Sample records for nj nm nv

  1. NV Energy RFP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NV Energy request for proposals (RFP) is seeking proposals that would allow the company to acquire or partner to construct a renewable energy resource that would satisfy a 54-MW of planning capacity. The company is also looking for proposals for a build-transfer option for a 140-MW single axis tracking solar PV facility at a location provided by the bidder.

  2. NV Energy- Energy Plus New Homes Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NV Energy offers the Energy Plus New Homes Program provides rebates to certified builders in the NV Energy service territory that build high-efficiency homes. (Rebates are only available to home...

  3. Photovoltech NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergy International LimitedPhoenixPhotovoltech NV Jump to:

  4. EA-1849: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV EA-1849: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV August 22, 2011 EA-1849: Final Environmental Assessment Tuscarora...

  5. Ultrasensitive Magnetometry and Imaging with NV Diamond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Changdong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NV centers in a diamond are proving themselves to be good building blocks for quantum information, electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging, and sensor applications. The key feature of the NV is that it has an electron spin that can be polarized...

  6. NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

  7. Ultrasensitive Magnetometry and Imaging with NV Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Changdong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ULTRASENSITIVE MAGNETOMETRY AND IMAGING WITH NV DIAMOND A Dissertation by CHANGDONG KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2010 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ULTRASENSITIVE MAGNETOMETRY AND IMAGING WITH NV DIAMOND A Dissertation by CHANGDONG KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  8. QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution - East QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution - East New Jersey Institute of Technology...

  9. NV Energy (Southern Nevada)- Solar Hot Water Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NV Energy is providing an incentive for its residential customers to install solar water heaters on their homes. As of July 26, 2013, NV Energy electric customers in Southern Nevada who own their...

  10. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources- Pearl Hot Spring, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  11. NV Energy (Southern Nevada)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''Pool Pump and duct system rebates are temporarily suspended. Contact NV Energy for additional information on funding and program availability.'''

  12. Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSEO Solar Electric Rebate Program NH NHPUC Renewable EnergyNH NJ NM NV NY OH OR PV Incentive Program Energy Office Renewable Technology Rebate

  13. February 2013 Siemens Princeton NJ Pascal Hitzler Semantic Data Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    February 2013 ­ Siemens Princeton NJ ­ Pascal Hitzler Semantic Data Analytics ­ The key://www.pascal-hitzler.de/ #12;February 2013 ­ Siemens Princeton NJ ­ Pascal Hitzler 2 Semantic Web journal · EiCs: Pascal://www.semantic-web-journal.net/ #12;February 2013 ­ Siemens Princeton NJ ­ Pascal Hitzler 3 Textbook Pascal Hitzler, Markus Krötzsch

  14. NV Energy (Northern Nevada)- Solar Hot Water Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NV Energy is providing an incentive for its residential customers, small commercial, nonprofit, school and other public customers to install solar water heaters on their homes and facilities. ...

  15. Photonic Quantum Networks formed from NV- Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kae Nemoto; M. Trupke; S. J. Devitt; B. Scharfenberger; K. Buczak; J. Schmiedmayer; W. J. Munro

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present a simple repeater scheme based on the negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond (NV-). Each repeater node is built from simple modules comprising an optical cavity containing a single NV-, with one nuclear spin from 15N as quantum memory. The operation in the module only uses deterministic processes and interactions and achieves high fidelity (>99%) operation, and modules are connected by optical fiber. In the repeater node architecture, the processes between modules by photons can be in principle deterministic, however current limitations on optical components lead to the processes to be probabilistic but heralded. The most resource modest repeater architecture contains at least two modules at each node, and the repeater nodes are than connected by telecom wavelength entangled photon pairs. We discuss the performance of quantum repeaters starting from the minimum-resource strategy with several modules (~10) and then incorporating more resource-intense strategies step by step. Our architecture enables large-scale quantum information networks with existing technology.

  16. SolarWorks NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore Jump to:VoltaicSolarProSolarWorks NJ Jump to:

  17. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Program Review Presentation NJ COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS REFUSE TRUCKS, SHUTTLE BUSES AND INFRASTRUCTURE Chuck Feinberg, Principal Investigator New Jersey Clean...

  18. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications CX-005345: Categorical Exclusion Determination NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure Business Case for Compressed...

  19. NV Energy (Northern Nevada)- SolarGenerations Solar Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As of March 2014, NV Energy residential electric customers in northern Nevada who own their homes are eligible for a rebate of 50% of the installed cost of the system up to $2,250. Additionally,...

  20. NV Energy formerly Sierra Pacific Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) |Renewable EnergyNV Energy SierraNV

  1. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  2. File:INL-geothermal-nv.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdf Jump to:nv.pdf Jump to:

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/13-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublicQuanlightR3(2)3-AK-aNV-a <

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/20-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche < (1)NV-a <

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/5-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <caMT-aNV-b <

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searcheWA-a <NV-c <

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/7-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searcheWA-aHI-a <aNV-a

  8. NV Energy Sierra Pacific Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) |Renewable EnergyNV Energy Sierra

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/1-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirect pageNV-a < RAPID‎

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/11-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirecta < RAPID‎ |bcNV-a

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/15-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:bdcba5-NV-a

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/17-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-a <c <NV-a

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bowen Lab - NJ 33

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NYBowen Lab - NJ 33 FUSRAP

  14. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  15. NV Energy (Northern Nevada Gas)- SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Nevada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial, industrial and institutional natural gas customers of NV Energy can take advantage of a wide variety of incentives for retrofit projects. Only customers in Northern Nevada (Reno-Sparks...

  16. http://www.sord.nv.doe.gov/meda_wind_roses_by_station_numbe.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Phone: Contact - (702) 295-1232 Fax - (702) 295-3068 http:www.sord.nv.doe.gov Report web page problems to: SORD Webmaster Page 1 of 2 SORD MEDA Wind Roses 5252011 http:...

  17. NV/YMP radiological control manual, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gile, A.L. [comp.] [comp.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) are located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental US since 1951. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for US defense-generated waste, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, and non-nuclear test operations such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC). Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level nuclear waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Planned future remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 2, represents DOE-accepted guidelines and best practices for implementing Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain Project Radiation Protection Programs in accordance with the requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. These programs provide protection for approximately 3,000 employees and visitors annually and include coverage for the on-site activities for both personnel and the environment. The personnel protection effort includes a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program accredited dosimetry and personnel bioassay programs including in-vivo counting, routine workplace air sampling, personnel monitoring, and programmatic and job-specific As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations.

  18. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 1 Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects NH 32 Awards Support Projects in 24 States 6 11 MA...

  19. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorized Access | Department2 1

  20. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorized Access | Department2 1 2 1

  1. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment ofPrivilegesUnauthorized Access | Department2 1 2 1 7

  2. Binding of He{sub n}V clusters to ?-Fe grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschopp, M. A., E-mail: mark.a.tschopp.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gao, F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Solanki, K. N. [Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to explore the formation/binding energetics and length scales associated with the interaction between He{sub n}V clusters and grain boundaries in bcc ?-Fe. In this work, we calculated formation/binding energies for 1–8 He atoms in a monovacancy at all potential grain boundary (GB) sites within 15?Ĺ of the ten grain boundaries selected (122106 simulations total). The present results provide detailed information about the interaction energies and length scales of 1–8 He atoms with grain boundaries for the structures examined. A number of interesting new findings emerge from the present study. First, the ?3(112) “twin” GB has significantly lower binding energies for all He{sub n}V clusters than all other boundaries in this study. For all grain boundary sites, the effect of the local environment surrounding each site on the He{sub n}V formation and binding energies decreases with an increasing number of He atoms in the He{sub n}V cluster. Based on the calculated dataset, we formulated a model to capture the evolution of the formation and binding energy of He{sub n}V clusters as a function of distance from the GB center, utilizing only constants related to the maximum binding energy and the length scale.

  3. Passive solar house in Skillman, NJ: Case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendig, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study traces the history of a single family residence in Skillman, NJ designed by Harrison Fraker. The house, built in 1978, was conceived as primarily passive solar house intended to rely on solar energy for most of its heating needs. Solar features include direct gain windows, water walls and sunspace. The study documents original solar features, identifies changes over time and evaluates performance of the house. The owners have removed movable insulation and significantly reduced the amount of thermal mass over the life of the building. The owner reported comfort level changes intuitively consistent with those modifications. The owner is contemplating further changes to make the house more marketable, changes likely to further alter the remaining passive solar features. Builders Guide software was used to calculate changes in solar performance of the house related to building modifications. Calculations of solar performance generally correspond to anecdotal information from the owner. The author's attempts with Energy 10 program showed some promise, but are as yet inconclusive. At this time BG appears to be more useful and user friendly to the average practitioner with limited time and design resources. As a practicing architect the author is most interested in lessons to be learned from the past as they might contribute to future projects. Information gleaned from this study did confirm intuitively expected and currently disseminated thinking regarding passive solar design. The thermal mass proved to be vulnerable to change. Features which required daily manual adjustment were quickly discarded. Desire for comfort was driving force in changing the house and took precedence over the need to save energy or money.

  4. Proceedings of ICAPP '06 Reno, NV USA, June 4-8, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proceedings of ICAPP '06 Reno, NV USA, June 4-8, 2006 Paper 6132 Fast Thorium Molten Salt Reactors Thorium, in Pressurized Water or Fast Neutrons Reactors. Two alternatives to produce 233 U are examined Gradignan Cedex, France Abstract ­ One of the pending questions concerning Molten Salt Reactors based

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-a <caacNM-ba

  6. J. Biomater. Sci. Polymer Edn, Vol. 19, No. 10, pp. 13631382 (2008) Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Krishanu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) coatings with varying moduli to test the hypothesis that lower moduliJ. Biomater. Sci. Polymer Edn, Vol. 19, No. 10, pp. 1363­1382 (2008) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden

  7. Company: American Pool Management Work Location: Edison, NJ Local Pools throughout Central and North Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Company: American Pool Management Work Location: Edison, NJ ­ Local Pools throughout Central and North Jersey Pay Rate: $9-$12/hour Type of Business: Swimming Pool Management Job Title: Seasonal Staffing Assistant, Seasonal Area Supervisors, Seasonal Pool Managers, Seasonal Lifeguards Start Date: May

  8. Abstract No. jone0499 FTIR Measurement of Organic Functional Groups in NY/NJ Harbor Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    % with a direct impact on shipping costs. Decontamination and beneficial use of the dredged material may help are enormous. In the NY/NJ Harbor case, dredging is required to maintain and improve navigation channels used for commercial purposes. Approximately 1,500,000 cubic meters of dredged material must be dredged and disposed

  9. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    for savings. In some cases it may be economically beneficial to pay for a professional energy audit. SelectingRutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525 Phone: 732.932.5000 Energy Consumption Electric Petroleum Natural Gas Gas Year 1 Year 4Year 3Year 2 Year 5

  10. Posted on Thu, Apr. 06, 2006 Laptop Orchestra boots up in N.J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posted on Thu, Apr. 06, 2006 Laptop Orchestra boots up in N.J. By David Patrick Stearns Inquirer for its highly portable equipment, and has up to 15 people onstage operating laptop computers, each/Still), to prosaic hand signals or, in one case, pieces of paper held up with printed directions containing

  11. Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection September 8 Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's (NJDEP) "Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Management rules to address the development and permitting of wind turbines in the coastal zone

  12. Fast and Accurate Algorithms for Projective Multi{Image Structure from John Oliensis (oliensis@research.nj.nec.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genc Siemens Research Princeton, N.J. 08540 Abstract We describe algorithms for computing projective the possibility of transforming the structure and motion by a projective transformation. #12; 1 Introduction

  13. 650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber-pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber- pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator Tobias.p.lamour@hw.ac.uk Abstract: Sub-250-fs pulses with energies of up to 650 nJ and peak powers up to 2.07 MW were generated from a cavity-dumped optical parametric oscillator, synchronously-pumped at 15.3 MHz with sub-400-fs pulses from

  14. Robust Dynamical Decoupling for Arbitrary Quantum States of a Single NV Center in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Shim; I. Niemeyer; J. Zhang; D. Suter

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical decoupling is a powerful technique for extending the coherence time (T$_2$) of qubits. We apply this technique to the electron spin qubit of a single nitrogen-vacancy center in type IIa diamond. In a crystal with natural abundance of $^{13}$C nuclear spins, we extend the decoherence time up to 2.2 ms. This is close to the T$_1$ value of this NV center (4 ms). Since dynamical decoupling must perform well for arbitrary initial conditions, we measured the dependence on the initial state and compared the performance of different sequences with respect to initial state dependence and robustness to experimental imperfections.

  15. DOI-BLM-NV-W010-2009-0018-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro Site Jump to:19-CX JumpDOI-BLM-NV-W010-2009-0018-CX

  16. USDA-FS-EA-NV-030-06-025 2012 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDB Ell-SalineFS-EA-NV-030-06-025

  17. DOI-BLM-NV-W010-2011-0100-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources DOE0083-CXDOI-BLM-NV-W010-2011-0100-CX

  18. NV energy electricity storage valuation : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; Jin, Chunlian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benefit the operations of NV Energy, and assesses whether those benefits are likely to justify the cost of the storage system. To determine the impact of grid-level storage, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (%22BA%22) as projected for 2020 was created. Storage was found to add value primarily through the provision of regulating reserve. Certain storage resources were found likely to be cost-effective even without considering their capacity value, as long as their effectiveness in providing regulating reserve was taken into account. Giving fast resources credit for their ability to provide regulating reserve is reasonable, given the adoption of FERC Order 755 (%22Pay-for-performance%22). Using a traditional five-minute test to determine how much a resource can contribute to regulating reserve does not adequately value fast-ramping resources, as the regulating reserve these resources can provide is constrained by their installed capacity. While an approximation was made to consider the additional value provided by a fast-ramping resource, a more precise valuation requires an alternate regulating reserve methodology. Developing and modeling a new regulating reserve methodology for NV Energy was beyond the scope of this study, as was assessing the incremental value of distributed storage.

  19. NV Energy Large-Scale Photovoltaic Integration Study: Intra-Hour Dispatch and AGC Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Meng, Da; Guo, Xinxin; Jin, Chunlian; Samaan, Nader A.

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty and variability with photovoltaic (PV) generation make it very challenging to balance power system generation and load, especially under high penetration cases. Higher reserve requirements and more cycling of conventional generators are generally anticipated for large-scale PV integration. However, whether the existing generation fleet is flexible enough to handle the variations and how well the system can maintain its control performance are difficult to predict. The goal of this project is to develop a software program that can perform intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulation, by which the balancing operations of a system can be simulated to answer the questions posed above. The simulator, named Electric System Intra-Hour Operation Simulator (ESIOS), uses the NV Energy southern system as a study case, and models the system’s generator configurations, AGC functions, and operator actions to balance system generation and load. Actual dispatch of AGC generators and control performance under various PV penetration levels can be predicted by running ESIOS. With data about the load, generation, and generator characteristics, ESIOS can perform similar simulations and assess variable generation integration impacts for other systems as well. This report describes the design of the simulator and presents the study results showing the PV impacts on NV Energy real-time operations.

  20. Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in NV-centered diamonds at variable fields and orientations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalo A. Alvarez; Christian O. Bretschneider; Ran Fischer; Paz London; Hisao Kanda; Shinobu Onoda; Junichi Isoya; David Gershoni; Lucio Frydman

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk, usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room-temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers could alleviate this need, but hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron->13C spin alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron-nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs, throughout the nuclear bulk ensemble. This method opens new perspectives for applications of diamond NV centers in NMR, and in quantum information processing.

  1. NJ.?3

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECTpi/L +3(YJ

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - NJ 24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyomingAllegheny-Ludlum SteelNJ 24

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vitro Corp of America - NJ 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntownUnitedCenter -VanadiumNJ 02

  4. New Jersey Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR)Nevis EngineCity,NewJump to:Iberia,ProgramNJ

  5. Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TO THEHudsonTargetingduty H2-DieselHelpin N.J.

  6. EA-1944: Ormat Technologies Brady Hot Springs Project, Churchill County, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ormat Technologies, Inc. (Ormat) proposes to use DOE and cost share funding to study the Brady Hot Springs geothermal Field 15-12RD well. This is an EGS Demonstration project divided into three phases. During Phase 1, Ormat characterized the target well to prepare for stimulation activities in Phase 2, Phase 2: Well Stimulation and Collection/Analysis of Stimulation Monitoring Data and Phase 3: Long-term testing of the system. Phase 2 and 3 activities would occur at Ormat's Brady Hot Springs geothermal field in Churchill County, NV on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). Since Phases 2 and 3 have the potential to impact subsurface resources, DOE must analyze the impacts associated with Phases 2 and 3. The BLM will be the lead agency for completion of the EA with BOR and DOE as cooperating agencies.

  7. Local and bulk 13C hyperpolarization in NV-centered diamonds at variable fields and orientations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Kanda, Hisao; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Gershoni, David; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarizing nuclear spins is of fundamental importance in biology, chemistry and physics. Methods for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei from free electrons in bulk, usually demand operation at cryogenic temperatures. Room-temperature approaches targeting diamonds with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers could alleviate this need, but hitherto proposed strategies lack generality as they demand stringent conditions on the strength and/or alignment of the magnetic field. We report here an approach for achieving efficient electron->13C spin alignment transfers, compatible with a broad range of magnetic field strengths and field orientations with respect to the diamond crystal. This versatility results from combining coherent microwave- and incoherent laser-induced transitions between selected energy states of the coupled electron-nuclear spin manifold. 13C-detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments demonstrate that this hyperpolarization can be transferred via first-shell or via distant 13Cs, throughout the nuclear ...

  8. Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor Case Study: Passaic River, New Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor ­ Case compounds. Decontamination of these sediments is one tool that can be used to cope with the problems posed decontamination technologies in near- commercial scale projects during the 2004-2005time period. We stress

  9. FACT SHEET: Projects with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) CCICADA is involved in several projects in partnership with FEMA Region II (which covers NJ, NY, Puerto Rico, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is involved in several projects in partnership with FEMA Region II (which covers NJ, NY, Puerto Rico

  10. Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

  11. F2C 1/Photoni Conference 2000/443 Sid em od e O p t ical I nj ection D FB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo-Young

    F2C 1/Photoni� Conference 2000/443 ¦ - / o Sid em od e O p t ical I nj ection � � ë � ÷ ¢ ¯ ¶ � D D ar ed - M od u lated D F B L aser s by Sid a n od e O p tical I nj ection ¨ ] � õ , - µ ¤ , � ì µ

  12. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  13. STRUCTURE OF PRESSURE PULSES IN LIQUIDS WITH GAS BUBBLES N.V. Malykh, I.A. 0G0R0DNIK0V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are predominant. This leads to the sound speed dispersion and determines either the short pulse structure oriSTRUCTURE OF PRESSURE PULSES IN LIQUIDS WITH GAS BUBBLES N.V. Malykh, I.A. 0G0R0DNIK0V Institute. I.-INTRODUCTION - The main specific feature of a liquide with gas bubbles is the great difference

  14. Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies Hadi with chip power reduc- tions. This paper examines how well process technology and mi- croarchitecture delivered on this assumption. This paper evalu- ates power and performance of native and Java workloads

  15. 32192UniprintNT11.09NJ HE105 Updated November 2013 Controlled by Coordinator Higher Education Enrolments & Fees PAGE 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    32192UniprintNT11.09NJ HE105 Updated November 2013 · Controlled by Coordinator Higher Education Enrolments & Fees PAGE 1 of 1 Higher Education Employer Authorisation Form Higher Education to withdraw this contract, for any reason, during 2014. Higher Education Fees are subject to the Higher

  16. 2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Plasma-Material Interactions with evaporated lithium coatings in NSTX 1:50 ­ 2:10 M. A. Jaworski 2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices April 27-29, 2011

  17. Shackleton, N.J., Curry, W.B., Richter, C., and Bralower, T.J. (Eds.), 1997 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 154

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .W. Murray,4 N.J. Shackleton,5 and S. Harris6 ABSTRACT Synthetic records of percent CaCO3, carbonate mass is developed that predicts percent CaCO3 from high-resolution measurements of stacked natural gamma emissions, stacked magnetic susceptibility, and digital color reßectance. Over 1300 measurements of percent CaCO3

  18. February 9, 2012 Consider the non-spherical wrist of the Comau Smart5 NJ4 170 robot, i.e., the last three revolute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ((t)) a linear Cartesian path with constant speed = 1. The robot is initially in the configuration q(0) = /3 /2Robotics I February 9, 2012 Exercise 1 Consider the non-spherical wrist of the Comau Smart5 NJ4 170 robot, i.e., the last three revolute joints of this 6R structure (see Fig. 1). The associated Denavit

  19. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transition 795-nm rubidium laser," Opt. Lett. 32, 2423- S.transition 795- nm rubidium laser using 3 He buffer gas",transition 795-nm Rubidium laser with He buffer gas" (

  20. 28-nm laser damage testing of LIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltyn, S.R.; Newman, B.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested several samples of LIF, both single crystal and press forged, for damage resistance to 10-ns 248-nm pulses at 35 pps. The damage thresholds - the highest levels at which no damage could be produced - ranged from 4 to 6 J/cm/sup 2/ although some test sites survived irradiation at approx. 30 J/cm/sup 2/. We observed that bulk damage is the primary failure mechanism in single crystal and press forged samples and that both types exhibit the same resistance to laser damage.

  1. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  2. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  3. Emile H. Elias a, Caitriana Steele a, Albert Rango a, John Mejia b a USDA/ARS Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM and b Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -009-9672-5. Martinec, Rango and Roberts. 2008. Snowment Runoff Model (SRM) User's Manual. Edited by Gomez 15 Rio Grande del Rancho 1999 28 29 0.3 0.87 215 16 Pueblo de Taos 1999 22 21 1.9 0.84 151 17 Lucero

  4. Grow NJ (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A business creating or retaining jobs in New Jersey and making a qualified capital investment at a qualified business facility can apply for grants of corporate business tax credits for job...

  5. NV-TAL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003408MLTPL00 Tensor Algebra Library for NVidia Graphics Processing Units  github.com/DmitryLyakh/TAL_SH 

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - WAPA Transmission Developments in NM ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM, CO, WY, KS, ND, UT, SD & ID Tasked with planning and financing of transmission lines within their respective states RETA has the additional requirement that 30% of...

  7. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  8. RF power potential of 45 nm CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Christopher

    This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS devices with varying device widths and layouts. We find that 45 nm CMOS can deliver a peak output power density of around 140 mW/mm with ...

  9. New Materials for 157 nm Photoresists: Characterization and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    . The current Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) Roadmap indicates the 100 nm technology node will be reached by 2005; however, many semiconductor manufacturers foresee the need for a technology enabling 100 by 2005. Therefore, 157 nm lithography is viewed as a potential bridge across the gap between optical

  10. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Anions at 118.2 nm: Observation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at 118.2 nm (10.488 eV) by tripling the third harmonic output (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser in a XeAr cell. Our study focuses on a set of...

  11. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-a Reliable Diode-Pumped Hydrocarbon-Free 795-nm Rubidiumand R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-

  12. albuquerque nm 1st: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  13. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  14. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  15. Single-frequency 1559-nm erbium-doped fiber laser pumped by a 650-nm semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, C. Randy [Lucent Technologies, Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733-0400 (United States)] Mizrahi, V. [Cienna Corporation, Hanover, Maryland 21076 (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-frequency laser with a 2-cm-length erbium-doped fiber and fiber-grating coupler mirrors was operated successfully with a 650-nm semiconductor pump laser. Laser pump threshold was 0.91-mW and 34-{mu}W output power at 1559 nm was obtained for 6-mW pump power. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  16. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405?nm radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L. [Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pianetta, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10?A/cm{sup 2} yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20?nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9?Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10?W/cm{sup 2}) of 257?nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405?nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405?nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1?keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 100–1000?nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50?h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405?nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  17. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  18. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study, this 3DVAR analysis method is adapted to perform multiple Doppler wind analysis for CASA radars, together

  19. Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels and Zhaoning Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels Han Caoa) and Zhaoning Yu Nanostructure wafers . The nanofluidic channels were further narrowed and sealed by techniques that are based- tremely small nanofluidic structures need to be fabricated and used as matrices for the manipulation

  20. NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009-Transferring from New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2010 NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009- 2010 11/9/2010 Transferring from New Mexico Junior College to the University of New Mexico #12;NMJC Course UNM Equivalent Important UNM Phone Numbers................................................................................................... http://advisement.unm.edu/ The University of New Mexico and New Mexico Junior College work closely

  1. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  2. Sub-30 nm InAs Quantum-Well MOSFETs with Self-aligned Metal Contacts and Sub-1 nm EOT HfO2 Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, JesĂşs A.

    performance, ability to harmoniously scale down to sub-30 nm gate length dimensions and CMOS. MOSFETs with gate length dimensions in the 20-30 nm range and outstanding electrical characteristics that yields an undercut spacer is etched through highly

  3. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c <NM-f

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c <NM-fg

  6. NM Underground Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLC JumpNF- Review ofNM

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a < RAPID‎ | RoadmapNM-a

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-a <caacNM-b

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-acCA-bfID-aNM-a

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-acCA-bfID-aNM-ac

  11. GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric Power Company NM LLC

  12. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of Propargyl Radicals at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncher, S.J.; Moore, D.T.; Sveum, N.E.; Neumark, D.M.

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of propargyl radical, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, and its perdeuterated isotopolog was investigated using photofragment translational spectroscopy. Propargyl radicals were produced by 193 nm photolysis of allene entrained in a molecular beam expansion, and then photodissociated at 248 nm. photofragment time-of-flight spectra were measured at a series of laboratory angles using electron impact ionization coupled to a mass spectrometer. Data for ion masses corresponding to C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 3}{sup +}, and the analogous deuterated species show that both H and H{sub 2} loss occur. The translational energy distributions for these processes have average values = 5.7 and 15.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and are consistent with dissociation on the ground state following internal conversion, with no exit barrier for H loss but a tight transition state for H{sub 2} loss. The translational energy distribution for H atom loss is similar to that in previous work on propargyl in which the H atom, rather than the heavy fragment, was detected. The branching ratio for H loss/H{sub 2} loss was determined to be 97.6/2.4 {+-} 1.2, in good agreement with RRKM results.

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ambrosia Lake Mill Site - NM 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizona ArizonaWyomingAllegheny-Ludlum SteelNJ

  14. DOE/NV?325?Rev

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-02, DOENV-325-Rev 6-DCN-06-02 062008 All Rev. 7 - Clarifications and edits based on NNSANSO, NDEP, RWAP and Waste Generator reviews. Revisions identified by change bars. 05...

  15. DOE/NV442 Environmental

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A LithologicProcessing SiteSurface10845 IT

  16. NV-04-1.book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i- DNANuclear

  17. Invictus NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformation sourceInvensys Building

  18. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  19. High power terahertz generation using 1550?nm plasmonic photomixers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Christopher W. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Preu, Sascha [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University Darmstadt, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1550?nm plasmonic photomixer operating under pumping duty cycles below 10%, which offers significantly higher terahertz radiation power levels compared to previously demonstrated photomixers. The record-high terahertz radiation powers are enabled by enhancing the device quantum efficiency through use of plasmonic contact electrodes, and by mitigating thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels through use of a low duty cycle optical pump. The repetition rate of the optical pump can be specifically selected at a given pump duty cycle to control the spectral linewidth of the generated terahertz radiation. At an average optical pump power of 150 mW with a pump modulation frequency of 1 MHz and pump duty cycle of 2%, we demonstrate up to 0.8 mW radiation power at 1 THz, within each continuous wave radiation cycle.

  20. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    made with the XM-1's current 25-nm MZP, the new MZP was able to obtain sharp images of lines a mere 15 nm apart-where the older zone plate had seen only a featureless field of...

  1. header for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    new radiation damage mechanisms in previously accepted optical materials. For 157 nm pellicles, newheader for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV Absorbance With the introduction of 157 nm as the next optical lithography wavelength, the need for new pellicle and photoresist

  2. Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

  3. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  4. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 ?m active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  5. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 12 nm Resolution Fresnel Zone Plate Lens based Soft X-raynanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. Theoptical performance of Fresnel zone plate lens based imaging

  6. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  7. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  8. Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25 #12;Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013 Paper 6722 DRAGON5: Designing Computational Schemes Dedicated to Fission Nuclear Reactors

  9. Enhanced production of coherent pulsed radiation at 125 nm: the route towards a tabletop VUV laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    surface with a 50-mm quartz lens. The VUV signal is measured by a calibrated CsI solar efficiency. Since deposition of opaque Hg on windows is an issue, very complex cell geometries have been to produce coherent 125-nm light with a single dye laser at 625.7 nm using a room-temperature Hg cell [3]. We

  10. A 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    simulation. A. Transistor Layout Caracterisation The size of the transistor depends on the maximum powerA 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier Sofiane Aloui, Eric Kerhervé IMS-CNRS University of Toulouse Toulouse, France plana@laas.fr Abstract--A 65nm CMOS, 60GHz fully integrated power

  11. Coherence and Linewidth Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, W.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bandwidth for a single-pass FEL amplifier initiated by SASE.Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W.M. Fawley, A.M. Sessler,Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W. M. Fawley and A. M.

  12. Passively modelocked 832 nm vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    , focused into an optical spot with dimensions of 100 Ă? 200 mm. The SESAM consisted of an AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As DBR, a spacer layer of GaAs0.75P0.25, a 4.8 nm GaAs quantum well and a 2 nm-thick capping layer of Ga

  13. Magnetization switching in 70-nm-wide pseudo-spin-valve nanoelements Xiaobin Zhua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GrĂĽtter, Peter

    Fe, respectively, in this case separated by a spacer layer. The individual elements have dimensions of 70 nm 550 nm with submicron or deep- submicron dimensions.4,5 These PSV or MTJ elements con- sist of asymmetric sandwiches is magnetically hard. For elements with micron-scale dimensions, interactions between the layers can lead

  14. Ranges and moments of depth distributions of boron and phosphorus implanted into silicon in the energy range 1.7-5.0 MeV with an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, L.; Shaw, W.; Jones, M.A. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Wilson, R.G. [Hughes Research Labs., Malibu, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy implantation of dopant atoms is used to form buried layers of high conductivity in silicon. These layers have many potential applications, including triple wells for FLASH memory devices, buried layers for CCD devices, and damage induced gettering regions in all devices. In order to make optimum use of very high energy dopant implants, the depth and profile shape characteristics of these implants need to be determined. This paper presents the results of depth profiling by SIMS of implants of boron and phosphorus in silicon. The implants were done on an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE mechanically scanned implanter with energies of 1.7-3.0 MeV for boron and 3-5 MeV for phosphorus, doses of 1 {times} 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}, and tilt/twist orientations of 0{degrees}/0{degrees}, 5.2{degrees}/16.7{degrees}, and 7{degrees}/27{degrees}. The four central moments of the depth distributions, as well as the peak depth have been calculated for each of the profiles. The projected ranges of all these implants are underestimated by TRIM92 calculations.

  15. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at a wavelength of 940 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W J; You, L X; He, Y H; Zhang, L; Liu, X Y; Yang, X Y; Wu, J J; Guo, Q; Chen, S J; Wang, Z; Xie, X M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop single-photon detectors comprising single-mode fiber-coupled superconducting nanowires, with high system detection efficiencies at a wavelength of 940 nm. The detector comprises a 6.5-nm-thick, 110-nm-wide NbN nanowire meander fabricated onto a Si substrate with a distributed Bragg reflector for enhancing the optical absorptance. We demonstrate that, via the design of a low filling factor (1/3) and active area ({\\Phi} = 10 {\\mu}m), the system reaches a detection efficiency of ~60% with a dark count rate of 10 Hz, a recovery time <12 ns, and a timing jitter of ~50 ps.

  16. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  17. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  18. Optical system for Argus 355-nm 90-mm aperture target-illumination experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.C.; Boyd, R.; Hermes, G.; Hildum, J.S.; Linford, G.; Martin, W.E.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of laser alignment, crystal tuning, target alignment, and laser beam diagnosis are provided by this optical system. Initial setup and preshot alignment techniques are discussed. Layout and operation are contrasted with the 532 nm target experiments.

  19. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 18, 2014 Los Alamos to partner with Toshiba to remotely and safely peer inside nuclear reactors LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory today...

  20. Switching of 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses using a compact PMN-PT modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adany, Peter; Price, E. Shane; Johnson, Carey K.; Zhang, Run; Hui, Rongqing

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A voltage-controlled birefringent cell based on ceramic PMN-PT material is used to enable fast intensity modulation of femtosecond laser pulses in the 800 nm wavelength window. The birefringent cell based on a PMN-PT ...

  1. Sub-10-nm electron-beam lithography for templated placement of colloidal quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfrinato, Vitor Riseti

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the investigation of resolution limits of electron-beam lithography (EBL) at the sub-10-nm scale. EBL patterning was investigated at low electron energy (2 keV) in a converted scanning electron microscope ...

  2. Sub-20nm substrate patterning using a self-assembled nanocrystal template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Ryan C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hexagonally close-packed monolayer of lead selenide quantum dots is presented as a template for patterning with a tunable resolution from 2 to 20nm. Spin-casting and micro-contact printing are resolved as methods of ...

  3. Comprehensive inverse modeling for the study of carrier transport models in sub-50nm MOSFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djomehri, Ihsan Jahed, 1976-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct quantitative 2-D characterization of sub-50 nm MOSFETs continues to be elusive. This research develops a comprehensive indirect inverse modeling technique for extracting 2-D device topology using combined log(I)-V ...

  4. Carbon nanotube assisted formation of sub-50 nm polymeric nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia-Hua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel processing method was developed for sub-50 nm structures by integrating quantum dots (QDs) on patterned polymer substrates. Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMa) was prepared by the initiated chemical vapor ...

  5. Timing performance of 30-nm-wide superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafi, Faraz

    We investigated the timing jitter of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs, also referred to as cascade-switching superconducting single-photon detectors) based on 30-nm-wide nanowires. At bias currents ...

  6. 4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm Molecular Writing Resolution", Small, 2005, ASAP. Patent the first "nano-fountain pen" capable of depositing organic ink molecules in patterns as small as 40 nm

  7. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  8. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane [Plasma Engineering Research Lab (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then scaled to classical microwave breakdown theory after correcting for the multiphoton ionization process for different pressures and good agreement, regarding both pressure dependence and breakdown threshold electric fields, is obtained. The effect of the presence of submicron particles on the 1064 nm breakdown threshold was also investigated. The measurements show that higher breakdown field is required, especially at lower pressures, and in close agreement with classical microwave breakdown theory and measurements in air.

  9. The SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool: learning a the 22-nm node and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Hudyma, Russ; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Montgomery, Warren; Roller, John; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to playa dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET operating as a SEMATECH resist and mask test center. Here we present an update summarizing the latest resist test and characterization results. The relatively small numerical aperture and limited illumination settings expected from 1st generation EUV production tools make resist resolution a critical issue even at the 32-nm node. In this presentation, sub 22 nm half pitch imaging results of EUV resists are reported. We also present contact hole printing at the 30-nm level. Although resist development has progressed relatively well in the areas of resolution and sensitivity, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of system-level contributors to the LER observed from the SEMA TECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  10. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578nm Ytterbium clock transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellini, Giacomo; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Pizzocaro, Marco; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the Ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to a ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic $^{173}$Yb with a < 50 Hz linewidth over 5 minutes, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  11. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131 and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716 Steven Letendre Green Mountain College One College Circle Poultney, VT 05764 and Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Donald W

  12. A high-power 626 nm diode laser system for Beryllium ion trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ball; M. W. Lee; S. D. Gensemer; M. J. Biercuk

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a high-power, frequency-tunable, external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system near 626 nm useful for laser cooling of trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ions. A commercial single-mode laser diode with rated power output of 170 mW at 635 nm is cooled to $\\approx - 31$ C, and a single longitudinal mode is selected via the Littrow configuration. In our setup, involving multiple stages of thermoelectric cooling, we are able to obtain $\\approx$130 mW near 626 nm, sufficient for efficient frequency doubling to the required Doppler cooling wavelengths near 313 nm in ionized Beryllium. In order to improve nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency, we achieve larger useful power via injection locking of a slave laser. In this way the entirety of the slave output power is available for frequency doubling, while analysis may be performed on the master output. We believe that this simple laser system addresses a key need in the ion trapping community and dramatically reduces the cost and complexity associated with Beryllium ion trapping experiments.

  13. Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression Christopher T of this concept. Our laboratory breadboard uses standard, single-mode optical fiber, off-the-shelf fiber-optic IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Transmitter--Single-mode laser 3.2 Transmitter--Single-mode fiber 3.3 Transmitter--Optical

  14. Highly efficient semiconductor optical amplifier for the 820-860-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Uspenskii, Mikhail B; Shishkin, Viktor A [M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-pass optical amplifier with a gain up to 32 dB at a wavelength of 840 nm is developed. Its high reliability is demonstrated at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of efficient application of this amplifier in MOPA systems are presented. (lasers)

  15. Laser amplification at 18. 2 nm in recombining plasma from a laser-irradiated carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Corbett, R.; Hooker, C.J.; Key, M.H.; Kiehn, G.P.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Pert, G.J.; Regan, C.; Rose, S.J.; Sadaat, S.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet laser amplification has been observed for the C VI Balmer-..cap alpha.. transition at 18.2 nm, with use of a novel optical system to irradiate up to 1 cm length of carbon fiber target. The measurements were time resolved and indicated peak single-transit amplification of about 30 times.

  16. A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1 , Anosh Davierwalla2 , David Mann3 IBM, Burlington, VT Abstract -- A linear high output power CMOS direct conversion transmitter for wideĂ?5 QFN. Index Terms -- direct conversion, CMOS, WCDMA, transmitter, third order distortion cancellation

  17. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldán-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Córdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Córdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  18. Performance of a High-Concentration Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier with 100 nm Amplification Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajireza, P.; Shahabuddin, N. S.; Abbasi-Zargaleh, S.; Emami, S. D.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z. [Center for Advanced Devices and Systems, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing demand for higher bandwidth has driven the need for higher Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) channels. One of the requirements to achieve this is a broadband amplifier. This paper reports the performance of a broadband, compact, high-concentration and silica-based erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier optimized to a 2.15 m long erbium-doped fiber with erbium ion concentration of 2000 ppm. The gain spectrum of the amplifier has a measured amplification bandwidth of 100 nm using a 980 nm laser diode with power of 150 mW. This silica-based EDFA shows lower noise figure, higher gain and wider bandwidth in shorter wavelengths compared to Bismuth-based EDFA with higher erbium ion concentration of 3250 ppm at equivalent EDF length. The silica-based EDF shows peak gain at 22 dB and amplification bandwidth between 1520 nm and 1620 nm. The lowest noise figure is 5 dB. The gain is further improved with the implementation of enhanced EDFA configurations.

  19. An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm Kenneth lithography design rules. The proposed microscope features an array of user-selectable Fresnel zoneplate-EUV, Fresnel zoneplate microscope, the AIT has been in the vanguard of high-resolution EUV mask imaging

  20. FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber , DESY, Hamburg, Germany for the VUV-FEL team Abstract The VUV-FEL is a free electron laser user facility being commissioned at DESY. It is based on the TTF-FEL, which was in operation until end of 2002 providing a photon beam for two pilot

  1. 1-10 nM E2 E2 30 E2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawato, Suguru

    076 1. E2 E2 E2 E2 2. E2 E2 2 E2 1 1-10 nM E2 5), 7) E2 30 E2 7) E2 512076-0792011 Modulation of Learning and Memory slowly but also rapidly. Slow actions of estradiol (E2) occur via nuclear receptors (ER), while rapid E2

  2. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser emitting at 899 nm Marc Castaing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    technologies have been developed to reach the blue range: GaN la- ser diodes, frequency-doubled laser diodes to the doping percentage, P cm-2 the absorption cross section at the pump wavelength 808 nm , A s-1 the inverse

  3. Sub-10 nm Self-Enclosed Self-Limited Nanofluidic Channel Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sub-10 nm Self-Enclosed Self-Limited Nanofluidic Channel Arrays Qiangfei Xia, Keith J. Morton report a new method to fabricate self-enclosed optically transparent nanofluidic channel arrays with sub. Here we propose and demonstrate a new method to fabricate enclosed optically transparent nanofluidic

  4. InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBO = 3.4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBOGaAs base and a 75 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. These devices exhibit collector thickness for any HBT. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector

  5. Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    1 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects--Thin GateThin Gate Oxide DegradationOxide Degradation #12;2 AcknowledgmentsAcknowledgments University), ECE Miles Wiscombe (UG), ECE #12;3 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3

  6. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Maywood NJ.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F

  7. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Middlesex NJ.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:FEngineers® New York District FUSRAP

  8. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Wayne NJ.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:FEngineers® New York District FUSRAP

  9. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023US Virgin120 US

  10. Palmco Power NJ, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, NewPalisades Park, New Jersey:Florida: Energy

  11. Valero Refining Company - NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AGUserVHF Technologies SA akaVadiumValeVale

  12. Implementation of a doubling cavity to produce a 423 nm light source for the excitation of Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashimaru, H.; Kitajima, T.; Hasegawa, S. [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For selective excitation of isotopes of Ca, a 423 nm narrow linewidth, continuous wave (CW) light source which corresponds to the S-P transition (4s{sup 21}S{sub 0}-4s4p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) is required. A solid state CW light source which generates 423 nm is difficult to commercially use. Therefore, we have developed a Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) system to obtain 423 nm lights from 846 nm lights by using a nonlinear optical crystal.

  13. NV Energy- Energy Smart Schools Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Smart Schools program helps Nevada school districts reduce energy consumption, improve learning environments, and save money by implementing energy efficiency improvements in new and...

  14. EIS-0354: Ivanpah Energy Center, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ivanpah Energy Center, L.P., a Diamond Generating Corporation Company, a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Corporation proposes to construct and operate a 500 Megawatt (MW) gas-fired electric power generating station in southern Clark County, Nevada.

  15. DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy features to the public.

  16. len Jr. Bl!ukr.'.lrd NV

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and generation, including renewable resources. (4) Development and incorporation of demand response, demand-side resources, and energy-efficiency resources. (5) Deployment of...

  17. NV/YMP RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL MANUAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE; BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and the Yucca Mountain Office of Repository Development (YMORD). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835), Occupational Radiation Protection. Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Pleasanton, California; and at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, field work by NNSA/NSO at other locations is also covered by this manual.

  18. https://ndwis.ndep.nv.gov/DWW/

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. HirschOccurrence ReportingSpringSelect

  19. ASM International NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE Jump to: navigation, search40 -Solar GmbH

  20. len Jr. Bl!ukr.'.lrd NV

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization of aShiprock)ReportR1PRESERVE THE KNOWLEDGE

  1. NV Bekaert SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material Co LtdNTDAform View

  2. DOE/NV--209-REV15

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S pSuppleme 1 25285

  3. DOE/NV--209-REV15

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S pSuppleme 1 25285

  4. ICOS Vision Systems NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New Energy DevelopmentListI Sol VenturesICFICOS

  5. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K. [Laboratory for X-ray Microimaging and Bioinformatics, Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7059 (United States); KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  6. Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C. [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)] [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Promethium-doped phosphate glass laser at 933 and 1098 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupke, W.F.; Shinn, M.D.; Kirchoff, T.A.; Finch, C.B.; Boatner, L.A.

    1987-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A promethium (Pm/sup 3 +/) laser has been demonstrated for the first time. Trivalent promethium 147 doped into a lead-indium-phosphate glass etalon was used to produce room-temperature four-level laser emission at wavelengths of 933 and 1098 nm. Spectroscopic and kinetic measurements have shown that Pm/sup 3 +/ is similar to Nd/sup 3 +/ as a laser active ion.

  8. Investigation of a Polarization Controller in Titanium Diffused Lithium Niobate Waveguide near 1530 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Won Ju

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF A POLARIZATION CONTROLLER IN TITANIUM DIFFUSED LITHIUM NIOBATE WAVEGUIDE NEAR 1530 NM WAVELENGTH A Dissertation by WON JU SUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... systems are being commercialized [1-3], and efforts for 400G modulators are being pursued [1, 4]. Various materials have been explored for high speed devices need [5, 6], and lithium niobate remains the most attractive choice currently [7]. Fiber...

  9. Formation of Micro and Nano Structures Using VUV 157 nm Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, C. D.; Cockcroft, S. [Physics, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on laser ablation experiments on micro and nano size composite structures. The surface of CR-39 and polycarbonate has been intentionally seeded with silicon carbide and silver nanowires and subsequently laser irradiated at a wavelength of 157 nm. We show scanning electron micrograph images of prismatic and conical structures produced by laser ablation and discuss a shape transformation from a prismatic to a conical structure.

  10. Table 1 Comparison of potential sub-10 nm III-V device architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    Extremely-Thin-Body (ETB) InAs quantum-well (QW) MOSFETs with improved electrostatics down to Lg = 50 nm (SAs channel. The ETB channel does not significantly degrade transport properties as evidenced by gm >1.5 mS/m and vinj = 2.4 107 cm/s. ETB-QW InAs MOSFET with scaled body for Improved Electrostatics T.-W. Kim, D

  11. InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers at 810 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Isozumi, S.; Nishi, H.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers emitting at 810 nm have been grown on GaAs substrates using two-step liquid-phase epitaxy. A threshold current of 79 mA and an external differential quantum efficiency of 26% are obtained. Fundamental transverse mode operation up to 3 mW is achieved in the laser with the active region of 3.5 ..mu..m wide.

  12. Toward Rapid Unattended X-ray Tomography of Large Planar Samples at 50-nm Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudati, J.; Tkachuk, A.; Gelb, J.; Hsu, G.; Feng, Y.; Pastrick, R.; Lyon, A.; Trapp, D.; Beetz, T.; Chen, S.; Hornberger, B.; Seshadri, S.; Kamath, S.; Zeng, X.; Feser, M.; Yun, W. [Xradia, Inc., Concord, California (United States); Pianetta, P.; Andrews, J.; Brennan, S. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California (United States); Chu, Y. S. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)] (and others)

    2009-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray tomography at sub-50 nm resolution of small areas ({approx}15 {mu}mx15 {mu}m) are routinely performed with both laboratory and synchrotron sources. Optics and detectors for laboratory systems have been optimized to approach the theoretical efficiency limit. Limited by the availability of relatively low-brightness laboratory X-ray sources, exposure times for 3-D data sets at 50 nm resolution are still many hours up to a full day. However, for bright synchrotron sources, the use of these optimized imaging systems results in extremely short exposure times, approaching live-camera speeds at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago in the US These speeds make it possible to acquire a full tomographic dataset at 50 nm resolution in less than a minute of true X-ray exposure time. However, limits in the control and positioning system lead to large overhead that results in typical exposure times of {approx}15 min currently.We present our work on the reduction and elimination of system overhead and toward complete automation of the data acquisition process. The enhancements underway are primarily to boost the scanning rate, sample positioning speed, and illumination homogeneity to performance levels necessary for unattended tomography of large areas (many mm{sup 2} in size). We present first results on this ongoing project.

  13. EIS-0403: DOE and BLM Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (AZ, CA, CO, NV, NM, and UT) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the...

  14. To users of the Western Wind Dataset: We have run into some issues on the wind dataset. For many uses of the dataset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % in the Westconnect footprint (AZ, WY, CO, NV, NM) and 20% in the rest of WECC. If you #12;use this forecast data

  15. Vehicle to Grid -A Control Area Operators Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Mexico Nav Glen Four Corners NM Coal Hydro Gas Wind Other Palo Verde AZ Market- place S. NV #12;#12;Key

  16. 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    . Here, we report that when using 785 nm excitation, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little

  17. 785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    using 785 nm excitation with 1 µm spot size, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond films785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser School is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little work has been reported

  18. Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm Damien Sangla,1,2 Marc (Doc. ID 109884); published July 9, 2009 A Nd:YVO4 crystal was pumped directly into the emitting level nm for an absorbed pump power of 14.6 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 78.7%. We

  19. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  20. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  1. Corrosion-resistant multilayer coatings for the 28-75 nm wavelength region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Fernandez-Perea, M; Al, E T

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion has prevented use of SiC/Mg multilayers in applications requiring good lifetime stability. We have developed Al-based barrier layers that dramatically reduce corrosion, while preserving high reflectance and low stress. The aforementioned advances may enable the implementation of corrosion-resistant, high-performance SiC/Mg coatings in the 28-75 nm region in applications such as tabletop EUV/soft x-ray laser sources and solar physics telescopes. Further study and optimization of corrosion barrier structures and coating designs is underway.

  2. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jia-Wei; Taloni, Alessandro; Chen, Yeng-Long; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  3. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  4. Bulk and surface laser damage of silica by picosecond and nanosecond pulses at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Do, Binh T

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured bulk and surface dielectric breakdown thresholds of pure silica for 14 ps and 8 ns pulses of 1064 nm light. The thresholds are sharp and reproducible. For the 8 ns pulses the bulk threshold irradiance is 4.75 {+-} 0.25 kW/{mu}m{sup 2}. The threshold is approximately three times higher for 14 ps pulses. For 8 ns pulses the input surface damage threshold can be made equal to the bulk threshold by applying an alumina or silica surface polish.

  5. NM Stat. 62-9 - The Utility Franchise | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLC JumpNF- Review ofNM Stat.

  6. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NM.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Originalfaq.pdfFinal.pdfNM.pdf Jump to: navigation,

  7. Two-photon laser excitation of trapped 232Th+ ions via the 402 nm resonance line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera-Sancho, O A; Zimmermann, K; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Glowacki, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of 232Th+ ions in a radiofrequency ion trap are reported. As the first excitation step, the strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the 6d^2 7s J=3/2 ground state to the 6d7s7p J=5/2 state at 24874 cm^{-1} is driven by radiation from an extended cavity diode laser. Spontaneous decay of the intermediate state populates a number of low-lying metastable states, thus limiting the excited state population and fluorescence signal obtainable with continuous laser excitation. We study the collisional quenching efficiency of helium, argon, and nitrogen buffer gases, and the effect of repumping laser excitation from the three lowest-lying metastable levels. The experimental results are compared with a four-level rate equation model, that allows us to deduce quenching rates for these buffer gases. Using laser radiation at 399 nm for the second step, we demonstrate two-photon excitation to the state at 49960 cm^{-1}, among the highest-lying classified levels of Th+. Thi...

  8. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  9. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M. [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  10. EA-1906: Operations, Consolidation, and Upgrades at the Office of Secure Transportation Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates environmental impacts associated with the siting and construction of several proposed buildings, including a new vehicle maintenance facility and mobile equipment maintenance building (and their support structures) at the Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM.

  11. High-order harmonic generation in atomic hydrogen at 248 nm: Dipole-moment versus acceleration spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Chu, Shih-I

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the high-order harmonic-generation (HG) spectra of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm based on the Fourier transform of the expectation values of the induced dipole moment and acceleration. The calculations ...

  12. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 technologies, like photovoltaics (PV), can offer additional benefits to electric utility companies utility company to defer investments in upgrading transmission and distribution facilities, among other

  13. 34 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 22, No. 1 / January 1, 1997 Intense plasma discharge source at 13.5 nm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    and Education in Optics and Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-2700 J. J. Rocca The f lux emitted at 13.5 nm by a lithium plasma within the bandwidth of multilayer op- tics

  14. Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

  15. Ytterbium-doped fibre laser tunable in the range 1017 - 1040 nm with second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fibre laser has been tuned to shorter emission wavelengths (from 1040 to 1017 nm). The laser output power obtained has been compared to calculation results. We have studied frequency doubling of the laser in a KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystal with type II phase matching in the XY plane and demonstrated wavelength tuning in the range 510 - 520 nm. (lasers)

  16. Frequency doubling and sum-frequency mixing operation at 469.2, 471, and 473 nm in Nd:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    at around 445, 469, or 479 nm are required to pump these Pr3-doped laser hosts [8­13]. Gal- lium nitride (GaN decades for different applications [1­4] such as la- ser remote sensing (differential absorption LIDAR to an absorption band of Pr3 [14]. For that purpose the laser has to work on the 938.5 nm transition line of Nd

  17. Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse-band 2% bandwidth conversion efficiency CE from a CO2 laser to 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet EUV light was investigated for Sn plasma. It was found that high in-band CE, 2.6%, is consistently obtained using a CO2 laser

  18. Structural distortions in 5-10 nm silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Kamp, Noelle M.; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Smith, R.K.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. We have used x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron light source to investigate pressure-dependent and size-dependent trends in the crystal structure of silver nanoparticles in a hydrostatic medium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. Results suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. We propose a mechanism for this transition that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. To further support this hypothesis, we also show that similar measurements of single-crystal platinum nanoparticles reveal no such distortions.

  19. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Danna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dallmann, Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tyagi, Hush T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Nicholas A [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Toliver, Paul [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Chapman, Thomas E [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Runser, Robert J [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Mcnown, Scott R [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  20. Optical-fiber source of polarization-entangled photon pairs in the 1550nm telecom band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoying Li; Paul L. Voss; Jay E. Sharping; Prem Kumar

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber based source of polarization-entangled photon pairs that is well suited for quantum communication applications in the 1550nm band of standard fiber-optic telecommunications. Polarization entanglement is created by pumping a nonlinear-fiber Sagnac interferometer with two time-delayed orthogonally-polarized pump pulses and subsequently removing the time distinguishability by passing the parametrically scattered signal-idler photon pairs through a piece of birefringent fiber. Coincidence detection of the signal-idler photons yields biphoton interference with visibility greater than 90%, while no interference is observed in direct detection of either the signal or the idler photons. All four Bell states can be prepared with our setup and we demonstrate violations of CHSH form of Bell's inequalities by up to 10 standard deviations of measurement uncertainty.

  1. Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Paul Ernest

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

  2. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant uncertainty existed about the quantum efficiency at 1550 nm the necessary operating temperature. This project has resulted in several conclusions after fabrication and measurement of the proposed structures. We have successfully demonstrated the Ge/Si proof-of-concept in producing high analog gain in a silicon region while absorbing in a Ge region. This has included significant Ge processing infrastructure development at Sandia. However, sensitivity is limited at low temperatures due to high dark currents that we ascribe to tunneling. This leaves remaining uncertainty about whether this structure can achieve the desired performance with further development. GM detection in InGaAs/InAlAs, Ge/Si, Si and pure Ge devices fabricated at Sandia was shown to overcome gain noise challenges, which represents critical learning that will enable Sandia to respond to future single photon detection needs. However, challenges to the operation of these devices in GM remain. The InAlAs multiplication region was not found to be significantly superior to current InP regions for GM, however, improved multiplication region design of InGaAs/InP APDs has been highlighted. For Ge GM detectors it still remains unclear whether an optimal trade-off of parameters can achieve the necessary sensitivity at 1550 nm. To further examine these remaining questions, as well as other application spaces for these technologies, funding for an Intelligence Community post-doc was awarded this year.

  3. Oxygen in Galactic Disk Stars: non-LTE abundances from the 777 nm O I triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen abundances for a large sample of dwarf and giant stars kinematically selected to be part of the Galactic thin and thick disks have been determined from a non-LTE analysis of the O I triplet lines at 777 nm. The abundance analysis was performed using the infrared flux method temperature scale, trigonometric surface gravities, and accurate atomic data. Within this framework, the ionization balance of iron lines could not be satisfied and so we adopted the iron abundances from Fe II lines only given that they are relatively less sensitive to changes in the atmospheric parameters. We show the resulting [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relationship and briefly discuss its implications.

  4. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  5. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Shih-Huang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP ConsideredMill Site

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown Site - MO 02 FUSRAPSt

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew Mexico Gnome-Coach, NewHamilton

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtah Mexican Hat,DisposalBrunswick

  10. http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/metadata/usgswrd/XML/nv_dtw750nv_l.xm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythemeansIHome * About * Archives

  11. Dynamics and manipulation of the dominant 13.5 nm in-band extreme ultraviolet emitting region of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuspeh, Samuel Edward

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing (HVM) of semiconductor microchips with nodes 32 nm and below is extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography using laser

  12. Page 312 Courses: Environmental Studies and Planning (ENSP) Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    -2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3) An examination of philosophical issues; concepts of extending and Critical Thinking). ENSP 307 ENviroNmENtal hiStory (4) History of the American environment and the ways). ENSP 308 ENviroNmENtal litEraturE (3) A survey of great American environmental books, including H. D

  13. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250?nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehnke, Frank, E-mail: mehnke@physik.tu-berlin.de; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250?nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246?nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235?nm and 263?nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234?nm with 14.5??W integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2?A/cm{sup 2}.

  14. A Multi-chain Measurements Averaging TDC Implemented in a 40 nm FPGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Shen; Shubin Liu; Binxiang Qi; Qi An; Shengkai Liao; Chengzhi Peng; Weiyue Liu

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision and high resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented in a 40 nm fabrication process Virtex-6 FPGA is presented in this paper. The multi-chain measurements averaging architecture is used to overcome the resolution limitation determined by intrinsic cell delay of the plain single tapped-delay chain. The resolution and precision are both improved with this architecture. In such a TDC, the input signal is connected to multiple tapped-delay chains simultaneously (the chain number is M), and there is a fixed delay cell between every two adjacent chains. Each tapped-delay chain is just a plain TDC and should generate a TDC time for a hit input signal, so totally M TDC time values should be got for a hit signal. After averaging, the final TDC time is obtained. A TDC with 3 ps resolution (i.e. bin size) and 6.5 ps precision (i.e. RMS) has been implemented using 8 parallel tapped-delay chains. Meanwhile the plain TDC with single tapped-delay chain yields 24 ps resolution and 18 ps precision.

  15. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel (nate) J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  16. Stress-induced piezoelectric field in GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tawfik, Wael Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511 (Egypt); Hyeon, Gil Yong; Lee, June Key, E-mail: junekey@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the influence of the built-in piezoelectric field induced by compressive stress on the characteristics of GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) prepared on sapphire substrates of different thicknesses. As the sapphire substrate thickness was reduced, the compressive stress in the GaN layer was released, resulting in wafer bowing. The wafer bowing-induced mechanical stress altered the piezoelectric field, which in turn reduced the quantum confined Stark effect in the InGaN/GaN active region of the LED. The flat-band voltage was estimated by measuring the applied bias voltage that induced a 180° phase shift in the electro-reflectance (ER) spectrum. The piezoelectric field estimated by the ER spectra changed by ?110?kV/cm. The electroluminescence spectral peak wavelength was blue-shifted, and the internal quantum efficiency was improved by about 22% at a high injection current of 100?mA. The LED on the 60-?m-thick sapphire substrate exhibited the highest light output power of ?59?mW at an injection current of 100?mA, with the operating voltage unchanged.

  17. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50?nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attota, Ravikiran, E-mail: Ravikiran.attota@nist.gov; Dixson, Ronald G. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30?nm–40?nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22?nm (k?=?2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  18. Electron Transport Behavior on Gate Length Scaling in Sub-50 nm GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jaeheon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kangnam University, 111 Gugal-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-city, Gyeonggi-do, Korea 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Short channel GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) have been fabricated with gate length to 20 nm, in order to examine the characteristics of sub-50 nm MESFET scaling. Here the rise in the measured transconductance is mainly attributed to electron velocity overshoot. For gate lengths below 40 nm, however, the transconductance drops suddenly. The behavior of velocity overshoot and its degradation is investigated and simulated by using a transport model based on the retarded Langevin equation (RLE). This indicates the existence of a minimum acceleration length needed for the carriers to reach the overshoot velocity. The argument shows that the source resistance must be included as an internal element, or appropriate boundary condition, of relative importance in any model where the gate length is comparable to the inelastic mean free path of the carriers.

  19. Broadband superluminescent diodes with bell-shaped spectra emitting in the range from 800 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreeva, E V; Il'ichenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Lapin, P I [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company 'M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum-well superluminescent diodes (SLD) with extremely thin active (AlGa)As and (InGa)As layers and centre wavelengths about 810, 840, 860 and 880 nm are experimentally studied. Their emission spectrum possesses the shape close to Gaussian, its FWHM being 30 – 60 nm depending on the length of the active channel and the level of pumping. Under cw injection, the output power of light-emitting modules based on such SLDs can amount to 1.0 – 25 mW at the output of a single-mode fibre. It is demonstrated that the operation lifetime of these devices exceeds 30000 hours. Based on the light-emitting modules the prototypes of combined BroadLighter series light sources are implemented having a bell-shaped spectrum with the width up to 100 nm. (optical radiation sources)

  20. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  1. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yen-Ting [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan); Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. Ĺ.; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Chen, Li-Chyong [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuei-Hsien [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nanishi, Yasushi [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a “narrow-pass” approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm.

  2. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  3. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  4. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  5. Calibration of Silver Plasmon Rulers in the 1-25 nm Separation Range: Experimental Indications of Distinct Plasmon Coupling Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calibration of Silver Plasmon Rulers in the 1-25 nm Separation Range: Experimental Indications of Distinct Plasmon Coupling Regimes Linglu Yang, Hongyun Wang, Bo Yan, and Bjo¨rn M. Reinhard* Department nanoparticles, so-called silver plasmon rulers, are synthesized with use of a rational DNA programmed self

  6. June 15, 2004 / Vol. 29, No. 12 / OPTICS LETTERS 1357 Highly coherent light at 13 nm generated by use of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Randy

    , and in developing new types of nano- probe. However, many EUV sources, such as synchrotrons and undulators1 and high Bartels et al. demonstrated that EUV light produced by HHG in gas-filled hollow waveguides exhibits full spatial coherence at wavelengths around 30 nm.3 The extended propagation length in the hollow

  7. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  8. Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields P2) with O2(X 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields of O(3 P2) with O2(X 3 g - ), O2 Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Product imaging of O(3 P2) following dissociation of ozone has been used to determine the relative yields of the product channels O(3 P2) + O2(X 3 g - ) of ozone. All three channels

  9. A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Sivaprasad Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen-the-shelf fiber-optic components and traditional RF and digital signal processing techniques to achieve fine erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) could be used to provide optical gain. The transmitted signal

  10. Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver and commercially available fiber-optic technologies. We use radio frequency (RF) pulse compression and digital commensurate with the desired range accuracy. With today's off-the-shelf fiber-optic components, multi

  11. Low-threshold, mirrorless emission at 981 nm in an Yb,Gd,Lu:KYW inverted rib waveguide laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low-threshold, mirrorless emission at 981 nm in an Yb,Gd,Lu:KYW inverted rib waveguide laser Amol for generating short pulses [2]. Liquid phase epitaxy has been used to fabricate planar [3, 4] and channel [5, 6W and a channel waveguide laser with an output power of 11 mW [9]. In this paper we demonstrate mirrorless lasing

  12. 2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm Laser Breakdown in Air Magesh Thiyagarajan, Member, IEEE, and John E. Scharer, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--We present the measurements and analysis of laser- induced breakdown processes in dry

  13. Sub-10-nm half-pitch electron-beam lithography by using poly,,methyl methacrylate... as a negative resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    is of great importance for high-density magnetic storage, integrated circuits, and nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Until now, hydrogen silsesquioxane HSQ and calixarene were the only two reported negative, the authors report that 10-nm half-pitch dense nanostructures can also be readily fabricated using the well

  14. A 65nm CMOS Ultra Low Power and Low Noise 131M Front-End Transimpedance Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    A 65nm CMOS Ultra Low Power and Low Noise 131M Front-End Transimpedance Amplifier Jiaping Hu and simulation of a high-transimpedance gain, ultra low-power dissipation and low-noise CMOS front- end control [3]. However, it introduces design challenges in the form of trade-offs between noise, power

  15. Using Mobilize Power Management IP for Dynamic & Static Power Reduction in SoC at 130 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using Mobilize Power Management IP for Dynamic & Static Power Reduction in SoC at 130 nm Dan Tensilica's 32-bit Xtensa microprocessor core, using Virtual Silicon's Power Management IP. Independent of incorporating more and more devices on a single chip, but also managing the increase in the power that goes

  16. Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L.

    10760 1 Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface using a reproducible, simple process incorporating polyimide with good adhesion that does not require based on a simplified, robust process incorporating photosensitive polyimide with good metal adhesion

  17. Dynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanker, Daniel

    of pulsed lasers for ablation, drilling, and cutting of soft tissues in liquid environments are accompaniedDynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions Igor Turovets and Daniel Palanker Laser Center, Hadassah University Hospital, P.O. Box 12000

  18. High resolution photoelectron images and D{sup +} photofragment images following 532-nm photolysis of D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W.; Neyer, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Heck, A.J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-resonant ionization and dissociation of D{sub 2} by intense 532-nm laser light is studied by a variation of the ``Ion Imaging`` technique called ``Velocity Mapping``. Images of the both the photoelectrons and D{sup +} photofragments are obtained and analyzed at two different laser intensities. Results are compared to previous studies and several differences are discussed.

  19. The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar Changwoo Nahm,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar cells Changwoo Nahm,1 nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). At the optimum Au/TiO2 mass ratio of 0.05, the power nanoparticles were also introduced to the electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the solar-cell

  20. Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related primarily to pigmenta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (400­1000 nm) is related physiology and relationships between plants and their growth environment. We studied reflectance of two co collected from 24 sites and white spruce from 30 sites. Overall, reflectance spectra of the two species were

  1. South Of Espanola; North Of Pojoaque At Intersection of NM399 and US 84/285 Turn onto 399(WSW),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    will be on your left, Go to third house on right (#18 on fence), 1.5 story adobe with passive solar Windows facing at Affordable Price Or Possible Lease or Lease to Purchase 18 Terrace Farm Rd LaMesilla, NM 2 story passive the Puye Ruins on Santa Clara Pueblo. House is oriented with huge solar windows facing due south toward

  2. Development of scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope with spatial resolution of 30 nm using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Sano, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Yabashi, M.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K. [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a high-spatial-resolution scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope (SXFM) using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. As a result of two-dimensional focusing tests at BL29XUL of SPring-8, the full width at half maximum of the focused beam was achieved to be 50x30 nm{sup 2} (VxH) under the best focusing conditions. The measured beam profiles were in good agreement with simulated results. Moreover, beam size was controllable within the wide range of 30-1400 nm by changing the virtual source size, although photon flux and size were in a trade-off relationship. To demonstrate SXFM performance, a fine test chart fabricated using focused ion beam system was observed to determine the best spatial resolution. The element distribution inside a logo mark of SPring-8 in the test chart, which has a minimum linewidth of approximately 50-60 nm, was visualized with a spatial resolution better than 30 nm using the smallest focused x-ray beam.

  3. Formation of in-volume nanogratings with sub-100 nm periods in glass by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Qiao, Lingling; Bellouard, Yves; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct experimental observation of the morphological evolution during the formation of nanogratings with sub-100-nm periods with the increasing number of pulses. Theoretical simulation shows that the constructive interference of the scattering light from original nanoplanes will create an intensity maximum located between the two adjacent nanoplanes, resulting in shortening of the nanograting period by half. The proposed mechanism enables explaining the formation of nanogratings with periods beyond that predicted by the nanoplasmonic model.

  4. Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue) B 420-460 Live Dead UV Blue Alexa 350 DAPI Indo-1(Violet) Hoechst 33342 C - empty Violet 405 A 505-550 Pac. Orange V500 VioGreen BVio 510 Viability Dye eF506 Alexa 430 Sapphire B 420-460 Pac. Blue eF450 V

  5. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  6. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm spectral line profile only gets shallower and stays in absorption. Linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) is detected in all lines of the He I triplet during the flare. Moreover, the circular polarization (Stokes V) is dominant during the flare, being the blue component of the He I triplet much stronger than the red component, and both are stronger than the Si I Stokes V profile. The Si I inversions reveal enormous changes of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare. Before the flare magnetic field conc...

  7. Note: Deep ultraviolet Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shaoqing [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Fengtao; Guo, Meiling; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Zhaochi, E-mail: zcfeng@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Can, E-mail: zcfeng@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep UV Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm was developed in this laboratory. An ellipsoidal mirror and a dispersed-subtractive triple monochromator were used to collect and disperse Raman light, respectively. The triple monochromator was arranged in a triangular configuration with only six mirrors used. 177.3 nm laser excited Raman spectrum with cut-off wavenumber down to 200 cm{sup ?1} and spectral resolution of 8.0 cm{sup ?1} can be obtained under the condition of high purity N{sub 2} purging. With the C–C ? bond in Teflon selectively excited by the 177.3 nm laser, resonance Raman spectrum of Teflon with good quality was recorded on the home-built instrument and the ?-?{sup *} transition of C–C bond was studied. The result demonstrates that deep UV Raman spectrograph is powerful for studying the systems with electronic transition located in the deep UV region.

  8. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  9. formation of the main deposit. At lower current densities, it is possible to deposit only this extremely thin tin film: it is 5 nm thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    . Whereas the 200-nm copper and 300-nm tin films in Fig. 4 have a thickness close to that predicted. We propose the following mechan- istic explanation of this effect. First, in thin cells problems of Li rechargeable batteries. Indeed, cycling efficiency of Li batteries is drastically reduced

  10. Effect of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons following ischemic insult

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Dong-Hee [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Moon Young [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jeong Hoon [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rehabilitation Medicine, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, National University Health System (Singapore); Lee, Jongmin, E-mail: leej@kuh.ac.kr [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 710 nm wavelength light (LED) has a protective effect in the stroke animal model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the effects of LED irradiation in vitro stroke model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment promotes the neurite outgrowth through MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of synaptic markers significantly increased with LED treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment protects cell death in the in vitro stroke model. -- Abstract: Objective: We previously reported that 710 nm Light-emitting Diode (LED) has a protective effect through cellular immunity activation in the stroke animal model. However, whether LED directly protects neurons suffering from neurodegeneration was entirely unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neuronal protection and neuronal outgrowth in an in vitro stroke model. Materials and methods: Primary cultured rat cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation and normal conditions. An LED array with a peak wavelength of 710 nm was placed beneath the covered culture dishes with the room light turned off and were irradiated accordingly. LED treatments (4 min at 4 J/cm{sup 2} and 50 mW/cm{sup 2}) were given once to four times within 8 h at 2 h intervals for 7 days. Mean neurite density, mean neurite diameter, and total fiber length were also measured after microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunostaining using the Axio Vision program. Synaptic marker expression and MAPK activation were confirmed by Western blotting. Results: Images captured after MAP2 immunocytochemistry showed significant (p < 0.05) enhancement of post-ischemic neurite outgrowth with LED treatment once and twice a day. MAPK activation was enhanced by LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells. The levels of synaptic markers such as PSD 95, GAP 43, and synaptophysin significantly increased with LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that LED treatment may promote synaptogenesis through MAPK activation and subsequently protect cell death in the in vitro stroke model.

  11. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jesus, V. L. B. de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis/RJ, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, Centro-Nilopolis-26530-060, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  12. Lithography-free sub-100nm nanocone array antireflection layer for low-cost silicon solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High density and uniformity sub-100nm surface oxidized silicon nanocone forest structure is created and integrated onto the existing texturization microstructures on photovoltaic device surface by a one-step high throughput plasma enhanced texturization method. We suppressed the broadband optical reflection on chemically textured grade-B silicon solar cells for up to 70.25% through this nanomanufacturing method. The performance of the solar cell is improved with the short circuit current increased by 7.1%, fill factor increased by 7.0%, conversion efficiency increased by 14.66%. Our method demonstrates the potential to improve the photovoltaic device performance with low cost high and throughput nanomanufacturing technology.

  13. Silica–silica Polyimide Buffered Optical Fibre Irradiation and Strength Experiment at Cryogenic Temperatures for 355 nm Pulsed Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takala, E; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Bremer, J; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A controlled UV-light delivery system is envisioned to be built in order to study the stability properties of superconducting strands. The application requires a wave guide from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Hydrogen loaded and unloaded polyimide buffered silica–silica 100 microm core fibres were tested at cryogenic temperatures. A thermal stress test was done at 1.9 K and at 4.2 K which shows that the minimal mechanical bending radius for the fibre can be 10 mm for testing (transmission was not measured). The cryogenic transmission loss was measured for one fibre to assess the magnitude of the transmission decrease due to microbending that takes place during cooldown. UV-irradiation degradation measurements were done for bent fibres at 4.2 K with a deuterium lamp and 355 nm pulsed lasers. The irradiation tests show that the fibres have transmission degradation only for wavelengths smaller than 330 nm due to the two photon absorption. The test demonstrates that the fibres are suitable for the ...

  14. Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

  15. Re-thinking highest and best use : implementing smart development in support of smart growth : a case study in Santa Fe, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkcom, Jennifer K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper answers the questions "where to develop?", "for whom to develop?", and "what to develop?" from a double bottom line perspective of profit making and social benefit, using a 3-acre property in Santa Fe, NM as an ...

  16. Method to grow carbon thin films consisting entirely of diamond grains 3-5 nm in size and high-energy grain boundaries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlisle, John A.; Auciello, Orlando; Birrell, James

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) having an average grain size between 3 and 5 nanometers (nm) with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm. A method of manufacturing UNCD film is also disclosed in which a vapor of acetylene and hydrogen in an inert gas other than He wherein the volume ratio of acetylene to hydrogen is greater than 0.35 and less than 0.85, with the balance being an inert gas, is subjected to a suitable amount of energy to fragment at least some of the acetylene to form a UNCD film having an average grain size of 3 to 5 nm with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm.

  17. Generation of 30-50 nm Structures Using Easily Fabricated, Composite Teri W. Odom, Venkat R. Thalladi, J. Christopher Love, and George M. Whitesides*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    of tens of nanometers are useful in ultradense data storage, subwavelength optics, and devices This communication describes a method to generate simple nanostructures with critical dimensions down to 30 nm, over

  18. Resonant cavity-enhanced photosensitivity in As[subscript 2]S[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass at 1550 nm telecommunication wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Juejun

    We report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of resonant cavity-enhanced photosensitivity in As[subscript 2]S[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass film at 1550?nm telecommunication wavelength. The measured ...

  19. 60nm collector InGaAs/InP Type-I DHBTs demonstrating 660 GHz f , BVCEO = 2.5V, and BVCBO = 2.7V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    60nm collector InGaAs/InP Type-I DHBTs demonstrating 660 GHz f , BVCEO = 2.5V, and BVCBO = 2.7VGaAs base and a 60 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. Devices employing a 400. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector electron transit times, and the base-collector

  20. The 846 nm A' 32; +X 3Z; band system of jet-cooled V, Eileen M. Spain, Jane M. Behm,a) and Michael D. Morse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Michael D.

    The 846 nm A' 32; +X 3Z; band system of jet-cooled V, Eileen M. Spain, Jane M. Behm,a) and Michael October 1991; accepted 4 November 1991) The 846 nm band system of jet-cooled 5'V2 has been recorded using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy, and is assigned as the A '38; +X `2; band system. Both the w

  1. Room-temperature cw operation of InGaAsP/InGaP lasers at 727 nm grown on GaAs substrates by liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Nishi, H.; Kusunoki, T.; Isozumi, S.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP lasers emitting at 724--727 nm have been fabricated on GaAs substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. The threshold current is reduced to 8 kA/cm/sup 2/ by thinning the active layer. Room-temperature cw operation is achieved for the first time in the lasing wavelength range below 760 nm in this quaternary system.

  2. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X., E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.cn; Li, W.; Guo, H., E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Quantum Information Technology, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup ?12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  3. Pressure shift and broadening of the 254-nm intercombination line of mercury by N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, James P.; Warrington, R. Bruce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA (United States); Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA (United States)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used laser absorption spectroscopy to study the collisional broadening and shift of the 254-nm 6 {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6 {sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line of Hg in the presence of N{sub 2} for pressures below 400 Torr. This study comprises the first measurements of the proportionality constants for pressure broadening and shift of Hg due to N{sub 2} in this pressure range, and the first high-precision measurements of these pressure effects on Hg for any foreign gas. We obtain -2.54(2) MHz/Torr for the shift and 9.01(4) MHz/Torr for the broadening (full width at half maximum) at 21 degree sign C (95% confidence interval). These results are important for ongoing experiments using optical pumping of mercury in tests of fundamental symmetries, as well as for characterization of interatomic forces and tests of the theory of collisional line broadening.

  4. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarantopoulou, E., E-mail: esarant@eie.gr; Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Cefalas, A. C. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Kakabakos, S. [N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Institute for Nuclear and Radiological Sciences, Energy, Technology and Safety, Patriarchou Gregoriou Str. Aghia Paraskevi, Athens 15310 (Greece); Velentzas, A. D. [University of Athens, Faculty of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Athens 15784 (Greece)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm?˛) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, ?-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  5. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diver, Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  6. Abrviations NM Nantes Mtropole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Premier week-end de formation WE2 Deuxičme week-end d'investigation WE3 Troisičme week-end de délibération

  7. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ewsuk, Kevin G. (Albuquerque, NM); Arguello, Jr., Jose G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of designing a primary geometry, such as for a forming die, to be used in a powder pressing application by using a combination of axisymmetric geometric shapes, transition radii, and transition spaces to simulate the geometry where the shapes can be selected from a predetermined list or menu of axisymmetric shapes and then developing a finite element mesh to represent the geometry. This mesh, along with material properties of the component to be designed and powder, is input to a standard deformation finite element code to evaluate the deformation characteristics of the component being designed. The user can develop the geometry interactively with a computer interface in minutes and execute a complete analysis of the deformation characteristics of the simulated component geometry.

  8. Role in Climate A Robock, Rutgers University,, New Brunswick, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    and cooling the surface. These clouds also absorb both solar (near infrared) and terrestrial radiation, heating the lower stratosphere. Volcanic aerosols also serve as surfaces for hetero- geneous chemical heating in the lower stratosphere, but the net effect is still heating. As this chemical effect depends

  9. RECIPIENT:Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, terature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  10. atlantic city nj: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: and Electric Company ("PG&E") entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement whereby PG&E agreed to purchase the HMU strongly supports the use of renewable...

  11. SUNDAY -1PM -7PM ASBURY PARK, NJ01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Graduate School. THURSDAY - 6PM - 7:30PM CLEVELAND TOWER AT OLD GC05 SAND VOLLEYBALL AND COOL SUMMER TREATS participant, but only while supplies last--first-come, first-served. We'll gather on the Palmer Square Green

  12. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt051tifeinberg2011...

  13. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. tiarravt051feinberg2010...

  14. To cities, with nothing : prisoner resettlement in Newark, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeney, Kevin Joseph

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers how cities can improve employment outcomes of recently released, formerly incarcerated people. The Newark Prisoner Reentry Initiative (NPRI) is a unique case where the city directly managed six ...

  15. HANWEI ZHANG 19 Riley Ct. Skillman, NJ 08558

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3, Pages 277-298 [6]. Klein, A., Zhang, H. & Themelis, N. J. (2003). A Waste-To-Energy Power Plant (2007). Process Simulation of a large Mass Burn Waste-To-Energy boiler by the combination of CFD

  16. ZERH Training Session: East Brunswick, NJ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Construction Tier 3 level are proposed to align with the National DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program following approval of the draft compliance filing by the...

  17. A Compilation Manager for SML/NJ User Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumgartner, Gerald

    automatic dependency analysis and a form of separate compilation known as cutoff recompilation [ATW94

  18. NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgenda Workshop AgendaGraphicNIF & PhotonAwards2,

  19. QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM ExitProperty Transfer or37 PM To: QERcommentsDepartment-

  20. DOE's NJ HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE BOWL® | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan by(formerlyand5, 2012

  1. Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource History View New PagesRiverNorthborough,Northeast

  2. Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby,Plains,Northampton, New York:Ohio:Northeast -

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bakelite Corp - NJ 35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NY 63 BuffaloArthur D

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NY 63HillFacility

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Callite Tungsten Co - NJ 36

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NYBowen Lab -C-B Tool Products

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -Elk River Reactor -

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -ElkGuterl SpecialtyHeavyHeyden

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 Supply Depot

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Picatinny Arsenal - NJ 31

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CTOregonPetrolite Corp - MOPicatinny

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Princeton University - NJ 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CTOregonPetrolite

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Raritan Arsenal - NJ 32

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le Blond Machine Tool Co -

  12. Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashton Greens Jump to:Valley,Bonn

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tube Reducing Co - NJ 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown SiteTracerlab IncMill Site

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Lead Co - NJ 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Electric Corp - NJ 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal - MAWesternPlant

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wyckoff Steel Co - NJ 20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal -Center

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew Mexico

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex Sampling Plant - NJ 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtah Mexican Hat, Utah,

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wayne Site - NJ 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew MexicoUtahNewNevadaSpringdaleOhio

  20. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock,Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and

  1. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock,Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen

  2. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock,Department of Energy 2 DOE

  3. Production and Injection data for NV Binary facilities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mines, Greg

    Excel files are provided with well production and injection data for binary facilities in Nevada. The files contain the data that reported montly to the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) by the facility operators. this data has been complied into Excel spreadsheets for each of the facilities given on the NBMG web site.

  4. Production and Injection data for NV Binary facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mines, Greg

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Excel files are provided with well production and injection data for binary facilities in Nevada. The files contain the data that reported montly to the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) by the facility operators. this data has been complied into Excel spreadsheets for each of the facilities given on the NBMG web site.

  5. EIS-0215: Pinon Pine Power Project, Tracy Station, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this statement to assess the environmental and human health issues associated with the Pinon Pine Power Project, a proposed demonstration project that would be cost-shared by DOE and the Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo.) under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. The proposed Federal action is for DOE to provide cost-shared funding support for the construction and operation of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a coal-fired power generating facility, which would be a nominal, 800-ton-per-day (104 megawatt (MW) gross generation) air-blown, Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle plant proposed by SPPCo. at its Tracy Power Station near Reno, Nevada.

  6. ClimatEiNvEStigatioN Russell review probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cannot afford not to go forward with the project," he says. ITER's council hopes to agree a final plan a budget shortfall at the experimental ITER fusion reactor, Nature has learned. The proposal has alarmed scientists, who say that it will rob researchers of vital funds at a time when governments are planning

  7. NV Energy (Northern Nevada)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''As of November 30, 2011, furnace and boiler rebates have been suspended until further notice. View the program web site for additional details and contact information.'''

  8. EIS-0413: Searchlight Wind Energy Project, Searchlight, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate 156 wind turbine generators and related facilities on public lands surrounding the town of Searchlight, Nevada. The proposal includes a substation that would be operated by Western.

  9. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources- Pearl Hot Spring, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: Integration of new thermochronometric, structural and geological analyses, reflection and refraction seismic surveys and existing geophysical data into a 3-D Earth Model to elucidate the tectonic and 4-D thermal evolution of southern Clayton Valley and the Weepah Hills (Pearl Hot Spring geothermal play).

  10. NNSA Network Vision (2NV) | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgendaSecurity Complex0 National

  11. OUTLINE OF TESTIMONY FOR PBI/RF/NV

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.of Energy251News ORSSABTESTIMONY

  12. http://ndep.nv.gov/bapc/capp/capp.html

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythemeansI MEDIANCactusCAPP regulates

  13. http://ndep.nv.gov/boff/ntsrod.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythemeansI MEDIANCactusCAPP

  14. http://ndep.nv.gov/bwm/hazard01.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythemeansI MEDIANCactusCAPP WWW NDEP

  15. http://ndep.nv.gov/bwm/landfill.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythemeansI MEDIANCactusCAPP WWW NDEP

  16. http://nevada.usgs.gov/doe_nv/ntsmap.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythemeansI MEDIANCactusCAPP WWW

  17. https://sweis.nv.doe.gov/References/Szymanski%202010.txt

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. HirschOccurrence ReportingSpringSelectFrom:

  18. File:EnergyResourcePermittingNV.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size ofMTB-GAS.pdfshaleusa4.pdfReference.pdf

  19. AMG Advanced Metallurgical Group NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers'sAIRMaster+ Software

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatoryada

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche < RAPID‎bj

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/4-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <cacac <

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/5-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <caMT-a

  6. DOI-BLM-NV-B020-????-???-EA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential Microhydro Site Jump to: navigation,?? Jump26-EA Jump

  7. EA-NV-030-05-08 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbHEA Home

  8. EA-NV-030-07-006 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjinDynetek Europe GmbHEA Home7-006 Jump

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation,c < RAPID‎ |b <a <

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/9-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpMT-a

  11. Remote Sensing For Geothermal Exploration Over Buffalo Valley, Nv | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpReliance Industries Limited Solar GroupAs

  12. NV-020-03-26 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material Co LtdNTDAform

  13. NV-020-07-EA-01 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material Co

  14. NV-020-08-CX-65 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material CoCX-65 Jump to:

  15. NV-020-08-DNA-52 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material CoCX-65 Jump

  16. NV-063-EA06-098 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material CoCX-65

  17. NV-EA-030-07-05 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar Material CoCX-65EA-030-07-05

  18. Energies Nouvelles et Environnement NV ENE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolis Jump to: navigation,Nouvelles et Environnement

  19. DNA-NV-030-09-03 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWingCushing,DADEVELOPMENTItalyIP (Smart

  20. Meeting Location: Las Vegas, NV- DOE Office at Lossee Road

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects38, 1979:32MediaStandards for Set-Top1 th

  1. Category:Las Vegas, NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo Back to PV Economicsdisplays

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shoal Test Site - NV 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSantaWyoming ShirleyShoal Test

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Nevada - NV 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntownUnited NuclearMiami - FLNevada

  4. NV Energy, Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy ThermalEnergy, Inc. Country United

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a < RAPID‎ |

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc <

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc <d

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc <de

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-a

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-ac < RAPID‎

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |g < RAPID‎ |

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-b <a <bb <

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-b <a <bb <c

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NV-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-b <a <bb

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NV-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-b <a <bbe <

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/4-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-ba < RAPID‎ |

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/4-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-ba < RAPID‎ |b

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NV-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-baa <ba <a

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/6-NV-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |gWA-eID-baa <ba <ab

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/7-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎c

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aacdfc

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NV-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k

  3. NV Energy - RenewableGenerations Rebate Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges|Advanced AuthoringIt's time toIndustrial Local

  4. NV Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges|Advanced AuthoringIt's time toIndustrial

  5. DOI-BLM-NV-C010-????-????-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs andCrops Ltd Jump to:2-0214-EA????-????-CX Jump to:

  6. Electrosteric enhanced stability of functional sub-10 nm cerium and iron oxide particles in cell culture medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Chanteau; J. Fresnais; J. -F. Berret

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of nanoparticles in biology require that the nanoparticles remain stable in solutions containing high concentrations of proteins and salts, as well as in cell culture media. In this work, we developed simple protocols for the coating of sub-10 nm nanoparticles and evaluated the colloidal stability of dispersions in various environments. Ligands (citric acid), oligomers (phosphonate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide)) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid)) were used as nanometer-thick adlayers for cerium (CeO2) and iron (gamma-Fe2O3) oxide nanoparticles. The organic functionalities were adsorbed on the particle surfaces via physical (electrostatic) forces. Stability assays at high ionic strength and in cell culture media were performed by static and dynamic light scattering. Among the three coating examined, we found that only poly(acrylic acid) fully preserved the dispersion stability on the long term (> weeks). The improved stability was explained by the multi-point attachments of the chains onto the particle surface, and by the adlayer-mediated electrosteric interactions. These results suggest that anionically charged polymers represent an effective alternative to conventional coating agents.

  7. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterfeldt, M., E-mail: martin.winterfeldt@fbh-berlin.de; Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910?nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  8. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R A; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A; Baker, S L; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; Nietubyc, R; Pelka, J B; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Juha, L; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Koptyaev, S; Velyhan, A; Krasa, J; Kuba, J; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wabnitz, H; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Stojanovic, N; Zastrau, U; Tronnier, A; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We exposed samples of B4C, amorphous C, chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD)-diamond C, Si, and SiC to single 25 fs-long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up to 2.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The samples were chosen as candidate materials for x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) optics. We found that the threshold for surface-damage is on the order of the fluence required for thermal melting. For larger fluences, the crater depths correspond to temperatures on the order of the critical temperature, suggesting that the craters are formed by two-phase vaporization [1]. XFELs have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity ultrashort pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1 to 10 keV regime. The expected high output fluence and short pulse duration pose significant challenges to the optical components, including radiation damage. It has not been possible to obtain direct experimental verification of the expected damage thresholds since appropriate x-ray sources are not yet available. FLASH has allowed us to study the interaction of high-fluence short-duration photon pulses with materials at the shortest wavelength possible to date. With these experiments, we have come closer to the extreme conditions expected in XFEL-matter interaction scenarios than previously possible.

  9. Characterization, 1064 nm photon signals and background events of a tungsten TES detector for the ALPS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan; Döbrich, Babette; Horns, Dieter; Januschek, Friederike; Lindner, Axel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high efficiency, low-background, and single-photon detection with transition-edge sensors (TES) is making this type of detector attractive in widely different types of application. In this paper, we present first characterizations of a TES to be used in the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) experiment searching for new fundamental ultra-light particles. Firstly, we describe the setup and the main components of the ALPS TES detector (TES, millikelvin-cryostat and SQUID read-out) and their performances. Secondly, we explain a dedicated analysis method for single-photon spectroscopy and rejection of non-photon background. Finally, we report on results from extensive background measurements. Considering an event-selection, optimized for a wavelength of $1064~{\\rm nm}$, we achieved a background suppression of $\\sim 10^{-3}$ with a $\\sim 50~\\%$ efficiency for photons passing the selection. The resulting overall efficiency was $23~\\%$ with a dark count rate of $8.6 \\cdot 10^{-3}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$. We observed that pi...

  10. Characterization, 1064 nm photon signals and background events of a tungsten TES detector for the ALPS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler; Noemie Bastidon; Babette Döbrich; Dieter Horns; Friederike Januschek; Axel Lindner

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The high efficiency, low-background, and single-photon detection with transition-edge sensors (TES) is making this type of detector attractive in widely different types of application. In this paper, we present first characterizations of a TES to be used in the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) experiment searching for new fundamental ultra-light particles. Firstly, we describe the setup and the main components of the ALPS TES detector (TES, millikelvin-cryostat and SQUID read-out) and their performances. Secondly, we explain a dedicated analysis method for single-photon spectroscopy and rejection of non-photon background. Finally, we report on results from extensive background measurements. Considering an event-selection, optimized for a wavelength of $1064~{\\rm nm}$, we achieved a background suppression of $\\sim 10^{-3}$ with a $\\sim 50~\\%$ efficiency for photons passing the selection. The resulting overall efficiency was $23~\\%$ with a dark count rate of $8.6 \\cdot 10^{-3}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$. We observed that pile-up events of thermal photons are the main background component.

  11. O({sup 3}P{sub J}) formation and desorption by 157-nm photoirradiation of amorphous solid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSimone, Alice J. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States)] [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States); Orlando, Thomas M., E-mail: thomas.orlando@chemistry.gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodissociation of amorphous solid water (ASW) deposited on a thinly oxidized copper substrate at 82 K was studied by measuring O({sup 3}P{sub J=2,1,0}) photoproducts detected with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. For each spin-orbit state, the oxygen atom time-of-flight spectrum was measured as a function of H{sub 2}O exposure, which is related to ice thickness, and 157-nm irradiation time. Four Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions with translational temperatures of 10?000 K, 1800 K, 400 K, and 82 K were found to fit the data. The most likely formation mechanisms are molecular elimination following ionization of water and ion-electron recombination, secondary recombination of hydroxyl radicals, and photodissociation of adsorbed hydroxyl radicals. Evidence for O-atom diffusion through bulk ASW was found for H{sub 2}O exposures of at least 5 Langmuir (1 L = 10{sup ?6} Torr?s). The cross sections for O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) depletion were 1.3 × 10{sup ?19} and 6.5 × 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} for 1 and 5 L, respectively.

  12. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire, Mark W. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ribas, Ignasi [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catling, David C., E-mail: M.Claire@uea.ac.uk [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  13. Lifetime studies of 130nm nMOS transistors intended for long-duration, cryogenic high-energy physics experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, J.R.; /Fermilab; Arora, R.; Cressler, J.D.; /Georgia Tech; Deptuch, G.W.; /Fermilab; Gui, P.; /Southern Methodist U.; Lourenco, N.E.; /Georgia Tech; Wu, G.; /Southern Methodist U.; Yarema, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future neutrino physics experiments intend to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. To increase performance, integrated readout electronics should work inside the cryostat. Due to the scale and cost associated with evacuating and filling the cryostat, the electronics will be unserviceable for the duration of the experiment. Therefore, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is via hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. The results show that the difference in lifetime for room temperature operation and cryogenic operation for this process are not great and the lifetimes at both 300K and at 77K can be projected to more than 20 years at the nominal voltage (1.5V) for this technology.

  14. BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurleyBLM

  15. PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports FY 2010 Obligations to Facilities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MONTANA (MT) 12 1,692,758 COLORADO (CO) 233 155,184,318 NEVADA (NV) 40 113,898,279 WEST VIRGINIA (WV) 92 298,711,497 NEW MEXICO (NM) 175 170,555,341 MICHIGAN (MI) 8...

  16. EIS-0403: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (AZ, CA, CO, NV, NM, and UT) The U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S....

  17. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar electric) NV (solar) MA (customer-sited PV) NY (retailsolar electric) NC (solar) NM (customer-sited DG) OH (solaror for distributed and customer-sited solar applications. A

  18. The effect of dose rate on interstitial release from the end-of-range implant damage region in silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Munkegade DK, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark Leonard M. Rubin and John Jackson Eaton Corporation, Beverly an Eaton NV-GSD 200. In the DSL the boron peaks occurred at depths of 105, 313, and 521 nm, each

  19. Influence of germanium and the melting method on the mechanical properties of NM23KhYu alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, D.V.; Rozonova, V.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the investigation was to increase the plasticity and ductility of NM233KhYu alloy without a detrimental effect on its service properties, selection of methods evaluation of placticity and ductility at increased temperatures, and establishment on the basis of the results obtained of the optimum temperature range for hot working by pressure. To evaluate the mechanical properties at increased temperature tension, impact strength and torsion tests were made. Alloying with germanium of NM23KhYu alloy leads to a two-to-three-time increase in its impact strength. Electron beam remelting of NM23KhYu alloy with germanium increases the impact strength, and the characteristics of plasticity by 1.5-2 times in comparison with the similar properties of this alloy produced by vacuum induction melting.

  20. Nonlinear absorption and optical strength of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the wavelength of 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Nikolai V; Sergeev, P B [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Reiterov, V M [All-Russian Scientific Centre 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute', St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was made of the dependence of the transmission of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples on the intensity of KrF-laser radiation ({lambda} = 248 nm) pulses of 85 ns duration. The two-photon absorption coefficients were found at {lambda} = 248 nm and their values for these two crystals were 0.5 {+-} 0.2 and 2 {+-} 1 cm Gw{sup -1}. The surface and bulk laser breakdown thresholds were determined for these samples. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting 625-nm laser upon optical pumping of an InGaP/AlGaInP nanostructure with a Bragg mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Lavrushin, B M; Skasyrsky, Yan K [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tiberi, M D [Principia Light Works Inc., Woodland Hills, CA (United States)

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed lasing is obtained in a multilayer quantum-well InGaP/AlGaInP structure in a cavity with an external mirror and a Bragg AlAs/AlGaAs mirror pumped by the 532-nm second harmonic from a diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Lasing is obtained at the TEM{sub 00} fundamental transverse mode of the cavity at a wavelength of 625 nm. The pulse beam power was 3.1 W and the radiation divergence achieved a diffraction limit of 10-12 mrad for 5-ns pulses with a repetition rate of 6 kHz. (lasers)

  2. Structure of a novel dodecaheme cytochrome c from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals an extended 12 nm protein with interacting hemes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Pessanha, M.; Yang, X.; Orshonsky, V.; Orshonsky, L.; Erickson, J.; Zagyansky, Y.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M. (Biosciences Division); (Requimte-CQFB); (Univ. nova de Lisboa)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiheme cytochromes c are important in electron transfer pathways in reduction of both soluble and insoluble Fe(III) by Geobacter sulfurreducens. We determined the crystal structure at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution of the first dodecaheme cytochrome c (GSU1996) along with its N-terminal and C-terminal hexaheme fragments at 2.6 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The macroscopic reduction potentials of the full-length protein and its fragments were measured. The sequence of GSU1996 can be divided into four c{sub 7}-type domains (A, B, C and D) with homology to triheme cytochromes c{sub 7}. In cytochromes c{sub 7} all three hemes are bis-His coordinated, whereas in c{sub 7}-type domains the last heme is His-Met coordinated. The full-length GSU1996 has a 12 nm long crescent shaped structure with the 12 hemes arranged along a polypeptide to form a 'nanowire' of hemes; it has a modular structure. Surprisingly, while the C-terminal half of the protein consists of two separate c{sub 7}-type domains (C and D) connected by a small linker, the N-terminal half of the protein has two c{sub 7}-type domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. This is also observed in the AB fragment. There is an unexpected interaction between the hemes at the interface of domains A and B, which form a heme-pair with nearly parallel stacking of their porphyrin rings. The hemes adjacent to each other throughout the protein are within van der Waals distance which enables efficient electron exchange between them. For the first time, the structural details of c{sub 7}-type domains from one multiheme protein were compared.

  3. Solar-blind deep-UV band-pass filter (250 -350 nm) consisting of a metal nano-grid fabricated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-blind deep-UV band-pass filter (250 - 350 nm) consisting of a metal nano-grid fabricated, fabricated and demonstrated a solar-blind deep-UV pass filter, that has a measured optical performance, the filter offers simple yet effective and low cost solar-blind deep-UV detection at either a single device

  4. Single-domain magnetic pillar array of 35 nm diameter and 65 Gbits/ik2 density for ultrahigh density quantum magnetic storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    density quantum magnetic storage Stephen Y Chou, Mark S. Wei, Peter R. Krauss, and Paul 6. FischerSingle-domain magnetic pillar array of 35 nm diameter and 65 Gbits/ik2 density for ultrahigh is 65 Gbits/in.2-over two orders of magnitude greater than the state-of-the-art magnetic storage density

  5. Revision 12-10-99 13. Summary of Materials Considerations and Data Base (S.J. Zinkle, S. Majumdar and N.M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    project includes conventional materials (e.g., austenitic stainless steel), low-activation structuralRevision 12-10-99 13. Summary of Materials Considerations and Data Base (S.J. Zinkle, S. Majumdar and N.M. Ghoniem) 13.1 Introduction The list of structural materials originally considered for the APEX

  6. Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520525 nm employing graded growth-temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Growths of staggered InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes emitting at 520­525 nm employing current spreading and light extraction in GaN-based light emitting diodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061107 (2012) Electrically driven nanopyramid green light emitting diode Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 061106 (2012

  7. H-atom high-n Rydberg time-of-flight spectroscopy of CH bond fission in acrolein dissociated at 193 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    H-atom high-n Rydberg time-of-flight spectroscopy of C­H bond fission in acrolein dissociated-atom velocity distribution from one- and multiple-photon dissociation processes in acrolein following excitation at 193 nm. The one-photon H-atom signal is dominated by primary C­H bond fission in acrolein. We compare

  8. 10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    10 to 70% methanol in 50 mM KH2PO4 over 25 min, 10 ml/min, monitor at 380 nm). Next, the HPLC- purified mixture was desalted on the same column (methanol was removed on a rotary evaporator, and the sample loaded in H2O and eluted with 90% methanol) and lyophilized, yielding the purified Nvoc

  9. Sub-50 nm high aspect-ratio silicon pillars, ridges, and trenches fabricated using ultrahigh resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resolution electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching P. B. Fischer and S. Y. Chou University of Minnesota Department of Electrical Engineering, Minneapolis, Minnesota 554~3 (Received 29 July 1992 and chlorine based reactive ion etching. These nanoscale Si features can be further reduced to 10 nm using

  10. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    by geometrical phase analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images resolution images have been used to obtain the strain in nano-structured materials.3 Although this approach in many different types of sam- ples, at this time the spatial resolution of between 3 and 6 nm

  11. Emission Spectroscopy of Dissociative Allyl Iodide and Allyl Alcohol Excited at 199.7 nm B. F. Parsons, D. E. Szpunar, and L. J. Butler*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Emission Spectroscopy of Dissociative Allyl Iodide and Allyl Alcohol Excited at 199.7 nm B. F investigated the emission spectroscopy of allyl iodide, CH2dCHCH2I, and allyl alcohol, CH2dCHCH2- OH, excited). The emission spectrum is dominated by activity in the CH2 wag and the CdC stretch, reflecting the dynamics

  12. The photospheric solar oxygen project: III. Investigation of the centre-to-limb variation of the 630nm [OI]-NiI blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caffau, E; Steffen, M; Livingston, W; Bonifacio, P; Malherbe, J -M; Doerr, H -P; Schmidt, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar photospheric abundance of oxygen is still a matter of debate. For about ten years some determinations have favoured a low oxygen abundance which is at variance with the value inferred by helioseismology. Among the oxygen abundance indicators, the forbidden line at 630nm has often been considered the most reliable even though it is blended with a NiI line. In Papers I and Paper II of this series we reported a discrepancy in the oxygen abundance derived from the 630nm and the subordinate [OI] line at 636nm in dwarf stars, including the Sun. Here we analyse several, in part new, solar observations of the the centre-to-limb variation of the spectral region including the blend at 630nm in order to separate the individual contributions of oxygen and nickel. We analyse intensity spectra observed at different limb angles in comparison with line formation computations performed on a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical simulation of the solar atmosphere. The oxygen abundances obtained from the forbidden line at differe...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of 10?nm thick piezoelectric AlN films with high c-axis orientation for miniaturized nanoelectromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaghloul, Usama, E-mail: uzheiba@andrew.cmu.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Microelectronics Department, Electronics Research Institute, 33 El Bohouth St., Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Piazza, Gianluca [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling of piezoelectric nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is challenged by the synthesis of ultrathin and high quality piezoelectric films on very thin electrodes. We report the synthesis and characterization of the thinnest piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) films (10?nm) ever deposited on ultrathin platinum layers (2–5?nm) using reactive sputtering. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and fast Fourier transform analyses confirmed the proper crystal orientation, fine columnar texture, and the continuous lattice structure within individual grains in the deposited AlN nanometer thick films. The average extracted d{sub 31} piezoelectric coefficient for the synthesized films is ?1.73 pC/N, which is comparable to the reported values for micron thick and highly c-axis oriented AlN films. The 10?nm AlN films were employed to demonstrate two different types of optimized piezoelectric nanoactuators. The unimorph actuators exhibit vertical displacements as large as 1.1??m at 0.7?V for 25??m long and 30?nm thick beams. These results have a great potential to realize miniaturized NEMS relays with extremely low voltage, high frequency resonators, and ultrasensitive sensors.

  14. The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

  15. SEEDED VISA: A 1064nm LASER-SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE M. Dunning, G. Andonian, E. Hemsing, S. Reiche, J. Rosenzweig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SEEDED VISA: A 1064nm LASER-SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE BNL ATF M. Dunning, G. Andonian, E. Hemsing Free Electron Laser (FEL) using the VISA undulator and a Nd:YAG seed laser will be performed for a short Rayleigh length FEL amplifier at 1 micron to allow for high power transmission with min- imal

  16. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  17. III International Conference on SiGe(C) Epitaxy and Heterostructures, NM, Mar. 2003 SiGe Single-Hole Transistor Fabricated by AFM Oxidation and Epitaxial Regrowth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    III International Conference on SiGe(C) Epitaxy and Heterostructures, NM, Mar. 2003 110 SiGe Single, West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. Nanodevices on Si/SiGe heterostructures are of growing interest [1 the performance of the devices. In this paper, we demonstrate a reproducible single-hole transistor SiGe device

  18. Fabrication of Sub-10-nm Silicon Nanowire Arrays by Size Reduction Lithography Yang-Kyu Choi, Ji Zhu,, Jeff Grunes,, Jeffrey Bokor, and Gabor. A. Somorjai*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokor, Jeffrey

    systems. Introduction The fabrication of nanoscale patterns with dimensions of 10 nm or less has been and space dimensions" from polysilicon (polycrystalline silicon) and a metal oxide by etching one et al. carried out what they called "spacer lithography" to produce electronic devices in silicon

  19. Renewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close MENA's Water Gap 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    .S. While at the World Bank, Dr. Debele has worked in many regions, including South Asia, Latin AmericaRenewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close MENA's Water Gap 56th Annual NM Water Conf., New Water New Energy: A Conference Linking Desalination and Renewable Energy 45 Renewable Energy

  20. Dependence of Gas-Phase Crotonaldehyde Hydrogenation Selectivity and Activity on the Size of Pt Nanoparticles (1.7-7.1 nm) Supported on SBA-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grass, Michael; Rioux, Robert; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The selectivity and activity for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol and butyraldehyde was studied over a series of Pt nanoparticles (diameter of 1.7, 2.9, 3.6, and 7.1 nm). The nanoparticles were synthesized by the reduction of chloroplatinic acid by alcohol in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), followed by encapsulation into mesoporous SBA-15 silica. The rate of crotonaldehyde hydrogenation and selectivity towards crotyl alcohol both increase with increasing particle size. The selectivity towards crotyl alcohol increased from 13.7 % to 33.9 % (8 Torr crotonaldehyde, 160 Torr H{sub 2} and 353 K), while the turnover frequency increases from 2.1 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4.8 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} with an increase in the particle size from 1.7 nm to 7.1 nm. The decarbonylation pathway to form propene and CO is enhanced over the higher proportion of coordinatively unsaturated sites on the smaller nanoparticles. The apparent activation energy remains constant ({approx} 16 kcal mol{sup -1} for the formation of butyraldehyde and {approx} 8 kcal mol{sup -1} for the formation of crotyl alcohol) as a function of particle size. In the presence of 130-260 mTorr CO, the reaction rate decreases for all products with a CO reaction order of -0.9 for crotyl alcohol and butyraldehyde over 7.1 nm Pt particles; over 1.7 nm Pt particles, the order in CO is -1.4 and -0.9, respectively. Hydrogen reduction at 673 K after calcination in oxygen results in increased activity and selectivity relative to reduction at either higher or lower temperature; this is discussed with regards to the incomplete removal and/or change in morphology of the polymeric surface stabilizing agent, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) used for the synthesis of the Pt nanoparticles.

  1. ACCEPTANCE REQUIREMENTS AND HOME ENERGY RATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................. NJ-5 NJ.6. Lighting Control Systems ........................................................................................................... NJ-6 NJ.6.1 Automatic Daylighting Controls Acceptance ........................................................................... NJ-9 NJ.6.4 Automatic Time Switch Control Acceptance

  2. A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic HEMTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm 0.4 0.35 In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic-mail:ykwon@snu.ac.kr) Abstract -- In this work, we demonstrate a compact 77GHz single-chip transceiver for an automotive radar at the transmitter and a 5dB conversion gain at the receiver. Index Terms -- Automotive radar, 77GHz, MHEMT, MMIC

  3. Comprehensive Characterization of Voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives from 10 nm to 1 cm: Effects of Temperature Cycling and Compressive Creep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, T M; Lauderbach, L; Gagliardi, F; Cunningham, B; Lorenz, K T; Lee, J I; van Buuren, T; Call, R; Landt, L; Overturf, G

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the characterization of voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives over several orders of magnitude, from sizes on the order of 10 nm to about 1 cm. This is accomplished using ultra small angle x-ray scattering to investigate voids from a few nm to a few microns, ultra small angle neutron scattering for voids from 100 nm to 10 microns, and x-ray computed microtomography to investigate microstructure from a few microns to a few centimeters. The void distributions of LX-17 are outlined, and the microstructure of LX-17 is presented. Temperature cycling and compressive creep cause drastically different damage to the microstructure. Temperature cycling leads to a volume expansion (ratchet growth) in TATB-based explosives, and x-ray scattering techniques that are sensitive to sizes up to a few microns indicated changes to the void volume distribution that had previously accounted for most, but not all of the change in density. This paper presents the microstructural damage larger than a few microns caused by ratchet growth. Temperature cycling leads to void creation in the binder poor regions associated with the interior portion of formulated prills. Conversely, compressive creep causes characteristically different changes to microstructure; fissures form at binder-rich prill boundaries prior to mechanical failure.

  4. Solvent dependent branching between C-I and C-Br bond cleavage following 266 nm excitation of CH{sub 2}BrI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Christopher P.; Spears, Kenneth G.; Wilson, Kaitlynn R.; Sension, Roseanne J. [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that ultraviolet photoexcitation of halomethanes results in halogen-carbon bond cleavage. Each halogen-carbon bond has a dominant ultraviolet (UV) absorption that promotes an electron from a nonbonding halogen orbital (n{sub X}) to a carbon-halogen antibonding orbital (?*{sub C-X}). UV absorption into specific transitions in the gas phase results primarily in selective cleavage of the corresponding carbon-halogen bond. In the present work, broadband ultrafast UV-visible transient absorption studies of CH{sub 2}BrI reveal a more complex photochemistry in solution. Transient absorption spectra are reported spanning the range from 275 nm to 750 nm and 300 fs to 3 ns following excitation of CH{sub 2}BrI at 266 nm in acetonitrile, 2-butanol, and cyclohexane. Channels involving formation of CH{sub 2}Br + I radical pairs, iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I, and iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br are identified. The solvent environment has a significant influence on the branching ratios, and on the formation and stability of iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I. Both iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I and iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br are observed in cyclohexane with a ratio of ?2.8:1. In acetonitrile this ratio is 7:1 or larger. The observation of formation of iso-CH{sub 2}I-Br photoproduct as well as iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I following 266 nm excitation is a novel result that suggests complexity in the dissociation mechanism. We also report a solvent and concentration dependent lifetime of iso-CH{sub 2}Br-I. At low concentrations the lifetime is >4 ns in acetonitrile, 1.9 ns in 2-butanol and ?1.4 ns in cyclohexane. These lifetimes decrease with higher initial concentrations of CH{sub 2}BrI. The concentration dependence highlights the role that intermolecular interactions can play in the quenching of unstable isomers of dihalomethanes.

  5. Analysis of output surface damage resulting from single 351 nm, 3 ns pulses on sub-nanosecond laser conditioned KD2PO4 crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarboe, J; Adams, J J; Hackel, R

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe that by conditioning DKDP using 500 ps laser pulses, the bulk damage threshold becomes essentially equivalent to the surface damage threshold. We report here the findings of our study of laser initiated output surface damage on 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP for test pulses at 351 nm, 3 ns. The relation between surface damage density and damaging fluence (r(f)) is presented for the first time and the morphologies of the surface sites are discussed. The results of this study suggest a surface conditioning effect resulting from exposure to 500 ps laser pulses.

  6. Increasing the creation yield of shallow single defects in diamond by surface plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterkamp, Christian; Scharpf, Jochen; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor [Institut für Quantenoptik, Ulm University, Albert Einstein Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany)] [Institut für Quantenoptik, Ulm University, Albert Einstein Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Pezzagna, Sebastien; Meijer, Jan [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Abteilung Nukleare Festkörperphysik, Universität Leipzig, Linnestraße 5, Leipzig 04103 (Germany)] [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Abteilung Nukleare Festkörperphysik, Universität Leipzig, Linnestraße 5, Leipzig 04103 (Germany); Diemant, Thomas; Jürgen Behm, Rolf [Institut für Oberflächenchemie und Katalyse, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, Ulm 89081 (Germany)] [Institut für Oberflächenchemie und Katalyse, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, Ulm 89081 (Germany)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond close to the crystal surface are very promising magnetic field sensors with very high sensitivity. Here, we report the enhanced creation of very shallow (less than 3 nm below the diamond surface) NV centers by using fluorine and oxygen plasma treatment. We observe a four fold increase—from 0.11% to about 0.45% in the production yield when the sample surface is terminated with fluorine or oxygen atoms. This effect is explained by the stabilization of the NV's negative charge state which is influenced by the various defects present on the diamond surface.

  7. Thin film three-dimensional topological insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors: A candidate for sub-10?nm devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhavan, N. D., E-mail: nima.dehdashti@uwa.edu.au; Jolley, G.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TI) are a new state of quantum matter in which surface states reside in the bulk insulating energy bandgap and are protected by time-reversal symmetry. It is possible to create an energy bandgap as a consequence of the interaction between the conduction band and valence band surface states from the opposite surfaces of a TI thin film, and the width of the bandgap can be controlled by the thin film thickness. The formation of an energy bandgap raises the possibility of thin-film TI-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs). In this paper, we explore the performance of MOSFETs based on thin film 3D-TI structures by employing quantum ballistic transport simulations using the effective continuous Hamiltonian with fitting parameters extracted from ab-initio calculations. We demonstrate that thin film transistors based on a 3D-TI structure provide similar electrical characteristics compared to a Si-MOSFET for gate lengths down to 10?nm. Thus, such a device can be a potential candidate to replace Si-based MOSFETs in the sub-10?nm regime.

  8. Towards sub-200?nm nano-structuring of linear giant magneto-resistive spin valves by a direct focused ion beam milling process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedmüller, Benjamin; Huber, Felix; Herr, Ulrich [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a detailed investigation of a focused ion beam (FIB) assisted nano-structuring process for giant magneto-resistive (GMR) spin valve sensors. We have performed a quantitative study of the dependence of the GMR ratio as well as the sensor resistance on the ion dose, which is implanted in the active region of our sensors. These findings are correlated with the decrease of magneto-resistive properties after micro- and nano-structuring by the FIB and reveal the importance of ion damage which limits the applicability of FIB milling to GMR devices in the low ?m range. Deposition of a protective layer (50?nm SiO{sub 2}) on top of the sensor structure before milling leads to a preservation of the magneto-resistive properties after the milling procedure down to sensor dimensions of ?300?nm. The reduction of the sensor dimensions to the nanometer regime is accompanied by a shift of the GMR curves, and a modification of the saturation behavior. Both effects can be explained by a micromagnetic model including the magnetic interaction of free and pinned layer as well as the effect of the demagnetizing field of the free layer on the sensor behavior. The results demonstrate that the FIB technology can be successfully used to prepare spintronic nanostructures.

  9. Cavity design for improved electrical injection in InAlGaP/AlGaAs visible (639--661 nm) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Lott, J.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (United States))

    1993-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical cavity design for improved electrical injection in visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes employing an InGaP/InAlGaP strained quantum-well active optical cavity and AlAs/Al[sub 0.5]Ga[sub 0.5]As distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) is described. The cavity design was determined by measuring the lasing threshold current density of visible edge-emitting laser diodes with AlAs/Al[sub 0.5]Ga[sub 0.5]As DBR cladding layers. By inserting InAlP spacer layers between the active region and the DBR cladding, significant improvement in the performance of the edge-emitting lasers was achieved. This approach was then applied to the design of visible VCSEL diodes, and resulted in the first demonstration of room-temperature electrically injected lasing, over the wavelength range 639--661 nm. The visible VCSELs, with a diameter of 20 [mu]m, exhibit pulsed output power of 3.4 mW at 650 nm, and continue to lase at a duty cycle of 40%. The threshold current was 30 mA, with a low threshold voltage (2.7 V) and low series resistance ([lt]15 [Omega]).

  10. Low leakage Ru-strontium titanate-Ru metal-insulator-metal capacitors for sub-20?nm technology node in dynamic random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovici, M., E-mail: Mihaela.Ioana.Popovici@imec.be; Swerts, J.; Redolfi, A.; Kaczer, B.; Aoulaiche, M.; Radu, I.; Clima, S.; Everaert, J.-L.; Van Elshocht, S.; Jurczak, M. [Imec, Leuven 3001 (Belgium)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved metal-insulator-metal capacitor (MIMCAP) stacks with strontium titanate (STO) as dielectric sandwiched between Ru as top and bottom electrode are shown. The Ru/STO/Ru stack demonstrates clearly its potential to reach sub-20?nm technology nodes for dynamic random access memory. Downscaling of the equivalent oxide thickness, leakage current density (J{sub g}) of the MIMCAPs, and physical thickness of the STO have been realized by control of the Sr/Ti ratio and grain size using a heterogeneous TiO{sub 2}/STO based nanolaminate stack deposition and a two-step crystallization anneal. Replacement of TiN with Ru as both top and bottom electrodes reduces the amount of electrically active defects and is essential to achieve a low leakage current in the MIM capacitor.

  11. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  12. Small-signal modulation and differential gain of red-emitting (??=?630?nm) InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Thomas; Banerjee, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Pallab, E-mail: pkb@eecs.umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report small-signal modulation bandwidth and differential gain measurements of a ridge waveguide In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN quantum dot laser grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The laser peak emission is at ??=?630?nm. The ?3?dB bandwidth of an 800??m long device was measured to be 2.4?GHz at 250?mA under pulsed biasing, demonstrating the possibility of high-speed operation of these devices. The differential gain was measured to be 5.3?×?10{sup ?17}?cm{sup 2}, and a gain compression factor of 2.87?×?10{sup ?17}?cm{sup 3} is also derived from the small-signal modulation response.

  13. Strain mapping with nm-scale resolution for the silicon-on-insulator generation of semiconductor devices by advanced electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Hutin, Louis; Le Royer, Cyrille [CEA, LETI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beche, Armand [CEA, LETI, and FEI France MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, INAC, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain engineering in the conduction channel is a cost effective method of boosting the performance in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices. However, given the small dimensions of these devices, it is difficult to quantitatively measure the strain with the required spatial resolution. Three different transmission electron microscopy techniques, high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, dark field electron holography, and nanobeam electron diffraction have been applied to measure the strain in simple bulk and SOI calibration specimens. These techniques are then applied to different gate length SiGe SOI pFET devices in order to measure the strain in the conduction channel. For these devices, improved spatial resolution is required, and strain maps with spatial resolutions as good as 1 nm have been achieved. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of using these three different techniques when used for strain measurement.

  14. NM, East Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan1,185530 474 523136 149

  15. NM, West Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan1,185530 47421 20 210 0 0

  16. NM Invest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/Ames Global EmissionsNIFE BateriasNITNM

  17. 7 -29 nm 29 -56 nm 56 -95 nm Particlenumberconcentration(#cm-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    Diesel Buses Using UltraUsing Ultra--low Sulfur Diesellow Sulfur Diesel Aura C. Dávila and Britt A.4 miles ·Average speed: 30 mph · Fuel: ·Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) ConclusionsConclusions ELPI. · Heavy-duty vehicles contribute one quarter of PM emissions from mobile sources.(1) · Using ultra-low

  18. Optical properties and energy transfer processes of Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}- codoped fluorotellurite glass under 1550?nm excitation for 2.0??m applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates 2.0??m emission properties and energy transfer processes in the Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass. The measured absorption spectra demonstrate that the codoped sample can be pumped by 1550?nm excitation efficiently. Judd-Ofelt and radiative parameters are calculated and discussed. Intensive 2.0??m emission originating from Ho{sup 3+}: {sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is observed and a long lifetime (11?ms) of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level is measured when Ho{sup 3+} ions are sensitized by Er{sup 3+} ions. Meanwhile, the upconversion spectra of the Er{sup 3+} singly and codoped samples are obtained and the energy transfer processes of the two ions is discussed based on the change of the upconversion emissions. The microscopic interaction parameters of the phonon-assisted (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}) process are calculated and the microparameter reaches as high as 10.1?×?10{sup ?41} cm{sup 6}/s. Hence, these results indicate that this Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass will be a suitable material for developing solid state laser around 2.0??m.

  19. Visible (657 nm) InGaP/InAlGaP strained quantum well vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Bryan, R.P.; Lott, J.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (United States)); Olbright, G.R. (Photonics Research, Inc., Broomfield, Colorado 80021 (United States))

    1992-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first visible (657 nm) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The photopumped undoped structure was grown using low-pressure metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy in a single-growth sequence on misoriented GaAs substrates. The optical cavity consists of an In{sub 0.54}Ga{sub 0.46}P/In{sub 0.48}(Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.52} P strained quantum-well active region and a lattice-matched In{sub 0.48}(Al{sub {ital y}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital y}}){sub 0.52} P (0.7{le}{ital y}{le}1.0) graded spacer region, while the distributed Bragg reflectors are composed of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/AlAs quarter-wave stacks. Room-temperature optically pumped lasing was achieved with a very low-threshold power, clearly demonstrating the viability of this new technology. These results provide the foundation for visible semiconductor laser-diode arrays for a number of applications including laser projection displays, holographic memories, and plastic fiber communication.

  20. Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy of $^4He$ $2^3P-3^{1,3}D$ transitions at 588 nm with a one-watt compact laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Feng, Yan; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy of helium $2^3P-3^{1,3}D$ transitions in an rf discharged sealed-off cell using a compact laser system at 588 nm. An external cavity diode laser at 1176 nm was constructed to seed a Raman fiber amplifier. Laser power of more than one watt at 588 nm was produced by frequency doubling of the fiber amplifier output using a MgO:PPLN crystal. A doubling efficiency of 23 % was achieved. The power-dependent spectra of the $2^3P-3^3D$ transitions were investigated. Furthermore, the Doppler-free spectrum of the spin-forbidden $2^3P-3^1D$ transitions was observed for the first time. Our results are crucial towards precision test of QED atomic calculations, especially for improving the determination of the helium $3^1D-3^3D$ separation.

  1. Low-Power Circuits for a 2.5-V, 10.7-to-86-Gb/s Serial Transmitter in 130-nm SiGe BiCMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voinigescu, Sorin Petre

    Low-Power Circuits for a 2.5-V, 10.7-to-86-Gb/s Serial Transmitter in 130-nm SiGe BiCMOS Timothy O operating up to 86 Gb/s are designed and implemented in a 130-nm SiGe BiCMOS technology with 150-GHz fT SiGe-GHz fT SiGe BiCMOS technology. Operation is verified up to 86 Gb/s at room temperature (92Gb/s and 71

  2. Importance of energy efficiency in the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrons, R.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the design of the Process and Environmental Technology Laboratory (PETL) in FY97, an energy conservation report (ECR) was completed. The original energy baseline for the building, established in Title 1 design, was 595,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr, site energy use. Following the input of several reviewers and the incorporation of the various recommendations into the Title 2 design, the projected energy consumption was reduced to 341,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr. Of this reduction, it is estimated that about 150,000 BTU/sq. ft./yr resulted from inclusion of more energy efficient options into the design. The remaining reductions resulted from better accounting of energy consumption between Title 1 ECR and the final ECR. The energy efficient features selected by the outcome of the ECR were: (1) Energy Recovery system, with evaporative cooling assist, for the Exhaust/Make-up Air System; (2) Chilled Water Thermal Storage system; (3) Premium efficiency motors for large, year-round applications; (4) Variable frequency drives for all air handling fan motors; (4) Premium efficiency multiple boiler system; and (5) Lighting control system. The annual energy cost savings due to these measures will be about $165,000. The estimated annual energy savings are two million kWhrs electric, and 168,000 therms natural gas, the total of which is equivalent to 23,000 million BTUs per year. Put into the perspective of a typical office/light lab at SNL/NM, the annual energy savings is equal the consumption of a 125,000 square foot building. The reduced air emissions are approximately 2,500 tons annually.

  3. Mechanisms of H{sub 2}O desorption from amorphous solid water by 157-nm irradiation: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSimone, Alice J.; Crowell, Vernon D. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Sherrill, C. David [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States) [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Computational Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Orlando, Thomas M. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States) [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodesorption of water molecules from amorphous solid water (ASW) by 157-nm irradiation has been examined using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. The rotational temperature has been determined, by comparison with simulations, to be 425 ± 75 K. The time-of-flight spectrum of H{sub 2}O (v= 0) has been fit with a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a translational temperature of 700 ± 200 K (0.12 ± 0.03 eV). H{sup +} and OH{sup +} fragment ions have been detected with non-resonant multiphoton ionization, indicating vibrationally excited parent water molecules with translational energies of 0.24 ± 0.08 eV. The cross section for water removal from ASW by 7.9-eV photons near 100 K is (6.9 ± 1.8) × 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} for >10 L H{sub 2}O exposure. Electronic structure computations have also probed the excited states of water and the mechanisms of desorption. Calculated electron attachment and detachment densities show that exciton delocalization leads to a dipole reversal state in the first singlet excited state of a model system of hexagonal water ice. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics simulations show possible desorption of a photo-excited water molecule from this cluster, though the non-hydrogen bonded OH bond is stretched significantly before desorption. Potential energy curves of this OH stretch in the electronic excited state show a barrier to dissociation, lending credence to the dipole reversal mechanism.

  4. The University of New Mexico MSC01 1220 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 Phone 505.277.6947 Fax 505.277.2321 www.unm.edu MEMORANDUMMEMORANDUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    The University of New Mexico · MSC01 1220 · 1 University of New Mexico · Albuquerque, NM 87131 a balanced approach to long-term sustainability. The changes should result in 100.7% funding in 2043 retirees until the fund is 100% funded. · The COLA reduction is based on the median retirement annuity

  5. High-Harmonic Inverse-Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800 nm Christopher M. S. Sears, Eric R. Colby, Benjamin M. Cowan, Robert H. Siemann, and James E. Spencer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    High-Harmonic Inverse-Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800 nm Christopher M. S. Sears, Eric R observation of a higher-order inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) interaction. Interaction at the fourth, fifth require electron bunches shorter than the laser wavelength. Current rf injectors for linear accelerators

  6. IMAGING SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF Ti I 2231 nm IN A SUNSPOT M. J. PENN1,2, W. D. CAO3,4, S. R. WALTON2, G. A. CHAPMAN2 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    line at 2231.0 nm is used to probe the magnetic and velocity fields in the spot umbra and penumbra in the umbra, and a dependence of the magnetic field on the plasma temperature similar to that which was seen

  7. High performance 70 nm In0.8GaP/In0.4AlAs/In0.35GaAs Metamorphic HEMT With Pd Schottky Contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Kwang Seok

    contacts, due to low diffusivity with InGaP of Pd as well as its high SBH [9], the distance between Schottky contact due to its low diffusion of Pd to InGaP. The fabricated 70 nm MHEMT's with Pd Schottky

  8. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser irradiation. X. Laser-induced near-surface absorption in single-crystal NaCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickinson, J. Thomas

    are expected to play an important role in optical break- down and surface damage. II. EXPERIMENT The results of a few thousand kelvin even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser absorption radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near-surface region

  9. The Efficacy of SEER as a Seasonal Performance Measure for Different Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, H. I.; Sachs, H. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Albuquerque-NM Amarillo-TX Austin-TX Boise-ID Brownsville-TX Columbia-SC Corpus_Christi-TX Elko-NV Fort_Smith-AR Grand_Junction-CO Jackson-MS Kansas_City-MO Little_Rock-AR Lubbock-TXLufkin-TX Memphis-TN Meridian-MS Miles..._City-MT Montgomery-AL Nashville-TN North_Platte-NE Norfolk-NE Pendleton-OR Pierre-SD Pocatello-ID Pueblo-CO Reno-NV Scottsbluff-NE Shreveport-LA Sioux_Falls-SD San_Antonio-TX Tonopah-NV Tucumcari-NM Victoria-TX 6 Tampa-Florida 40 60 80 100 120...

  10. Gene Flow in Scrub Jays: Frequency and Direction of Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between coastal and interior Scrub Jay populations. Locality Museum nohef. Description East-west movement NV, Granite Mountains NV, Sutcliffe NV, Ormsby Co., Kings Cyn. NV, Reno NV, Gardnerville CA, Inyo Co., west wall, Owens Valley CA...

  11. 9Bibliography 1 Adams, NJ & Slotow, RH (eds). 1998. Proceedings of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Allan, DG, Davies, GB & Parker, V. 2000. The birds (Aves) of the middle Save River valley, Moçambique. Cape Town, Johannesburg: Juta. 178 pp. 20 Altshul, HJ. 2000. Addressing the poverty focus in migrant

  12. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    horses do not need to be stabled in a barn if there is shelter from the elements in the form of a run or no shelter will grow a longer hair coat (page 1, left). This longer, denser hair coat will help keep them in winter as long as it has a naturally thick hair coat and is adapted to the cold. There are a wide variety

  13. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but nollimiled to, literature surveys. inventories. audits), data analysis (indudm9 computer modeling). document preparation (such as...

  14. NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TYPE OF OPERATION ----------- 0 Research & Develapment q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale g Bench Scale Process ? a Theoretical Studies? 0 Sample...

  15. Conference on Systems Engineering Research March 17-19, 2010, Hoboken, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    in acquisition and development leads to lower system life cycle costs, fewer accidents and a reduction of errors considered and executed to ensure a successful product. A six year collaborative initiative has resulted- A New Look, there has been increasing pressure to reduce development cycle time for new systems, to cut

  16. Princeton University qili@princeton.edu Citizenship: China Princeton, NJ 08540 Telephone: 612-860-0517

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    College, Northfield MN 2009-2011 Study the theoretical aspect of quantum-classical transition under and statistical approach using Mathematica Invited to give a presentation at the undergraduate session of the 41 (NEMS) such as carbon nanotubes Performed quantitative analysis on NEMS with both theoretical

  17. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 623 Bowser Rd. Piscataway NJ 08854-8014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    University/Industry Partnership: Collaborative Effort to Recycle Scrap Tires for Transportation Applications

  18. u.s. DI!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    inventory, and information collection activities that are directly conservation of fish, wildlife, related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources or to the...

  19. Center for Health & Counseling Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430-1680

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    Arts College NOROVIRUS ILLNESS Norovirus ­ the stomach bug · Norovirus is a highly contagious illness have other illnesses. Norovirus is highly contagious and spreads rapidly. · Noroviruses are highly contagious and outbreaks are common due to the ease of transmission. · People with norovirus are contagious

  20. Contributions to the Paleontology of New Jersey (II) STOP 5: GINGERBREAD CASTLE STROMATOLITES, HAMBURG, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    Allentown Dolomite (Middle Cambrian ­ lowermost Ordovician), a shallow water, nearshore carbonate energy environments. The higher energy environment is also reinforced by the many storm layers present larger ooids. Dark gray rip-up clasts occur near the interface of the two layers. Figure 4. Edgewise

  1. Admission Office Princeton University P.O. Box 430 Princeton, NJ 08542-0430 Visual arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    is for students who have devoted a significant amount of time and energy to one or more of these art forms and whoApplicationID,ifavailable school name Dance IncludeaDVDofoneormoresolo performance(s)ofcontrastingstylesand/orof your choreography solo, or you are the choreographer. On-campus auditions arenotoffered

  2. Admission Office Princeton University P.O. Box 430 Princeton, NJ 08542-0430 Visual arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is for students who have devoted a significant amount of time and energy to one or more of these art forms and who areacode/number(pleasedonotincludecountrycode) CurrentsecondaryschoolCommonApplicationID,ifavailable school, or you are the choreographer. On-campus auditions arenotoffered;however,ifyouareabletovisit campus while

  3. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their paper use by 70 percent by using tablets instead of paper. (Photo by Leanna MeyerPPPL) The Health Physics group at PPPL reduced their paper use by 70 percent by using...

  4. H. B. Fry, Staff Assistant NJ-, i.4 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION CCSJCERMZIQ THE M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ," POSTGranite City,' : H. B.

  5. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tindall Homes, Columbus, NJ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines |New TechnologyNelsonWith

  6. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: John Hubert Associates, EXIT-0, North Cape May, NJ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment of EnergyCustomIndoor airPLUS WebinarHubert

  7. Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactiveITransactional NetworkTransferring the

  8. **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship ProgramBiomassUniversityNuclear SecurityFeb 16 17

  9. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUSAdvancedMuseum Day at0019 Forx N yo r tNO

  10. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUSAdvancedMuseum Day at0019 Forx N yo r

  11. NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.1 ,NICXELI

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NY 63 BuffaloArthur DBaker and

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E I Du Pont - NJ 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo - NYBowenColumbusDivDuriron Co -E B-

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Pulverizing Co - NJ 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -ElkGuterlHookerInstitute

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffalo -ElkGuterlHookerInstitute- NYArmy-J T

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 SupplyCanaan

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfaltz and Bauer Inc - Richfield - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CTOregonPetrolite Corp - MO 0828

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Pipe and Foundry Co - NJ 23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown SiteTracerlabPA

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Radium Corp - NJ 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K LeDowntown SiteTracerlabPARadium Corp -

  1. The NV center as a quantum actuator: time-optimal control of nuclear spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarice D. Aiello; Paola Cappellaro

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Indirect control of qubits by a quantum actuator has been proposed as an appealing strategy to manipulate qubits that couple only weakly to external fields. While universal quantum control can be easily achieved when the actuator-qubit coupling is anisotropic, the efficiency of this approach is less clear. Here we analyze the time-efficiency of the quantum actuator control. We describe a strategy to find time-optimal control sequence by the quantum actuator and compare their gate times with direct driving, identifying regimes where the actuator control performs faster. As an example, we focus on a specific implementation based on the Nitrogen-Vacancy center electronic spin in diamond (the actuator) and nearby carbon-13 nuclear spins (the qubits).

  2. RECIPIENT:Desert Research Institute STATE:NV PROJECT Tall Tower...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  3. Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden (2006) NUMEN, Vol. 53 Also available online www.brill.nl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be in correcting either the mistakes of Western specialists or the presumptions of local scholars on one or another in Turkish and in Western languages about Bektashism and Alevism, many of them by Bektashis or sympathizers the everlasting Bektashi and the differ- ent religions present in Anatolia or in the Balkans and their devel

  4. March 16, 2011 Pauli Kehayias 1 Single-photon NV sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    coherence Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment Coincident count rate ~ For number states, for n = 0 experiments (Hanbury-Brown and Twiss, Mach-Zehnder, Pfleegor-Mandel) Quantum key distribution [2,3] Quantum

  5. NV: ELTE AZONOST: Mat. BSc. Algebra2: 4. vizsga (keresztflv)/1 2010. jan. 26.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, Emil

    . Számítsuk ki a kvaterniócsoportban (kjk)2009 k-2 értékét. (kjk)2009 k-2 = -j 17. Legyen A1 a síkon az

  6. EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility- Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) will evaluate the potential impacts of the Phase II Facility of the Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant.

  7. C:\\Work 102004\\2006 Projections\\NV Projections Review 2008 v45...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    have also been sectors that increased employment since 2007. These included the retail, health care, transportation and warehousing, and management of companies sectors. This has...

  8. NV Energy Solar Integration Study: Cycling and Movements of Conventional Generators for Balancing Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing penetration level of solar power in the southern Nevada system, the impact of solar on system operations needs to be carefully studied from various perspectives. Qualitatively, it is expected that the balancing requirements to compensate for solar power variability will be larger in magnitude; meanwhile, generators providing load following and regulation services will be moved up or down more frequently. One of the most important tasks is to quantitatively evaluate the cycling and movements of conventional generators with solar power at different penetration levels. This study is focused on developing effective methodologies for this goal and providing a basis for evaluating the wear and tear of the conventional generators

  9. NV Energy (Northern Nevada)- SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''Funding is not currently available for the Nevada Surebet Northern Retrofit Program. New Construction projects are still eligible for funding as of October, 2012.'''

  10. NV Energy (Southern Nevada)- SureBet Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''Funding is not currently available for the Nevada Surebet Southern Retrofit Program. New Construction projects are still eligible for funding as of October, 2012.'''

  11. http://water.nv.gov/WaterPlanning/wat-fact/gwinfo.cfm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Resources Designated (YesNo) AFYR Date 106 Antelope Valley 115 2,600 7,417 792 Y 107 Smith Valley 479 17,000 1 59,088 692 Y WaterPlanning. Basin No. Basin Name Area, sq. miles...

  12. https://empcs.nv.doe.gov/emis2/fa/pg/FFACO.Obligations_Commitments...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and cleared by the RCT who will issue a radiation clearance certification (i.e., a green tag) prior to waste removal. The survey will include field screening andor...

  13. Photonic architecture for scalable quantum information processing in NV-diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kae Nemoto; Michael Trupke; Simon J. Devitt; Ashley M. Stephens; Kathrin Buczak; Tobias Nobauer; Mark S. Everitt; Jorg Schmiedmayer; William J. Munro

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics and information are intimately connected, and the ultimate information processing devices will be those that harness the principles of quantum mechanics. Many physical systems have been identified as candidates for quantum information processing, but none of them are immune from errors. The challenge remains to find a path from the experiments of today to a reliable and scalable quantum computer. Here, we develop an architecture based on a simple module comprising an optical cavity containing a single negatively-charged nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Modules are connected by photons propagating in a fiber-optical network and collectively used to generate a topological cluster state, a robust substrate for quantum information processing. In principle, all processes in the architecture can be deterministic, but current limitations lead to processes that are probabilistic but heralded. We find that the architecture enables large-scale quantum information processing with existing technology.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOI-BLM-NV-W010-2012-0057-EA DOE/EA-1944

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune 20,in the Next FiveASSESSMENT

  15. GRR workshop at GRC scheduled for 10/2 in Reno, NV | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG2 EnergyGIS keywordUpdateworkshop

  16. EA-1849: Ormat Nevada Geothermal Projects in Northern NV | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIXKahukuCounty,ColoradoAprilAirTuscarora,

  17. DOE/NV-441 Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Rulison Drilling Effluent

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A LithologicProcessing SiteSurface1

  18. DOE/NV/10845 IT U S VECAS LIBRARY UC-703 I?. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A LithologicProcessing SiteSurface10845 IT U

  19. Microsoft Word - doe_nv--1164-WM07-7416FINALpaper.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary v TABLE OF7 Conference,

  20. Title Final Environmental Impact Statement: Tonopah Test Range Area 10, Nye County, NV

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 Hour ofGeologic map