. "We have developed novel ways of estimating epidemics dynamics such as who infected whom, and the true population incidence of infection versus mere diagnoses dates," said Thomas Leitner, principal investigator. "Obviously, knowledge about these things is important for public health monitoring, decision making and intervention campaigns, and further to forensic investigations." The team models the uninfected population using traditional differential equations

124

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2008 Special Libraries Association Annual Conference Founding Alliance Members * Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) - Canada * VTT Technical...

125

China: A Rising Scientific (Super-)Power & a Node Embedded in the Global Scientific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China: A Rising Scientific (Super-)Power & a Node Embedded in the Global Scientific Network Cong Cao, Ph.D. University of Nottingham Cong.cao@nottingham.ac.uk #12;· China as a Rising Scientific) #12;The Global Scientific Network (25 nations, 2004) #12;· China as a Node Embedded in the Global

Rambaut, Andrew

126

Scientific Report (2002-2004)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 An overview of our work as well as two recent publications are contained in this scientific report. The work reported here revolves around the discovery of new coherent nonlinear kinetic waves in laser produced plasmas, we call KEEN waves (kinetic, electrostatic electron nonlinear waves), and optical mixing experiments on the Imega laser system at LLE with blue-green light for the exploration of ways to suppress parametric instabilities in long scale length, long pulsewidth laser-plasmas such as those which will be found on NIF or LMJ.

Bedros Afeyan

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

Scientific Potential of Einstein Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Einstein gravitational-wave Telescope (ET) is a design study funded by the European Commission to explore the technological challenges of and scientific benefits from building a third generation gravitational wave detector. The three-year study, which concluded earlier this year, has formulated the conceptual design of an observatory that can support the implementation of new technology for the next two to three decades. The goal of this talk is to introduce the audience to the overall aims and objectives of the project and to enumerate ET's potential to influence our understanding of fundamental physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

B. Sathyaprakash; M. Abernathy; F. Acernese; P. Amaro-Seoane; N. Andersson; K. Arun; F. Barone; B. Barr; M. Barsuglia; M. Beker; N. Beveridge; S. Birindelli; S. Bose; L. Bosi; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; T. Bulik; E. Calloni; G. Cella; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; A. Chincarini; J. Clark; E. Coccia; C. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; S. Danilishin; K. Danzmann; R. De. Salvo; T. Dent; R. De. Rosa; L. Di. Fiore; A. Di. Virgilio; M. Doets; V. Fafone; P. Falferi; R. Flaminio; J. Franc; F. Frasconi; A. Freise; D. Friedrich; P. Fulda; J. Gair; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; K. Glampedakis; C. Gräf; M. Granata; H. Grote; G. Guidi; A. Gurkovsky; G. Hammond; M. Hannam; J. Harms; D. Heinert; M. Hendry; I. Heng; E. Hennes; S. Hild; J. Hough; S. Husa; S. Huttner; G. Jones; F. Khalili; K. Kokeyama; K. Kokkotas; B. Krishnan; T. G. F. Li; M. Lorenzini; H. Lück; E. Majorana; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; I. Martin; C. Michel; Y. Minenkov; N. Morgado; S. Mosca; B. Mours; H. Müller-Ebhardt; P. Murray; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; R. Oshaughnessy; C. D. Ott; C. Palomba; A. Paoli; G. Parguez; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; L. Pinard; W. Plastino; R. Poggiani; P. Popolizio; M. Prato; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; J. Read; T. Regimbau; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; L. Rezzolla; F. Ricci; F. Richard; A. Rocchi; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Santamaria; B. Sassolas; R. Schnabel; C. Schwarz; P. Seidel; A. Sintes; K. Somiya; F. Speirits; K. Strain; S. Strigin; P. Sutton; S. Tarabrin; A. Thüring; J. van den Brand; M van Veggel; C. Van Den Broeck; A. Vecchio; J. Veitch; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; S. Vyatchanin; B. Willke; G. Woan; K. Yamamoto

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, whichOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research The primaryof the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 21, 2013-The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gamma-ray observatory begins gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico August 21, 2013 New site to observe supernovas and supermassive black holes LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 21, 2013-The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory has begun formal operations at its site in Mexico. HAWC is designed to study the origin of very high-energy cosmic rays and observe the most energetic objects in the known universe. This extraordinary observatory, using a unique detection technique that differs from the classical astronomical design of mirrors, - 2 - lenses, and antennae, is a significant boost to international scientific and technical knowledge. "The HAWC observatory will search for signals from dark matter and to study some

130

Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

132

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- TA-1 Manhattan Laboratory - NM 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TA-1 Manhattan Laboratory - NM 11 TA-1 Manhattan Laboratory - NM 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TA-1 MANHATTAN LABORATORY (NM.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Main Technical Area LASL LANL NM.11-1 NM.11-2 NM.11-3 Location: Los Alamos , New Mexico NM.11-3 Evaluation Year: 1985 NM.11-1 Site Operations: Nuclear weapons research and development. NM.11-1 NM.11-3 Site Disposition: Site Disposition NM.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium , Plutonium, Fission Products NM.11-1 NM.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.11-2 NM.11-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP NM.11-1 Also see Documents Related to TA-1 MANHATTAN LABORATORY NM.11-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist; Jones to File; Subject:

135

NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION NM-TRIBE-PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION Location: Tribe NM-TRIBE- PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE HOUSING CORPORATION NM American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Pueblo of Pojoaque Housing Corporation plans to improve the energy efficiency of six tribal homes located in White Sands Village by removing and replacing inefficient single-pane windows with double- pane, metal-clad wood windows. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

136

Photorefractive effect at 775 nm in doped lithium niobate crystals  

SciTech Connect

The photorefractive effect induced by 775-nm laser light on doped lithium niobate crystals is investigated by the direct observation in the far field of the transmitted-beam distortion as a function of time. Measurements performed at various Zr-doping concentrations and different light intensities show that the 775-nm light beam induces a steady-state photorefractive effect comparable to that of 532-nm light, but the observed build-up time of the photovoltaic field is longer by three-orders of magnitude. The 775-nm photorefractivity of lithium niobate crystals doped with 3 mol. % ZrO{sub 2} or with 5.5 mol. % MgO is found to be negligible.

Nava, G.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Degiorgio, V. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, and CNISM, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Ciampolillo, M. V.; Pozza, G.; Sada, C. [Physics and Astronomy Departement, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Design and Implementation of High Speed Memory in 130 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the design and analysis of high speed SRAM memory using ATD (Address Transition Detector) technique in 130 nm with the capacitive load of the memory is 5pF

Sampath Kumar; Arti Noor; Sanjay Kr. Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wallow, "The SEMATECH Berkeley MET pushing EUV development beyond 22-nm half pitch," Proc. SPIE 7636, 76361J (2010); P. Naulleau, C. Anderson, L. Baclea-an, P. Denham, S. George,...

139

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving the Way to Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print Wednesday, 30 March 2011 00:00 As the nanoelectronics industry pushes towards feature sizes of 22 nm and smaller, conventional single-exposure refractive lithography systems used to print circuit patterns onto computer chips will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the industry's future needs. Despite strong progress in EUV lithography over the past decade, significant challenges remain, including defect-free mask fabrication (see Science Highlight Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects), and the development of ultrahigh-resolution photoresist-a light-sensitive material used to form a patterned coating-that simultaneously supports low line-edge roughness (LER), high sensitivity, and sub-22-nm resolution. Using the SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) at ALS Beamline 12.0.1.3, advanced EUV photoresist research can be performed while high-power stand-alone light sources are still being developed. High-quality 16-nm lines and spaces have been printed using the MET, representing the highest resolution ever achieved from a single-exposure projection optical lithography tool.

140

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print As the nanoelectronics industry pushes towards feature sizes of 22 nm and smaller, conventional single-exposure refractive lithography systems used to print circuit patterns onto computer chips will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the industry's future needs. Despite strong progress in EUV lithography over the past decade, significant challenges remain, including defect-free mask fabrication (see Science Highlight Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects), and the development of ultrahigh-resolution photoresist-a light-sensitive material used to form a patterned coating-that simultaneously supports low line-edge roughness (LER), high sensitivity, and sub-22-nm resolution. Using the SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) at ALS Beamline 12.0.1.3, advanced EUV photoresist research can be performed while high-power stand-alone light sources are still being developed. High-quality 16-nm lines and spaces have been printed using the MET, representing the highest resolution ever achieved from a single-exposure projection optical lithography tool.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller Print As the nanoelectronics industry pushes towards feature sizes of 22 nm and smaller, conventional single-exposure refractive lithography systems used to print circuit patterns onto computer chips will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the industry's future needs. Despite strong progress in EUV lithography over the past decade, significant challenges remain, including defect-free mask fabrication (see Science Highlight Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects), and the development of ultrahigh-resolution photoresist-a light-sensitive material used to form a patterned coating-that simultaneously supports low line-edge roughness (LER), high sensitivity, and sub-22-nm resolution. Using the SEMATECH Berkeley Microfield Exposure Tool (MET) at ALS Beamline 12.0.1.3, advanced EUV photoresist research can be performed while high-power stand-alone light sources are still being developed. High-quality 16-nm lines and spaces have been printed using the MET, representing the highest resolution ever achieved from a single-exposure projection optical lithography tool.

142

Scientific Labs | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Nanomaterials-Handling Laboratory opens at SNS New Nanomaterials-Handling Laboratory opens at SNS Rhonda Moody (far right) shows visitors the new nanomaterials lab in the SNS Central Laboratory and Office Building. Rhonda Moody (far right) trains scientific associates in the new nanomaterials lab. The associates provide support for users and staff at the instrument beam lines. (Click for larger image.) The nanomaterials lab on the second floor (near the users area) of the SNS CLO provides researchers with new equipment, as well as additional space. The nanomaterials lab on the second floor (near the users area) of the SNS CLO provides researchers with new equipment, as well as additional space. (Click for larger image.) A new nanomaterials-handling lab recently opened in the second floor lab suites (G-202A) of the SNS Central Laboratory and Office Building (CLO).

143

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Jobs  

Office of Science (SC) Website

about/jobs/ Below is a list of currently about/jobs/ Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the links to the formal position announcements on USAJOBS.gov for more information. en {D1C7BEC4-D6F9-4FB7-A95E-142A6B699F6B}https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/358465200 Computer Scientist Computer Science Research & Partnerships Division Job Title: Computer Scientist Computer Science Research & Partnerships DivisionOffice: Advanced Scientific Computing ResearchURL: USAjobs listingVacancy Number: 14-DE-SC-HQ-005Location:

144

Computer simulation and scientific visualization  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of processes in engineering and the physical sciences has progressed rapidly over the last several years. With rapid developments in supercomputers, parallel processing, numerical algorithms and software, scientists and engineers are now positioned to quantitatively simulate systems requiring many billions of arithmetic operations. The need to understand and assimilate such massive amounts of data has been a driving force in the development of both hardware and software to create visual representations of the underling physical systems. In this paper, and the accompanying videotape, the evolution and development of the visualization process in scientific computing will be reviewed. Specific applications and associated imaging hardware and software technology illustrate both the computational needs and the evolving trends. 6 refs.

Weber, D.P.; Moszur, F.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Computing Center Scientific Computing Center 2004 annual report Cover image: Visualization based on a simulation of the density of a fuel pellet after it is injected into a tokamak fusion reactor. See page 40 for more information. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2004 annual report Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory * University of California * Berkeley, California 94720 This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC 03-76SF00098. LBNL-57369, April 2005 ii iii The Year in Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Advances in Computational Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

146

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

States Department of Energy Office of Scientific & Technical Information The "Big Data" Era Link to larger image. Slide 2: The "Big Data" Era A definition: "A collection of...

147

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of Scientific & Technical Information Transparency Colaboration Participation Global Data Access Interagency Data Access DOE Data Access U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

148

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GALICIA BANK Gilbert Boillot Edward L of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany

149

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and technology activities are identified, disseminated, and preserved. STIP members, led by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), work together to...

150

NERSC HPSS Storage by Scientific Discipline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Science Databases Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix Groups at...

151

Site Map | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

type Recent Patents Recent Software Recent Technical Reports Scientific Research Data By Lab, Major Site, or Technology Center DOE National Laboratories Find STI from or about ANL...

152

Scientific and Technical Information Program | A Collaboration...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

arrow Recent Patents Recent Software Recent Technical Reports Scientific Research Data By Lab, Major Site, or Technology Center By DOE Collection dropdown arrow DOE Data Explorer...

153

NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and share massive bio-imaging datasets. Read More National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Computing at NERSC OURSYSTEMS GETTINGSTARTED DOCUMENTATIONFOR USERS...

154

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

as the DOE Central Files The scientific and technical legacy of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies is captured within the OSTI building - whether in...

155

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and Development Project Summaries, includes summaries of energy-related scientific projects performed since 1995 at DOE laboratories and research facilities. These are just a...

156

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

accelerating scientific progress, we also encourage commercialization through a single search of DOE Labs' Technology Transfer Resources ETEC, October 19, 2012 Remaining...

157

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

accelerating scientific progress, we also encourage commercialization through a single search of DOE Labs' Technology Transfer Resources Remaining Challenge. Link to larger...

158

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research News In the News 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 In Focus Presentations & Testimony...

159

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

promote SC contributions to science * Searchable Field Work Proposals (FWP) - Management tool to search, evaluate, and monitor FWPs - DOE R&D Tracking 2008 Scientific and...

160

Science Accelerator Resource Descriptions, Office of Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Descriptions Below you will find descriptions of each of the scientific and technical resources searchable in the Science Accelerator. DOE Data Explorer Locate collections...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget * Site Map Information Bridge Home * Basic Search * Fielded Search * Alerts * Help Bookmark and Share...

162

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

de l'Information Scientifique et Technique. The At-Large Member is Yvonne Halland, Strategic Information Resources Coordinator at the Council for Scientific and Industrial...

163

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contract to Cray August 5, 2009 BERKELEY, CA - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National...

164

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

At DOE Information Bridge you can find more than 150,000 full text scientific and technical reports. The DOE Information Bridge is a DOE Science Accelerator...

165

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bringing Light to Grey Brian A. Hitson Associate Director Office of Scientific and Technical Information U.S. Department of Energy Introduction Opening Remarks GL10 - Tenth...

166

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

* Chair: Richard Boulderstone (British Library) * Deputy Chair: Pam Bjornson (Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information) * Treasurer: Tae-sul Seo (Korea...

167

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(France) Australian Antarctic Data Centre Bangladesh Journals Online (BanglaJOL) Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information Catalogue of the TIB, German...

168

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

African Journals Online Article@INIST (France) Australian Antarctic Data Centre Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information CSIR Research Space (South Africa)...

169

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Founding Alliance Members. Link to larger image. Slide 22: Founding Alliance Members Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (CISTI) - Canada VTT Technical...

170

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

African Journals Online * Article@INIST (France) * Australian Antarctic Data Centre * Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information * CSIR Research Space (South...

171

Proposed scientific activities for the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project (SSSDP) has been organized for the purpose of investigating a hydrothermal system at depths and temperatures greater than has been done before. Plans are to deepen an existing well or to drill a new well for research purposes for which temperatures of 300/sup 0/C will be reached at a depth of less than 3.7 km and then deepen that well a further 1.8 km. This report recounts the Congressional history of the appropriation to drill the hole and other history through March 1984, gives a review of the literature on the Salton Sea Geothermal Field and its relationship to other geothermal systems of the Salton Trough, and describes a comprehensive series of investigations that have been proposed either in the well or in conjunction with the SSSDP. Investigations in geophysics, geochemistry and petrology, tectonics and rock mechanics, and geohydrology are given. A tabulation is given of current commercial and state-of-the-art downhole tools and their pressure, temperature, and minimum hole size limitations.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

173

Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Albuquerque, NM Home > About Us > Our Locations > Albuquerque Complex > Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New ...

174

Scientific Data Management Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (SDM/ISIC): Scientific Process Automation (SPA), FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report from SDSC and UC Davis on DE-FC02-01ER25486, Scientific Data Management Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (SDM/ISIC): Scientific Process Automation (SPA).

Bertram Ludaescher; Ilkay Altintas

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

Enabling scientific workflows in virtual reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To advance research and improve the scientific return on data collection and interpretation efforts in the geosciences, we have developed methods of interactive visualization, with a special focus on immersive virtual reality (VR) environments. Earth ... Keywords: geosciences, scientific visualization, virtual reality, workflow

Oliver Kreylos; Gerald Bawden; Tony Bernardin; Magali I. Billen; Eric S. Cowgill; Ryan D. Gold; Bernd Hamann; Margarete Jadamec; Louise H. Kellogg; Oliver G. Staadt; Dawn Y. Sumner

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Provenance and scientific workflows: challenges and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provenance in the context of workflows, both for the data they derive and for their specification, is an essential component to allow for result reproducibility, sharing, and knowledge re-use in the scientific community. Several workshops have been held ... Keywords: provenance, scientific workflows

Susan B. Davidson; Juliana Freire

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Clustering High Dimensional Massive Scientific Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many scientific applications can benefit from an efficient clustering algorithm of massively large high dimensional datasets. However most of the developed algorithms are impractical to use when the amount of data is very large. Given N objects ... Keywords: clustering, datasets, high dimensional, scientific

Ekow J. Otoo; Arie Shoshani; Seung-Won Hwang

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Advisory Committee Scientific Advisory Committee » SAC DOCUMENTS 2013 Role and Charter of the SSRL SAC Scope The SSRL Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) reports to and advises the SSRL Director on issues related to: Operation of SSRL as a scientific user facility Planning, construction and operation of new SSRL facilities Long-term scientific directions of SSRL Membership and Officers SAC consists of 12 external members, and representatives from the following SSRL committees serve on the SAC in an Ex Officio capacity Co-Chairs of the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) Chair of the Structural Molecular Biology Advisory Committee (SMBAC) Chair of the SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee (SSRLUOEC SAC members are appointed by the SSRL Director for 3-year terms, with one third of the members rotating off and being replaced every year

179

National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report Annual Report This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC 03-76SF00098. LBNL-49186, December 2001 National Energ y Research Scientific Computing Center 2001 Annual Report NERSC aspires to be a world leader in accelerating scientific discovery through computation. Our vision is to provide high- performance computing tools to tackle science's biggest and most challenging problems, and to play a major role in advancing large- scale computational science and computing technology. The result will be a rate of scientific progress previously unknown. NERSC's mission is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery in the Department of Energy Office

180

900-MHz NMR: Accelerating Scientific Discovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00-MHz NMR: Accelerating Scientific 00-MHz NMR: Accelerating Scientific Discovery Scientific Innovation Through Integration 900-MHz NMR: Accelerating Scientific Discovery 900-MHz NMR: Accelerating Scientific Discovery Introduction When the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research approved the development and purchase of the world's first 900-MHz NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrometer in 1992, the highest magnetic field available was 750 MHz. DOE's decision and the ultimate success of its 900-MHz NMR spectrometer, which recently saw its five-year anniversary of operation at EMSL, catalyzed the development of a new generation of ultrahigh-field NMR spectrometers worldwide. Building new technology Building the magnet for the 900-MHz NMR spectrometer brought engineering challenges. Can the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Title Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Choi, Jong Hyun, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series Volume 59 Start Page 54 Issue 1 Pagination 54-59 Abstract Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics.

182

Two methods of realising 10nm T-gate lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents two separate methods for the fabrication of 10nm footprint T-gates using a two-step gate process. We examine the limits of lithographic and pattern transfer processes using the exposure of ZEP520A resist by electron beam lithography, ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, HEMT, ICP, RIE, Reactive ion etching, T-gate

S. Bentley; X. Li; D. A. J. Moran; I. G. Thayne

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approach—that is, the advection–aridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007—and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve Rainfall–Runoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

188

Scientific Research Data | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific Research Data Scientific Research Data Scientific Research Data DOE generates scientific research data in many forms, both text and non-text. Much of the Department's text-based R&D results are readily available via OSTI databases. OSTI has broadened efforts to make non-text scientific and technical information (STI) available as well, providing access to underlying non-text data such as numeric files, computer simulations and interactive maps, as well as multimedia and scientific images. During 2011, OSTI implemented changes to its technology infrastructure to facilitate the announcement and registration of DOE-funded publicly available R&D research datasets through its membership in DataCite exit federal site . This web service builds on OSTI scientific research data discovery tools,

189

U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well U.S. Scientific Team Draws on New Data, Multiple Scientific Methodologies to Reach Updated Estimate of Oil Flows from BP's Well June 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - Based on updated information and scientific assessments, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, and Chair of the National Incident Command's Flow Rate Technical Group (FRTG) Dr. Marcia McNutt (Director of the U.S. Geological Survey) today announced an improved estimate of how much oil is flowing from the leaking BP well. Secretary Chu, Secretary Salazar, and Dr. McNutt convened a group of federal and independent scientists on Monday to discuss new analyses and

190

Processing and managing scientific data in SOA environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased complexity of scientific research poses new challenges to scientific data management. Meanwhile, scientific collaboration is becoming increasing important, which relies on integrating and sharing data from distributed institutions. Scientific ... Keywords: data management, meta data, scientific data, service-oriented architecture (SOA)

Bogdan Shishedjiev; Mariana Goranova; Juliana Georgieva; Veska Gancheva

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Scientific - Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and

192

File:INL-geothermal-nm.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nm.pdf nm.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage New Mexico Geothermal Resources Size of this preview: 466 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 467 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(3,727 × 4,791 pixels, file size: 1.5 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description New Mexico Geothermal Resources Sources Idaho National Laboratory Authors Patrick Laney; Julie Brizzee Related Technologies Geothermal Creation Date 2003-11-01 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States New Mexico File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:41, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:41, 16 December 2010 3,727 × 4,791 (1.5 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch" data

193

Slide06 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Slide06 Slide06 Slide06 Systems that crawl the Web do not typically reach below the surface * Google "crawls" the surface Web, but scientific databases are largely found in the deep Web * Scientific databases stump Google The limitations of Googling are inherent in the underlying technology employed by Google and each of the other familiar search engine companies. Google and the others are committed to crawling technology. To prepare for searches by Web patrons, a Web crawler (or "spider" or "robot") visits as many Web sites as it can find, mostly by following links. An index of each such page is created, thus slowly building a vast composite index of all the pages visited. Later, when Web patrons perform a search, they are actually searching the composite index.

194

doi:10.1152/advan.00056.2004. Staying Current Ethics and scientific publication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi:10.1152/advan.00056.2004.—This article summarizes the major categories of ethical violations encountered during submission, review, and publication of scientific articles. We discuss data fabrication and falsification, plagiarism, redundant and duplicate publication, conflict of interest, authorship, animal and human welfare, and reviewer responsibility. In each section, pertinent historical background and citation of relevant regulations and statutes are provided. Furthermore, a specific case(s) derived from actual situations is(are) presented. These cases were chosen to highlight the complexities that investigators and journals must face when dealing with ethical issues. A series of discussion questions follow each case. It is our hope that by increasing education and awareness of ethical matters relevant to scientific investigation and publication, deviations from appropriate conduct will be reduced. plagiarism; redundant; falsification; conflict of interest; fabrication

Dale J. Benos; Jorge Fabres; John Farmer; Jessica P. Gutierrez; Kristin Hennessy; David Kosek; Joo Hyoung Lee; Dragos Olteanu; Tara Russell; Faheem Shaikh; Kai Wang; Dale J; Jorge Fabres; John Farmer; Jessica P. Gutierrez; Kristin Hennessy; David Kosek; Joo Hyoung Lee; Tara Russell; Faheem Shaikh; Kai Wang Ethics

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Tracking Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS Storage New supercomputers and networks are contributing to record levels of scientific productivity. In fact, every new system installed at NERSC over the last 10 years has generated about 50 percent more data than its predecessor. To effectively meet the increasing scientific demand for storage systems and services, the center's staff must first understand how data moves within the facility. Until recently, the process of obtaining these insights was extremely tedious because the statistics came from multiple sources, including network router statistics, client and server transfer logs, storage and accounting reports-all saved as very

196

LCLS CDR Chapter 3 - Scientific Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Scientific Basis for Optical Systems TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) has recommended experiments in five scientific disciplines for the initial operation of the LCLS. These experiments cover a variety of scientific disciplines: atomic physics, plasma physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. The x-ray optics and detectors needed to verify the LCLS capability to address these five disciplines will be constructed and installed as part of the LCLS project. The experiments are described in detail in the document "LCLS: The First Experiments" referenced earlier. Two classes of experiments are proposed for the LCLS. The first class consists of experiments where the x-ray beam is used to probe the sample, as is done in most experiments at current

197

FWP Scientific Publications | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FWP FWP Scientific Publications FWP Scientific Publications Scientific publications either directly studying former workers in the context of the screening program or recruiting former workers in the program as research participants for scientific studies funded by the National Institutes of Health or other research funding sources are summarized below according to publication date. Mikulski M., Gerke A., Lourens S., Czeczok T., Sprince N., Laney A., Fuortes L. Agreement between fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal spirometry interpretation protocols decreases with age - Is there a need for a new gold standard? Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 55(7): 802-808, 2013. To assess concordance between the fixed 70% ratio cutoff point with the fixed percent predicted values (Fixed-ratio) and the lower limit of normal

198

Science Thems Scientific Integration Through Innovation SCIENCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Scientific Integration Through Innovation SCIENCE THEMES Science Themes focus EMSL's research direction and capability decisions. They help define and direct both the collection of user research projects accepted via EMSL's user proposal process and the development of its key capabilities made available to users, with an eye toward enhancing scientific progress in the areas of environmental molecular science most critical to DOE and the nation. Each individual Science Theme emphasizes drivers important to a field of science, and as a strong family, the themes share significant overlap and linked areas of common scientific interest. Thus, the scope of a research project in EMSL may impact all three Science Themes: Biological Interactions and Dynamics - Developing a quantitative, systems-

199

DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific Breakthroughs DOE Supercomputing Resources Available for Advancing Scientific Breakthroughs April 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting proposals for a program to support high-impact scientific advances through the use of some of the world's most powerful supercomputers located at DOE national laboratories. Approximately 1.3 billion supercomputer processor-hours will be awarded in 2010 through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program for large-scale, computationally intensive projects addressing some of the toughest challenges in science and engineering. Researchers are currently using supercomputing time under this year's

200

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-ocean ridge flanks have been investigated. These include the Galapagos mounds, the southern flank of the Costa logging tools are expected to provide little information of direct benefit to the scientific objectives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science.gov App Find science information and research results from 13 U.S. federal agencies. Get quick answers from over 55 scientific databases and more than 2100 websites....

202

A.I., Scientific Discovery and Realism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epistemologists have debated at length whether scientific discovery is a rational and logical process. If it is, according to the Artificial Intelligence hypothesis, it should be possible to write computer programs able to discover laws or theories; ...

Mario Alai

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

1990s 2000s 2009: Superconductivity 2009: Dr. Warnick, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Home of Science.gov 2009: Visitors 2009: Science.gov AAAS 2003 Kent Smith;...

204

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Electron Accelerator...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Aspects and Scientific Challenges Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Research Highlights .pdf file (13.1MB) Questions for the...

205

Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-28, 2012 Barbara Helland Advanced Scientific Computing Research NERSC-HEP Requirements Review 1 Science C ase S tudies d rive d iscussions Program R equirements R eviews ...

206

Contact Us | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MAIL U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge,TN 37831 Last updated: December 20, 2012 U.S. Department of Energy U.S....

207

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Office of Scientific and Technical Information U.S. Department of Energy Mobile | FAQs | A to Z Index | Site Map | Contact Us Search OSTI website Search HOME ABOUT OSTI SCIENCE...

208

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Science Adventure: Girls Scientific Salon | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Adventure: Girls Scientific Salon Science Adventure: Girls Scientific Salon April 6, 2013 9:00AM EDT Lederman Science Center Students , Grades 4 - 7 (In or Completed)...

210

OSTI Publications, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

These grand outcomes can be achieved by committing to openly sharing scientific research data and spreading the worlds great scientific discoveries faster. This Strategic Plan...

211

Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for DOE Researchers? Well, Yes, No and Maybe Can Cloud Computing Address the Scientific Computing Requirements for...

212

Green In Silico Project - Evolving Scientific Research out of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green In Silico Project - Evolving Scientific Research out of the Lab into the Data Center - Environmental Benefits and Challenges of Scientific Computing Speaker(s): Peter James...

213

DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges January 26, 2010 - 12:00am...

214

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Scientific Discovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scientific Discovery and Innovation 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Scientific Discovery and Innovation The United States has always been a Nation of innovators and the...

215

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

216

Audit of the Department of Energy's Scientific and Technical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scientific and Technical Information Process, IG-0407 Audit of the Department of Energy's Scientific and Technical Information Process, IG-0407 Audit of the Department of Energy's...

217

ORAU: Scientific and Technical Peer Review Services fact sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to ensure timely and fair assessments for informed funding decisions. Scientific and Technical Peer Review Services Unmatched Access to Scientific and Technical Reviewers ORAU is...

218

Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's...

219

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL LAND PARCELS A, B, C, E, K, LN, PL (NM.07 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Los Alamos County , New Mexico NM.07-2 Evaluation Year: 1986 NM.07-1 Site Operations: No specific operations identified for these tracts of land. NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria. Declared as surplus real property and offered for public sale in 1972. NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Indicated NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Indicated Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.07-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

220

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

222

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

223

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

224

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

225

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

226

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

227

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

228

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

229

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

230

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

231

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

232

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink’s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schüttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Mapping the evolution of scientific ideas  

SciTech Connect

Despite the apparent conceptual boundaries of scientific fields, a formal description for their evolution is lacking. Here we describe a novel approach to study the dynamics and evolution of scientific fields using a network-based analysis. We build an idea network consisting of American Physical Society PACS numbers as nodes representing scientific concepts. Two PACS numbers are linked if there exist publications that reference them simultaneously. We locate scientific fields using Cfinder, an overlapping community finding algorithm, and describe the time evolution of these fields using a community evolution method over the course of 1985-2006. The communities we identify map to known scientific fields, and their age strongly depends on t.heir size, impact and activity. Our analysis further suggests that communities that redefine themselves by merging and creating new groups of ideas tend to have more fitness as measured by the impact per paper, and hence communities with a higher fitness tend to be short-lived. The described approach to quantify the evolution of ideas may be relevant in making predictions about the future of science and how to guide its development.

Roberts, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Mark [UNIV OF MARYLAND; Gulbahce, Natali [UNIV OF BOSTON

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fuel Cell Scientific LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific LLC Scientific LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Cell Scientific LLC Address 200 F Main Street Place Stoneham, Massachusetts Zip 02180 Sector Hydrogen Product Fuel cell parts supplier Website http://www.fuelcellsupplies.ne Coordinates 42.4894164°, -71.1002334° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4894164,"lon":-71.1002334,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Sponsoring Organizations | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sponsoring Organizations Sponsoring Organizations Print page Print page Email page Email page U.S. Department of Energy Sponsoring Organizations for DOE-funded Scientific and Technical Information (STI) (Reference DOE O 241.1B, Scientific and Technical Information Management, Section 4 REQUIREMENTS, item g) The following list includes the current USDOE Sponsoring Organizations identified as funding research and development and other technology activities which result in scientific and technical information. DOE Program Offices and the Program Offices' respective subprogram(s) which may fund research are included. This list will be revised as needed to include additional offices or to reflect current Departmental funding organizations. Questions or input may be provided to stip@osti.gov. Current

236

Crime and punishment in scientific research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arguments against scientific misconduct one finds in the literature generally fail to support current policies on research fraud: they may not prove wrong what is typically considered research misconduct and they tend to make wrong things that are not usually seen as scientific fraud, in particular honest errors. I argue that society cannot set a rule enjoining scientists to be honest, so any such rule can only be internal to science. Therefore society cannot legitimately enforce it. Moreover, until an argument is provided to prove that lack of honesty is far worse than lack of technical competence, intentional deceit should not be punished much more harshly than technical errors. Keywords: cheating; ethics; fabrication; falsification; integrity; plagiarism; research fraud; scientific misconduct.

Bouville, Mathieu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Big Data Ecosystems Enable Scientific Discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 5 years, advances in experimental, sensor and computational technologies have driven the exponential growth in the volumes, acquisition rates, variety and complexity of scientific data. As noted by Hey et al in their 2009 e-book The Fourth Paradigm, this availability of large-quantities of scientifically meaningful data has given rise to a new scientific methodology - data intensive science. Data intensive science is the ability to formulate and evaluate hypotheses using data and analysis to extend, complement and, at times, replace experimentation, theory, or simulation. This new approach to science no longer requires scientists to interact directly with the objects of their research; instead they can utilize digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and visualized results - allowing them carry out 'experiments' in data.

Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

STI Defined | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

STI Defined STI Defined Print page Print page Email page Email page Information products deemed by the originator to be useful beyond the originating site (i.e., intended to be published or disseminated), in any format or medium, which contain findings and technological innovations resulting from research and development (R&D) efforts and scientific and technological work of scientists, researchers, and engineers, whether Federal employee, contractor, or financial assistance recipient. STI also conveys the results of demonstration and commercial application activities as well as experiments, observations, simulations, studies, and analyses. Scientific findings are communicated through various media - e.g., textual, multimedia, audiovisual, and digital - and are produced in a range

239

Reflex: Scientific Workflows for the ESO Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently released Reflex scientific workflow environment supports the interactive execution of ESO VLT data reduction pipelines. Reflex is based upon the Kepler workflow engine, and provides components for organising the data, executing pipeline recipes based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library, invoking Python scripts, and constructing interaction loops. Reflex will greatly enhance the quick validation and reduction of the scientific data. In this paper we summarize the main features of Reflex, and demonstrate as an example its application to the reduction of echelle UVES data.

Ballester, Pascal; Forchi, Vincenzo; Freudling, Wolfram; Garcia-Dabo, Cesar Enrique; Gebbinck, Maurice klein; Modigliani, Andrea; Romaniello, Martino

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Public Service Co of NM | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from PNM) (Redirected from PNM) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NM Place New Mexico Utility Id 15473 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 10A Irrigation 10A Irrigation within Grant, Lincoln, Hidalgo and Otero counties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Public Service Co of NM | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NM Place New Mexico Utility Id 15473 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 10A Irrigation 10A Irrigation within Grant, Lincoln, Hidalgo and Otero counties 10B Irrigation TOU

242

Database of average-power damage thresholds at 1064 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have completed a database of average-power, laser-induced, damage thresholds at 1064 nm on a variety of materials. Measurements were made with a newly constructed laser to provide design input for moderate and high average-power laser projects. The measurements were conducted with 16-ns pulses at pulse-repetition frequencies ranging from 6 to 120 Hz. Samples were typically irradiated for time ranging from a fraction of a second up to 5 minutes (36,000 shots). We tested seven categories of samples which included antireflective coatings, high reflectors, polarizers, single and multiple layers of the same material, bare and overcoated metal surfaces, bare polished surfaces, and bulk materials. The measured damage threshold ranged from 46 J/cm/sup 2/ for a bare polished glass substrate. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Rainer, F.; Hildum, E.A.; Milam, D.

1987-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Climate change: The IPCC scientific assessment  

SciTech Connect

Book review of the intergovernmental panel on climate change report on global warming and the greenhouse effect. Covers the scientific basis for knowledge of the future climate. Presents chemistry of greenhouse gases and mathematical modelling of the climate system. The book is primarily for government policy makers.

Houghton, J.T.; Jenkins, G.J.; Ephraums, J.J. (eds.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Taking scientific visualization to the masses  

SciTech Connect

The paper offers the premise that scientific visualization capabilities are generally available only to a limited subset of scientists. Several reasons for this are presented. The paper describes a collaborative project between scientists of the Defense Nuclear Agency and computer scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This project's goal is to get visualization capabilities into the hands of many more scientists.

Vigil, M.; Bouchier, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Scientific drilling technologies for hostile environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews the current United States Department of Energy Continental Scientific Drilling Program for Thermal Regimes and the related technologies being developed for geothermal drilling. Plans for penetrating into a molten magma body at temperatures from 800 to 1000{degree}C are also reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Matchmaking scientific workflows in grid environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the scientific workflow matchmaking problem in Grid environments and combine workflow mapping and scheduling. Based on the characteristics of Grids, a new resource model is proposed. Motivated by the observations that not all ... Keywords: grid computing, matchmaking algorithm, resource model, workflow

Yili Gong; Marlon E. Pierce; Geoffrey C. Fox

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Scientific workflow design for mere mortals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in research and development of scientific workflow systems. These systems promise to make scientists more productive by automating data-driven and compute-intensive analyses. Despite many early achievements, ... Keywords: Automatic optimization, COMAD, Collection, Desiderata, Provenance, Resilience, Workflow

Timothy McPhillips; Shawn Bowers; Daniel Zinn; Bertram Ludäscher

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Weak information work in scientific discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists continually work with information to move their research projects forward, but the activities involved in finding and using information and their impact on discovery are poorly understood. In the Information and Discovery in Neuroscience (IDN) ... Keywords: Information practices, Information seeking, Neuroscience, Research processes, Scientific discovery

Carole L. Palmer; Melissa H. Cragin; Timothy P. Hogan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

250

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications that are transitioning to petascale as well as to produce software that facilitates their development, such as the MPICH library, which provides a portable and efficient implementation of the MPI standard--the prevalent programming model for large-scale scientific applications--and the PETSc toolkit that provides a programming paradigm that eases the development of many scientific applications on high-end computers.

Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible… (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract “suggest that raising energy prices—such as in the form ofconsumers actually “see” energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

FY09 assessment of mercury reduction at SNL/NM.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This assessment takes the result of the FY08 performance target baseline of mercury at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, and records the steps taken in FY09 to collect additional data, encourage the voluntary reduction of mercury, and measure success. Elemental (metallic) mercury and all of its compounds are toxic, and exposure to excessive levels can permanently damage or fatally injure the brain and kidneys. Elemental mercury can also be absorbed through the skin and cause allergic reactions. Ingestion of inorganic mercury compounds can cause severe renal and gastrointestinal damage. Organic compounds of mercury such as methyl mercury, created when elemental mercury enters the environment, are considered the most toxic forms of the element. Exposures to very small amounts of these compounds can result in devastating neurological damage and death.1 SNL/NM is required to report annually on the site wide inventory of mercury for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program, as the site's inventory is excess of the ten pound reportable threshold quantity. In the fiscal year 2008 (FY08) Pollution Prevention Program Plan, Section 5.3 Reduction of Environmental Releases, a performance target stated was to establish a baseline of mercury, its principle uses, and annual quantity or inventory. This was accomplished on July 29, 2008 by recording the current status of mercury in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

McCord, Samuel Adam

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error var...

Kurucz, R L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error varies from 0.1 to 1.0 percent. The residual spectrum was calibrated two different ways: First by normalizing it to the continuum of theoretical solar model ASUN (Kurucz 1992), and second, by degrading the spectrum to the resolution of the observed irradiance (Thuillier et al. 2004) to determine a normalization function that was then applied to the high resolution spectrum.

Robert L. Kurucz

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 141 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¼ 1 mm, Def ¼ D ¼ 1000 mm2 /s [47], Ce ¼ 0:03 nm�3 (Ref. [23, p. 173]) and kEsdh ¼ 15 pJ/m (sE20 mJ/m2

258

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM Tracks Eastern Area No 3 - NM 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL TRACKS EASTERN AREA NO. 3 (NM.10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Area No. 3 , Los Alamos County , New Mexico NM.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NM.10-2 Site Operations: These tracts were part of LASL and were subject to contamination from laboratory operations. NM.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria per environmental radiation survey NM.10-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.10-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to LASL TRACKS EASTERN AREA NO. 3

259

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits December 2, 2011 - 2:01pm Addthis This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear combustion that sets off type 1a supernovae. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear

260

USDOE, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Directors Directors 1947 Thompson 1948 Boardman 1951 Abdian 1956 Day 1959 Shannon 1979 Coyne 1991 Buffum 1997 Warnick OSTI Directors Timeline, 1994 to 1997 Walter L. Warnick, 1997 to present Office of Scientific and Technical Information Walter L. Warnick Amid emerging computing power and expanding networks now revolutionizing scientific communication, OSTI has pushed pedal to the metal to lead government search technology under the guidance of Walt Warnick. The OSTI Corollary: accelerating the spread of knowledge will accelerate discovery, has generated expansion of OSTI's longtime commitment to development of superior access to quality content. OSTI has championed relevancy ranking and federated search technology to increase access to research results. Soon after Dr. Warnick arrived at OSTI, the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

About | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

About About Print page Print page Email page Email page The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R&D) and other science and technology endeavors in a variety of fields. The knowledge gained during the R&D process is frequently imparted through scientific and technical information (STI), a key outcome of DOE R&D and other activities. DOE Researchers Within the DOE Office of Science, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has the responsibility for coordinating STI activities and for leading a collaborative effort to a distributed STI environment. To that end, OSTI and designated representatives from the Headquarters Programs, Field Offices, national laboratories, and facility contractors who are STI program stakeholders work together to facilitate access to STI

262

Technical Information Officers | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Information Officers Technical Information Officers Print page Print page Email page Email page Technical Information Officers (TIO) serve as the principal DOE or NNSA office point of contact and assistant to, and liaison with, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) that serves as the Department's office charged with the Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP). The TIOs are to be familiar with the STI Programs within their Office they represent (given they have contracting financial assistance and/or acquisition activities) and for their major site/facility management contractor(s) STI Program to discern compliance with the DOE O 241.1B. They must maintain an up-to-date knowledge-base of the STI Program activities and provide timely feedback on issues as they emerge. While

263

NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Org Chart NERSC History NERSC Stakeholders NERSC Usage Demographics Careers Visitor Info Web Policies Science at NERSC NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Accelerator Science Astrophysics Biological Sciences Chemistry & Materials Science Climate & Earth Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Systems Computational Systems Table Data Systems Table Edison Cray XC30 Hopper Cray XE6 Carver IBM iDataPlex PDSF Genepool NERSC Global Filesystem HPSS data archive Data Transfer Nodes History of Systems NERSC-8 Procurement

264

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits Superlative Supercomputers: Argonne's Mira to Accelerate Scientific Discoveries, Societal Benefits December 2, 2011 - 2:01pm Addthis This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear combustion that sets off type 1a supernovae. | Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory This is a computer simulation of a Class 1a supernova. Argonne National Laboratory's Mira will have enough computing power to help researchers run simulations of exploding stars, specifically, of the turbulent nuclear

265

Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe  

SciTech Connect

A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

Vouk, Mladen A.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Scientific applications for high-energy lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

Lee, R.W. [comp.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Scientific Opportunity to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we start by examining previous efforts at linking science and DOE EM research with cleanup activities. Many of these efforts were initiated by creating science and technology roadmaps. A recurring feature of successfully implementing these roadmaps into EM applied research efforts and successful cleanup is the focus on integration. Such integration takes many forms, ranging from combining information generated by various scientific disciplines, to providing technical expertise to facilitate successful application of novel technology, to bringing the resources and creativity of many to address the common goal of moving EM cleanup forward. Successful projects identify and focus research efforts on addressing the problems and challenges that are causing “failure” in actual cleanup activities. In this way, basic and applied science resources are used strategically to address the particular unknowns that are barriers to cleanup. The brief descriptions of the Office of Science basic (Environmental Remediation Science Program [ERSP]) and EM’s applied (Groundwater and Soil Remediation Program) research programs in subsurface science provide context to the five “crosscutting” themes that have been developed in this strategic planning effort. To address these challenges and opportunities, a tiered systematic approach is proposed that leverages basic science investments with new applied research investments from the DOE Office of Engineering and Technology within the framework of the identified basic science and applied research crosscutting themes. These themes are evident in the initial portfolio of initiatives in the EM groundwater and soil cleanup multi-year program plan. As stated in a companion document for tank waste processing (Bredt et al. 2008), in addition to achieving its mission, DOE EM is experiencing a fundamental shift in philosophy from driving to closure to enabling the long-term needs of DOE and the nation.

Pierce, Eric M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Looney, Brian B.; Zachara, John M.; Liang, Liyuan; Lesmes, D.; Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Adams, V.; Denham, Miles E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

Former Worker Program - FWP Scientific Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FWP Scientific Publications FWP Scientific Publications Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Scientific publications either directly studying former workers in the context of the screening program or recruiting former workers in the program as research participants for scientific studies funded by the National Institutes of Health or other research funding sources are summarized below according to publication date. Mikulski M., Gerke A., Lourens S., Czeczok T., Sprince N., Laney A., Fuortes L. Agreement between fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal spirometry interpretation protocols decreases with age - Is there a need for a new gold standard? Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 55(7): 802-808, 2013. To assess concordance between the fixed 70% ratio cutoff point with the fixed percent predicted values (Fixed-ratio) and the lower limit of normal (LLN) algorithms in interpreting spirometry results in an older population, spirometries were interpreted using Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reference equations for 2,319 workers. The Fixed-ratio algorithm characterized 34.5% (n=801) results as abnormal, compared with 29.7% (n=689) by the LLN. There were almost twice as many obstructive and mixed airways spirometries identified under the Fixed-ratio compared to LLN. Rates of restrictive pattern physiology were virtually the same under each algorithm. Overall agreement between the algorithms decreased with age from "almost perfect" for those younger than 60 years to "substantial" for those older than 80 years. This study found age-related discordance between two algorithms possibly related to the lack of reference equations and standards for individuals older than 80 years.

271

EAGLES: An interactive environment for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAGLES Project is creating a computing system and interactive environment for scientific applications using object-oriented software principles. This software concept leads to well defined data interfaces for integrating experiment control with acquisition and analysis codes. Tools for building object-oriented systems for user interfaces and codes are discussed. Also the terms of object-oriented programming are introduced and later defined in the appendix. These terms include objects, methods, messages, encapsulation and inheritance.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.; Shectman, R.M.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

EAGLES: An interactive environment for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAGLES Project is creating a computing system and interactive environment for scientific applications using object-oriented software principles. This software concept leads to well defined data interfaces for integrating experiments control with acquisition and analysis codes. Tools for building object-oriented systems for user interfaces and codes are discussed. Also the terms of object-oriented programming are introduced and later defined in the appendix. These terms include objects, methods, messages, encapsulation and inheritance.

Lawver, B.S.; O'Brien, D.W.; Poggio, M.E.; Shectman, R.M.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

On Phenomenology of Complex Scientific Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance evolution of a number of complex scientific and technical systems demonstrate exponential progress with time exp(+t/C) . The speed of progress C - a measure of difficulty and complexity - is analyzed for high energy elementary particle colliders, astrophysical searches for galaxies and exoplanets, protein structure determination and compared with computers and thermonuclear fusion reactors. An explanation of the characteristic exponential progress is offered.

Shiltsev, Vladimir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 155 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS AMAZON DEEP-SEA FAN Dr. Roger D. Flood Co of Canada P.O. Box 1006 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia Canada B2Y4A2 Dr. Adam Klaus Staff Scientist, Leg l55 Ocean and handling. D I S C L A I M E R This publication was prepared by the Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

275

Energy Smart Management of Scientific Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific data centers comprised of high-powered computing equipment and large capacity disk storage systems consume considerable amount of energy. Dynamic power management techniques (DPM) are commonly used for saving energy in disk systems. These involve powering down disks that exhibit long idle periods and placing them in standby mode. A file request from a disk in standby mode will incur both energy and performance penalties as it takes energy (and time) to spin up the disk before it can serve a file. For this reason, DPM has to make decisions as to when to transition the disk into standby mode such that the energy saved is greater than the energy needed to spin it up again and the performance penalty is tolerable. The length of the idle period until the DPM decides to power down a disk is called idlenessthreshold. In this paper, we study both analytically and experimentally dynamic power management techniques that save energy subject to performance constraints on file access costs. Based on observed workloads of scientific applications and disk characteristics, we provide a methodology for determining file assignment to disks and computing idleness thresholds that result in significant improvements to the energy saved by existing DPMsolutions while meeting response time constraints. We validate our methods with simulations that use traces taken from scientific applications.

Otoo, Ekow; Rotem, Dron; Tsao, Shih-Chiang

2009-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

276

Exploring HPCS Languages in Scientific Computing  

SciTech Connect

As computers scale up dramatically to tens and hundreds of thousands of cores, develop deeper computational and memory hierarchies, and increased heterogeneity, developers of scientific software are increasingly challenged to express complex parallel simulations effectively and efficiently. In this paper, we explore the three languages developed under the DARPA High-Productivity Computing Systems (HPCS) program to help address these concerns: Chapel, Fortress, and X10. These languages provide a variety of features not found in currently popular HPC programming environments and make it easier to express powerful computational constructs, leading to new ways of thinking about parallel programming. Though the languages and their implementations are not yet mature enough for a comprehensive evaluation, we discuss some of the important features, and provide examples of how they can be used in scientific computing. We believe that these characteristics will be important to the future of high-performance scientific computing, whether the ultimate language of choice is one of the HPCS languages or something else.

Barrett, Richard F [ORNL; Alam, Sadaf R [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Shet, Aniruddha G [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Demonstration of an 8.85 nm Gain-Saturated Table-Top Soft X-Ray Laser and Lasing down to 7.4 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the efficient generation of a gain-saturated 8.85 nm wavelength table-top soft x-ray laser operating at 1 Hz repetition rate and the observation of lasing at wavelengths as short as 7.36 nm in lanthanide ions.

Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Jorge, Rocca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Fortran binding for the GNU scientific library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GNU scientific library is a collection of numerical routines for scientific computing. This article discusses some aspects of the design of a fully standard-conforming Fortran binding for GSL via incremental usage of Fortran 2003 features, in particular ...

Reinhold Bader

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Scientific discovery and topological transitions in collaboration networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the advent and development of eight scientific fields from their inception to maturity and map the evolution of their networks of collaboration over time, measured in terms of co-authorship of scientific papers. ...

Bettencourt, Luis M. A.

282

Good bones: anthropological scientific collaboration around computed tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report preliminary results from a socio-technical analysis of scientific collaboration, specifically a loosely connected group of physical anthropology researchers. Working from a combination of interview data and artifact analysis, we identify current ... Keywords: scientific collaboratories, virtual organizations

Andrea H. Tapia; Rosalie Ocker; Mary Beth Rosson; Bridget Blodgett

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Embodying scientific concepts in the physical space of the classroom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several simulation environments exist that create a place in which students can explore scientific phenomena. In this paper, we propose design guidelines for creating a classroom environment that puts scientific concepts directly into that physical space. ...

Peter Malcolm; Tom Moher; Darshan Bhatt; Brian Uphoff; Brenda López-Silva

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Building a scientific and engineering base in Qatar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trying to build a scientific and engineering base in Qatar. Photos by Julie KorhummelLLNL Building a scientific and engineering base in Qatar Stephen P Wampler, LLNL, (925)...

285

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

286

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

287

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

288

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

289

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

290

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

291

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

292

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

293

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

(Re)Use in public scientific workflow repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific workflows help in designing, managing, monitoring, and executing in-silico experiments. Since scientific workflows often are complex, sharing them by means of public workflow repositories has become an important issue for the community. However, ... Keywords: scientific workflows, similarity measures, workflow reuse

Johannes Starlinger; Sarah Cohen-Boulakia; Ulf Leser

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Stefan P. Muszala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Simulation by Stefan P. Muszala B.S., B.A. Rutgers and Computer Engineering 2008 #12;This thesis entitled: Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Engineering) Model Based Load Indices (MBLI) for Scientific Simulation Thesis directed by Dr. Daniel Connors

Colorado at Boulder, University of

299

Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Methods in Computer Science Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic Department of Computer Science analyzes scientific aspects of Computer Science. First it defines science and scientific method in general. It gives a dis- cussion of relations between science, research, development and technology. The existing

Cunningham, Conrad

300

GMS: preserving multiple expert voices in scientific knowledge management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer archives of scientific and engineering knowledge must insure the accuracy, completeness, and validity of their contents. Unfortunately, designers of these sites often overlook the social and cognitive context of scientific activity in favor ... Keywords: cognitive psychology, ethnography, expert communities, information architecture, interaction design, knowledge design, scientific knowledge management, user interface design

Adria H. Liszka; William A. Stubblefield; Stephen D. Kleban

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Efficient Excitation of Gain-Saturated Sub-9-nm-Wavelength Tabletop Soft-X-Ray Lasers and Lasing Down to 7.36 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have demonstrated the efficient generation of sub-9-nm-wavelength picosecond laser pulses of microjoule energy at 1-Hz repetition rate with a tabletop laser. Gain-saturated lasing was obtained at =8.85 nm in nickel-like lanthanum ions excited by collisional electron-impact excitation in a precreated plasma column heated by a picosecond optical laser pulse of 4-J energy. Furthermore, isoelectronic scaling along the lanthanide series resulted in lasing at wavelengths as short as =7.36 nm. Simulations show that the collisionally broadened atomic transitions in these dense plasmas can support the amplification of subpicosecond soft-x-ray laser pulses.

Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Liu, Yanwei [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Jorge, Rocca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Scientific research in the Soviet Union  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I report on the scientific aspects of my US/USSR Interacademy Exchange Visit to the Soviet Union. My research was conducted at three different institutes: the Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow, the Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute in Gatchina, and the Yerevan Physics Institute in Soviet Armenia. I included relevant information about the Soviet educational system, salaries of Soviet physicists, work habits and research activities at the three institutes, and the relevance of that research to work going on in the United States. 18 refs.

Mtingwa, S.K.

1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S.Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) andOASCR Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (DOE

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Challenge Challenge by David Wojick on Fri, 11 Dec, 2009 Take a well known area of scientific and/or technological research. Call it X-research, where X is anything you can name. X might be biofuels, cancer, dark matter, you name it. How do you find all of the people working in area X, plus all of their Web content, to build a comprehensive Web portal for them? That is the X-Portal challenge. The X-Portal challenge is a lot harder than you might think, because research tends to be a seamless web, with no sharp boundaries. So bounding the community is the heart of the challenge. Moreover, everyone in the community is actually working on a different problem, some aspect of the general problem that defines the community. So there is no unique marker, no badge of membership.

306

CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd Place Yoqneam, Israel Zip 20692 Sector Solar Product Israel-based manufacturer of non-contact substrate processing, handling, and testing equipments for Flat Panel Display (FPD), semiconductor, and solar industries. References CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd is a company located in Yoqneam, Israel . References ↑ "CoreFlow Scientific Solutions Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoreFlow_Scientific_Solutions_Ltd&oldid=343913" Categories:

307

Scientific Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Scientific Scientific Highlights Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home Scientific Highlights Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) was formed in June 1977 and has been at the forefront of scientific discovery since the middle of the 20th century. The BES research programs are rooted in the Nation's research efforts to win World War II that predate the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1946. The goals of the early U.S. science programs that evolved into BES were to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user facilities necessary for

308

Universal Scientific Industrial USI Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific Industrial USI Group Scientific Industrial USI Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Universal Scientific Industrial (USI Group) Place Taiwan Sector Services Product USI Group is a design and manufacturing services company that is venturing into polysilicon production. References Universal Scientific Industrial (USI Group)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Universal Scientific Industrial (USI Group) is a company located in Taiwan . References ↑ "Universal Scientific Industrial (USI Group)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Universal_Scientific_Industrial_USI_Group&oldid=352541" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

309

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Common and Scientific Names Table D1 Common and scientific names as referred to in document.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green-winged teal Anas crecca Horned lark Eremophila alpestris Lazuli bunting Passerina amoena Lewis tenebrosus Red-legged frog Rana aurora Western toad Bufo boreas COMMON SCIENTIFIC MAMMALS American beaver Red alder Alnus rubra Russian olive Elaeagnus angustifolia Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis Subalpine fir

315

L3, Fabrication of Top-Gated Sub-10 nm Epitaxial Graphene ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HSQ lines (width ~10 nm) on graphene were fabricated and then the HSQ line .... Electroluminescent Devices with a Low Turn-on Voltage and High Brightness.

316

Hexagonally Arranged Nanopore Film Fabricated via Selective Etching by 172-nm Vacuum Ultraviolet Light Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

Motonori Komura; Kaori Kamata; Tomokazu Iyoda; Keiji Nagai

317

Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To extend soft x-ray microscopy to a resolution of order 10 nm or better, we developed a new nanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. The new process, based on the double patterning technique, has enabled us to fabricate high quality gold zone plates with 12 nm outer zones. Testing of the zone plate with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope, XM-1, in Berkeley, showed that the lens clearly resolved 12 nm lines and spaces. This result represents a significant step towards 10 nm resolution and beyond.

Chao, W.; Kim, J.; Rekawa, S.; Fischer, P.; Anderson, E. H.

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Definitions | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Definitions Definitions Print page Print page Email page Email page A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X-Z Abstract Concise statement (5000 words or less) of the purpose, scope, and major findings of work reported in a scientific and technical information (STI) product. Access Limitation Intellectual property or distribution limitation category of an STI product AN 241.1 (AN 241.1 Reference Copy) A webform used by DOE Headquarters Programs and DOE site/facility management contractors to transmit metadata about an STI Product to OSTI for announcement, as appropriate. The 241.1 metadata can also be provided to OSTI via harvesting or batch file submission. AN 241.3 (AN 241.3 Reference Copy) A webform used by financial assistance recipients and DOE non-site/facility

320

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

models and simulations - Scientific images (static) - Scientific multimedia (audio, video, animations) - Specialized mix (primarily for genomic collections) Add new comment...

322

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

scientific knowledge. * Provide equal access to science for anyone on the Internet - including mobile users. * Promote scientific collaboration, participation, and...

323

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

scientific knowledge * Providing equal access to science for anyone on the Internet * Promoting scientific collaboration, participation, and transparency ... and...

324

Slide24 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

scientific knowledge * Providing equal access to science for anyone on the Internet * Promoting scientific collaboration, participation, and transparency ... and...

325

Slide23 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

scientific knowledge. * Provide equal access to science for anyone on the Internet - including mobile users. * Promote scientific collaboration, participation, and...

326

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

327

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Antone L. Brooks Why This Project? For maximum benefit, state-of-the-art research and new data from the Low Dose Radiation Research Program must be available to other scientists, regulatory agencies, and the public. This project stays abreast of scientific advances in the field, gathers, integrates, and summarizes the research within the program, and disseminates this information to appropriate scientific, regulatory, and public venues. Project Goals Provides a focal point for distribution of information generated in the program, to scientific committees, other governmental and regulatory agencies, and to the public Provides scientific support for the Low Dose Program website

328

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research December 27, 2005 - 4:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have issued a joint Request for Proposals for advanced scientific computing research. DOE expects to fund $67 million annually for three years to five years under its Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) research program. Scientific computing, including modeling and simulation, has become crucial for research problems that are insoluble by traditional theoretical and experimental approaches, hazardous to study in the laboratory, or time-consuming or expensive to solve by traditional means.

329

Role of Modeling and Simulation in Scientific Discovery | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of Modeling and Simulation in Scientific Discovery Role of Modeling and Simulation in Scientific Discovery Role of Modeling and Simulation in Scientific Discovery January 29, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis Role of Modeling and Simulation in Scientific Discovery What are the key facts? Modeling and simulation supplement theory and experimentation, improving the scientific method. Industry that has embraced modeling and simulation has realized huge savings in cost and time in getting thier products to market. Modeling and simulation should never be viewed as a substitute for real-world experimentation. Scientific discovery, or understanding, involves the formulation of theory to explain observed phenomena, the design and execution of experiments to test theory and the feedback of experimental results to evolve theory. This

330

Scientific Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Scientific Scientific Highlights Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Scientific Highlights Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) was formed in June 1977 and has been at the forefront of scientific discovery since the middle of the 20th century. The BES research programs are rooted in the Nation's research efforts to win World War II that predate the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1946. The goals of the early U.S. science programs that evolved into BES were to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user facilities necessary for conducting basic research. These overarching goals have not changed.

331

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Scientific Computing Center NERSC Exceeds Reliability Standards With Tape-Based Active Archive Research Facility Accelerates Access to Data while Supporting Exponential Growth Founded in 1974, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary scientific com- puting facility for the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy. NERSC is located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Oakland Scientific Facility in Oakland, California and is mandated with providing computational resources and expertise for scientific research to about 5,000 scientists at national labora- tories and universities across the United States, as well as their international col- laborators. A division of Lawrence Berke- ley National Laboratory, NERSC supports

332

Scientific Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Scientific Scientific Highlights Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Scientific Highlights Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) was formed in June 1977 and has been at the forefront of scientific discovery since the middle of the 20th century. The BES research programs are rooted in the Nation's research efforts to win World War II that predate the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1946. The goals of the early U.S. science programs that evolved into BES were to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user facilities necessary for

333

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

335

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Scientific Societies, E-print Network -- Energy, science, and technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Scientific Societies Scientific Societies The Scientific Societies Page provides access to websites of scientific societies and professional associations whose focus is in the natural sciences as well as other related disciplines of interest to the Department of Energy research and development programs, projects, and initiatives. Chinese Dutch English French German Italian Japanese Nordic Russian Spanish/Portuguese Other View list of all societies. Choose desired language(s) and/or discipline(s) and select "Display Societies" button. Display Societies Languages All Languages English Japanese Chinese Nordic Dutch Russian French Spanish-Portuguese German Italian Other Disciplines All Subjects Biology and Medicine Biotechnology Chemistry Computer Technologies and Information Sciences

339

Secretary Chu's Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity Notes...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Secretary Steven Chu "Science and technology are the foundation of all Department of Energy activities...," the Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity opens....

340

Feature, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and easily accessible by the scientific community and the public. Several OSTI-led initiatives, products and services are listed within the DOE Open Government Plan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NERSC Role in Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine Yelick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Scientific Computing Research Katherine Yelick NERSC Director Requirements Workshop NERSC Mission The mission of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high performance computing, information, data, and communications services for all DOE Office of Science (SC) research. Sample Scientific Accomplishments at NERSC 3 Award-winning software uses massively-parallel supercomputing to map hydrocarbon reservoirs at unprecedented levels of detail. (Greg Newman, LBNL) . Combustion Adaptive Mesh Refinement allows simulation of a fuel- flexible low-swirl burner that is orders of magnitude larger & more detailed than traditional reacting flow simulations allow.

342

OSTI Innovation, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

sharing of knowledge. The DOE Science Accelerator initiative will bring together non-integrated R&D data, textual information, and disparate scientific communities through...

343

A software framework for simulation-based scientific investigations .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis provides a design and development of a software architecture and programming framework that enables domain-oriented scientific investigations to be more easily developed and… (more)

Salman, Adnan M., 1965-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

OSTP Directs Federal Agencies to Increase Public Access to Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTP Directs Federal Agencies to Increase Public Access to Scientific Publications open book The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has issued a major...

345

Merit Review Procedures for Advanced Scientific Computing Research...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

News In the News In Focus Presentations & Testimony Recovery Act About Organization Budget Field Offices Federal Advisory Committees History Scientific and Technical...

346

Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Snowmass P5 Planning Process Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic...

347

Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Research Diffusion Diffusion Accelerator Links OSTI is conducting applied research to explore ways to speed up the diffusion of knowledge and accelerate scientific progress. OSTI's...

348

NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center has officially accepted a series of upgrades to its Cray XT4 supercomputer,...

349

NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2012 Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2012 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). It is a competitive...

350

Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments - Final Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final scientific report for the University of Pittsburgh portion of the collaborative grant, 'Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments'

Jeffrey A. Newman

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

2000 and Beyond Meeting the Needs for Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI website Search OSTI Homepage Science Accelerator Find DOE Collections Enter Search Terms GO 2000 and Beyond Meeting the Needs for Scientific and Technical Information...

352

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research: Target 2014 ASCRFrontcover.png Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for...

353

Workshop on Emerging Scientific Opportunities using X-ray Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wah Keat Lee (Advanced Photon Source) Gabrielle Long (Advanced Photon Source) Stuart Stock (Northwestern Medical School) Workshop on Emerging Scientific Opportunities using...

354

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Scientific/Technical Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Final ScientificTechnical Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

355

Scientific assessment of coastal wetland loss, restoration and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get this from a library! Scientific assessment of coastal wetland loss, restoration and management in Louisiana. [Donald F Boesch; Louisiana State ...

356

Diffusion of Research, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Information: Population Modeling of the Emergence and Development of Scientific Fields: Carbon Nanotubes Chart Description carbon nanotubes. Link to larger image. This case shows...

357

OSTI Innovation, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

documents Increasing visibility of and access to scientific research data Developing grid-based and other distributed computer processing techniques to support search across...

358

Communications | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Goes Multilingual Now you can find non-English scientific literature from databases in China, Russia, France, and several Latin American countries and have your search results...

359

OSTI History, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

In 1997, OSTI coordinated the Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) Strategic Plan, which promotes more mutually beneficial collaboration with STIP partners at...

360

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ORISE: Implementing Improvements to Benefit the Scientific Peer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) sets the standard for automated scientific peer reviews by continuously implementing process...

362

DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

global climate, turbulence, stress corrosion cracking, computational chemistry and quantum chromodynamics. In support of these scientific applications, approximately 24.3...

363

The Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award | Stanford Synchrotro...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Development Award honors a pioneer at the forefront of accomplishments in NMR, EPR, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy who was dedicated to the pursuit of the...

364

Nearest-IR superluminescent diodes with a 100-nm spectral width  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental study of quantum well superluminescent diodes with an extremely thin (InGa)As active layer. Under cw injection, the output power of such diodes is several milliwatts, with a centre wavelength of 830 nm and emission bandwidth of about 100 nm. (letters)

Il'chenko, S N; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Yakubovich, S D

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Rock Sampling At Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Zuni Mountains Nm Area (Brookins, 1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Zuni Mountains Nm Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radiogenic heat production analysis from U,Th,K concentrations. References D. G. Brookins (1982) Potassium, Uranium, Thorium Radiogenic Heat Contribution To Heat Flow In The Precambrian And Younger Silicic Rocks Of The Zuni And Florida Mountains, New Mexico (Usa) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_Sampling_At_Zuni_Mountains_Nm_Area_(Brookins,_1982)&oldid=387056" Category: Exploration Activities

366

Building blocks for future detectors: Silicon test masses and 1550 nm laser light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use the combination of quasi-monochromatic, continuous-wave laser light at 1064 nm and fused silica test masses at room temperature. Detectors of the third generation, such as the Einstein-Telescope, will involve a considerable sensitivity increase. The combination of 1550 nm laser radiation and crystalline silicon test masses at low temperatures might be important ingredients in order to achieve the sensitivity goal. Here we compare some properties of the fused silica and silicon test mass materials relevant for decreasing the thermal noise in future detectors as well as the recent technology achievements in the preparation of laser radiation at 1064 nm and 1550 nm relevant for decreasing the quantum noise. We conclude that silicon test masses and 1550 nm laser light have the potential to form the future building blocks of gravitational wave detection.

R. Schnabel; M. Britzger; F. Brückner; O. Burmeister; K. Danzmann; J. Dück; T. Eberle; D. Friedrich; H. Lück; M. Mehmet; R. Nawrodt; S. Steinlechner; B. Willke

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

368

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

370

Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Climate Change 2001: Climate Change 2001: Working Group I: The Scientific Basis Get Javascript Other reports in this collection 4. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases Contents Executive Summary 4.1 Introduction 4.1.1 Sources of Greenhouse Gases 4.1.2 Atmospheric Chemistry and Feedbacks 4.1.3 Trace Gas Budgets and Trends 4.1.4 Atmospheric Lifetimes and Time-Scales 4.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 4.2.1 Non-CO2 Kyoto Gases 4.2.1.1 Methane (CH4) 4.2.1.2 Nitrous oxide (N2O) 4.2.1.3 Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 4.2.1.4 Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) 4.2.2 Montreal Protocol Gases and Stratospheric Ozone (O3) 4.2.3 Reactive Gases 4.2.3.1 Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) 4.2.3.2 Volatile organic compounds (VOC) 4.2.3.3 Nitrogen oxides (NOx)

371

Multicore Architecture-aware Scientific Applications  

SciTech Connect

Modern high performance systems are becoming increasingly complex and powerful due to advancements in processor and memory architecture. In order to keep up with this increasing complexity, applications have to be augmented with certain capabilities to fully exploit such systems. These may be at the application level, such as static or dynamic adaptations or at the system level, like having strategies in place to override some of the default operating system polices, the main objective being to improve computational performance of the application. The current work proposes two such capabilites with respect to multi-threaded scientific applications, in particular a large scale physics application computing ab-initio nuclear structure. The first involves using a middleware tool to invoke dynamic adaptations in the application, so as to be able to adjust to the changing computational resource availability at run-time. The second involves a strategy for effective placement of data in main memory, to optimize memory access latencies and bandwidth. These capabilties when included were found to have a significant impact on the application performance, resulting in average speedups of as much as two to four times.

Srinivasa, Avinash

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Verifying disarmament: scientific, technological and political challenges  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in, and hopes for, nuclear disarmament in governments and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) around the world. If a nuclear-weapon-free world is to be achievable, verification and compliance will be critical. VerifYing disarmament would have unprecedented scientific, technological and political challenges. Verification would have to address warheads, components, materials, testing, facilities, delivery capabilities, virtual capabilities from existing or shutdown nuclear weapon and existing nuclear energy programs and material and weapon production and related capabilities. Moreover, it would likely have far more stringent requirements. The verification of dismantlement or elimination of nuclear warheads and components is widely recognized as the most pressing problem. There has been considerable research and development done in the United States and elsewhere on warhead and dismantlement transparency and verification since the early 1990s. However, we do not today know how to verifY low numbers or zero. We need to develop the needed verification tools and systems approaches that would allow us to meet this complex set of challenges. There is a real opportunity to explore verification options and, given any realistic time frame for disarmament, there is considerable scope to invest resources at the national and international levels to undertake research, development and demonstrations in an effort to address the anticipated and perhaps unanticipated verification challenges of disarmament now andfor the next decades. Cooperative approaches have the greatest possibility for success.

Pilat, Joseph R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

Scientific computations on modern parallel vector systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational scientists have seen a frustrating trend of stagnating application performance despite dramatic increases in the claimed peak capability of high performance computing systems. This trend has been widely attributed to the use of superscalar-based commodity components who’s architectural designs offer a balance between memory performance, network capability, and execution rate that is poorly matched to the requirements of large-scale numerical computations. Recently, two innovative parallel-vector architectures have become operational: the Japanese Earth Simulator (ES) and the Cray X1. In order to quantify what these modern vector capabilities entail for the scientists that rely on modeling and simulation, it is critical to evaluate this architectural paradigm in the context of demanding computational algorithms. Our evaluation study examines four diverse scientific applications with the potential to run at ultrascale, from the areas of plasma physics, material science, astrophysics, and magnetic fusion. We compare performance between the vector-based ES and X1, with leading superscalar-based platforms: the IBM Power3/4 and the SGI Altix. Our research team was the first international group to conduct a performance evaluation study at the Earth Simulator Center; remote ES access in not available. Results demonstrate that the vector systems achieve excellent performance on our application suite – the highest of any architecture tested to date. However, vectorization of a particle-incell code highlights the potential difficulty of expressing irregularly structured algorithms as data-parallel programs. 1.

Leonid Oliker; Andrew Canning; Jonathan Carter; John Shalf; Stephane Ethier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

From Mesh Generation to Scientific Visualization:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel supercomputing has typically focused on the inner kernel of scientific simulations: the solver. The front and back ends of the simulation pipeline---problem description and interpretation of the output---have taken a back seat to the solver when it comes to attention paid to scalability and performance, and are often relegated to offline, sequential computation. As the largest simulations move beyond the realm of the terascale and into the petascale, this decomposition in tasks and platforms becomes increasingly untenable. We propose an end-to-end approach in which all simulation components---meshing, partitioning, solver, and visualization---are tightly coupled and execute in parallel with shared data structures and no intermediate I/O. We present our implementation of this new approach in the context of octree-based finite element simulation of earthquake ground motion. Performance evaluation on up to 2048 processors demonstrates the ability of the end-toend approach to overcome the scalability bottlenecks of the traditional approach.

An End-To-End Approach; Tiankai Tu; Hongfeng Yu; Leonardo Ramirez-guzman; Jacobo Bielak; Omar Ghattas; Kwan-liu Ma; David R. O’hallaron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technology Pathway Partnership Final Scientific Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the scientific progress and results made in the development of high efficiency multijunction solar cells and the light concentrating non-imaging optics for the commercial generation of renewable solar energy. During the contract period the efficiency of the multijunction solar cell was raised from 36.5% to 40% in commercially available fully qualified cells. In addition significant strides were made in automating production process for these cells in order to meet the costs required to compete with commercial electricity. Concurrent with the cells effort Boeing also developed a non imaging optical systems to raise the light intensity at the photovoltaic cell to the rage of 800 to 900 suns. Solar module efficiencies greater than 30% were consistently demonstrated. The technology and its manufacturing were maturated to a projected price of < $0.015 per kWh and demonstrated by automated assembly in a robotic factory with a throughput of 2 MWh/yr. The technology was demonstrated in a 100 kW power plant erected at California State University Northridge, CA.

Hall, John C. Dr.; Godby, Larry A.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technology Pathway Partnership Final Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the scientific progress and results made in the development of high efficiency multijunction solar cells and the light concentrating non-imaging optics for the commercial generation of renewable solar energy. During the contract period the efficiency of the multijunction solar cell was raised from 36.5% to 40% in commercially available fully qualified cells. In addition significant strides were made in automating production process for these cells in order to meet the costs required to compete with commercial electricity. Concurrent with the cells effort Boeing also developed a non imaging optical systems to raise the light intensity at the photovoltaic cell to the rage of 800 to 900 suns. Solar module efficiencies greater than 30% were consistently demonstrated. The technology and its manufacturing were maturated to a projected price of kWh and demonstrated by automated assembly in a robotic factory with a throughput of 2 MWh/yr. The technology was demonstrated in a 100 kW power plant erected at California State University Northridge, CA.

Hall, John C. Dr.; Godby, Larry A.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluating the potential of multithreaded platforms for irregular scientific computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resurgence of current and upcoming multithreaded architectures and programming models led us to conduct a detailed study to understand the potential of these platforms to increase the performance of data-intensive, irregular scientific applications. ... Keywords: data-intensive applications, irregular scientific applications, multithreaded architectures

Jarek Nieplocha; Andrès Márquez; John Feo; Daniel Chavarría-Miranda; George Chin; Chad Scherrer; Nathaniel Beagley

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

JASMIN: a parallel software infrastructure for scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exponential growth of computer power in the last 10 years is now creating a great challenge for parallel programming toward achieving realistic performance in the field of scientific computing. To improve on the traditional program for numerical ... Keywords: J Adaptive Structured Meshes applications INfrastructure (JASMIN), parallel computing, scientific computing

Zeyao Mo; Aiqing Zhang; Xiaolin Cao; Qingkai Liu; Xiaowen Xu; Hengbin An; Wenbing Pei; Shaoping Zhu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

350nm CMOS test-chip for architecture verification of real-time QVGA color-video segmentation at the 90nm technology node  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We designed a cell-network-based full-custom test-chip for gray-scale/color image segmentation of real-time video-signals in 350nm CMOS technology. From this digital test-chip design, fully-integrated QVGA-size video-picture-segmentation chips, with ...

Takashi Morimoto; Yohmei Harada; Tetsushi Koide; Hans Jürgen Mattausch

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High silicon content silylating reagents for dry-developed positive-tone resists for extreme ultraviolet (13.5 nm) and deep ultraviolet (248 nm) microlithography  

SciTech Connect

Recent results in the use of disilanes as silylating reagents for near-surface imaging with deep-UV (248 nm) and EUV (13.5 nm) lithography are reported. A relatively thin imaging layer of a photo-cross-linking resist is spun over a thicker layer of hard-baked resist that functions as a planarizing layer and antireflective coating. Photoinduced acid generation and subsequent heating crosslinks and renders exposed areas impermeable to an aminodisilane that reacts with the unexposed regions. Subsequent silylation and reactive ion etching afford a positive-tone image. The use of disilanes introduces a higher concentration of silicon into the polymer than is possible with silicon reagents that incorporate only one silicon atom per reactive site. The higher silicon content in the silylated polymer increases etching selectivity between exposed and unexposed regions and thereby increases the contrast. Additional improvements that help to minimize flow during silylation are also discussed, including the addition of bifunctional disilanes. We have resolved high aspect ratio, very high quality 0.20 {mu}m line and space patterns at 248 nm with a stepper having a numerical aperture (NA)= 0.53, and have resolved {<=} 0.15 {mu}m line and spaces at 13.5 nm.

Wheeler, D.; Scharrer, E.; Kubiak, G. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Authors: Antone L.Brooks, Richard J. Bull, Lezlie A. Couch. Institutions: Washington State University Tri-Cities The purpose of this project is to provide scientific, technical, and organizational support to optimize the impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. This project will serve as a focal point for collection and dissemination of scientific information from the scientists funded in the Program to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the regulatory agencies, and the public. The project will be responsible for analysis of the scientific information in the broader context of biomedical research and will provide this information to the Office of Biological Research

383

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

Scientific statistics and graphics on the Macintosh  

SciTech Connect

In many organizations scientists have ready access to more than one computer, often both a workstation (e.g., SUN, HIP, SGI) as well as a Macintosh or other PC. The scientist commonly uses the work station for {open_quotes}number-crunching{close_quotes} and data analysis whereas the Macintosh is relegated to either word processing or serves as a {open_quotes}dumb terminal{close_quotes} to a larger mainframe computer. In an informal poll of the author`s colleagues, very few of them used their Macintoshes for either statistical analysis or for graphical data display. The author believes that this state of affairs is particularly unfortunate because over the last few years both the computational capability, and even more so, the software availability for the Macintosh have become quite formidable. In some instances, very powerful tools are now available on the Macintosh that may not exist (or be far too costly) on the so-called {open_quotes}high end{close_quotes} workstations. Many scientists are simply unaware of the wealth of extremely useful, {open_quotes}off-the-shelf{close_quote} software that already exists on the Macintosh for scientific graphical and statistical analysis. This paper is a very personal view illustrating several such software packages that have proved valuable in the author`s own work in the analysis and display of climatic datasets. It is not meant to be either an all-inclusive enumeration, nor is it to be taken as an endorsement of these products as the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} of their class. Rather, it has been found, through extensive use that these few packages were generally capable of satisfying his particular needs for both statistical analysis and graphical data display. In the limited space available, the focus will be on some of the more novel features found to be of value.

Grotch, S.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A training program for scientific supercomputing users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Carbon nanotube assisted formation of sub-50 nm polymeric nano-structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel processing method was developed for sub-50 nm structures by integrating quantum dots (QDs) on patterned polymer substrates. Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMa) was prepared by the initiated chemical vapor ...

Lee, Chia-Hua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Single Event Mechanisms in 90 nm Triple-well CMOS Devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Triple-well NMOSFETs collect more charge as compared to dual-well NMOSFETs. Single event charge collection mechanisms in 90 nm triple-well NMOS devices are explained and compared… (more)

Roy, Tania

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 5, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lab director to link science education, national security in TEDxABQ talk September 5, 2013 Watch live stream at home or at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Sept. 5,...

392

HSQ double patterning process for 12 nm resolution x-ray zone plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source is focused by a condenser zone plate (CZP) onto thethe outer region of a 30 nm gold condenser zone plate (CZP).The condenser has 40820 zones and a diameter of 9.8 mm. The

Chao, Weilun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Airborne Doppler Lidar Investigation of Sea Surface Reflectance at a 355-nm Ultraviolet Wavelength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the sea surface reflectance for different incidence angles based on observations of an airborne Doppler lidar at an ultraviolet wavelength of 355 nm is described. The results were compared to sea surface reflectance models, ...

Zhigang Li; Christian Lemmerz; Ulrike Paffrath; Oliver Reitebuch; Benjamin Witschas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., August 7, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab's Frontiers in Science lectures focus on epigenetics August 7, 2013 Is behavior hardwired by DNA or a product of environment? LOS ALAMOS, N.M., August 7, 2013-Los Alamos...

395

Effects of 810-nm Laser on Murine Bone-Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective: The purpose of this study was to Investigate the effect of 810-nm low level laser therapy (LLLT) on dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. Background data: LLLT can enhance wound healing and increase cell proliferation ...

Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao

396

A Simple All Weather Model to Estimate Ultraviolet Solar Radiation (290–385 nm)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new expression to estimate the solar ultraviolet irradiance from parameters usually available in radiometric networks is presented. The authors have analyzed the relation between solar ultraviolet global irradiance (290–385 nm), UV, and ...

I. Foyo-Moreno; J. Vida; L. Alados-Arboledas

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise, St. Louis, Missouri;...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system has an educational func- tion for students and faculty, as well. Additional metering monitors the actual loads of dry labs, wet labs, and offices. For ease of access, Web...

398

Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Characterization of an asynchronous source of heralded single photons generated at a wavelength of 1550 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We make a thorough analysis of heralded single photon sources regarding how factors such as the detector gate-period, the photon rates, the fiber coupling efficiencies, and the system losses affect the performance of the source. In the course of this we give a detailed description of how to determine fiber coupling efficiencies from experimentally measurable quantities. We show that asynchronous sources perform, under most conditions, better than synchronous sources with respect to multiphoton events, but only for nearly perfect coupling efficiencies. We apply the theory to an asynchronous source of heralded single photons based on spontaneous parametric downconversion in a periodically poled, bulk, KTiOPO4 crystal. The source generates light with highly non-degenerate wavelengths of 810 nm and 1550 nm, where the 810 nm photons are used to announce the presence of the 1550 nm photons inside a single-mode optical fiber. For our setup we find the probability of having a 1550 nm photon present in the single-mode fiber, as announced by the 810 nm photon, to be 48%. The probability of multiphoton events is strongly suppressed compared to a Poissonian light source, giving highly sub-Poisson photon statistics.

Maria Tengner; Daniel Ljunggren

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

The changing face of digital science: new practices in scientific collaborations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The confluence of two major trends in scientific research is leading to an upheaval in standard scientific practice. A new generation of scientists, working in large-scale collaborations, is repurposing social software for use in collaborative science. ... Keywords: scientific collaboratories, scientific data analysis, scientific groupware, visualization

Cecilia R. Aragon; Sarah Poon; Claudio T. Silva

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Provenance-based Adaptive Scheduling Heuristic for Parallel Scientific Workflows in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last years, scientific workflows have emerged as a fundamental abstraction for structuring and executing scientific experiments in computational environments. Scientific workflows are becoming increasingly complex and more demanding in terms of ... Keywords: Cloud computing, Provenance, Scientific experiment, Scientific workflow

Daniel Oliveira; Kary A. Ocaña; Fernanda Baião; Marta Mattoso

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Awards Supercomputer Contract to Cray National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Awards Supercomputer Contract to Cray August 5, 2009 BERKELEY, CA - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced today that a contract for its next generation supercomputing system will be awarded to Cray Inc. The multi-year supercomputing contract includes delivery of a Cray XT5(tm) massively parallel processor supercomputer, which will be upgraded to a future-generation Cray supercomputer. When completed, the new system will deliver a peak performance of more than one petaflops, equivalent to more

403

2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Scientific Discovery and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Scientific Discovery and Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Scientific Discovery and Innovation 2006 Department of Energy Strategic Plan - Scientific Discovery and Innovation The United States has always been a Nation of innovators and the Department of Energy has been a major contributor to that legacy. DOE-supported basic research has produced Nobel Laureates, numerous paradigm-shifting scientific discoveries, and revolutionary technologies that have spawned entirely new industries. Such breakthroughs have created fundamentally new energy options, underpinned U.S. national security during challenging times, and contributed to the health of our citizenry and the stewardship of our Nation's environmental resources. This great engine of U.S. innovation has played an important role in fueling a strong economy and one

404

Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation Secretary Bodman in Illinois Highlights Scientific Research Investments to Advance America's Innovation April 11, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis ROMEOVILLE, IL - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today joined Rep. Judy Biggert (IL-13th) at a technology firm in Illinois to highlight scientific research investments that have led to partnerships between DOE's National laboratories and private industry. At Advanced Diamond Technologies, Inc., Secretary Bodman touted the key contributions of scientists and engineers across the country and the importance of sustaining innovation and entrepreneurship in advancing energy and economic security. "Moving technologies from the laboratory setting to commercial

405

Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota) Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota) Scientific and Natural Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Certain scientific and natural areas are established throughout the state for the purpose of preservation and protection. Construction and new

406

NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output---1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1999. Included are citations for Special Publications, Technical Publications, Conference Publications, ...

Stewart S. H.; Machie H. B.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

AAOCS Award for Scientific Excellence in Lipid Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Awards a scientist from the Australasian region that has made a significant research contribution towards fats and oils research. AAOCS Award for Scientific Excellence in Lipid Research Australasian Section aaocs aocs australasian Australasian Sections A

408

OSTI Mission | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Newsletter for Office of Scientific and Technical Information OSTI.gov Newsletter OSTI has been making government R&D results open and transparent since 1947 OSTI Mission OSTI...

409

Scientific visualization as an interpretive and expressive medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a powerful technique for the visual representation of complex data, scientific visualization offers the potential to help secondary school science students learn through active inquiry. Over a period of several years, we have been conducting research ...

Douglas N. Gordin; Daniel C. Edelson; Louis M. Gomez

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill May 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis At the request of President Obama, Secretary Chu and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories are providing round-the-clock scientific support to help inform strategies to stop the BP oil spill. Secretary Chu has spent several days in Houston monitoring the top kill attempt, analyzing the data as it comes in and helping to develop strategies to give it the best chances of success. In the days leading up to the "top kill" attempt, the Secretary and his team of scientists provided expert advice and technical support to test the assumptions behind BP's work and to offer analytical rigor. When diagnostic and pressure tests

411

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.27.05 Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) have issued a joint Request for Proposals for advanced scientific computing research. DOE expects to fund $67 million annually for three years to five years under its Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) research program.'

412

Lester to lead ORISE's scientific and technical peer review program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lester to lead ORISE's scientific and technical peer review program Lester to lead ORISE's scientific and technical peer review program FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 14, 2010 FY10-42 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Oak Ridge Associated Universities has appointed Tony Lester as director of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education's program focused on scientific peer review. Lester has been serving in this role in an acting capacity since September 2009. Tony Lester Tony Lester In his role, Lester manages a research peer review capability that coordinates the use of independent, expert reviewers to determine the scientific technical feasibility of proposals submitted in response to government agency research needs. His team works closely with the federal government to provide liaison, consultation and operations support during the planning and execution of customers' grant management cycles. The

413

STI Products Produced by Financial Assistance Recipients | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Financial Assistance Recipients Financial Assistance Recipients Print page Print page Email page Email page Research, development, demonstration, and other scientific/technical awards should generally require periodic progress reports, special status reports, and a final scientific/technical report. Progress and status reports are management reports which provide information on the project status. These reports should not be sent to OSTI. However, the final scientific/technical report is sent to OSTI. DOE adds appropriate patent and data provisions in all research, development, or demonstration, and other scientific/technical awards relative to protecting Government-funded data, resulting in either unlimited rights or broad government license in data delivered to DOE. In order to promote more uniformity in financial assistance patent and data

414

Statutory Authorities, Office of Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Statutory Authorities Statutory Authorities Established in 1947, DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) fulfills the agency's responsibilities related to the collection, preservation, and dissemination of scientific and technical information emanating from DOE R&D activities. This responsibility has been codified in the organic, or enabling, legislation of DOE and its predecessor agencies and, more recently, was defined as a specific OSTI responsibility in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-58), Section 982, called out responsibility of OSTI: "The Secretary, through the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, shall maintain with the Department publicly available collections of scientific and technical information resulting

415

Visualizing the Future of Scientific Discovery - NERSC Science News June  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualizing the Visualizing the Future of Scientific Discovery Visualizing the Future of Scientific Discovery June 11, 2009 snVolRender-3.png A SUPERNOVA'S VOLUME: This volume rendering of supernova simulation data was generated by running the VisIt application on 32,000 processors on Franklin, a Cray XT4 supercomputer at NERSC. As computational scientists are confronted with increasingly massive datasets from supercomputing simulations and experiments, one of the biggest challenges is having the right tools to gain scientific insight from the data. A team of Department of Energy (DOE) researchers recently ran a series of experiments to determine whether VisIt, a leading scientific visualization application, is up to the challenge. Running on some of the world's most powerful supercomputers, VisIt achieved unprecedented levels of performance

416

Scientific Applications Research Associates Inc SARA | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scientific Applications Research Associates Inc SARA Scientific Applications Research Associates Inc SARA Jump to: navigation, search Name Scientific Applications Research Associates Inc SARA Address 6300 Gateway Dr Place Cypress Zip 90630 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 714-224-4410 x 274 Website http://www.sara.com/rae/ocean_ Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Magnetohydrodynamic MHD Wave Energy Converter MWEC This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Scientific_Applications_Research_Associates_Inc_SARA&oldid=678443"

417

Deep Web Video, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Web Video Download latest version of Flash Player exit federal site to view Video. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)...

418

Library Tools, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Library Tools Department of Energy library tools are provided as a free service to librarians and the library community to expand access to and use of DOE scientific research...

419

Investigating the Limits of SOAP Performance for Scientific Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing synergy between Web Services and Grid-based technologies [7] will potentially enable profound, dynamic interactions between scientific applications dispersed in geographic, institutional, and conceptual space. Such deep interoperability requires ...

Kenneth Chiu; Madhusudhan Govindaraju; Randall Bramley

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the final project report of award "A Study of Transport Protocols for Wide Area Scientific Applications", given by DOE in 2003 to Vishal Misra at Columbia University.

Vishal Misra

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Contact Us, Science Accelerator, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

p.m. We do our best to respond within 72 hours. PHONE 865-576-1188 MAIL U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge,TN 37831...

422

NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output---2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 2000. Included are citations for Special Publications, Technical Publications, Conference Publications, ...

Machie Harriet B.; Stewart Susan H.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A classification of scientific visualization algorithms for massive threading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the number of cores in processors increase and accelerator architectures are becoming more common, an ever greater number of threads is required to achieve full processor utilization. Our current parallel scientific visualization codes rely on partitioning ...

Kenneth Moreland, Berk Geveci, Kwan-Liu Ma, Robert Maynard

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Explore the World of Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Scientific Computing LIVE Dr. Roy Whitney, Ms. Rita Chambers and Dr. Chip Watson - CEBAF March 6, 1991 Simulations and demonstrations of the human interface for real-time data...

425

Partial Evaluation for Scientific Computing: The Supercomputer Toolkit Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the key role played by partial evaluation in the Supercomputer Toolkit, a parallel computing system for scientific applications that effectively exploits the vast amount of parallelism exposed by partial ...

Berlin, Andrew

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Library Tools | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

as a free service to librarians and the library community to expand access to and use of DOE scientific research results: DOE MARC Records System provides Machine-Readable...

427

A generic high-performance method for deinterleaving scientific data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-performance and energy-efficient data management applications are a necessity for HPC systems due to the extreme scale of data produced by high fidelity scientific simulations that these systems support. Data layout in memory hugely impacts the ...

Eric R. Schendel, Steve Harenberg, Houjun Tang, Venkatram Vishwanath, Michael E. Papka, Nagiza F. Samatova

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy Department Seeks Proposals to Use Scientific Computing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's missions," said Secretary Bodman. "This program opens up the world of high-performance computing to a broad array of scientific users. Through the use of these advanced...

429

NASA Langley Scientific and Technical Information Output---1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1996. Included are citations for Formal Reports, High-Numbered Conference Publications, High-Numbered Technical ...

Stewart S. H.; Phillips M. S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Better tiling and array contraction for compiling scientific programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific programs often include multiple loops over the same data; interleaving parts of different loops may greatly improve performance. We exploit this in a compiler for Titanium, a dialect of Java. Our compiler combines reordering optimizations ...

Geoff Pike; Paul N. Hilfinger

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

ROARS: a scalable repository for data intensive scientific computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with ...

Hoang Bui; Peter Bui; Patrick Flynn; Douglas Thain

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Scalable and Distributed Processing of Scientific XML Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seamless and intuitive search capability for the vast amount of datasets generated by scientific experiments is critical to ensure effective use of such data by domain specific scientists. Currently, searches on enormous XML datasets is done manually ...

Elif Dede; Zacharia Fadika; Chaitali Gupta; Madhusudhan Govindaraju

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Scientific data movement enabled by the DYNES instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific innovation continues to increase requirements for the computing and networking infrastructures of the world. Collaborative partners, instrumentation, storage, and processing facilities are often geographically and topologically separated, ... Keywords: CMS, DYNES, FDT, ION, LHC, atlas, oscars, perfsonar

Jason Zurawski; Eric Boyd; Tom Lehman; Shawn McKee; Azher Mughal; Harvey Newman; Paul Sheldon; Steve Wolff; Xi Yang

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Re-examining automatic keyphrase extraction approaches in scientific articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We tackle two major issues in automatic keyphrase extraction using scientific articles: candidate selection and feature engineering. To develop an efficient candidate selection method, we analyze the nature and variation of keyphrases and ...

Su Nam Kim; Min-Yen Kan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Predicting a scientific community's response to an article  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of predicting measurable responses to scientific articles based primarily on their text content. Specifically, we consider papers in two fields (economics and computational linguistics) and make predictions about downloads and ...

Dani Yogatama; Michael Heilman; Brendan O'Connor; Chris Dyer; Bryan R. Routledge; Noah A. Smith

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

OSTI Publications, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a single query. June 2009 - Office of Scientific and Technical Information 2009-2013 Strategic Plan (2181-KB PDF) OSTI works to ensure that U.S. scientists and engineers,...

438

Essays on the production and commercialization of new scientific knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific research frequently generates tremendous economic value. Yet, this value tends to be elusive and public and private organizations often struggle to obtain returns from their investment in science. This dissertation, ...

Bikard, Michaël

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the Scientific Contributions and Insight of Professor Yale Mintz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professor Yale Mintz's contributions in combining theory, diagnostic analysis, and modeling in scientific studies across a broad range of interests over more than four decades are reviewed. His studies include diagnostic analysis of the general ...

Donald R. Johnson; Akio Arakawa

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A University Laboratory Course to Improve Scientific Communication Skills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 14-week laboratory course at the University of Helsinki was offered to improve undergraduate and graduate students' writing and speaking skills, as well as their scientific skills. To emphasize active learning, the course avoided long lecture ...

David M. Schultz

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Deep Web Video, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

site to view Video. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) provides access to a wealth of energy, science, and technology...

442

Diffusion of Research, Office of Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Office of Scientific and Technical Information U.S. Department of Energy Mobile | FAQs | A to Z Index | Site Map | Contact Us Search OSTI website Search HOME ABOUT OSTI SCIENCE...

443

Scientific data repositories: designing for a moving target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing scientific data warehouses requires constant adaptations to cope with changes in processing algorithms, computing environments, database schemas, and usage patterns. We have faced this challenge in the RHESSI Experimental Data Center (HEDC), ...

Etzard Stolte; Christoph von Praun; Gustavo Alonso; Thomas Gross

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm Molecular Writing Resolution", Small, 2005, ASAP. Patent the first "nano-fountain pen" capable of depositing organic ink molecules in patterns as small as 40 nm

Shull, Kenneth R.

445

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Database Showcases Robust DOE R&D Investments to Further Scientific...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Database Showcases Robust DOE R&D Investments to Further Scientific Discovery September 18, 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department...

447

Slide04 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Knowledge Investment Curve Pace of Scientific Discovery Vertical Axis the pace of discovery Horizontal Axis the %, from zero to 100, of R&D funding for sharing scientific...

448

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Its Mission Highlighted in Secretary Chu's Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity by Peter Lincoln on Thu, 17 May, 2012 The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)...

449

Slide06 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DDE are: - Numeric data - Figures (graphic) and data plots - Interactive data maps - Computer models and simulations - Scientific images (static) - Scientific multimedia (audio,...

450

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

451

DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0111-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NM-L000-2012-0111-DNA NM-L000-2012-0111-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0111-DNA DNA at Lightning Dock Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Lightning Dock Geothermal Inc Geothermal Area Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Project Location New Mexico Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Drilling Techniques Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Las Cruces District Office Managing Field Office none provided Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager none provided Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates

452

DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0200-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0200-DNA DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0200-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0200-DNA DNA at Lightning Dock Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Lightning Dock Geothermal Inc Geothermal Area Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Project Location New Mexico Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Las Cruces District Office Managing Field Office none provided Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager none provided Mineral Manager BLM

453

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

454

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00 Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

455

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Gas Buggy Site - NM 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gas Buggy Site - NM 14 Gas Buggy Site - NM 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Project Gas Buggy Site (NM.14 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site Nevada Test Site History Documents Related to Project Gas Buggy Site Fact Sheet Gasbuggy, New Mexico The Gasbuggy Site is located in northwestern New Mexico in Rio Arriba County approximately 55 miles east of the city of Farmington and approximately 12 miles southwest of Dulce, New Mexico, in the Carson National Forest. Floodplains and Wetlands Survey Results for the Gasbuggy and Gnome-Coach Sites, New Mexico, December 1993.

456

DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0218-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0218-DNA DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0218-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0218-DNA DNA at Lightning Dock Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Lightning Dock Geothermal Inc Geothermal Area Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Project Location New Mexico Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Well Testing Techniques Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Las Cruces District Office Managing Field Office none provided Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager none provided Mineral Manager BLM

457

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

458

A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

459

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

alerts Topic alerts Topic Science.gov Mobile: Top Ten in Federal Apps! by Linda McBrearty 03 Jul, 2012 in Products and Content science.gov mobile Hard work and innovation pay off! Government Computer News (GCN) and Information Week have published their Top Ten Federal mobile apps lists, and Science.gov was the only interagency mobile application named to both! Since last year, over 100 federal agencies have established mobile apps in response to a recent White House initiative requiring them to make their services available for mobile use. GCN evaluated the apps on their usefulness, how helpful they actually were, and also on that intangible "cool factor." GCN applauded Science.gov Mobile's surprisingly powerful search engine that checks science data from 13 federal agencies and said "It could probably even be a boon to researchers to keep them from duplicating research, and it will certainly help your kids get an A on their science papers." Information Week published its "10 Handy Mobile Apps From Uncle Sam" and noted that: "(The) Science.gov site searches scientific information from more than 50 databases and 2,100 government-affiliated websites. On-the-go science buffs can now access that data trove via a mobile version of the website or a downloadable Android app. Users can get Wikipedia and EurekAlert! results related to their searches."

460

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

apps Topic apps Topic Science.gov Mobile: Top Ten in Federal Apps! by Linda McBrearty 03 Jul, 2012 in Products and Content science.gov mobile Hard work and innovation pay off! Government Computer News (GCN) and Information Week have published their Top Ten Federal mobile apps lists, and Science.gov was the only interagency mobile application named to both! Since last year, over 100 federal agencies have established mobile apps in response to a recent White House initiative requiring them to make their services available for mobile use. GCN evaluated the apps on their usefulness, how helpful they actually were, and also on that intangible "cool factor." GCN applauded Science.gov Mobile's surprisingly powerful search engine that checks science data from 13 federal agencies and said "It could probably even be a boon to researchers to keep them from duplicating research, and it will certainly help your kids get an A on their science papers." Information Week published its "10 Handy Mobile Apps From Uncle Sam" and noted that: "(The) Science.gov site searches scientific information from more than 50 databases and 2,100 government-affiliated websites. On-the-go science buffs can now access that data trove via a mobile version of the website or a downloadable Android app. Users can get Wikipedia and EurekAlert! results related to their searches."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

mobile Topic mobile Topic Science.gov Mobile: Top Ten in Federal Apps! by Linda McBrearty 03 Jul, 2012 in Products and Content science.gov mobile Hard work and innovation pay off! Government Computer News (GCN) and Information Week have published their Top Ten Federal mobile apps lists, and Science.gov was the only interagency mobile application named to both! Since last year, over 100 federal agencies have established mobile apps in response to a recent White House initiative requiring them to make their services available for mobile use. GCN evaluated the apps on their usefulness, how helpful they actually were, and also on that intangible "cool factor." GCN applauded Science.gov Mobile's surprisingly powerful search engine that checks science data from 13 federal agencies and said "It could probably even be a boon to researchers to keep them from duplicating research, and it will certainly help your kids get an A on their science papers." Information Week published its "10 Handy Mobile Apps From Uncle Sam" and noted that: "(The) Science.gov site searches scientific information from more than 50 databases and 2,100 government-affiliated websites. On-the-go science buffs can now access that data trove via a mobile version of the website or a downloadable Android app. Users can get Wikipedia and EurekAlert! results related to their searches."

462

Analysis of electromigration induced early failures in Cu interconnects for 45nm node  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bi-directional current stressing was used for monitoring electromigration (EM) lifetime evolution in 45nm node interconnects. Experimental results show that an initial bimodal distribution of lifetimes can be modified into a more robust mono-modal distribution. ... Keywords: Bi-directional current, Cu interconnects, Electromigration, FEM modeling

L. Arnaud; F. Cacho; L. Doyen; F. Terrier; D. Galpin; C. Monget

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Free-electron lasers for strategic defense: the benefits of scientific open scientific exchange  

SciTech Connect

A dominant theme of the Fifth International Seminar on Nuclear War, held at Erice, Sicily, (August 19-24, 1985), was the appeal for openness in science and in technological research. In his address to the seminar, Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Andreotti cited the remarkable achievements at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), as an inspiring example of the benefits of scientific collaboration across national borders - science without frontiers. Dr. Edward Teller eloquently argued that, ''thanks to a nearly complete lack of official secrecy, computer technology has fluorished in the free societies of the United States, Japan, and Western Europe.'' The superiority of this technology, vis-a-vis its status in the Soviet bloc, has enhanced both the national security and the economic vitality of the United States and its allies. A further example of the success of science without secrecy can be found in another technology of major importance to the goals of America's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). The technology of note is the free electron-l'Ser (FEL).

Barletta, W.A.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

464

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Laws, Policies, and Schedules | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Mandates and Guidance Mandates and Guidance Laws, Policies, and Schedules Print page Print page Email page Email page Dissemination of scientific and technical information (STI) resulting from Department of Energy (DOE) research and development programs to promote scientific progress and public understanding has been a fundamental requirement since the founding of the Department and its predecessor agencies. A number of laws require the Department to make its information available, while others place some limits on the dissemination of scientific and technical information for which the unauthorized release would be detrimental to national interests. DOE O 241.1B provides the overall DOE objective, requirements, and responsibilities within which these mandates are to be met. Following are laws, policies, schedules and

466

OSTI - MARC Records, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, USDOE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MAchine-Readable Cataloging (MARC) Records for SciTech Connect Full-Text MAchine-Readable Cataloging (MARC) Records for SciTech Connect Full-Text Available at No Cost! Download MARC Records The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) offers librarians and the library community the opportunity to download records of DOE Scientific and Technical Information (STI) in MARC format (see MARC FAQs). By using OSTI's MARC download, librarians can now easily expand access to a variety of scientific research straight from their catalogs. This is a free public service provided by OSTI. We appreciate your thoughts, comments, and questions MARCrecords@osti.gov. SciTech Connect Full-Text MARC Records include all the records from SciTech Connect that contain links to freely available full-text. For the purpose

467

Solid-State Lighting Issue 12: Scientific Literature (Early February -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE (Early February - Early April 2002) 2: SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE (Early February - Early April 2002) From the Technical Literature The material in this section is selected from scientific and technical papers that became available during the reporting time period. Links to online abstracts are provided. Most online abstracts are freely accessible to the public. A few require journal subscriptions or memberships, and are noted as such. The technical literature section is roughly organized by subject area and, within subjects, alphabetically by institution of the lead author. Use the links below to go directly to a section. A. Materials and Device Fabrication B. Materials and Device Design Properties C. Packaging and Reliability D. Lighting Systems A. Materials and Device Fabrication

468

NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC's Franklin NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability NERSC's Franklin Supercomputer Upgraded to Double Its Scientific Capability July 20, 2009 OCEAN EDDIES: This image comes from a computer simulation modeling eddies in the ocean. An interesting feature is the abundance of eddies away from the equator, which is shown in the center of the image at y=0. This research collaboration led by Paola Cessi of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography performed over 15,000 years worth of deep ocean circulation simulations with 1.6 million processor core hours on the upgraded Franklin system. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center has officially accepted a series of upgrades to its Cray XT4 supercomputer, providing the facility's 3,000 users with twice

469

DOE's National Laboratory Directors Highlight Scientific Merits of GNEP |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratory Directors Highlight Scientific Merits of National Laboratory Directors Highlight Scientific Merits of GNEP DOE's National Laboratory Directors Highlight Scientific Merits of GNEP May 2, 2006 - 10:29am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - Directors of nine of the Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories today announced their support for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and discussed the collaboration among the labs in carrying out the partnership. GNEP, part of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, will support advanced technologies to recycle spent nuclear fuel and promote emissions-free nuclear energy in a more proliferation-resistant manner. President Bush has requested $250 million in fiscal year (FY) 2007 for GNEP. "The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership demonstrates the enormous role that

470

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Research Program Authors: Antone L. Brooks Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities Richland, Washington The purpose of this project is to provide a focal point for communication of the research results from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. The major communication tool provided by this project is a Website at Washington State University. The website is being maintained to provide communication between the scientific advances generated by the research program and scientists both in and outside the program, policy makers, regulators and the public. The website also contains a number of presentations and illustrations that are written so that they will be easy

471

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), World Bank Climate Smart Planning Platform Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.mca4climate.info/ Program Start: 2011 Cost: Free Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Screenshot References: MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning[1]

472

Reading Comprehension - The Scientific Method in the Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Scientific Method in the Lab The Scientific Method in the Lab The very first step in the scientific method is to state the _________ title problem conclusion data . Once you have done this you can do some research and then form a good _________ conclusion analysis hypothesis guess . Then we test this by doing _________ an experiment a process a conclusion . We then analyze all of our _________ numbers data procedures and finally form a _________ report graph conclusion . There are a lot of safety rules that we must follow in the science lab as well. One piece of equipment we will use most often is _________ an apron a pair of gloves goggles . If you spill harsh chemicals on your skin you should run it under water for at least _________ 5 seconds 15 seconds 15 minutes one hour . When smelling chemicals, never take a big sniff, always

473

Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions January 8, 2014 - 1:45pm Addthis This 3-D rendering of a lysozyme molecule shows two gadolinium atoms bound to it. Researchers soaked lysozyme crystals in a solution containing the metal gadolinium to help improve imaging quality in an experiment at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser. The experiment proved that LCLS can resolve the lysozyme structure without using data obtained earlier, and researchers hope to use similar techniques to reconstruct important unsolved proteins. | Photo credit: Max Planck Society. This 3-D rendering of a lysozyme molecule shows two gadolinium atoms bound to it. Researchers soaked lysozyme crystals in a solution containing the

474

Los Alamos National Laboratory Advancing National Security Through Scientific  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Scientific Inquiry LANL is a key player in energy security | pg. 14 In this Issue Take a look at LANL's visualization environment | pg. 20 October 2010 LANL is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Editors: Barbara Mack and Jeff Berger Art Direction: Cisneros Design Produced by the Communications Office of Los Alamos National Laboratory E-mail: why@lanl.gov Printed on recycled paper LALP-10-054 About this magazine Why magazine is a new publication primarily for employees and retirees of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Lab will publish Why four times a year and develop for it an online presence. This periodical is named for the crucial nature of scientific inquiry at Los Alamos

475

Secretary Chu Embraces Cooperation, Scientific Progress in Moscow |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Embraces Cooperation, Scientific Progress in Moscow Embraces Cooperation, Scientific Progress in Moscow Secretary Chu Embraces Cooperation, Scientific Progress in Moscow June 9, 2011 - 3:53pm Addthis Secretary Chu and Rosatom General Director Sergey Kiriyenko sigh the U.S.-Russia joint nuclear cooperation agreement. | Courtesy of Dan Leistikow Secretary Chu and Rosatom General Director Sergey Kiriyenko sigh the U.S.-Russia joint nuclear cooperation agreement. | Courtesy of Dan Leistikow Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs To say that Secretary Chu's two days in Moscow have been busy is a bit of an understatement. His days were filled with meetings, speaking engagements and the U.S.-Russia Energy Working Group meeting. The Working Group is part of the broader Administration effort to promote cooperation between the

476

EETD's Materials Project In Scientific American's 2013 World-changing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Project In Scientific American's 2013 World-changing Materials Project In Scientific American's 2013 World-changing Ideas Issue The Materials P roject November 2013 In Scientific American magazine's December 2013 issue, "World-changing ideas," the cover story, "How supercomputers will yield a golden age of materials science," sets the scene for the issue's focus on practical innovations emerging from the laboratory. In the article, MIT's Gerbrand Ceder and Environmental Energy Technologies Division scientist Kristin Persson describe the Materials Project, a collaboration of researchers building a free, open-access database containing the fundamental thermodynamic and electronic properties of all known inorganic compounds. Using high-throughput materials design, they hope to revolutionize the

477

Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January 2008, Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project, Doe Gred Iii (De-Fc36-04Go14339) Details Activities (10) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Emigrant Slimhole Drilling Project ('ESDP') was a highly successful, phased resource evaluation program designed to evaluate the commercial geothermal potential of the eastern margin of the northern Fish Lake Valley pull-apart basin in west-central Nevada. The program involved three phases: (1) Resource evaluation; (2) Drilling and resource characterization; and (3) Resource testing and assessment. Efforts included

478

FY 2014 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA FY 2014 Scientific Infrastructure Support for Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research FOA The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) conducts crosscutting nuclear energy research and development (R&D) and associated infrastructure support activities to develop innovative technologies that offer the promise of dramatically improved performance for advanced reactors and fuel cycle concepts while maximizing the impact of DOE resources. The development of nuclear energy-related infrastructure and basic capabilities in the research community is necessary to promote R&D that supports nuclear science and engineering (NS&E), DOE-NE's mission, and the Nation's nuclear energy challenges. Accordingly, DOE intends to

479

ORISE: Inter-rater Reliability brings Standardization to Scientific Peer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standardization of Scientific Peer Reviews Standardization of Scientific Peer Reviews IRR: A New Initiative Aims to Bring Standardization to ORISE Scientific Peer Reviews In some peer reviews, clear instructions on the basis for rating proposals may not be given to reviewers. As a result, the reviewers' final ratings can leave much room for interpretation thanks to varying degrees of reviewer knowledge and experience... all of which contribute to the final rating number. For instance, the rating scale for a particular review is 1 to 5 (with 1 being the highest). One reviewer rates the proposal a 2, and a second reviewer rates the same proposal a 4 but notes "this is the best proposal" he's ever seen. If the proposal was the best ever, why didn't he rate the proposal a 1? And, was the range in their scores due

480

DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific 0 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing DOE Announces $60 Million in Projects to Accelerate Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing September 7, 2006 - 8:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science today announced approximately $60 million in new awards annually for 30 computational science projects over the next three to five years. The projects are aimed at accelerating research in designing new materials, developing future energy sources, studying global climate change, improving environmental cleanup methods and understanding physics from the tiniest particles to the massive explosions of supernovae. "Advanced computing is a critical element of President Bush's American

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nm actual scientific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ankur Scientific Energy Technologies Pvt Ltd Place Baroda, Gujarat, India Zip 390 008 Sector Biomass Product Baroda-based developer and manufacturer of a wide range of biomass gasification technologies. Coordinates 41.95624°, -86.485679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.95624,"lon":-86.485679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

Sources for Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Reports | OSTI,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Sources for Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Reports Sources for Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Reports You can find full-text scientific and technical reports produced since 1991 (and some reports published prior to 1991) online at SciTech Connect. If you do not find what you are searching for at SciTech Connect, you can try the sources listed below. Depending on the source, documents may be available online or in other formats. Also, visit Adopt-A-Doc for an on-demand service that provides the option to sponsor the digitization of full-text DOE technical reports. Public Access: National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 1-800-553-NTIS (6847) or 703-605-6000 Fax: 703-321-8547 TDD: 703-487-4639 Internet: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx

483

Epidemiological Modeling | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Epidemiological Modeling Epidemiological Modeling Diffusion Epidemiological Modeling Through innovation and research, OSTI speeds the diffusion of scientific knowledge to accelerate the advancement of science. One way OSTI has approached this challenge is through conducting applied research using epidemiological models. OSTI assembled a diffusion research team of epidemiological modelers and science diffusion experts to explore a number of case studies of science knowledge diffusion. Preliminary results indicate (1) that the spread of ideas can be measured and modeled, and (2) that increasing the contact rate between scientists has an impact on the speed the diffusion of scientific knowledge. These findings could have broad implications for increasing the pace of discovery, predicting viability for scientific fields, evaluating long-term

484

DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges January 26, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that approximately 1.6 billion supercomputing processor hours have been awarded to 69 cutting-edge research projects through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program. The INCITE program provides powerful resources to enable scientists and engineers to conduct cutting-edge research in just weeks or months rather than the years or decades needed previously. This facilitates scientific breakthroughs in areas such as climate change, alternative energy, life sciences, and materials science.

485

DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges January 26, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that approximately 1.6 billion supercomputing processor hours have been awarded to 69 cutting-edge research projects through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program. The INCITE program provides powerful resources to enable scientists and engineers to conduct cutting-edge research in just weeks or months rather than the years or decades needed previously. This facilitates scientific breakthroughs in areas such as climate change, alternative energy, life

486

Good housekeeping: Safety and order in the scientific laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory safety might not seem, at first, to be very profoundly related to scientific knowledge. Of course safety is a relatively trivial issue in many scientific settings, especially in comparison to the kind of safety concerns found, say, at a construction site or a chemical plant. However, as scientific work has come to involve more exotic chemicals, biological organisms, and forms of radiation, and generally become more industrial in character, safety has become more of a concern. This has occurred alongside a general expansion of government regulation of workplace safety during the 20thc entury, and a recent trend toward extending work lace safety efforts to new kinds of work, including administrative and professional tasks. As a result of these trends, scientists find that they are increasingly being held responsible for following safety regulations in their re{approx}earc

Sims, B. H. (Benjamin H.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Capturing and supporting contexts for scientific data sharing via the biological sciences collaboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific collaboration is largely focused on the sharing and joint analysis of scientific data and results. Today, a movement is afoot within the scientific computing community to shift "collaboratory" development from traditional tool-centric approaches ... Keywords: collaboratory, data provenance, data sharing, data sharing contexts, data-centric collaboration, metadata, scientific workflow, tool-centric collaboration

George Chin, Jr.; Carina S. Lansing

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

activities...," the Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity (https:www.directives.doe.govreferencessecretarialpolicystatementonscientificintegrityview)...

489

Determining factors that affect long-term evolution in scientific application software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the characteristics of scientific application software is its long lifetime of active maintenance. There has been little software engineering research into the development characteristics of scientific software and into the factors that support ... Keywords: Characteristics of scientific software development, Empirical study, Long-term software evolution, Model of change, Scientific software

Diane Kelly

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Adventures in supercomputing: Scientific exploration in an era of change  

SciTech Connect

Students deserve the opportunity to explore the world of science surrounding them. Therefore it is important that scientific exploration and investigation be a part of each student`s educational career. The Department of Energy`s Adventures in Superconducting (AiS) takes students beyond mere scientific literacy to a rich embodiment of scientific exploration. AiS provides today`s science and math students with a greater opportunity to investigate science problems, propose solutions, explore different methods of solving the problem, organize their work into a technical paper, and present their results. Students learn at different rates in different ways. Science classes with students having varying learning styles and levels of achievement have always been a challenge for teachers. The AiS {open_quotes}hands-on, minds-on{close_quotes} project-based method of teaching science meets the challenge of this diversity heads on! AiS uses the development of student chosen projects as the means of achieving a lifelong enthusiasm for scientific proficiency. One goal of AiS is to emulate the research that takes place in the everyday environment of scientists. Students work in teams and often collaborate with students nationwide. With the help of mentors from the academic and scientific community, students pose a problem in science, investigate possible solutions, design a mathematical and computational model for the problem, exercise the model to achieve results, and evaluate the implications of the results. The students then have the opportunity to present the project to their peers, teachers, and scientists. Using this inquiry-based technique, students learn more than science skills, they learn to reason and think -- going well beyond the National Science Education Standard. The teacher becomes a resource person actively working together with the students in their quest for scientific knowledge.

Gentry, E. [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Helland, B. [Krell Institute, Ames, IA (United States); Summers, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Scientific aspects of hydraulic engineering in the Extreme North  

SciTech Connect

Information relative to participation of the B. E. Vedeneev All-Russian Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva) in the solution of problems of scientific verification of the design, construction, and operation of water-development works in regions of the Extreme North are presented. Basic characteristics of changes in the technical condition of high rock-and-earthfill dams, and the conditions under which their safety is ensured for long-term service in these regions are examined.

Panov, S. I.; Krivonogova, N. F.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

492

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

scientific integrity Topic scientific integrity Topic OSTI and Its Mission Highlighted in Secretary Chu's Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity by Peter Lincoln 17 May, 2012 in Science Communications The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) plays an integral role in ensuring transparency and access to the results of the Department of Energy's scientific efforts - and such transparency and access help assure DOE's scientific integrity, according to a policy statement recently issued by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu. "Science and technology are the foundation of all Department of Energy activities...," the Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity (https://www.directives.doe.gov/references/secretarial_policy_statement_on_scientific_integrity/view) opens. "The Department's mission relies on objective, reliable, accurate, and accessible scientific and technical information." And OSTI addresses the agency's responsibilities to collect, preserve and disseminate scientific and technical information emanating from the Department's research and development activities.

493

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station - NM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station - Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station - NM 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station (NM.0-02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

494

A InGaN/GaN quantum dot green ({lambda}=524 nm) laser  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of self-organized InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers are reported. The laser heterostructures were grown on c-plane GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and the laser facets were formed by focused ion beam etching with gallium. Emission above threshold is characterized by a peak at 524 nm (green) and linewidth of 0.7 nm. The lowest measured threshold current density is 1.2 kA/cm{sup 2} at 278 K. The slope and wall plug efficiencies are 0.74 W/A and {approx}1.1%, respectively, at 1.3 kA/cm{sup 2}. The value of T{sub 0}=233 K in the temperature range of 260-300 K.

Zhang Meng; Banerjee, Animesh; Lee, Chi-Sen; Hinckley, John M.; Bhattacharya, Pallab [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Nanoscale Photonics and Spintronics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NM.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NM.pdf NM.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage New Mexico Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 249 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description New Mexico Ethanol Plant Locations Sources United States Department of Agriculture Related Technologies Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol Creation Date 2010-01-19 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States New Mexico External links http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Ethanol_Plants/ File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:18, 27 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:18, 27 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (249 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

496

Radiation-induced transient attenuation of optical fibers at 800 and 1300 nm  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced absorption in optical fibers has been a subject of considerable interest throughout the world. As availability and applications of fibers have evolved from ''first window'' systems operating near 850 nm to ''second window'' systems near 1300 nm, interest in wavelength dependence of radiation effects in optical fibers has similarly evolved. The present work summarizes second-window, radiation-induced transient absorption measurements in optical fibers for times shorter than 5 ..mu..s. Comparisons to first window data for these fibers are also presented. Only high purity silica fibers with low-OH concentrations were used in the present study to avoid the large OH absorption band in this region. This paper also collects first window data on several high-OH optical fibers.

Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Development of mirror manipulator for hard-x-ray nanofocusing at sub-50-nm level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray focusing using Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors is promising owing to their capability of highly efficient and energy-tunable focusing. We report the development of a mirror manipulator which enables KB mirror alignment with a high degree of accuracy. Mirror alignment tolerances were estimated using two types of simulators. On the basis of the simulation results, the mirror manipulator was developed to achieve an optimum KB mirror setup. As a result of focusing tests at BL29XUL of SPring-8, the beam size of 48x36 nm{sup 2} (VxH) was achieved in the full width at half maximum at an x-ray energy of 15 keV. Spatial resolution tests showed that a scanning x-ray microscope equipped with the KB focusing system could resolve line-and-space patterns of 80 nm linewidth in a high visibility of 60%.

Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Hara, H.; Yamamura, K.; Sano, Y.; Endo, K.; Mori, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K. [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multicore Platforms for Scientific Computing: Cell BE and NVIDIA Tesla J. Fern´andez, M.E. Acacio Tesla computing solutions. The former is a re- cent heterogeneous chip-multiprocessor (CMP) architecture, multicore, Cell BE, NVIDIA Tesla, CUDA 1 Introduction Nowadays, multicore architectures are omnipresent

Acacio, Manuel

499

Scientific and Technical Information Program | A Collaboration to Ensure  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) is a collaboration from across the DOE complex working to ensure that the results of DOE-funded research and development (R&D) and other science and technology activities are identified, disseminated, and preserved. STIP members, led by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), work together to increase the availability and transparency of various types of STI, using best practices, tools, references, and standard operating procedures. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) is a collaboration from across the DOE complex working to ensure that the results of DOE-funded research and development (R&D) and other science and technology activities are identified, disseminated, and preserved. STIP members, led by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), work together to increase the availability and transparency of various types of STI, using best practices, tools, references, and standard operating procedures. For researcher DOE dropdown arrow Program Managers/Project Officers Contracting Officers and Contract Specialists Investigators / Authors dropdown arrow DOE Programs and Major Site/Facility Contractors University or R&D and Other Contracts

500

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF A LIST OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, !!! -- 1 -- INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF A LIST OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS . 1. Please su