Sample records for nj ct pa

  1. Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)References ↑ US Census BureauNorthbrook, Ohio: EnergyJump to:

  2. Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:Community NominationsCarolina‎ |NAE/Enel NorthMiddleNortheast

  3. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  5. QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution - East QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution - East New Jersey Institute of Technology...

  6. HANWEI ZHANG 19 Riley Ct. Skillman, NJ 08558

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3, Pages 277-298 [6]. Klein, A., Zhang, H. & Themelis, N. J. (2003). A Waste-To-Energy Power Plant.zhang@gmail.com Research Interests Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste to energy; Numerical Analysis of High (2007). Process Simulation of a large Mass Burn Waste-To-Energy boiler by the combination of CFD

  7. February 2013 Siemens Princeton NJ Pascal Hitzler Semantic Data Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitzler, Pascal

    February 2013 Siemens Princeton NJ Pascal Hitzler Semantic Data Analytics The key://www.pascal-hitzler.de/ #12;February 2013 Siemens Princeton NJ Pascal Hitzler 2 Semantic Web journal EiCs: Pascal://www.semantic-web-journal.net/ #12;February 2013 Siemens Princeton NJ Pascal Hitzler 3 Textbook Pascal Hitzler, Markus Krtzsch

  8. Palmco Power NJ, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPP EquipmentPartnersPalisadesPalmco Power NJ, LLC

  9. Valero Refining Company - NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy NowNew HampshireValero Refining Company - NJ Jump to:

  10. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Program Review Presentation NJ COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS REFUSE TRUCKS, SHUTTLE BUSES AND INFRASTRUCTURE Chuck Feinberg, Principal Investigator New Jersey Clean...

  11. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ1PA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but nollimiled to, literature surveys. inventories. audits), data analysis (indudm9 computer modeling). document preparation (such as...

  12. PA Nanotechnology 2012 Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    PA Nanotechnology 2012 Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy June 5, 2012 Harrisburg University technologies that can impact your business and Pennsylvania's economy Moderator: Charles Brumlik, Nanobiz #12

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Jersey City NJ Site - NJ 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown SiteOhio FernaldGraniteJersey City NJ

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Brunswick NJ Site - NJ 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown SiteOhioMissouriMaywood SiteBrunswick NJ

  15. A space-charge-neutralizing plasma for beam drift compression P.K. Roya,, P.A. Seidl a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    - long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter $5A space-charge-neutralizing plasma for beam drift compression P.K. Roya,?, P.A. Seidl a , A. Anders of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA d

  16. PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    PA Nanotechnology 2012: Nanotech's Role in Advancing PA's Economy Date: June 5, 2012 Time: 7:30 am impact your business and regional economy · Processes and programs for moving laboratory technologies in Advancing PA's Economy Agenda 730 Registration and Breakfast 820 Welcome 830 Keynote: TBA 910 Break 925

  17. Making an impact in public health through philanthrocapitalism : the PaCT Project and ImPaCT Commercial Ventures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Todd Germaine

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale epidemiologic longitudinal cohort studies are a distinct area of epidemiology and public health. To conduct such studies, it often requires exorbitant resources. African collaborators and a team of Harvard ...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wyckoff Steel Co - NJ 20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlantSteel Co - NJ 20

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown SiteOhioMissouriMaywood Site - NJ 10

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex Sampling Plant - NJ 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown SiteOhioMissouriMaywood Site - NJ

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic city nj Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cape May Atlantic and Cape May October 1 December 31 100 66 166 NJ Atlantic City Ocean City ... Source: Hardy, Christopher R. - Biology Department, Millersville University...

  2. Siemens Pittsburgh, PA Novelis Corporation Atlanta, GA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Industrial Design ­ Shanghai, China Eaton Corporation ­ Pittsburgh, PA CMU, CTTEC ­ PittsburghSiemens ­ Pittsburgh, PA Novelis Corporation ­ Atlanta, GA Expense

  3. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  4. Pa bru Dancing Song 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bsod nams dung mtsho

    Description (to be used in archive entry) This song can be sung while dancing at any celebratory gathering. The lyrics describe a happy deer family living in a happy valley. ??????????????????,?????? ???????????????? ?????????????????????... ?????????????????????????????? ???????????????? Tape No. / Track / Item No. Pa bru Dancing Song 3.MP3 Length of track 00:01:29 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track The Great Valley ????? ??????????????? Translation of title...

  5. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC) EV Community...

  6. UTILITY OF EXTRACTING CY PARTICLE ENERGY BY WAVES N.J. FISCH, M.C. HERRMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UTILITY OF EXTRACTING CY PARTICLE ENERGY BY WAVES N.J. FISCH, M.C. HERRMANN Princeton Plasma. The utility of extracting CY particle power, and then diverting this power to fast fuel ions, is investigated

  7. Passive solar house in Skillman, NJ: Case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendig, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study traces the history of a single family residence in Skillman, NJ designed by Harrison Fraker. The house, built in 1978, was conceived as primarily passive solar house intended to rely on solar energy for most of its heating needs. Solar features include direct gain windows, water walls and sunspace. The study documents original solar features, identifies changes over time and evaluates performance of the house. The owners have removed movable insulation and significantly reduced the amount of thermal mass over the life of the building. The owner reported comfort level changes intuitively consistent with those modifications. The owner is contemplating further changes to make the house more marketable, changes likely to further alter the remaining passive solar features. Builders Guide software was used to calculate changes in solar performance of the house related to building modifications. Calculations of solar performance generally correspond to anecdotal information from the owner. The author's attempts with Energy 10 program showed some promise, but are as yet inconclusive. At this time BG appears to be more useful and user friendly to the average practitioner with limited time and design resources. As a practicing architect the author is most interested in lessons to be learned from the past as they might contribute to future projects. Information gleaned from this study did confirm intuitively expected and currently disseminated thinking regarding passive solar design. The thermal mass proved to be vulnerable to change. Features which required daily manual adjustment were quickly discarded. Desire for comfort was driving force in changing the house and took precedence over the need to save energy or money.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Navy Ammunition Depot - NJ 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexico -36

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Electric Corp - NJ 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlant - PA

  10. The Graduate School PA Public Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    The Graduate School PA Public Administration KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course an overview of information strategies and management approaches to government functions and public policy, and training in the health care sector. Prereq: MHA program status. PA 631 PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. (3

  11. Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor Case Study: Passaic River, New Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Sediment Decontamination For Navigational And Environmental Restoration In NY/NJ Harbor ­ Case, Arlington, VA 22230 Sediments in the NY/NJ Harbor are widely contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds. Decontamination of these sediments is one tool that can be used to cope with the problems posed

  12. Abstract No. jone0514 Elemental Distributions for NY/NJ Harbor Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Abstract No. jone0514 Elemental Distributions for NY/NJ Harbor Sediments K. Jones (BNL), H. Feng (Montclair State U.) and A. Lanzirotti (U. of Chicago) Beamline(s): X26A Sediments in the New York/New Jersey Waterways Sediments, is a useful material for use in investigation of the spatial variability. This standard

  13. Abstract No. jone0499 FTIR Measurement of Organic Functional Groups in NY/NJ Harbor Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Abstract No. jone0499 FTIR Measurement of Organic Functional Groups in NY/NJ Harbor Sediments H. Jones (BNL) Beamline(s): U2B Sediments in urban rivers and estuaries are usually contaminated contaminated sediments cause to the environment and human health is now widely recognized and has stimulated

  14. Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Report NJ Department of Environmental Protection September 8 Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's (NJDEP) "Large Scale Wind Turbine Siting Map Management rules to address the development and permitting of wind turbines in the coastal zone

  15. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    for savings. In some cases it may be economically beneficial to pay for a professional energy audit. SelectingRutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525 Phone: 732.932.5000 Energy Consumption Electric Petroleum Natural Gas Gas Year 1 Year 4Year 3Year 2 Year 5

  16. Company: American Pool Management Work Location: Edison, NJ Local Pools throughout Central and North Jersey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Company: American Pool Management Work Location: Edison, NJ ­ Local Pools throughout Central and North Jersey Pay Rate: $9-$12/hour Type of Business: Swimming Pool Management Job Title: Seasonal Staffing Assistant, Seasonal Area Supervisors, Seasonal Pool Managers, Seasonal Lifeguards Start Date: May

  17. Posted on Thu, Apr. 06, 2006 Laptop Orchestra boots up in N.J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posted on Thu, Apr. 06, 2006 Laptop Orchestra boots up in N.J. By David Patrick Stearns Inquirer for its highly portable equipment, and has up to 15 people onstage operating laptop computers, each/Still), to prosaic hand signals or, in one case, pieces of paper held up with printed directions containing

  18. QER Public Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution QER Public Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Meeting Date and...

  19. Fast and Accurate Algorithms for Projective Multi{Image Structure from John Oliensis (oliensis@research.nj.nec.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genc Siemens Research Princeton, N.J. 08540 Abstract We describe algorithms for computing projective the possibility of transforming the structure and motion by a projective transformation. #12; 1 Introduction

  20. 650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber-pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber- pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator Tobias.p.lamour@hw.ac.uk Abstract: Sub-250-fs pulses with energies of up to 650 nJ and peak powers up to 2.07 MW were generated from a cavity-dumped optical parametric oscillator, synchronously-pumped at 15.3 MHz with sub-400-fs pulses from

  1. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/19/2011 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Nanotechnology for Industry May 31, 2011 9 _____________________________________________________________ _____________The field of nanotechnology continues to be one of the leading forces behind our nation's ability to develop, commercialize, and produce advancements that are enabled by nanotechnology. Therefore, Drexel

  2. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to stochastically simulate the 3D flow of water in the fractured host rock (in the vicinity of potential emplacement drifts) under ambient conditions. The Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel evaluates the impact of the partial collapse of a drift on seepage. Drainage in rock below the emplacement drift is also evaluated.

  3. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  4. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  5. Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use Level 2 proficiency in performing and interpreting cardiac nuclear imaging tests. Progression

  6. Technical Insights for Saltstone PA Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Sarkar, S.; Mahadevan, S.; Kosson, D.

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is a collaborative program sponsored by the US DOE Office of Waste Processing. The objective of the CBP is to develop a set of computational tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. CBP tools are expected to better characterize and reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the assessment process, as the five-year program progresses. In September 2009, entering its second year of funded effort, the CBP sought opportunities to provide near-term tangible support to DOE Performance Assessments (PAs). The Savannah River Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was selected for the initial PA support effort because (1) cementitious waste forms and barriers play a prominent role in the performance of the facility, (2) certain important long-term behaviors of cementitious materials composing the facility are uncertain, (3) review of the SDF PA by external stakeholders is ongoing, and (4) the DOE contractor responsible for the SDF PA is open to receiving technical assistance from the CBP. A review of the current (SRR Closure & Waste Disposal Authority 2009) and prior Saltstone PAs (e.g., Cook et al. 2005) suggested five potential opportunities for improving predictions. The candidate topics considered were (1) concrete degradation from external sulfate attack, (2) impact of atmospheric exposure to concrete and grout before closure, such as accelerated slag and Tc-99 oxidation, (3) mechanistic prediction of geochemical conditions, (4) concrete degradation from rebar corrosion due to carbonation, and (5) early age cracking from drying and/or thermal shrinkage. The candidate topics were down-selected considering the feasibility of addressing each issue within approximately six months, and compatibility with existing CBP expertise and already-planned activities. Based on these criteria, the five original topics were down-selected to two: external sulfate attack and mechanistic geochemical prediction. For each of the selected topics, the CBP communicated with the PA analysts and subject matter experts at Savannah River to acquire input data specific to the Saltstone facility and related laboratory experiments. Simulations and analyses were performed for both topics using STADIUM (SIMCO 2008), LeachXS/ORCHESTRA (ECN 2007, Meeussen 2003), and other software tools. These supplemental CBP analyses produced valuable technical insights that can be used to strengthen the Saltstone PA using the ongoing PA maintenance process. This report in part summarizes key information gleaned from more comprehensive documents prepared by Sarkar et al. (2010), Samson (2010), and Sarkar (2010).

  7. NJ.?3

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _ ,' ,:.' :r-2 . . . * c

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - NJ 24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E I Du Pont - NJ 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNY 28DorrE B Badger - MA- NJ

  10. Help in N.J. for Those Struggling with Energy Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatin N.J. for Those Struggling with

  11. -CT CT)Computed Tomography(. ,. , -100 ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsky, Ross

    . , , , , . , " , , . , . , . : . 2-4 . 2-3 -. ) D,DMAIC, SPC, FMEA, Control Plan, Lean) 8(-. -. . . NPI . , , .' , " . " * . : ) B.A ,(-. 4-6. ) QFD, CtQ breakdown, DfSS, SPC, AQP, FMEA, Control Plan.( Six Sigma GB

  12. Palmco Power PA, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOski Energy LLC Place:FerrySprings, California: EnergyPA,

  13. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL SiteMidAtl PA Site

  14. annihilation pa methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    saturationCGC formalism for pA collisions at the LHC including the charged hadron multiplicity distribution, the nuclear modification factor for single inclusive hadron and...

  15. CT Solar Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  16. Ultrasound images in the new `iPA Phonetics' App

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Ultrasound images in the new `iPA Phonetics' App Christopher Coey1 , John H. Esling1 , Scott R in an App iPA Phonetics is an application that illustrates the sounds and articulations of an expanded version of the IPA chart. The App gives users of Apple iOS mobile electronic devices the ability to access

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Beryllium Corp - PA 39

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill - NJ 0-04 BellCityBeryllium

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - PA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill - NJ 0-04Bethlehem

  19. Syllabus (Subject to Change) PA 590 CAPSTONE RESEARCH COURSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Fall 2013 Syllabus (Subject to Change) 1 PA 590 ­ CAPSTONE RESEARCH COURSE Room 110 CUPPA Hall will spend approximately 10-15 hours each, per week, on their team project. #12;Fall 2013 Syllabus (Subject

  20. Structure and function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein PA1324 (21170)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Northwest National Laboratory, Biological Sciences Division, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056 Received 12 June 2008 aeruginosa PA1324; NMR; functional genomics; NMR high-throughput screens; protein-ligand binding; protein

  1. 2012 International Pittsburgh Coal Conference Pittsburgh, PA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 2012 International Pittsburgh Coal Conference Pittsburgh, PA, USA October 15 - 18, 2012 PROGRAM through the bed (1). An aquifer is suited for underground storage of gases or liquids since

  2. alegre pa brazil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grant Title: ACADEMIC CAREER AWARD (Parent K07) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-11-192. CFDA Number(s): 93.213, 93.866. Engineering Websites Summary: Grant Title: ACADEMIC CAREER...

  3. PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Collaborating in Today's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    4/23/2009 Present PA Regional Nanotechnology Conference Collaborating in Today's Economy May 27's future economy and workforce will be affected by new initiatives such as development and implementation

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York Shipbuilding Corp - NJ 34

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexicoEngland Lime Co

  5. State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa protein pa1324 Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Structure and function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein PA1324 (21-170) Kelly A. Mercier,1 John R... aeruginosa PA1324; NMR; functional genomics; NMR...

  7. Morphological studies on block copolymer modified PA 6 blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poindl, M., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C., E-mail: marcus.poindl@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut fr Kunststofftechnik, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymer was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.

  8. ContaCt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositionalInitial Validation andPWRContaCt The nuclear

  9. CT NC0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,.

  10. Health Economics PHS/Econ/PA 848, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Health Economics PHS/Econ/PA 848, Spring 2011 Tuesdays, 9:30AM-12:00PM, 511 WARF John Mullahy@wisc.edu Office Hours: By Appointment Overview Health Economics is an advanced graduate-level survey course covering selected topics in health economics. In most cases a solid understanding of microeconomic theory

  11. 2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Plasma-Material Interactions with evaporated lithium coatings in NSTX 1:50 2:10 M. A. Jaworski 2nd Int. Symp. on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices, April 27-29, 2011, Princeton, NJ Program for the 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices April 27-29, 2011

  12. February 9, 2012 Consider the non-spherical wrist of the Comau Smart5 NJ4 170 robot, i.e., the last three revolute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ((t)) a linear Cartesian path with constant speed = 1. The robot is initially in the configuration q(0) = /3 /2Robotics I February 9, 2012 Exercise 1 Consider the non-spherical wrist of the Comau Smart5 NJ4 170 robot, i.e., the last three revolute joints of this 6R structure (see Fig. 1). The associated Denavit

  13. 32192UniprintNT11.09NJ HE105 Updated November 2013 Controlled by Coordinator Higher Education Enrolments & Fees PAGE 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    32192UniprintNT11.09NJ HE105 Updated November 2013 · Controlled by Coordinator Higher Education Enrolments & Fees PAGE 1 of 1 Higher Education Employer Authorisation Form Higher Education to withdraw this contract, for any reason, during 2014. Higher Education Fees are subject to the Higher

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - activator t-pa current Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vol. 91, pp. 3670-3674, April 1994 Summary: activator (tPA) requires an Intravenous infusion (1.5-3 h) became the clearance oftPA from the circulation... -normal...

  15. Hemi Orolingual Angioedema after tPA Administration for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, Bryan; Chebl, Ralphe B.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to improve. As the tPA infusion was ending, the patientplasminogen activator infusion. Figure 2. Patients tongueevery 15 minutes during tPA infusion for signs of clinical

  16. Privacy Act (PA) of 1974 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentationsSRS Responds to TrainPrior-Fiscal-Years(PA) of

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pennsylvania Disposal Site - PA 43

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OH 34PantexDisposal Site - PA

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Philadelphia Navy Yard - PA 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OHPhiladelphia Navy Yard - PA

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aliquippa - PA 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L*Aliquippa - PA 07

  20. PaTu Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesaPPT Research IncPaTu Wind Farm Jump

  1. PaSol Italia SpA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPP Equipment CorporationPV World Co LtdPaSol Italia

  2. Grant Title: RESEARCH ON THE HEALTH OF LGBTI POPULATIONS (R01, R03, R21) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-12-111, PA-12-112, PA-12-113. CFDA Number(s): 93.865; 93.393, 93.394,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    : PA-12-111, PA-12-112, PA-12-113. CFDA Number(s): 93.865; 93.393, 93.394, 93.395, 93.396, 93.399; 93

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA VT...

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI...

  5. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA VT...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2013 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI...

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Coal supply regions Figure F6. Coal Supply Regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2012 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI...

  9. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AZ OR CA HI V MT WY ID UT CO IV OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN WI MI OH NE SD MN ND II NM TX MS AL AR LA III NJ CT VT ME RI MA NH FL GA SC NC WV MD DE VA NY PA I PAD District I - East...

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AZ OR CA HI V MT WY ID UT CO IV OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN WI MI OH NE SD MN ND II NM TX MS AL AR LA III NJ CT VT ME RI MA NH FL GA SC NC WV MD DE VA NY PA I PAD District I - East...

  11. Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science Candidate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Distribution of Arsenic in Presque Isle, PA, Pond Sediments Jason Murnock, Master of Science........................................................................................ 3 Arsenic in Soil & Sediments......................................................................................... 12 Sediment Digestion and Analysis

  12. WC_1990_006_CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Government_US_and_Foreign_Pa...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    rnmentUSandForeignPa.pdf More Documents & Publications WC1990012CLASSWAIVERofPatentRightsinInventionsMade.pdf WC1990008CLASSWAIVERfortheGovernmentsUSandFore...

  13. Grow NJ (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A business creating or retaining jobs in New Jersey and making a qualified capital investment at a qualified business facility can apply for grants of corporate business tax credits for job...

  14. Simulations de Parent / Kinship Simulations Colloque final du projet SimPa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    Simulations de Parent / Kinship Simulations Colloque final du projet SimPa Final workshop Remarks, Francois Heran (INED) 10h30 From Tip to SimPa. Why Bother with Simulation?, Michael Houseman (University of Ljubjana) 13h00 Lunch 14h30 Machine Learning Applied to Alliance Networks, Telmo Menezes (CAMS

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aluminum Co of America - PA 23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24 FUSRAP Considered

  16. Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s Siemens AG, CT, September 2001 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY Research and Technology at Siemens Transportation Power Information & Communications Health Automation & Control #12;2 Siemens AGResearch and Technology at Siemens CORPORATETECHNOLOGY CT / E 020 a - 02.01 Key Figures for 2000 Amounts in billions

  17. Limited View Angle Iterative CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Some Prior Literature in Limited View Tomography CT with limited-angle data and few views IRR algorithm Iterative Reconstruction-Reprojection (IRR) : An Algorithm for Limited Data Cardiac- Computed-views and limited-angle data in divergent-beam CT by E. Y. Sidky, CM Kao, and X. Pan (2006) Few-View Projection

  18. Hemi Orolingual Angioedema after tPA Administration for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, Bryan; Chebl, Ralphe B.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    after alteplase treatment of stroke. Neurology. Volume2015 tPA for ischemic stroke: case report. Air Med J. 2011;in acute ischemic stroke. an in vitro experimental approach.

  19. VaPa - nuorten varhennettu kuntoutus Lappeenrannassa; Backdated rehabilitation of youngsters in Lappeenranta.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korja,Minna-Liisa

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Kehittmishanke ksittelee Lappeenrannassa vuosina 2001-2003 toteutettua nuorten varhennettua kuntoutusta VaPa- hanketta. Kuntoutuskokeilun jrjestettiin Lappeenrannan sosiaali- ja terveysviraston ostopalveluna yhteis-voimin Lappeenrannan Kelan, tyvoimatoimiston ja toteuttajatahon Laptuote-stin (more)

  20. DEPARTII'IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA'PA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DEPARTII'IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA'PA DETEIU.fiNATION RECIPIENT:ldaho Office of Energy Resources PROJECT TITLE : Program Year 2012 State Energy Program...

  1. H.C. DORLAND, N.J. BEUKES, J. GUTZMER, D.A.D. EVANS AND R.A. ARMSTRONG SOUTH AFRICAN JOURNAL OF GEOLOGY, 2006, VOLUME 109 PAGE 139-156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H.C. DORLAND, N.J. BEUKES, J. GUTZMER, D.A.D. EVANS AND R.A. ARMSTRONG SOUTH AFRICAN JOURNAL.evans@yale.edu R.A. Armstrong Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia e-mail: Richard.Armstrong@anu.edu.au © 2006 March Geological Society of South Africa ABSTRACT

  2. Student ConduCt Student Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Code of Student ConduCt 2013-14 Student Affairs #12;Contents Letter from the Dean of Students .........................................................................................ii University Code of Student Conduct Preamble............................................. 1 Section I: Rules of Student Conduct.............................................................. 1 Section

  3. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  4. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  5. J/$?$ production in In-In and p-A collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Scomparin

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA60 experiment studies dimuon production in In-In and p-A collisions at the CERN SPS. We report recent results on \\jpsi production, measured through its muon pair decay. As a function of centrality, we show that in In-In the \\jpsi yield is suppressed beyond expectations from nuclear absorption. We present also for the first time results on \\jpsi production in p-A collisions at 158 GeV, the same energy of the nucleus-nucleus data. For both p-A and In-In we show preliminary results on \\psip suppression. Finally, we have studied the kinematical distributions of the \\jpsi produced in In-In collisions. We present results on transverse momentum and rapidity, as well as on the angular distribution of the \\jpsi decay products.

  6. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was concluded following completion of Phase 1, and Phase 2 (design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype surface vibration system) was not pursued.

  7. An Econometric Study Of Vine Copulas D. Guganand P.A. Maugis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    An Econometric Study Of Vine Copulas D. Guganand P.A. Maugis PSE, Universit Paris 1 Panthon. Both results are crucial to motivate any econometrical work based on vine copulas. We provide used in econometrics and finance. They became an essential tool for pricing complex products, managing

  8. Failure-Tolerant Path Planning for the PA-10 Robot Operating Amongst Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    Failure-Tolerant Path Planning for the PA-10 Robot Operating Amongst Obstacles Rodrigo S. Jamisola/or orientation in the workspace despite any single locked-joint failure at any time. An algorithm is presented relative to its task, only a single locked-joint failure occurs at any given time, the robot is capable

  9. fishing fleets were allegedly hampering their mackerel-fishing operations. Pa-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishing fleets were allegedly hampering their mackerel-fishing operations. Pa- trols by fishery of the EEZ, d)jurisdiction over the preser- vation of the marine environment (in- cluding control Olicia/ de /a Fedemcion . At a joint press conference following the signing of the Presidential message

  10. Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    Paper Number 15736-PA Title Reaction Kinetics of Fuel Formation for In-Situ Combustion Authors Abu believed to cause fuel formation for in-situ combustion have been studied and modeled. A thin, packed bed the approach of a combustion front. Analysis of gases produced from the reaction cell revealed that pyrolysis

  11. STAPLE USE IN LIBERTY-AND ROUNDUP-TOLERANT COTTON P.A. Dotray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    STAPLE USE IN LIBERTY- AND ROUNDUP-TOLERANT COTTON P.A. Dotray Texas Tech University, Texas (pyrithiobac) received a Federal 3 label for use in cotton in 1996. Staple provides broad-spectrum, over-the-top weed control with both foliar and soil activity. The use of Staple in cotton has been limited because

  12. PA Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center for Energy Research

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production and structural problems with and BaO impregnated tungstenproduction have previously limited the use of LaB 6 temperature for LaB 6 , tungsten,

  13. Graphene oxide-silica nanohybrids as fillers for PA6 based nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maio, A. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo, Italy and STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d'Orleans (Italy); Fucarino, R.; Khatibi, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Rosselli, S.; Bruno, M. [STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d'Orleans II, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared by oxidation of graphite flakes by a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} based on Marcano's method. Two different masterbatches containing GO (33.3%) and polyamide-6 (PA6) (66.7%) were prepared both via solvent casting in formic acid and by melt mixing in a mini-extruder (Haake). The two masterbatches were then used to prepare PA6-based nanocomposites with a content of 2% in GO. For comparison, a nanocomposite by direct mixing of PA6 and GO (2%) and PA6/graphite nanocomposites were prepared, too. The oxidation of graphite into GO was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. All these techniques demonstrated the effectiveness of the graphite modification, since the results put into evidence that, after the acid treatment, interlayer distance, oxygen content and defects increased. SEM micrographs carried out on the nanocomposites, showed GO layers totally surrounded by polyamide-6, this feature is likely due to the strong interaction between the hydrophilic moieties located both on GO and on PA6. On the contrary, no interactions were observed when graphite was used as filler. Mechanical characterization, carried out by tensile and dynamic-mechanical tests, marked an improvement of the mechanical properties observed. Photoluminescence and EPR measurements were carried out onto nanoparticles and nanocomposites to study the nature of the interactions and to assess the possibility to use this class of materials as semiconductors or optical sensors.

  14. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maletz, Kristina L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States); Ennis, Ronald D., E-mail: REnnis@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Kagen, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel); Wernick, Iddo [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Beth Israel Medical Center, Continuum Health Partners, New York, NY (Israel)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  15. abdominal ct images: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods establish microCT imaging as a useful tool for comparative Metscher, Brian 31 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  16. abdominal ct findings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image Leow, Wee Kheng 11 CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 Physics...

  17. Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Anatomic measurement accuracy: CT parameters and 3D rendering effects Brian J Whyms a, E Michael of Neuroscience #12;INTRODUCTION Measurements from 3D-CT rendering are used in research and clinical management-CT rendering techniques on measurements #12;METHODS Scanned: 3 human mandibles a phantom object Phantom

  18. PA 9949 Hertz Exhibit E Pricing Sheet Revised by Amendment No. 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    /A International Locations International rentals do not include third party liability and loss damage waiver.00 ID Sun Valley $6.00 IL Chicago $8.00 MA Boston $8.00 MD Baltimore $8.00 MI Detroit $8.00 MT Missoula.00 OR Redmond $10.00 OR Salem Airport Only $10.00 OR Sun River $10.00 PA Philadelphia $8.00 WA Pasco $10.00 WA

  19. diversa sa plica ciones de pla nifica cina pa recen restricciones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrido, Antonio

    plica ciones de pla nifica cióna pa recen restricciones respectoa tem pora lida d de la sa cciones de la ma ora de pro lema s rea les la e e c ción de n pla n conlleva la tilia ción de rec rsos enera el tiempo pesa r de los res lta dos o tenidos de forma a isla da en pla nifica ción sc ed lina a ido

  20. Comparison of CT, PET, and PET/CT for Staging of Patients with Indolent Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fueger, Barbara J.; Yeom, Kristen; Czernin, Johannes; Sayre, James W.; Phelps, Michael E.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. J. Fueger et al. : PET/CT for indolent lymphoma Table 2.Performance for detection of nodal disease Sensitivity PETCT PET/CT pG0.001 vs PET, CT Specificity pG0.001 vs PET

  1. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C., E-mail: skappadath@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (?) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (? ? 200400 HU) resulted in low ?-maps noise (? ? 1%3%). Noise levels greater than ?10% in 140 keV ?-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ?15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 ?Gy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected ? values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in ?. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ?100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in ?{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ?10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect SPECT quantification is low (CTDI{sub vol} ? 4 ?Gy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts.

  2. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the tetrahydrofuran/ethanol system at 25, 50, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, E.; Scholz, A.G.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium of the system tetrahydrofuran (THF)/ethanol at 25, 50, and 100 kPa has been determined experimentally by using an equilibrium still of the recirculation type. Data reduction based on the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models provides a correlation for ..gamma.. /SUB i/. The tetrahydrofuran/ethanol system forms an azeotrope above 53 kPa. At 100 and 150 kPa, the azeotropic mixtures contain respectively 0.908 and 0.844 mole fraction of tetrahydrofuran.

  3. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

  4. CT volumetry of the skeletal tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brindle, James M.; Alexandre Trindade, A.; Pichardo, Jose C.; Myers, Scott L.; Shah, Amish P.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Statistics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); MD Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed tomography (CT) is an important and widely used modality in the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. In the field of molecular radiotherapy, the use of spongiosa volume (combined tissues of the bone marrow and bone trabeculae) has been suggested as a means to improve the patient-specificity of bone marrow dose estimates. The noninvasive estimation of an organ volume comes with some degree of error or variation from the true organ volume. The present study explores the ability to obtain estimates of spongiosa volume or its surrogate via manual image segmentation. The variation among different segmentation raters was explored and found not to be statistically significant (p value >0.05). Accuracy was assessed by having several raters manually segment a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe with known volumes. Segmentation of the outer region of the PVC pipe resulted in mean percent errors as great as 15% while segmentation of the pipe's inner region resulted in mean percent errors within {approx}5%. Differences between volumes estimated with the high-resolution CT data set (typical of ex vivo skeletal scans) and the low-resolution CT data set (typical of in vivo skeletal scans) were also explored using both patient CT images and a PVC pipe phantom. While a statistically significant difference (p value <0.002) between the high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was observed with excised femoral heads obtained following total hip arthroplasty, the mean difference between high-resolution and low-resolution data sets was found to be only 1.24 and 2.18 cm{sup 3} for spongiosa and cortical bone, respectively. With respect to differences observed with the PVC pipe, the variation between the high-resolution and low-resolution mean percent errors was a high as {approx}20% for the outer region volume estimates and only as high as {approx}6% for the inner region volume estimates. The findings from this study suggest that manual segmentation is a reasonably accurate and reliable means for the in vivo estimation of spongiosa volume. This work also provides a foundation for future studies where spongiosa volumes are estimated by various raters in more comprehensive CT data sets.

  5. Bottomonium and Drell-Yan production in p-A collisions at 450 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA50 Collaboration

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA50 Collaboration has measured heavy-quarkonium production in p-A collisions at 450 GeV incident energy (sqrt(s) = 29.1 GeV). We report here results on the production of the Upsilon states and of high-mass Drell-Yan muon pairs (m > 6 GeV). The cross-section at midrapidity and the A-dependence of the measured yields are determined and compared with the results of other fixed-target experiments and with the available theoretical estimates. Finally, we also address some issues concerning the transverse momentum distributions of the measured dimuons.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Atomic Power Div - PA 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlant - PA 04

  7. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-PA.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to: navigation,storage planIL.pdfOH.pdf JumpPA.pdf Jump

  8. Bottomonium and Drell-Yan production in p-A collisions at 450 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro, B; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Beol, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Castor, J; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cical, C; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavicheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Loureno, C; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Riccati, L; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Willis, N

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA50 Collaboration has measured heavy-quarkonium production in p-A collisions at 450 GeV incident energy (sqrt(s) = 29.1 GeV). We report here results on the production of the Upsilon states and of high-mass Drell-Yan muon pairs (m > 6 GeV). The cross-section at midrapidity and the A-dependence of the measured yields are determined and compared with the results of other fixed-target experiments and with the available theoretical estimates. Finally, we also address some issues concerning the transverse momentum distributions of the measured dimuons.

  9. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nattenmller, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.nattenmueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Filsinger, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias_filsinger@web.de; Bryant, Mark, E-mail: mark.bryant@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Stiller, Wolfram, E-mail: Wolfram.Stiller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, Lars, E-mail: lars.grenacher@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@urz.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n=476) and therapeutic drainages (n=591) in thoracic (n=37), abdominal (n=866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n=164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5% in all procedures (n=27), 4.4% in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0% in drainages; 13.5% in thoracic, 2.0% in abdominal, and 3.0% in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1%). Pneumothorax (n=14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n=9), paresthesia (n=2), material damage (n=1), and bone fissure (n=1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7% (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n=4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n=21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  10. Nuclear absorption of Charmoniums in pA and AA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analysed the latest NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ production in pA and AA collisions. The $J/\\psi$ production is assumed to be a two step process, (i) formation of $c\\bar{c}$ pairs, perturbatively calculable, and (ii) formation of $J/\\psi$ from the pair, a non-perturbative process, which is conviniently parametrized. In a nuclear medium, as the $c\\bar{c}$ pair passes through the nuclear medium, it gain relative square momentum and some of the pairs can gain enough square momentum to cross the threshold for open charm meson, leading to suppression in nuclear medium. Few parameters of the model were fixed from the latest high statistics NA50 pA and NA38 SU total $J/\\psi$ cross sectional data. The model then reproduces the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ over Drell-Yan ration in 200 GeV/c S+U and 158 GeV/c Pb+Pb collisions. We also discuss the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression at RHIC energy.

  11. CT. L-2 United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CT NC0 - i ,

  12. Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation,Pvt LtdShrub Oak, New York: EnergySibleySidney,EnergyCT

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24 FUSRAPAlaskaBearing

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24

  15. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  16. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in 2.5 kPa water vapor for tritium readiness.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A more reactive liner material is needed for use as liner and cruciform material in tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBAR) in commercial light water nuclear reactors (CLWR). The function of these components is to convert any water that is released from the Li-6 enriched lithium aluminate breeder material to oxide and hydrogen that can be gettered, thus minimizing the permeation of tritium into the reactor coolant. Fourteen zirconium alloys were exposed to 2.5 kPa water vapor in a helium stream at 300 C over a period of up to 35 days. Experimental alloys with aluminum, yttrium, vanadium, titanium, and scandium, some of which also included ternaries with nickel, were included along with a high nitrogen impurity alloy and the commercial alloy Zircaloy-2. They displayed a reactivity range of almost 500, with Zircaloy-2 being the least reactive.

  17. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Carpentier; Mario S. Rodrigues; Luca Costa; Miguel V. Vitorino; Elisabeth Charlaix; Joel Chevrier

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which explains this behavior.

  18. Out of equilibrium GigaPa Young modulus of water nanobridge probed by Force Feedback Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca; Vitorino, Miguel V; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of capillary condensation, water droplets appear in nano/micropores. The large associated surface interactions can deeply influence macroscopic properties as in granular media. We report that dynamical properties of such nanobridge dramatically change when probed at different time scales. Using a novel AFM mode, the Force Feedback Microscopy, the gap between the nanotip and the surface is continuously varied, and we observe this change in the simultaneous measurements, at different frequencies, of the stiffness G'(N/m), the dissipative coefficient G"(kg/sec) together with the static force. As the measuring time approaches the microsecond, the liquid droplet exhibits a large positive stiffness (it is small and negative in the long time limit). Although clearly controlled by surface effects, it compares to the stiffness of a solid nanobridge with a 1 GigaPa Young modulus. We argue that as evaporation and condensation gradually lose efficiency, the contact line progressively becomes immobile, which expla...

  19. CT Poison Control Center 2014 Video Contest Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    entry form (found on posioncontrol.uchc.edu) b. Include a link to your video from your You Tube account and community partners. Judges will consider: length of video, appropriate format, accuracy of information poison center means to you, value of the CT Poison Control Center · Programming your phone with the CT

  20. MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

  1. MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - angiographic cone-beam ct Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: medical multi-slicecone-beam CT scanners typically use equiangular projection data, our new formula may... : Computed tomography (CT), cone-beam geometry, Feldkamp-type...

  3. Grant Title: AHRQ HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH DEMONSTRATION AND DISSEMINATION GRANTS Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  4. Grant Title: RESEARCH ON PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES (R01) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

  5. Large-scale 700 hPa Height Patterns Associated with Cyclone Passage and Strong Winds on Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 ABSTRACT. The difference in 700 hPa height patterns Commonwealth Blvd. Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 2Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research biological effects (Lam and Schertzer 1987). They can also affect the formation and transport of ice. Hence

  6. Directory Home Directory Liaison List Server Help A-Z Index IFAS Main Pa Unit Name: Ft. Lauderdale -REC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Directory Home Directory Liaison List Server Help A-Z Index IFAS Main Pa Unit Name: Ft. Lauderdale, and Page 1 of 2Employee and Unit Directory - IFAS - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Flor... 8/13/2013http://directory.ifas.ufl.edu/Dir/searchdir?pageID=2&uid=85 #12;Tampa) 1. Take US-27

  7. Graduate student and Associate Professor, respectively, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    . and Motta, A. T., "Role of Radiation in BWR Core Shroud Cracking," Reactor Dosimetry, ASTM STP 1398, John G and Materials, West Conshohocken, PA, 2000. Abstract: We present a calculation of the displacement rates years, extensive cracking has been observed in boiling water reactor (BWR) core shroud welds [1

  8. COTTON RESPONSE TO SOIL APPLIED CADRE AND PURSUIT. J.R. Karnei, P.A. Dotray, J.W. Keeling,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    COTTON RESPONSE TO SOIL APPLIED CADRE AND PURSUIT. J.R. Karnei, P.A. Dotray, J.W. Keeling, W are faced with numerous weed problems in cotton and peanut, including yellow and purple nutsedge these weeds, but can significantly injure cotton the following growing season. Most of the approximately 200

  9. Collective String Interactions in AdS/QCD and High-Multiplicity pA Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Shuryak, Edward

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QCD strings originate from high-energy scattering in the form of Reggions and Pomerons, and have been studied in some detail in lattice numerical simulations. Production of multiple strings, with their subsequent breaking, is now a mainstream model of high energy $pp$ and $pA$ collisions. Recent LHC experiments revealed that high multiplicity end of such collisions show interesting collective effects. This ignited an interest in the interaction of QCD strings and multi-string dynamics. Holographic models, collectively known as AdS/QCD, developed in the last decade, describe both hadronic spectroscopy and basic thermodynamics, but so far no studies of the QCD strings have been done in this context. The subject of this paper is to do this. First, we study in more detail the scalar sector of hadronic spectroscopy, identifying "glueballs" and "scalar mesons," and calculate the degree of their mixing. The QCD strings, holographic images of the fundamental strings, thus have a "gluonic core" and a "sigma cloud." Th...

  10. PaR Tensile Truss for Nuclear Decontamination and Decommissioning - 12467

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebler, Gary R. [PaR Systems Inc., 707 County Road E West, Shoreview, MN 55126 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote robotics and manipulators are commonly used in nuclear decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) processes. D and D robots are often deployed using rigid telescoping masts in order to apply and counteract side loads. However, for very long vertical reaches (15 meters or longer) and high lift capacities, a telescopic is usually not practical due to the large cross section and weight required to make the mast stiff and resist seismic forces. For those long vertical travel applications, PaR Systems has recently developed the Tensile Truss, a rigid, hoist-driven 'structure' that employs six independent wire rope hoists to achieve long vertical reaches. Like a mast, the Tensile Truss is typically attached to a bridge-mounted trolley and is used as a platform for robotic manipulators and other remotely operated tools. For suspended, rigid deployment of D and D tools with very long vertical reaches, the Tensile Truss can be a better alternative than a telescoping mast. Masts have length limitations that can make them impractical or unworkable as lengths increase. The Tensile Truss also has the added benefits of increased safety, ease of decontamination, superior stiffness and ability to withstand excessive side loading. A Tensile Truss system is currently being considered for D and D operations and spent fuel recovery at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. This system will deploy interchangeable tools such as underwater hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic shears and crushers, grippers and fuel grapples. (authors)

  11. Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    1 Low-Dose Dual-Energy CT for PET Attenuation Correction with Statistical Sinogram Restoration. of Michigan & Univ. of Washington Outline Introduction - PET/CT background - CT-based attenuation correction for PET Conventional sinogram decomposition in DE-CT Statistically motivated sinogram restoration in DE

  12. Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbisser, Amelia M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

  13. Obscure pulmonary masses: bronchial impaction revealed by CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugatch, R.D.; Gale, M.E.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dilated bronchi impacted with mucus or tumor are recognized on standard chest radiographs because they are surrounded by aerated pulmonary parenchyma. When imaged in different projections, these lesions produce a variety of appearances that are generally familiar. This report characterizes less familiar computed tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathologic bronchial distension of congenital, neoplastic, or infectious etiologies and correlates them with chest films. In seven patients, CT readily revealed dilated bronchi and/or regional lung hypodensity. In four of these cases, CT led to the initial suspicion of dilated bronchi. CT should be used early in the evaluation of atypical pulmonary mass lesions or to confirm suspected bronchial impaction because of the high probability it will reveal diagnostic features.

  14. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J. [Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States); Harry S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States) and Departments of Internal Medicine, Chemistry, and the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65201 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  15. X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation T. Fettah Kosar, PhD Center for Nanoscale Systems Harvard) Model: HMXST225 (max. 225 kV) #12;Overview 3 Introduction to X-ray imaging and Computed Tomography (CT) · What are X-rays and how do we generate and image them? · How do we magnify X-ray images and keep them

  16. 456 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS, VOL. 24, NO. 2, APRIL 2008 the PA10-6CE utilizing the geometric and flexibility calibration method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    456 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS, VOL. 24, NO. 2, APRIL 2008 the PA10-6CE utilizing the geometric for demanding dynamic ap- plications with the PA10-6CE robot arm. ACKNOWLEDGMENT The authors thank N. Mauntler in robot joints with harmonic drives and torque sensors," Int. J. Robot. Res., vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 214­ 239

  17. Aufgabe 4-8: Luft tritt mit 300 K und 100 kPa in eine Gasturbine mit Abwrmenutzung ein. Im Verdichter der Gasturbine wird die Luft auf 800 kPa und 580 K gebracht. Der

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    ?bung 10: Aufgabe 4-8: Luft tritt mit 300 K und 100 kPa in eine Gasturbine mit Abwärmenutzung ein einen Wirkungsgrad von 72% und die Luft tritt mit 1200 K in die Turbine ein. Bei einem adiabten. Luft tritt in den Kompressor mit 300 K und 14 kg/s ein. In der Brennkammer wird die Luft auf 1500 K

  18. SU-E-I-78: Improving Prostatic Delineation Using Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gersh, J; Fried, D [Gibbs Cancer Center ' Research Institute - Pelham, Greer, SC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Visual prostatic definition is difficult using conventional CT. This is because the prostate is surrounded closely with tissue of similar electron density. Definition is further hindered when the region contains high-Z material (such as fiducial markers). Dual-energy CT (DECT) is a technique where images are rendered using two tube voltages during a single scan session. This study evaluates DECT as a means of improving prostatic volume delineation for radiation oncology. Methods: The patients were scanned using a Definition AS20 (Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA). This device uses a single-tube configuration, where two scans of differing energies are performed in serial. The scans are acquired with tube voltage of 80kVp and 140kVp. Following acquisition, these scan data were used to generate effective monoenergetic scans ranging from 40keV to 190keV. In the current study, the data were presented to observers using a novel program, which allows real-time adjustment of window, level, and effective keV; all while scrolling through volumetric slices. Three patients were scanned, each with a different high-contrast material in or around the prostate: I-125 seeds, gold fiducial markers, and prostatic calcifications. These images are compared to a weighted average of the 80kVp and 140kVP scans, which yield a scan similar to that of a 120 kVp scan, which is a common tube voltage in radiation oncology. Results: Prostatic definition improved in each case. Differentiation of soft tissue from surrounding adipose improved with lower keV, while higher keV provided a reduction of high-z artifacts. Furthermore, the dynamic adjustment of the keV allowed observers to better recognize regions of differing tissue composition within this relatively homogeneous area. Conclusion: By simultaneously providing the observer with the benefits of high-energy images and low-energy images, and allowing adjustment in real-time, improved imaging in highly homogeneous regions such as the male pelvis is achievable.

  19. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabaldon, C.; Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for the water + 1-propanol system are reported at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The results were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak methods. The system shows a minimum boiling azeotrope, and the azeotropic composition is scarcely shifted with pressure. Results were compared with literature values. The data were correlated with Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC liquid-phase activity coefficient models.

  20. Vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane or octane at 101. 3 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiaki, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Kenji; Tsuji, Tomoya; Hongo, Masaru (Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry); Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) are required for engineering use such as in the design and operation of separation processes. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for ethanol with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane or octane at 101.3 kPa in an equilibrium still with circulation of both the vapor and liquid phases. The results were correlated with the Wilson and nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) equations.

  1. pp, pA and. cap alpha cap alpha. collisions and the understanding of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, W.M.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global characteristics of heavy ion collisions at high energy are now understood at some level such that the challenging search for Quark-Gluon plasma signatures becomes of more importance. Some features of pp, pA, and ..cap alpha../ alpha/ interactions at ..sqrt..s less than or equal to 62 GeV are selected to illustrate potential consequences for, and problems of, investigations of the Quark-Gluon plasma. 35 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Non-Abelian Bremsstrahlung and Azimuthal Asymmetries in High Energy p+A Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gyulassy; P. Levai; I. Vitev; T. Biro

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the GLV reaction operator solution to the Vitev-Gunion-Bertsch (VGB) boundary conditions to compute the all-order in nuclear opacity non-abelian gluon bremsstrahlung of event-by-event fluctuating beam jets in nuclear collisions. We evaluate analytically azimuthal Fourier moments of single gluon, $v_n^M\\{1\\}$, and even number $2\\ell$ gluon, $v_n^M\\{2\\ell\\}$ inclusive distributions in high energy p+A reactions as a function of harmonic $n$, %independent target recoil cluster number, $M$, and gluon number, $2\\ell$, at RHIC and LHC. Multiple resolved clusters of recoiling target beam jets together with the projectile beam jet form Color Scintillation Antenna (CSA) arrays that lead to characteristic boost non-invariant trapezoidal rapidity distributions in asymmetric $B+A$ nuclear collisions. The scaling of intrinsically azimuthally anisotropic and long range in $\\eta$ nature of the non-abelian \\br leads to $v_n$ moments that are similar to results from hydrodynamic models, but due entirely to non-abelian wave interference phenomena sourced by the fluctuating CSA. Our analytic non-flow solutions are similar to recent numerical saturation model predictions but differ by predicting a simple power-law hierarchy of both even and odd $v_n$ without invoking $k_T$ factorization. A test of CSA mechanism is the predicted nearly linear $\\eta$ rapidity dependence of the $v_n(k_T,\\eta)$. Non-abelian beam jet \\br may thus provide a simple analytic solution to Beam Energy Scan (BES) puzzle of the near $\\sqrt{s}$ independence of $v_n(p_T)$ moments observed down to 10 AGeV where large $x$ valence quark beam jets dominate inelastic dynamics. Recoil \\br from multiple independent CSA clusters could also provide a partial explanation for the unexpected similarity of $v_n$ in $p(D)+A$ and non-central $A+A$ at same $dN/d\\eta$ multiplicity as observed at RHIC and LHC.

  3. Initial-State Bremsstrahlung versus Final-State Hydrodynamic Sources of Azimuthal Harmonics in p+A at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miklos Gyulassy; Peter Levai; Ivan Vitev; Tamas S. Biro

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent pTfluid'' interpretations of those data. We report results at QM14 on azimuthal harmonics associated with initial-state non-abelian ``wave interference'' effects predicted by perturbative QCD gluon bremsstrahlung and sourced by Color Scintillation Arrays (CSA) of color antennas. CSA are naturally identified with multiple projectile and target beam jets produced in inelastic p+A reactions. We find a remarkable similarity between azimuthal harmonics sourced by initial state CSA and those predicted with final state perfect fluid models of high energy p+A reactions. The question of which mechanism dominates in $p+A$ and $A+A$ remains open at this time.

  4. N E W S O L A R H O M E S PA R T N E R S H I P GoSolarCalifornia.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N E W S O L A R H O M E S PA R T N E R S H I P GoSolarCalifornia.org Energy Efficient Solar Homes to May, 2007. MARkeTInG ReSeARCh #12;N E W S O L A R H O M E S PA R T N E R S H I P GopercentbelievethateventuallyalmostallnewlybuilthomesinCaliforniawillhavesolar electric systems. MARkeTInG ReSeARCh #12;N E W S O L A R H O M E S PA R T N

  5. On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Melia

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is a vacuum solution, though quite evidently rho is not 0. Here, we address these concerns and demonstrate that all criticisms leveled thus far against R_h=ct, including the supposed vacuum condition, are unwarranted. They all appear to be based on incorrect assumptions or basic theoretical errors. Nevertheless, continued scrutiny such as this will be critical to establishing R_h=ct as the correct description of nature.

  6. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  7. Molecular imaging in oncology: the acceptance of PET/CT and the emergence of MR/PET imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiepers, Christiaan; Dahlbom, Magnus

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CTComputed tomography . PETPositron Emission Tomography .body imaging with MRI or PET/CT: the future for single-Sollitto RA et al (2009) 18F-FDG PET/CT of transitional cell

  8. Unusual association of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with pancreatic metastasis: emerging role of PET-CT in tumor staging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Christie R, Daw NC et al ( 2005) PET/CT in the evaluation ofComparative study of FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging inet al (2009) Diagnostic value of PET/CT for the staging and

  9. UNREVIEWED DISPOSAL QUESTION EVALUATION: IMPACT OF NEW INFORMATION SINCE 2008 PA ON CURRENT LOW-LEVEL SOLID WASTE OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.; Smith, F.; Hamm, L.; Butcher, T.

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid low-level waste disposal operations are controlled in part by an E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) Performance Assessment (PA) that was completed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in 2008 (WSRC 2008). Since this baseline analysis, new information pertinent to disposal operations has been identified as a natural outcome of ongoing PA maintenance activities and continuous improvement in model simulation techniques (Flach 2013). An Unreviewed Disposal Question (UDQ) Screening (Attachment 1) has been initiated regarding the continued ability of the ELLWF to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 performance objectives in light of new PA items and data identified since completion of the original UDQ Evaluation (UDQE). The present UDQE assesses the ability of Solid Waste (SW) to meet performance objectives by estimating the influence of new information items on a recent sum-of-fractions (SOF) snapshot for each currently active E-Area low-level waste disposal unit. A final SOF, as impacted by this new information, is projected based on the assumptions that the current disposal limits, Waste Information Tracking System (WITS) administrative controls, and waste stream composition remain unchanged through disposal unit operational closure (Year 2025). Revision 1 of this UDQE addresses the following new PA items and data identified since completion of the original UDQE report in 2013: ? New K{sub d} values for iodine, radium and uranium ? Elimination of cellulose degradation product (CDP) factors ? Updated radionuclide data ? Changes in transport behavior of mobile radionuclides ? Potential delay in interim closure beyond 2025 ? Component-in-grout (CIG) plume interaction correction Consideration of new information relative to the 2008 PA baseline generally indicates greater confidence that PA performance objectives will be met than indicated by current SOF metrics. For SLIT9, the previous prohibition of non-crushable containers in revision 0 of this UDQE has rendered the projected final SOF for SLIT9 less than the WITS Admin Limit. With respect to future disposal unit operations in the East Slit Trench Group, consideration of new information for Slit Trench#14 (SLIT14) reduced the current SOF for the limiting All-Pathways 200-1000 year period (AP2) by an order of magnitude and by one quarter for the Beta-Gamma 12-100 year period (BG2) pathway. On the balance, updates to K{sub d} values and dose factors and elimination of CDP factors (generally favorable) more than compensated for the detrimental impact of a more rigorous treatment of plume dispersion. These observations suggest that future operations in the East Slit Trench Group can be conducted with higher confidence using current inventory limits, and that limits could be increased if desired for future low-level waste disposal units. The same general conclusion applies to future STs in the West Slit Trench Group based on the Impacted Final SOFs for existing STs in that area.

  10. VACT: Visualization-Aware CT Reconstruction Ziyi Zheng and Klaus Mueller, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Klaus

    Abstract-- Computed tomography (CT) reconstruction methods are often unaware of the requirements Medical routine frequently utilizes 3D visualization tools for diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT between the raw projection data and their visualization via vol- ume rendering. Our framework can

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aneurysm ct evaluation Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF SURGERY VOL 30 NO 4 OCTOBER 2007 2007 Elsevier. All rights reserved. Summary: tomography (CT). Follow-up CT scan at 22 months showed the presence of a markedly enlarged...

  12. Detektion von Phochromozytomen und rekurrenten medullren Schilddrsenkarzinomen mit F18 DOPA PET/CT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeich, Katrin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Evaluating [18F]dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) in patients with clinical suspicion for a primary or recurrent pheochromocytoma (pheo) by means of whole body PET/CT. In pheos PET/CT detects (more)

  13. Safety evaluation of a recombinant plasmin derivative lacking kringles 2-5 and rt-PA in a rat model of transient ischemic stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. Experimental & Translational Stroke Medicine 2012, 4:102012 References 1. NINDS (rt-PA Stroke Study Group): Tissueactivator for acute ischemic stroke. N Engl J Med 1995, 333:

  14. 1210 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 41, NO. 5, MAY 2006 A SiGe PA With Dual Dynamic Bias Control and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbeck, Peter M.

    1210 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 41, NO. 5, MAY 2006 A SiGe PA With Dual Dynamic from the battery, is the key factor determining the talk time and battery life for portable wireless

  15. Alle Angaben ohne Gewhr -fr eine verbindliche Festlegung wenden Sie sich bitte an den PA Zuordnungsliste Studienschwerpunkt Numerik und Simulation Studiengang Physikalische Ingenieurwissenschaft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Zuordnungsliste Studienschwerpunkt Numerik und Simulation Studiengang Physikalische Ingenieurwissenschaft Datum 27 bitte an den PA Zuordnungsliste Studienschwerpunkt Numerik und Simulation Studiengang Physikalische Studienschwerpunkt Numerik und Simulation Studiengang Physikalische Ingenieurwissenschaft Datum 27.08.07 Prüfungsfach

  16. Abstract Atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) was as low as 18 Pa during the Pleistocene and is projected to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    Abstract Atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) was as low as 18 Pa during the Pleistocene and is projected to increase from 36 to 70 Pa CO2 before the end of the 21st century. High pCO2 often increases the growth and repro- duction of C3 annuals, whereas low pCO2 decreases growth and may reduce or prevent

  17. An air line carries air at 800 kPa and 80C. An Air line ~ O O C insulated tank initially contains 20C air at a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haimei

    An air line carries air at 800 kPa and 80°C. An Air line ~ O O C insulated tank initially contains 20°C air at a pressure of 90kPa. The valve is opened, and air flows into the tank. Determine the final temperature of the air in the tank and the mass of air that enters the tank if the valve is left

  18. On Recent Claims Concerning the R_h=ct Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melia, Fulvio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R_h=ct Universe is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology which, like LCDM, assumes the presence of dark energy in addition to (baryonic and non-luminous) matter and radiation. Unlike LCDM, however, it is also constrained by the equation of state (EOS) p=-rho/3, in terms of the total pressure p and energy density rho. One-on-one comparative tests between R_h=ct and LCDM have been carried out using over 14 different cosmological measurements and observations. In every case, the data have favoured R_h=ct over the standard model, with model selection tools yielding a likelihood ~90-95% that the former is correct, versus only ~5-10% for the latter. In other words, the standard model without the EOS p=-rho/3 does not appear to be the optimal description of nature. Yet in spite of these successes---or perhaps because of them---several concerns have been published recently regarding the fundamental basis of the theory itself. The latest paper on this subject even claims---quite remarkably---that R_h=ct is ...

  19. Status and Promise CT's and Magnetized Target Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hill (LLNL) #12;CT's: Spheromaks & Field Reversed Configurations At LLNL, the SSPX experiment is investigating spheromak formation, sustainment, and confinement issues. (Hill, Mclean, Wood, Ryutov). At UC-Davis, formation and acceleration of spheromaks. (Hwang) At the U of Washington, field reversed configuration

  20. AUTOCORRECTING RECONSTRUCTION FOR FLEXIBLE CT SCANNERS Jeff Orchard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orchard, Jeffery J.

    revolutionize the world of computed tomography (CT). Tiny x-ray emitters and detectors could be embedded scanners. Index Terms: computed tomography, image reconstruction, entropy, nanotechnology, autofocus 1. An automatic (data-driven) motion-correction method for SPECT (single photon emission computed tomog- raphy

  1. Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 1 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook page 2 Table of Contents Standards 22 #12;Saturday Workshop 2/7/2009 RS: Molly Burke CT's: Roy Center & Lee Kelly Drosophila Handbook

  2. Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thoracic CT-PET Registration Using a 3D Breathing Model Antonio Moreno1 , Sylvie Chambon1 , Anand P Orlando, USA Abstract. In the context of thoracic CT-PET volume registration, we present a novel method applications. We consider Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in thoracic regions

  3. Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorperian, Houri K.

    Measurements from 3D-CT renderings are used in research and clinical management: Characterization for the prism]) RENDERING TECHNIQUES USED in ANALYZE 10.0: - Volume Render - (2) Volumes of Interest 1) VOI-Auto & 2) VOI-Manual TOTAL 3D-CT MODELS: 3 mandibles X 18 CT series X 3 rendering techniques = 162 mandible

  4. X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction via Wavelet Frame Based Regularization and Radon Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    to reconstruct high quality CT images from limited and noisy projection data. One of the common CT systems Bin Dong Jia Li Zuowei Shen December 22, 2011 Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been,8]. Numerical simulations and comparisons will be presented at the end. Keywords: Computed tomography, wavelet

  5. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), 96 Jonathan Lucas Street (MSC 323), Charleston, South Carolina 29425-3230 (United States); Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 E Adams Street, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the isocenter (free in air). Conversion from in-patient air KERMA values to tissue dose would require the use of energy-appropriate conversion factors.

  6. {sup 226}Ra and {sup 231}Pa systematics of axial MORB, crustal residence ages, and magma chamber characteristics at 9--10{degree}N East Pacific Rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, S.J.; Murrell, M.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perfit, M.R. [Univ., of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Geology; Batiza, R. [Univ., of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Fornari, D.J. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass spectrometric measurements of {sup 30}Th-22{sup 226}Ra and {sup 235}-U{sup 231}Pa disequilibria for axial basalts are used to determine crustal residence ages for MORB magma and investigate the temporal and spatial characteristics of axial magma chambers (AMC) at 9--10{degrees}N East Pacific Rise (EPR). Relative crustal residence ages can be calculated from variations in {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th and {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U activity ratios for axial lavas, if (1) mantle sources and melting are uniform, and mantle transfer times are constant or rapid for axial N-MORB, and (2) {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th in the melt are unaffected by shallow level fractional crystallization. Uniform Th, Sr, and Nd isotopic systematics and incompatible element ratios for N-MORB along the 9--10{degrees}N segment indicate that mantle sources and transfer times are similar. In addition, estimated bulk solid/melt partition coefficients for U, Th, and Pa are small, hence effects of fractional crystallization on {sup 231}Pa/{sup 235}U ratios for the melt are expected to be negligible. However, fractional crystallization of plagioclase in the AMC would lower {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th ratios in the melt and produce a positive bias in {sup 226}Ra crustal residence ages for fractionated lavas.

  7. Production of mini-(gluon)jets and strangeness enhancement in pA and AA collisions at relativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tai An; Sa Ben-Hao

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that effective string tension increases as a result of the hard gluon kinks on a string is applied to study the strange particle production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is found that the effective string tension increases with the increase of centrality and mass of the colliding system as a consequence of the mini-(gluon)jet production stemming from the collective string-string interaction. This mechanism leads to strangeness enhancement in pA and AA collisions through the enhanced production of the strange quark pairs from the color field of strings. We discuss different roles played by this mechanism and rescattering of the final state hadrons in the production of strange particles and compare our results with experimental data.

  8. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distillation is perhaps the separation process most widely used in the chemical processing industry. The correct design of distillation columns requires the availability of accurate and, if possible, thermodynamically consistent vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) data. The present work is part of a project studying the effect of pressure on the behavior of the azeotropic point in mixtures in which at least one component is an alcohol. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were obtained for the water + 2-propanol system at 30, 60, and 100 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent by the methods of Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs, Kojima, and Wisniak. The data were correlated with five liquid phase activity coefficient models (Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC).

  9. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0, and the couch was rotated to 270. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270 to 90. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  10. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,CoalThousandIL Site Consumption120MidAtl

  11. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Maywood NJ.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '*I_1Shiprock, New

  12. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Middlesex NJ.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '*I_1Shiprock, NewEngineers® New

  13. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Wayne NJ.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '*I_1Shiprock, NewEngineers® New

  14. ZERH Training Session: East Brunswick, NJ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  15. SolarWorks NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:Information SilverSolarStructure Ltd Jump to:SolarWaterWorld

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexico

  17. Visiting Companies, Institutions and Laboratories 3M Health Care St. Paul, MN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    Orthopaedics and Optima Sports Medicine Salem, NH Ethicon Somerville, NJ Fraunhofer Center for Manufacturing Innovation Brookline, MA GE Healthcare Lawrence, MA Gems Sensors - Controls Plainville, CT Genzyme

  18. Equal rights for equal action : women's mobilization for suffrage in Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skog, Erica Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Dictatorship in Venezuela, 1945-1959. Hamden, CT: Archonand Political Change in Venezuela. Princeton, NJ: Princetonand the Church in Venezuela. Journal of Interamerican

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - air ct cisternography Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James E. Mason* and Cristina L. Archer1 Summary: supply with electricity from compressed air energy storage combustion turbine (CAES CT) power plants... compressed air energy...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - axial ct scan Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine 12 Projection-based features for reducing false positives in computer-aided detection of colonic polyps in CT colonography Summary: indicates one IPC....

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal multislice ct Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ge Wanga) and Michael W. Vannier Department... in multislice spiralhelical computed tomography CT and provide guidelines for scanner design and protocol... optimization....

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal ct replace Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leeds Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 23 ARTICLE IN PRESS Computer-Aided Design ( ) Summary: a limited number of CT images. The three- dimensional...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aided ct image Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 ARTICLE IN PRESS Computer-Aided Design ( ) Summary: a limited number of computed tomography (CT) images. The three-dimensional template geometry of a healthy... contour shown...

  4. Grant Title: BEHAVIORAL AND INTEGRATIVE TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (R01, R03, Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-077. CFDA Number(s): 93.279, 93.273.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-13-077. CFDA Number(s): 93.279, 93.273. Agency/Department: Department of Health

  5. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNY 28Dorr Corp - CT 14

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNYEra ToolFenn Machinery Co - CT

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTR.l\CT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smartHistory:CONTR.l\CT 2.

  9. The Innocent Habiyaremye Fellowship Information Networking Institute --Carnegie Mellon | 4616 Henry Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213 | Phone: 412.268.7195 | www.ini.cmu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Henry Street · Pittsburgh, PA 15213 | Phone: 412.268.7195 | www.ini.cmu.edu Information Networking Institute (INI) who embodies a sense of community spirit in his or her everyday actions, while also meeting of an INI alumnus and a native of Rwanda who inspired others through his kindness and volunteer activities

  10. A Finite Volume Approach For Contingent Claims R. Zvan \\Lambda , P.A. Forsyth y , and K.R. Vetzal z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    A Finite Volume Approach For Contingent Claims Valuation R. Zvan \\Lambda , P.A. Forsyth y , and K presents a nonconservative finite volume approach for solving two dimensional contingent claims valuation problems. The finite volume method is more flexible than finite difference schemes which are often

  11. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of ethylbenzene + m-xylene and ethylbenzene + o-xylene systems at 6. 66 and 26. 66 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monton, J.B.; Llopis, F.J. (Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data were obtained for systems of ethylbenzene with m- and o-xylenes at 6.66 and 26.66 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent. They were equally well correlated with the Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. The parameters of these equations are given.

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes A.C. Dillon, P.A. Parilla, K.E.H. Gilbert, J.L. Alleman, T. Gennett*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes A.C. Dillon, P.A. Parilla, K.E.H. Gilbert, J.L. Alleman, T. Gennett*, and M.J. Heben National Renewable Energy Laboratory *Rochester Institute of Technology 2003 DOE HFCIT Program Review Meeting DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE Office of Science

  13. HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON SINGLE-WALL NANOTUBES A.C. Dillon, K.E.H. Gilbert, P.A. Parilla, J.L. Alleman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN STORAGE IN CARBON SINGLE-WALL NANOTUBES A.C. Dillon, K.E.H. Gilbert, P.A. Parilla, J.L. Alleman, G.L. Hornyak, K.M. Jones, and M.J. Heben National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO 80401-3393 Abstract Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) and other nanostructured carbon materials have attracted

  14. Book Review: Error: On Our Predicament When Things Go Wrong Nicholas Rescher Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2007 ISBN 9780822943271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyzyk, Mark

    Book Reviews 27 Error: On Our Predicament When Things Go Wrong Nicholas Rescher Pittsburgh, PA: University o f Pittsburgh Press, 2007 ISBN 9 7 8 0 8 2 2 9 4 3 2 7 1 Review by Mark Cyzyk, Johns Hopkins University This is a short, dense book...

  15. ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION IN DEREGULATED MARKETS; CONFERENCE AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY, PITTSBURGH PA USA DECEMBER 2004 1 A criticality approach to monitoring cascading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION IN DEREGULATED MARKETS; CONFERENCE AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY, PITTSBURGH PA USA DECEMBER 2004 1 A criticality approach to monitoring cascading failure risk and failure the risk of cascading failure of electric power transmission systems as overall loading is increased

  16. PaedDr. Michaela Regecov, PhD., Department of Algebra, Geometry and Didactics of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    PaedDr. Michaela Regecová, PhD., Department of Algebra, Geometry and Didactics of Mathematics of Theory of didactic situations for the realisation the current pedagogical practice related with teaching of mathematics at primary and secondary schools (creation of a-didactic situation, levels of didactic situations

  17. P.A. Nelson S.M. Kajiura G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV-filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiura, Stephen

    P.A. Nelson ? S.M. Kajiura ? G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV levels of solar radiation than they had previously experienced in the source habitat in the turbid waters spectrum, but sharks exposed to greater solar radiation showed increased UV blocking in their corneal

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Chain and Cable Co - CT 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJ 24 FUSRAPAlaskaBearingChain

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlantSteel Co - NJ

  20. ZERH Lender PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services are services that ensure a green appraiser and hand-off of the Residential Green and Energy Efficient Addendum to the green appraiser for consideration in the...

  1. ZERH Builder PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartmentLieve LaurensThe A ppraisal P rocess: Be Y our

  2. ZERH Training PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartmentLieve LaurensThe A ppraisal P rocess: Be Y U.S.

  3. ZERH Verifier PA Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartmentLieve LaurensThe A ppraisal P rocess: Be Y U.S.

  4. Appendix PA: Performance Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes LaboratoryAntonyaAppeals4 STANDARDN NEPA Disclosure for

  5. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  6. Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenemann, P. Thomas

    Validation of Plaster Endocast Morphology Through 3D CT Image Analysis P. Thomas Schoenemann,1 by creating endo- casts out of rubber latex shells filled with plaster. The extent to which the method questions. Pairs of virtual endocasts (VEs) created from high-resolution CT scans of corresponding latex/plaster

  7. Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chew Lim

    Hemorrhage Slices Detection in Brain CT Images Ruizhe Liu, Chew Lim Tan, Tze Yun Leong Department) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose the bleeding Tomography (CT) scans are widely used in today's diagnosis of head traumas. It is effective to disclose

  8. Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann1 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY System Identification & Forecasting with Advanced Neural Networks Principles, Techniques, Applications Hans Georg Zimmermann Siemens AG Email : Hans_Georg.Zimmermann@siemens.com Siemens AG, CT IC 4, H.-G. Zimmermann2 CORPORATETECHNOLOGY . . . . ! " i ii wxw 0 w1 wn xn x1 Distinct

  9. Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chetverikov, Dmitry

    Bone Surface Reconstruction From CT/MR Images Using Fast Marching and Level Set Methods1) Istv surfaces reconstructed from MR volumes are shown. 1 Outline of the project One of our current projects steps of bone surface reconstruction from CT/MR slice images. 2 Main steps of reconstruction 2.1

  10. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki; Jeong, Dong Hyeok

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed Tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, is required to be converted to electron density for radiation dose calculation for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages were applied to take the patient CT image without applying the specific CT number to electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of dose calculation would be unassured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to change in tube voltage were demonstrated and the dose calculation errors in percentage depth dose (PDD) and a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in PDD from TPS dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3 % and 1.1 % respectively when applying the same CT number to electron density conversion curve to the 80 kVp and 140 kVp images. In the clinical case, the different CT nu...

  11. Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golland, Polina

    Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

  12. AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boykov, Yuri

    AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

  13. CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CT-PET Landmark-based Lung Registration Using a Dynamic Breathing Model S. Chambon1 , A. Moreno1-based registration of CT (at two different instants of the breathing cycle, intermediate expirations) and PET images in order to simulate the instant in the breathing cycle most similar to the PET image and guarantee

  14. GPU IMPLEMENTATION OF A 3D BAYESIAN CT ALGORITHM AND ITS APPLICATION ON REAL FOAM RECONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tomography (CT) [1, 3]. The limits of these meth- ods appear when the number of projections is small, and as well as any iterative algebraic meth- ods is the computation time and especially for projection solve is to reconstruct the object f from the projection data g collected by a cone beam 3D CT. The link

  15. Searching Effective Parameters for Low-Dose CT Reconstruction by Ant Colony Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Klaus

    , Eric Papenhausen and Klaus Mueller Abstract-- Low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) has been gaining. To cope with the limited data collected at 30% of standard radiation, low-dose CT reconstruction algorithms generally require several iterations of forward projection, back-projection and regularization

  16. Locating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    , a technique for locating the eyes in Computed Tomography brain scan data, is described. The objective and implemented an algorithm which automaticallyidenti es and locates the eyes in a Computed Tomography(CT) brainLocating the Eyes in CT Brain Scan Data Kostis Kaggelides, Peter J. Elliott IBM UK Scienti c Centre

  17. CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November 6 2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 1 CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2 User's Manual (November straightness. Using #12;CT-FIRE (V1.3 Beta2) User's Manual, LOCI @ UW-Madison 2 the advanced output control-processing. Major features of the versions Version 1.3 Beta2 (newest): The primary change in CT-FIRE V1.3 Beta2

  18. THE Pa{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF H II REGIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES FROM HST/NICMOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Guilin; Calzetti, Daniela [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Schinnerer, Eva [MPI for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Sofue, Yoshiaki [Department of Physics, Meisei University, 2-1-1 Hodokubo, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506 (Japan); Komugi, Shinya [Joint ALMA Office, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile); Egusa, Fumi [Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Scoville, Nicholas Z., E-mail: liu@pha.jhu.edu [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The H II region luminosity function (LF) is an important tool for deriving the birthrates and mass distribution of OB associations and is an excellent tracer of the newly formed massive stars and associations. To date, extensive work (predominantly in H{alpha}) has been done from the ground, which is hindered by dust extinction and the severe blending of adjacent (spatially or in projection) H II regions. Reliably measuring the properties of H II regions requires a linear resolution <40 pc, but analyses satisfying this requirement have been done only in a handful of galaxies, so far. As the first space-based work using a galaxy sample, we have selected 12 galaxies from our HST/NICMOS Pa{alpha} survey and studied the LF and size distribution of H II regions both in individual galaxies and cumulatively, using a virtually extinction-free tracer of the ionizing photon rate. The high angular resolution and low sensitivity to diffuse emission of NICMOS also offer an advantage over ground-based imaging by enabling a higher degree of de-blending of the H II regions. We do not confirm the broken power-law LFs found in ground-based studies. Instead, we find that the LFs, both individual and co-added, follow a single power law dN(L)/dln L{proportional_to}L {sup -1}, are consistent with the mass function of star clusters in nearby galaxies, and are in agreement with the results of the existing analyses with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. The individual and co-added size distributions of H II regions are both roughly consistent with dN(D)/dln D{proportional_to}D {sup -3}, but the power-law scaling is probably contaminated by blended regions or complexes.

  19. Berthon P, Katoh M, Dusanter-Fourt 1, Kelly PA, Djiane J, 1986b. Purification of prolactin receptor from sow mam-mary gland and polyclonal antibodies production. Mol Cell Endocrinol, soumis publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Berthon P, Katoh M, Dusanter-Fourt 1, Kelly PA, Djiane J, 1986b. Purification of prolactin receptor publication Djiane J, Durand P, Kelly PA, 1977. Evolution of prolactin receptors in rabbit mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. Endocrinology, 100:1348-1356 Djiane J, Dusanter-Fourt 1, Katoh M, Kelly

  20. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfanner, Florian [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Maier, Joscha [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Kachelrie, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the measurements of the test persons, there is a very good correlation (?= 0.917) between the respiratory motion phases received by the radar system and the external motion monitor. Our concept of using an array of transmitting antennas turned out to be widely insensitive to the positioning of the test persons. A time shift between the respiratory motion curves recorded with the radar system and the motion curves from the external respiratory monitor was observed which indicates a slight difference between internal organ motion and motion detected by the external respiratory monitor. The simulations were in good accordance with the measurements.Conclusions: A continuous wave radar operating in the near field of the antennas can be used to determine the respiratory motion of humans accurately. In contrast to trigger systems used today, the radar system is able to measure motion inside the body. If such a monitor was routinely available in clinical CT, it would be possible optimizing the scan start with respect to the respiratory state of the patient. Breathing commands would potentially widely be avoided, and as far as uncooperative patients or children are concerned, less sedation might be necessary. Further applications of the radar system could be in radiation therapy or interventional imaging for instance.

  1. New results on nuclear dependence of J/psi and psi' production in 450 GeV pA collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Shahoyan

    2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the reliability of the charmonia suppression as a signature of the Quark-Gluon Plasma formation in nucleus-nucleus collisions it is important first to understand the details of the production of J/psi and psi' in pA interactions and the difference in the suppression of these two states. This report presents the results of the study by the NA50 collaboration of the J/psi and psi' production in pA interactions at 450 GeV beam energy and its dependence on rapidity. It is shown that the psi' suffers more suppression than the J/psi, which is consistent with a similar observation made at 800 GeV beam energy by the E866/NuSea collaboration.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex North NJ Site - NJ 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-EngineerSelling

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Standard Oil Development Co of NJ - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MO 02 FUSRAP Considered

  4. Vapor-liquid equilibria of n-hexane + cyclohexane + n-heptane and the three constituent binary systems at 101. 0 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan, D.S.; Shiau, H.Y.; Tsai, F.N. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the title ternary system and the three constituent binary systems have been measured at 101.0 kPa by using a dynamic equilibrium still. The binary data were tested for thermodynamic consistency and were correlated by the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. Predictions for the ternary system by these equations have been compared with the experimental data.

  5. Vapor-liquid equilibria for the binary systems of 1-butanol with some halohydrocarbons at 40.0 and 101.3 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artigas, H.; Lafuente, C.; Cea, P.; Royo, F.M.; Urieta, J.S. [Univ. de Zaragoza (Spain)] [Univ. de Zaragoza (Spain)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements at 40.0 and 101.3 kPa are reported for 1-butanol + chlorocyclohexane, + chlorobenzene, + bromocyclohexane, + bromobenzene. Some of the studied systems show minimum temperature azeotropes. The experimental data were tested for thermodynamic consistency and satisfactorily correlated with the Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. Predictions with the UNIFAC method and ASOG method were also obtained.

  6. N E W S O L A R H O M E S PA R T N E R S H I P GoSolarCalifornia.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N E W S O L A R H O M E S PA R T N E R S H I P GoSolarCalifornia.org About the New Solar Homes Partnership As part of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's $3.3 billion California Solar Initiative, California. The New Solar Homes Partnership (NSHP) is a component of the California Solar Initiative and has a goal

  7. Overexpression of KAI1 induces autophagy and increases MiaPaCa-2 cell survival through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chun-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Disease, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Institute of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Disease, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032 (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yan, Jun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wang, Li-Sheng [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)] [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Guo, Xiao-Zhong, E-mail: guoxiaozhong1962@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)] [Department of Gastroenterology, Shenyang General Hospital of PLA, 83 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Hua, E-mail: wanghua@bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)] [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} We first investigate the effects of KAI1 on autophagy in MiaPaCa-2 cells. {yields} Our findings demonstrate that KAI1 induces autophagy, which in turn inhibits KAI1-induced apoptosis. {yields} This study also supplies a possible novel therapeutic method for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using autophagy inhibitors. -- Abstract: KAI1, a metastasis-suppressor gene belonging to the tetraspanin family, is known to inhibit cancer metastasis without affecting the primary tumorigenicity by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. Recent studies have shown that hypoxic conditions of solid tumors induce high-level autophagy and KAI1 expression. However, the relationship between autophagy and KAI1 remains unclear. By using transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, we found that KAI1 can induce autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2. KAI1-induced autophagy was confirmed by the expression of autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin 1. KAI1 induces autophagy through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases rather than that of AKT. KAI1-induced autophagy protects MiaPaCa-2 cells from apoptosis and proliferation inhibition partially through the downregulation of poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase-3 activation.

  8. Measurement of cross sections for the {sup 232}Th(P,4n){sup 229}Pa reaction at low proton energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost, C. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Griswold, J. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA and Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bruffey, S. H.; Mirzadeh, S. [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Stracener, D. W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Williams, C. L. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The alpha-emitters {sup 225}Ac and {sup 213}Bi are of great interest for alpha-radioimmunotherapy which uses radioisotopes attached to cancer-seeking antibodies to efficiently treat various types of cancers. Both radioisotopes are daughters of the long-lived {sup 229}Th(t{sub 1/2} = 7880y). {sup 229}Th can be produced by proton irradiation of {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th, either directly or through production of isobars that beta-decay into {sup 229}Th. To obtain excitation functions, {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th have been irradiated at the On-Line Test Facility at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL. Benchmark tests conducted with Cu and Ni foils show very good agreement with literature results. The experiments with thorium targets were focused on the production of {sup 229}Pa and its daughter {sup 225}Ac from both {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th. Differential cross-sections for production of {sup 229}Pa and other Pa isotopes have been obtained.

  9. CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Clemson University, Charleston, South Carolina 29425 (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

  10. Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning for Power-Intensive Continuous Processes under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    , Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Praxair, Inc., Danbury, CT Corresponding author. Email address: grossmann@cmu.edu 1

  11. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but with an edge-preserving regularization term. Results: On the Catphan phantom, the method maintains the same spatial resolution on the decomposed images as that of the CT images before decomposition (8 pairs/cm) while significantly reducing their noise standard deviation. Compared to that obtained by the direct matrix inversion, the noise standard deviation in the images decomposed by the proposed algorithm is reduced by over 98%. Without considering the noise correlation properties in the formulation, the denoising scheme degrades the spatial resolution to 6 pairs/cm for the same level of noise suppression. Compared to the edge-preserving algorithm, the method achieves better low-contrast detectability. A quantitative study is performed on the contrast-rod slice of Catphan phantom. The proposed method achieves lower electron density measurement error as compared to that by the direct matrix inversion, and significantly reduces the error variation by over 97%. On the head phantom, the method reduces the noise standard deviation of decomposed images by over 97% without blurring the sinus structures. Conclusions: The authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for DECT. The method combines noise suppression and material decomposition into an iterative process and achieves both goals simultaneously. By exploring the full variance-covariance properties of the decomposed images and utilizing the edge predetection, the proposed algorithm shows superior performance on noise suppression with high image spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability.

  12. Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

  13. RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS?-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

  14. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709 Fabrics: A Parametric Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, Sireesha

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709 plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

  16. MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darrouzet, Stephen 1987-

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis Copyright 2011 Stephen Daniel Darrouzet... ABSTRACT MicroCT of Coronary Stents: Staining Techniques for 3-D Pathological Analysis. (May 2011) Stephen Daniel Darrouzet, B.S., Texas A&M Unversity Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fred Clubb, Jr. In the area of translational research...

  17. Grant Title: MENTORED CLINICAL SCIENTIST RESEARCH CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARD (PARENT Funding Opportunity Number: PA-11-193. CFDA Number(s): 93.866; 93.271; 93.855, 93.856; 93.846; 93.286;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-11-193. CFDA Number(s): 93.866; 93.271; 93.855, 93.856; 93.846; 93.286; 93.398; 93

  18. Grant Title: MENTORED RESEARCH SCIENTIST DEVELOPMENT AWARD (PARENT K01) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-11-190. CFDA Number(s): 93.866, 93.271, 93.855, 93.856, 93.846, 93.865,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    : PA-11-190. CFDA Number(s): 93.866, 93.271, 93.855, 93.856, 93.846, 93.865, 93.173, 93.279, 93.281, 93

  19. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for binary and ternary systems composed of water, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol at 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabaldon, C.; Marzal, P.; Monton, J.B.; Rodrigo, M.A. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria data were obtained for the 2-propanol + 1-propanol binary system and the water + 1-propanol + 2-propanol ternary system at 100 kPa. The data were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to the Van Ness-Byer-Gibbs method for the binary system and according to the McDermott-Ellis method for the ternary one. The binary system is well represented by assuming ideal behavior. The binary interaction parameters obtained from this and previous work are used to predict the vapor-liquid equilibrium for the ternary system using the UNIQUAC, NRTL, and Wilson models. The ternary system is well predicted from binary data.

  20. VLE measurements of binary mixtures of methanol, ethanol, 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane, and 2-methoxy-2-methylbutane at 101.32 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arce, A.; Martinez-Ageitos, J.; Soto, A. [Univ. of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium data for 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane + methanol, 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane + ethanol, methanol + 2-methoxy-2-methylbutane, ethanol + 2-methoxy-2-methylbutane, and 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane + 2-methoxy-2-methylbutane were determined at 101.32 kPa. Fredenslund et al.`s test confirmed the results to be thermodynamically consistent. The VLE data were satisfactorily correlated using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations for liquid phase activity coefficients and adequately predicted using the ASOG, UNIFAC, UNIFAC-Dortmund, and UNIFAC-Lyngby group contribution methods.

  1. Hausaufgabe 6: Aufgabe 3-20: Ein 0,12 m-Tank enthlt gesttigtes R-134a bei 800 kPa. Zu Beginn sind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Hausaufgabe 6: Aufgabe 3-20: Ein 0,12 m³-Tank enthält gesättigtes R-134a bei 800 kPa. Zu Beginn sind 25% des Tanks mit flüssigem R-134a gefüllt. Der Rest mit gasförmigem R-134a. Ein Ventil am Boden des Tanks wird geöffnet und flüssiges Kühlmittel tritt aus. Von au?en wird dem Kühlmittel Wärme

  2. Article_SAGEO_PA PISSARD_V6_Cemadocx -accede_document.php http://cemadoc.irstea.fr/exl-php/util/documents/accede_document.php 1 sur 9 27/01/2014 10:35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Article_SAGEO_PA PISSARD_V6_Cemadocx - accede_document.php http://cemadoc.irstea.fr/exl-php/util/documents/accede_document.php - accede_document.php http://cemadoc.irstea.fr/exl-php/util/documents/accede_document.php 2 sur 9 27_SAGEO_PA PISSARD_V6_Cemadocx - accede_document.php http://cemadoc.irstea.fr/exl-php/util/documents/accede_document.php

  3. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  4. Adaptive mean filtering for noise reduction in CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilts, Michelle; Jirasek, Andrew [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, V8R6V5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W2Y2 (Canada)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) as a method of extracting 3D dose information from irradiated polymer gel dosimeters is showing potential as a practical means to implement gel dosimetry in a radiation therapy clinic. However, the response of CT contrast to dose is weak and noise reduction is critical in order to achieve adequate dose resolutions with this method. Phantom design and CT imaging technique have both been shown to decrease image noise. In addition, image postprocessing using noise reduction filtering techniques have been proposed. This work evaluates in detail the use of the adaptive mean filter for reducing noise in CT gel dosimetry. Filter performance is systematically tested using both synthetic patterns mimicking a range of clinical dose distribution features as well as actual clinical dose distributions. Both low and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situations are examined. For all cases, the effects of filter kernel size and the number of iterations are investigated. Results indicate that adaptive mean filtering is a highly effective tool for noise reduction CT gel dosimetry. The optimum filtering strategy depends on characteristics of the dose distributions and image noise level. For low noise images (SNR {approx}20), the filtered results are excellent and use of adaptive mean filtering is recommended as a standard processing tool. For high noise images (SNR {approx}5) adaptive mean filtering can also produce excellent results, but filtering must be approached with more caution as spatial and dose distortions of the original dose distribution can occur.

  5. Malignant pleural mesothelioma: value of CT and MR imaging in predicting resectability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patz, E.F. Jr.; Shaffer, K.; Piwnica-Worms, D.R.; Jochelson, M.; Sarin, M.; Sugarbaker, D.J.; Pugatch, R.D. (Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBJECTIVE. The objective was to determine if CT or MR imaging findings could be used to accurately predict resectability in patients with biopsy-proved malignant pleural mesotheliomas. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. CT and MR findings in 41 consecutive patients with malignant mesotheliomas who were referred to the thoracic surgery clinic for extrapleural pneumonectomy were studied by thoracic radiologists before surgery. Review of radiologic studies focused on local invasion of three separate regions: the diaphragm, chest wall, and mediastinum. Results of all imaging examinations were carefully correlated with intraoperative, gross, and microscopic pathologic findings. RESULTS. After radiologic and clinical evaluation, 34 patients (83%) had thoracotomy; 24 of these had tumors that were resectable. The sensitivity was high (> 90%) for both CT and MR in each region. Specificity, however, was low, probably because of the small number of patients with unresectable tumors. CONCLUSION. CT and MR provided similar information on resectability in most cases. Sensitivity was high for both procedures. Because CT is more widely available and used, the authors suggest it as the initial study when determining resectability. In difficult cases, important complementary anatomic information can be derived from MR images obtained before surgical intervention.

  6. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua, E-mail: JYao@cc.nih.gov [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Nacif, Marcelo S. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)] [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% 3.52%,?0.31% 0.10%,?0.69 0.14?mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95,?0.90,?0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  7. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Osamu [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)]. E-mail: osa-mu@umin.ac.jp; Hayashi, Shinya [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Sakurai, Kota [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Nakano, Masahiro [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Maeda, Sunaho [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro R.T. [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Deguchi, Takashi [Department of Urology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu City (Japan)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 {+-} 6.17 cc (mean {+-} SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 {+-} 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported.

  8. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankar, Sridhar, E-mail: shankars@ummhc.org; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Flanagan, Hugh L. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Anesthesia (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Surgery (United States)

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  9. Georgia Power`s Plant Yates CT-121 demonstration performance results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burford, D.P. [Southern Co. Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States); Pearl, I.G. [Radian Corp., Tucker, GA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chiyoda CT-121 demonstration project, being conducted at Georgia Power`s Plant Yates` 100 MWe Unit 1, is an evaluation of a unique wet-limestone, forced-oxidized FGD process and is a part of the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) program. The CT-121 process uses a single unique absorber vessel made entirely of fiberglass reinforced plastics called a jet bubbling reactor (JBR). The JBR allows concurrent completion of all the necessary reactions to remove sulfur dioxide from the flue gas and to precipitate a gypsum byproduct. This paper will discuss the results of the low-particulate test phase, including the effects of higher-sulfur coal, as well as initial results from the high-particulate test phase (existing electrostatic precipitator deenergized). DOE-sponsored air toxics testing has also been conducted, but final results were not available at the time of this writing. A discussion of limestone selection and its impact on the dewatering properties of the CT-121 gypsum byproduct is also included. Performance results emphasize the efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of the CT-121 process. Preliminary testing of the CT-121 process at Plant Yates has produced excellent performance results. The process has proven itself capable of exceeding its design SO{sub 2} removal efficiency specification of 90%, both with and without the ESP in service. The process has also achieved SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies of greater than 98%. Particulate measurements, conducted with the ESP deenergized, have established the capability of the CT-121 process to remove over 99% of the boiler`s particulate emissions at 100% boiler load.

  10. Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yu [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China and Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan [School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Lian Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shen Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms the conventional interpolation-based approaches by producing images with the markedly improved structural clarity and greatly reduced artifacts.

  11. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  12. Vapor-liquid equilibria of binary and ternary mixtures of cyclohexane, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and octane at 101.3 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.C.; Tang, M.; Chen, Y.P. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibria were measured at 101.3 kPa for the three binary and one ternary mixtures of cyclohexane, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and octane. The isobaric T-x-y data were reported, including an azeotropic point for the binary mixture cyclohexane + 3-methyl-2-butanone. The virial equation of state truncated after the second coefficient was used to calculate the vapor-phase fugacity coefficients. The Tsonopoulos correlation equation was applied to determine the second virial coefficients. Various activity coefficient models of the Wilson, the NRTL, and the UNIQUAC equations were used to correlate the binary experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium results. Optimally-fitted binary parameters of the activity coefficient models were obtained and those parameters of the NRTL model were employed to predict the ternary vapor-liquid equilibria. Satisfactory results were presented for the correlation and prediction of the vapor-liquid equilibrium data on binary and ternary mixtures.

  13. Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT via group-sparsity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhavsar, Arnav; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lian, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: 4D-CT typically delivers more accurate information about anatomical structures in the lung, over 3D-CT, due to its ability to capture visual information of the lung motion across different respiratory phases. This helps to better determine the dose during radiation therapy for lung cancer. However, a critical concern with 4D-CT that substantially compromises this advantage is the low superior-inferior resolution due to less number of acquired slices, in order to control the CT radiation dose. To address this limitation, the authors propose an approach to reconstruct missing intermediate slices, so as to improve the superior-inferior resolution.Methods: In this method the authors exploit the observation that sampling information across respiratory phases in 4D-CT can be complimentary due to lung motion. The authors approach uses this locally complimentary information across phases in a patch-based sparse-representation framework. Moreover, unlike some recent approaches that treat local patches independently, the authors approach employs the group-sparsity framework that imposes neighborhood and similarity constraints between patches. This helps in mitigating the trade-off between noise robustness and structure preservation, which is an important consideration in resolution enhancement. The authors discuss the regularizing ability of group-sparsity, which helps in reducing the effect of noise and enables better structural localization and enhancement.Results: The authors perform extensive experiments on the publicly available DIR-Lab Lung 4D-CT dataset [R. Castillo, E. Castillo, R. Guerra, V. Johnson, T. McPhail, A. Garg, and T. Guerrero, A framework for evaluation of deformable image registration spatial accuracy using large landmark point sets, Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 18491870 (2009)]. First, the authors carry out empirical parametric analysis of some important parameters in their approach. The authors then demonstrate, qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the ability of their approach to achieve more accurate and better localized results over bicubic interpolation as well as a related state-of-the-art approach. The authors also show results on some datasets with tumor, to further emphasize the clinical importance of their method.Conclusions: The authors have proposed to improve the superior-inferior resolution of 4D-CT by estimating intermediate slices. The authors approach exploits neighboring constraints in the group-sparsity framework, toward the goal of achieving better localization and noise robustness. The authors results are encouraging, and positively demonstrate the role of group-sparsity for 4D-CT resolution enhancement.

  14. for Proton CT R. P. Johnson, Member, IEEE, V. Bashkirov, V. Giacometti, R. F. Hurley, P. Piersimoni,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing treatment with particle beam a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton, from which we derive the water equivalent path. INTRODUCTION roton CT (pCT) is an evolving technology that promises to improve proton treatment planning

  15. A method for measuring joint kinematics designed for accurate registration of kinematic data to models constructed from CT data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Kenneth J.; Manson, T. T.; Pfaeffle, H. J.; Tomaino, M. M.; Woo, S. L-Y

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for position and 0.1 degrees for orientation for linkage digitization and better than +/- 0.2 mm and +/- 0.2 degrees for CT digitization. Surface models of the radius and ulna were constructed from CT data, as an example application. Kinematics of the bones...

  16. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Bailey, D; Bailey, E [Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: ?5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal brain ct Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P R I N G 2 0 0 7 N Y U P H Y S I C I A N S P R I N G 2 0 0 7 1 1 Summary: to put their head in a CT scanner," says Dr. de Leon. At the time, brain scans were used in dementia...

  18. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  19. DAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    -ray/neutron spectrometer, a magnetometer and a gravity investigation. Dawn uses solar arrays to power its xenon ion engine solar panels roughly 21 m tip-to-tip, a 5 m magnetometer boom and three ion thrusters, one of whichDAWN: A JOURNEY TO THE BEGINNING OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM C.T. Russell(1) , A. Coradini(2) , W

  20. Surface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials (e.g., carbon-fibre-reinforced plas- tics) induce manufacturers to design new functionSurface Extraction from Multi-Material Components for Metrology using Dual Energy CT Christoph surface models of multi-material components using dual energy com- puted tomography (DECT

  1. Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Multi-energy CT Based on a Prior Rank, Intensity and Sparsity Model (PRISM) Hao Gao1 , Hengyong Yu2 spectrum. Besides, the energy-dependent intensity information can be incorporated into the PRISM in terms on the generalized rank and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base

  2. The Mathematics of the Imaging Techniques of MEG, CT, PET and SPECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fokas, A. S.

    The Mathematics of the Imaging Techniques of MEG, CT, PET and SPECT A.S. Fokas, V. Marinakis), of positron emission tomography (PET) and of single photon emission computed to­ mography (SPECT) are reviewed techniques of positron emission tomography (PET) and of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING Maite L,cerquide,davidm,anna}@maia.ub.es ABSTRACT This paper introduces a machine learning approach into the process of direct volume rendering that generates the classification func- tion within the optical property function used for rendering. Briefly

  4. Lack of Correlation Between External Fiducial Positions and Internal Tumor Positions During Breath-Hold CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunjan, Sandeep, E-mail: shunjan@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Starkschall, George; Prado, Karl; Dong Lei; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: For thoracic tumors, if four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is unavailable, the internal margin can be estimated by use of breath-hold (BH) CT scans acquired at end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE). By use of external surrogates for tumor position, BH accuracy is estimated by minimizing the difference between respiratory extrema BH and mean equivalent-phase free breathing (FB) positions. We tested the assumption that an external surrogate for BH accuracy correlates with internal tumor positional accuracy during BH CT. Methods and Materials: In 16 lung cancer patients, 4DCT images, as well as BH CT images at EI and EE, were acquired. Absolute differences between BH and mean equivalent-phase (FB) positions were calculated for both external fiducials and gross tumor volume (GTV) centroids as metrics of external and internal BH accuracy, respectively, and the results were correlated. Results: At EI, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacement correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.11). Similarly, at EE, the absolute difference between mean FB and BH fiducial displacements correlated poorly with the absolute difference between FB and BH GTV centroid positions on CT images (R{sup 2} = 0.18). Conclusions: External surrogates for tumor position are not an accurate metric of BH accuracy for lung cancer patients. This implies that care should be taken when using such an approach because an incorrect internal margin could be generated.

  5. Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

  6. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Osamu, E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro [Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gastroenterological Surgery (Japan)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Springdale PA - PA 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntownRocky Flats Site,NevadaSpook,

  8. 1Prepared by BG Rahm & SJ Riha (NYS Water Resources Institute), D Yoxtheimer (Penn State Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Alternative Fuels, Engines, and Emissions), K Davis & S Belmecheri (Penn State University) Environmental water Center for Outreach and Research), E Boyer (PA Water Resources Research Center), D Carder (WVU Center sessions: 1. What data sources are currently available for collecting information on water and air systems

  9. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of p-xylene + o-xylene and m-xylene + o-xylene systems at 6. 66 and 26. 66 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llopis, F.J.; Monton, J.B. (Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data were obtained for systems of o-xylene with p- and m-xylenes at 6.66 and 26.66 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent. They were equally well correlated with the Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. The parameters of these equations are given.

  10. UNlllERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO, RECINTO DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS PO BOX ~7 SAN JUAN PA ~~ .TEl7B7.758-2525 EXI: 171 SECRETARiA JUNTA ADMINISTRATIVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    UNlllERSIDAD DE PUERTO RICO, RECINTO DE CIENCIAS MEDICAS PO BOX ~7 SAN JUAN PA ~~ .TEl7B7AZ, SecretariaEjecutiva de la Junta Administrativa del Recintode CienciasMedicas de la Universidad de Puerto Rico y acechol' del Recinto de Ciencias Medicas y luego de la discusion de rigor, ACORO6: APROBAR la

  11. 2-91 The gage pressure in a pressure cooker is maintained constant at 100 kPa by a petcock. The mass of the petcock is to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    2-42 2-91 The gage pressure in a pressure cooker is maintained constant at 100 kPa by a petcock itself out. Therefore, it can be disregarded in calculations if we use the gage pressure as the cooker

  12. NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY2011 - FY2015 Andrew P. Jones 10111 - 93015 Multiple sites - NJ, CA, PA, Germany Slipstream Pilot-Scale Demonstration of a Novel Amine-Based Post-Combustion...

  13. Same-Sex Couples and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Population: New Estimates from the American Community Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Gary J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Same-sex couplesLong Island, NY-NJ-PA Oklahoma City, OK Orlando-Kissimmee,WV New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia

  14. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kieninger, R. T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a...

  15. Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

  16. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E. [Department of Medical Physics, Radiation Oncology, Hospital Virgen del Consuelo, Callosa de Ensarria 12-Valencia, Valencia 46007 (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, H. NISA 'Virgen del Consuelo', Valencia (Spain)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.3 mm{+-}1.0 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.6 mm{+-}1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.7 mm{+-}0.8 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.3 mm{+-}1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for both the axial and helical CT image acquisition protocols.

  17. Training Session: West Chester, PA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  18. A5 PA Addendum 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE

  19. D"E(:pa

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_BayoRECORD OF^_.Ther-tin enDe

  20. 2010 PA CoP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Murray (EM-23) Video Download PDF Download LFRG Lessons Learned on QA Susan Krenzien (Navarro-Intera) 2:30 - 2:45 pm Break 2:45 - 4:00 pm - ASCEM and CBP Updates Video Download...

  1. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, Sanjit O., E-mail: tewaris@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Petre, Elena N., E-mail: petree@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Osborne, Joseph, E-mail: osbornej@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  2. PET/CT com FDG-18 F em pacientes com suspeita de recidiva de carcinoma de ovrio.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanja Dragosavac

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??O exame PET/CT com FDG-18F um mtodo de diagnstico por imagem, til em oncologia. O cncer de ovrio o cncer ginecolgico de maior (more)

  3. American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American

  4. Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

  5. CT-Guided Interventions Using a Free-Hand, Optical Tracking System: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, Tilman, E-mail: TSchubert@uhbs.ch; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Pansini, Michele [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Liu, David [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada); Gutzeit, Andreas [Winterthur Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Kos, Sebastian [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeThe present study was designed to evaluate the geometrical accuracy and clinical applicability of a new, free-hand, CT-guided, optical navigation system.MethodsFifteen procedures in 14 consecutive patients were retrospectively analyzed. The navigation system was applied for interventional procedures on small target lesions, in cases with long needle paths, narrow access windows, or when an out-of-plane access was expected. Mean lesion volume was 27.9 ml, and mean distance to target measured was 107.5 mm. Eleven of 15 needle trajectories were planned as out-of-plane approaches regarding the axial CT plane.ResultsNinety-one percent of the biopsies were diagnostic. All therapeutic interventions were technically successful. Targeting precision was high with a mean distance of the needle tip from planned target of 1.98 mm. Mean intervention time was 1:12 h. A statistically significant correlation between angular needle deviation and intervention time (p = 0.007), respiratory movement of the target (p = 0.008), and body mass index (p = 0.02) was detected. None of the evaluated parameters correlated significantly with the distance from the needle tip to the planned target.ConclusionsThe application of a navigation system for complex CT-guided procedures provided safe and effective targeting within a reasonable intervention time in our series.

  6. Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alchohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transaortic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, S. [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis with a CT-guided anterior transonic approach, a new method for splanchnic block alleviation of chronic abdominal pain, is described. Ten patients with chronic abdominal pain requiring narcotic treatment, six with pancreatic carcinoma, one with gastric carcinoma, two with chronic pancreatitis, and one with pain of unknown etiology, were referred for splanchnic nerve neurolysis. With CT guidance, a 20 gauge needle was placed through the aorta into the retrocrural space at T11-T12, and 5-15 ml 96% alcohol was injected into the retrocrural space. Following the procedure, 6 of 10 patients were pain free, 2 patients had temporary pain relief, and 2 patients were without response. There were no significant complications. CT-guided anterior transaortic retrocrural splanchnic nerve alcohol neurolysis is technically feasible, easier to perform than the classic posterolateral approach, and may have less risk of complications. The success rate in this initial trial was reasonable and, therefore, this technique provides an additional method for the treatment of abdominal pain. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua [Task Group 179, Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero St., Suite H 1031, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

  8. Freehand Two-Step CT-Guided Brain Tumor Biopsy: A Fast and Effective Interventional Procedure in Selected Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos ['Korgialeneio-Benakeio', Hellenic Red-Cross Hospital of Athens, Radiology Department (Greece)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided needle biopsy of brain lesions without a stereotactic device, and to determine the best possible indications for this technique. Methods. From February 2001 to February 2004, 20 patients (12 men, 8 women; age 61-82 years) underwent CT-guided brain lesion biopsy. The procedure started with a brain CT scan for lesion localization and for selection of the inlet for needle insertion. The patient was then transported to the operating room where cranioanatrisis was performed. Subsequently, the biopsy was performed under CT guidance using a 14G brain biopsy needle with a blind smooth end and lateral holes. At the end of the biopsy, the field was checked for possible complications with a CT scan. Results. Histopathologic results were: brain tumor in 16 patients (80%), inflammatory process in 3 (15%), and no conclusive diagnosis in 1 (5%). A repeat of the process was required in 2 patients. A minor complication of local hematoma was found in 1 patient (5%). There were no deaths or other serious complications.Conclusion. CT-guided biopsy is a reliable method for histopathologic diagnosis of brain lesions in selected cases. It is a simple, fast, effective, low-cost procedure with minimal complications, indicated especially for superficial and large tumors.

  9. SUNDAY -1PM -7PM ASBURY PARK, NJ01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Graduate School. THURSDAY - 6PM - 7:30PM CLEVELAND TOWER AT OLD GC05 SAND VOLLEYBALL AND COOL SUMMER TREATS participant, but only while supplies last--first-come, first-served. We'll gather on the Palmer Square Green

  10. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt051tifeinberg2011...

  11. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. tiarravt051feinberg2010...

  12. Role in Climate A Robock, Rutgers University,, New Brunswick, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    and cooling the surface. These clouds also absorb both solar (near infrared) and terrestrial radiation, heating the lower stratosphere. Volcanic aerosols also serve as surfaces for hetero- geneous chemical heating in the lower stratosphere, but the net effect is still heating. As this chemical effect depends

  13. To cities, with nothing : prisoner resettlement in Newark, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeney, Kevin Joseph

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers how cities can improve employment outcomes of recently released, formerly incarcerated people. The Newark Prisoner Reentry Initiative (NPRI) is a unique case where the city directly managed six ...

  14. RECIPIENT:Princeton Power Systems STATE: NJ PROJECT Marine High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, terature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

  15. NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSCJeffreyKey ActionsThe NextAwards » 2012

  16. QER Public Meeting in Newark, NJ: Electricity Transmission and Distribution

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans | Department of- East | Department of

  17. NJ OFFICE OF THE STATE Stephen M. Eells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    of data. Data Privacy ­ Personal and confidential information must be protected. Federal regulations (IE Challenges as we Move Forward Electronic Evidence vs hard copy Access to data vs privacy protection Your accuracy. #12;Data Access Data Protection ­ limiting access so as to protect the integrity and accuracy

  18. DOE's NJ HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE BOWL® | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice of ScientificSolar Residence by e2DOE5, 2012

  19. Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind Farm Jump to:CaseInternational

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bakelite Corp - NJ 35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJFertilizer Works -Bakelite

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bloomfield Tool Co - NJ 21

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill - NJFacility -Bloomfield Tool

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bowen Lab - NJ 33

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill - NJFacilityBodo Canyon Cell

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Callite Tungsten Co - NJ 36

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill -Elmore - OHCallite Tungsten Co

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNYEra Tool andFairmont Chemical

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heyden Chemical Corp - NJ 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison Mill Site -HealdHeyden

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Picatinny Arsenal - NJ 31

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OHPhiladelphia Navy Yard -

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Princeton University - NJ 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co -0-19 Polytechnic-Princeton

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Raritan Arsenal - NJ 32

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co -0-19GasK LeRaritan Arsenal

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tube Reducing Co - NJ 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MOTracerlab Inc - MA0-02ATube

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Lead Co - NJ 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MOTracerlab IncMines

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wayne Site - NJ 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntownRocky FlatsOhio > Fernald >Wayne

  12. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOEToward aInnovation |NEXT STEPS The nextEnergy

  13. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOEToward aInnovation |NEXT STEPS The nextEnergyDepartment

  14. NJ Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Trucks, Shuttle Buses and Infrastructure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOEToward aInnovation |NEXT STEPS The

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: NJ Transit FutureGrid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLSMolten-Salt Storage System Areva SolarNASA NASANEDNESLNISACNJ

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexicoEngland Lime Co -

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A01EngineeringOlin

  18. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)] [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Foley, W. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 030, in 5 increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30 gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the gantry reduced the dose to the breast, while also increasing noise standard deviation. Overall, the noise increase outweighed the dose reduction for the eight voxelized phantoms, suggesting that tilted gantry acquisition may not be beneficial for reducing breast dose while maintaining image quality.

  19. Vapor-liquid equilibria for systems of 1-butanol with 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-2-butanol, and 3-methyl-2-butanol at 30 and 100 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aucejo, A.; Burguet, M.C.; Monton, J.B.; Munoz, R.; Sanchotello, M.; Vazquez, M.I. (Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data were measured for binary systems of 1-butanol with 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-2-butanol, and 3-methyl-2-butanol at 30 and 100 kPa. The experimental data obtained in this work are thermodynamically consistent according to a point-to-point consistency test, and deviation from ideal behavior is small in all cases. They can be equally well correlated with the Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations.

  20. Correlation between internal fiducial tumor motion and external marker motion for liver tumors imaged with 4D-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: abeddar@mdanderson.org; Kainz, Kristofer [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina Marie [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsunashima, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pan Tinsu [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Prado, Karl [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We investigated the correlation between the motions of an external marker and internal fiducials implanted in the liver for 8 patients undergoing respiratory-based computed tomography (four-dimensional CT [4D-CT]) procedures. Methods and Materials: The internal fiducials were gold seeds, 3 mm in length and 1.2 mm in diameter. Four patients each had one implanted fiducial, and the other four had three implanted fiducials. The external marker was a plastic box, which is part of the Real-Time Position Management System (RPM) used to track the patient's respiration. Each patient received a standard helical CT scan followed by a time-correlated CT-image acquisition (4D-CT). The 4D-CT images were reconstructed in 10 separate phases covering the entire respiratory cycle. Results: The internal fiducial motion is predominant in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 7.5-17.5 mm. The correlation between external respiration and internal fiducial motion is best during expiration. For 2 patients with their three fiducials separated by a maximum of 3.2 cm, the motions of the fiducials were well correlated, whereas for 2 patients with more widely spaced fiducials, there was less correlation. Conclusions: In general, there is a good correlation between internal fiducial motion imaged by 4D-CT and external marker motion. We have demonstrated that gating may be best performed at the end of the respiratory cycle. Special attention should be paid to gating for patients whose fiducials do not move in synchrony, because targeting on the correct respiratory amplitude alone would not guarantee that the entire tumor volume is within the treatment field.

  1. Visiting Companies, Institutions and Laboratories 1 3M Health Care St. Paul, MN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Optima Sports Medicine Salem, NH 39 Ethicon Somerville, NJ 40 Fraunhofer Center for Manufacturing Innovation Brookline, MA 41 GE Healthcare Lawrence, MA 42 Gems Sensors - Controls Plainville, CT 43 Genzyme

  2. Fact #775: April 15, 2013 Top Ten Urban Areas for Fuel Wasted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information &127;Top Ten Urban Areas for Fuel Wasted due to Traffic Congestion, 2011 Rank Urban Area Fuel Wasted due to Congestion (Million Gallons) 1 New York-Newark NY-NJ-CT...

  3. SU-E-I-18: CT Scanner QA Using Normalized CTDI Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randazzo, M; Tambasco, M; Russell, B [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To create a ratio of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) data normalized to in-air measurements (CTDIair) as a function of beam quality to create a look-up table for frequent, rapid quality assurance (QA) checks of CTDI. Methods: The CTDIw values were measured according to TG-63 protocol using a pencil ionization chamber (Unfors Xi CT detector) and head and body Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms (16 and 32 cm diameter, respectively). Single scan dose profiles were measured at each clinically available energy (80,100,120,140 kVp) on three different CT scanners (two Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash and one GE Optima), using a tube current of 400 mA, a one second rotation time, and the widest available beam width (32 0.6 mm and 16 1.25 mm, respectively). These values were normalized to CTDIair measurements using the same conditions as CTDIw. The ratios (expressed in cGy/R) were assessed for each scanner as a function of each energy's half value layer (HVL) paired with the phantom's appropriate bow tie filter measured in mmAl. Results: Normalized CTDI values vary linearly with HVL for both the head and body phantoms. The ratios for the two Siemens machines are very similar at each energy. Compared to the GE scanner, these values vary between 1020% for each kVp setting. Differences in CTDIair contribute most to the deviation of the ratios across machines. Ratios are independent of both mAs and collimation. Conclusion: Look-up tables constructed of normalized CTDI values as a function of HVL can be used to derive CTDIw data from only three in-air measurements (one for CTDIair and two with added filtration for HVL) to allow for simple, frequent QA checks without CT phantom setup. Future investigations will involve comparing results with Monte Carlo simulations for validation.

  4. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNair, Helen A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Coffey, Jerome [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Shoulders, Beverley [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke N. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Norman, Andrew [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, S. Aslam [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Warrington, Alan P. [Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David P. [Department of Academic Urology Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

  5. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  6. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

  7. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Surgery, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 2 to 60 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 70 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 50 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 70 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 50, 40 40, and 30 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%20%) from 3.9 to 0.8 mm.Conclusions: A set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system were constructed with position reliably better than a tenth of a millimeter. The hardware system is ready for image-guided conformal radiotherapy for small animals with capability of respiratory-gated delivery.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-EngineerSelling Corp - CT 0-01

  9. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  10. Sparse signal reconstruction from polychromatic X-ray CT measurements via mass attenuation discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandi?, Aleksandar [Iowa State University, Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method for reconstructing sparse images from polychromatic x-ray computed tomography (ct) measurements via mass attenuation coefficient discretization. The material of the inspected object and the incident spectrum are assumed to be unknown. We rewrite the Lambert-Beers law in terms of integral expressions of mass attenuation and discretize the resulting integrals. We then present a penalized constrained least-squares optimization approach for reconstructing the underlying object from log-domain measurements, where an active set approach is employed to estimate incident energy density parameters and the nonnegativity and sparsity of the image density map are imposed using negative-energy and smooth ?{sub 1}-norm penalty terms. We propose a two-step scheme for refining the mass attenuation discretization grid by using higher sampling rate over the range with higher photon energy, and eliminating the discretization points that have little effect on accuracy of the forward projection model. This refinement allows us to successfully handle the characteristic lines (Dirac impulses) in the incident energy density spectrum. We compare the proposed method with the standard filtered backprojection, which ignores the polychromatic nature of the measurements and sparsity of the image density map. Numerical simulations using both realistic simulated and real x-ray ct data are presented.

  11. Dose calculation software for helical tomotherapy, utilizing patient CT data to calculate an independent three-dimensional dose cube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Simon J.; Eyre, Katie R.; Tudor, G. Samuel J.; Fairfoul, Jamie [Medical Physics Department, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Treatment plans for the TomoTherapy unit are produced with a planning system that is integral to the unit. The authors have produced an independent dose calculation system, to enable plans to be recalculated in three dimensions, using the patient's CT data. Methods: Software has been written using MATLAB. The DICOM-RT plan object is used to determine the treatment parameters used, including the treatment sinogram. Each projection of the sinogram is segmented and used to calculate dose at multiple calculation points in a three-dimensional grid using tables of measured beam data. A fast ray-trace algorithm is used to determine effective depth for each projection angle at each calculation point. Calculations were performed on a standard desktop personal computer, with a 2.6 GHz Pentium, running Windows XP. Results: The time to perform a calculation, for 3375 points averaged 1 min 23 s for prostate plans and 3 min 40 s for head and neck plans. The mean dose within the 50% isodose was calculated and compared with the predictions of the TomoTherapy planning system. When the modified CT (which includes the TomoTherapy couch) was used, the mean difference for ten prostate patients, was -0.4% (range -0.9% to +0.3%). With the original CT (which included the CT couch), the mean difference was -1.0% (range -1.7% to 0.0%). The number of points agreeing with a gamma 3%/3 mm averaged 99.2% with the modified CT, 96.3% with the original CT. For ten head and neck patients, for the modified and original CT, respectively, the mean difference was +1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.1%) and 1.1% (range -0.4% to +3.0%) with 94.4% and 95.4% passing a gamma 4%/4 mm. The ability of the program to detect a variety of simulated errors has been tested. Conclusions: By using the patient's CT data, the independent dose calculation performs checks that are not performed by a measurement in a cylindrical phantom. This enables it to be used either as an additional check or to replace phantom measurements for some patients. The software has potential to be used in any application where one wishes to model changes to patient conditions.

  12. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality especially for children. Unless recalibrated, kV should be constant for all anatomical sites if diagnostic CT scanner is used as a simulator. This work was partially supported by Capital Medical Development Scientific Research Fund of China.

  13. Grant Title: RESEARCH SUPPLEMENTS TO PROMOTE DIVERSITY IN HEALTH-RELATED RESEARCH Funding Opportunity Number: PA-12-149. CFDA Number(s): 93.398, 93.867, 93.233, 93.837, 93.838, 93.839,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-12-149. CFDA Number(s): 93.398, 93.867, 93.233, 93.837, 93.838, 93.839, 93.172, 93

  14. Grant Title: MIDCAREER INVESTIGATOR AWARD IN PATIENT-ORIENTED RESEARCH (K24) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-11-195. CFDA Number(s): 93.866, 93.271, 93.855, 93.856, 93.846, 93.398,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: PA-11-195. CFDA Number(s): 93.866, 93.271, 93.855, 93.856, 93.846, 93.398, 93.865, 93.173, 93

  15. Offering Songs, Festive Songs, Processional Songs mGar-gLu, Khro-Glu, Phebsnga: Khang Lhamo, Yandol & Pema Dolma Music: Li phur ma laten pai, 'The belt on the boots'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Katey

    phur ma laten pai Translation of title The belt on the boots Description (to be used in archive entry) Genre or type (i.e. epic, song, ritual) khro glu (festive song) Medium (i.e. reel to reel, web-based file, DVD) Digital Recording Related... access (fully closed, fully open) Fully open for web streaming Notes and context (include reference to any related documentation, such as photographs) "This belt is really long on the boots. If we use it on the waist it's short. You can use...

  16. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of 1-butanol + N,N-dimethylformamide and 1-pentanol + N,N-dimethylformamide systems at 50.00 and 100.00 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marzal, P.; Gabaldon, C.; Seco, A.; Monton, J.B. [Univ. de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental determinations of vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) are indispensable for the design of separation processes such as distillation columns, extractive distillation, and selection of solvents. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were obtained for the 1-butanol + N,N-dimethylformamide and 1-pentanol + N,N-dimethylformamide systems at 50.00 and 100.00 kPa. The activity coefficients were found to be thermodynamically consistent. The data were correlated with five liquid phase activity coefficient models (Margules, Van Laar, Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC). Experimental vapor pressures of N,N-dimethylformamide are also included.

  17. N e w Fa c u lt y P r o F i l e s K i N g H a l l e x Pa N s i o N &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    N e w Fa c u lt y P r o F i l e s K i N g H a l l e x Pa N s i o N & r e N o vat i o N s o a r s a l s o i n s i d e : r e m e m b e r i N g t H e c l a s s o F 1 9 6 9 D o N o r r o l l s #12;m e for our students, with the School of Law unveiling a new externship program in Washington, D.C. in spring

  18. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin [Department of Medical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  19. Multi-GPU parallelization of a 3D Bayesian CT algorithm and its application on real foam reconstruction with incomplete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tomography (CT) [1,2]. The limits of these methods appear when the number of projections is small, and for example, the data set are not complete due to the limited acquistion time. In this specific context is the computation time and especially for projection and backprojection steps. In this study, first we show how we

  20. Methods for reduced platen compression (RPC) test specimen cutting locations using micro-CT and planar radiographs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Heber

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to complete an RPC analysis and improving the quality of the obtained results. High-resolution micro-CT scans are used to gain a better understanding of rat long bone anatomy by quantifying the location, shape, and orientation of the growth plate, primary...

  1. TRACE/PARCS calculations of exercises 1 and 2 of the V1000CT-2 benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K. [Pennsylvania State Univ., 230 Reber Bldg, Univ. Park, PA 16801 (United States); Popov, E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exercises 1 and 2 of the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 2 (V1000CT-2) are investigated using coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics/thermal-hydraulics code TRACE/PARCS. Two coarse mesh 3-D thermal-hydraulic models (with six angular sectors and with eighteen angular sectors) were developed for the system code TRACE for Exercise 1 and their applicability is evaluated using the test data provided in the benchmark specification. The six sector model is then coupled with the PARCS 3-D neutron kinetics model in order to analyze Exercise 2 of the benchmark. The results show that TRACE code is accurate enough to simulate the flow mixing occurring in the downcomer of the VVER-1000 reactor. (authors)

  2. Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Luyao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU within either projection domain or image domain. Further test shows the method is robust with respect to segmentation procedure.

  3. CT Measurements of Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigham, William E.; Castanier Louis M.; Hughes, Richard G.

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water/air experiment. These results suggest that it is incorrect to assume negligible capillary continuity between matrix blocks as is often done.

  4. Dynamic Multiscale Boundary Conditions for 4D CT Images of Healthy and Emphysematous Rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Carson, James P.; Thomas, Mathew; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the shape of the lung during breathing determine the movement of airways and alveoli, and thus impact airflow dynamics. Modeling airflow dynamics in health and disease is a key goal for predictive multiscale models of respiration. Past efforts to model changes in lung shape during breathing have measured shape at multiple breath-holds. However, breath-holds do not capture hysteretic differences between inspiration and expiration resulting from the additional energy required for inspiration. Alternatively, imaging dynamically without breath-holds allows measurement of hysteretic differences. In this study, we acquire multiple micro-CT images per breath (4DCT) in live rats, and from these images we develop, for the first time, dynamic volume maps. These maps show changes in local volume across the entire lung throughout the breathing cycle and accurately predict the global pressure-volume (PV) hysteresis.

  5. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L., E-mail: clbrace@wisc.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 1.8 mm (?20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 1.0 mm (?10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ?70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  6. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  7. Summer 2011 Internships-Employers and Salaries Carnegie Institute of Technology (CIT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Barbara CA Net App (2) Pittsburgh PA NEC Labs Princeton NJ Tesla Motors Palo Alto CA Qualcomm San Diego CA Digital, LLC Cambridge MA General Motors Detroit MI Goldman Sachs New York NY Google Mountain View CA Electric Transportation Erie PA General Motors Rochester NY Intel Santa Clara CA Lockheed Martin Arlington

  8. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada)] [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada)] [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8?mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  9. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)] [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

  10. Calculations of two new dose metrics proposed by AAPM Task Group 111 using the measurements with standard CT dosimetry phantoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the equilibrium dose-pitch product D-caret{sub eq} for scan modes involving table translation and the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) for stationary-table modes on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long (e.g., at least 40 cm) phantoms. This paper presents an alternative approach to calculate both metrics using the measurements of scanning the standard computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry phantoms on CT scanners.Methods: D-caret{sub eq} was calculated from CTDI{sub 100} and ?(CTDI{sub 100}) (CTDI{sub 100} efficiency), and D{sub L}(0) was calculated from D-caret{sub eq} and the approach to equilibrium function H(L) =D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq}, where D{sub eq} was the equilibrium dose. CTDI{sub 100} may be directly obtained from several sources (such as medical physicist's CT scanner performance evaluation or the IMPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator), or be derived from CTDI{sub Vol} using the central to peripheral CTDI{sub 100} ratio (R{sub 100}). The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers [X. Li, D. Zhang, and B. Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 901905 (2012); and ibid. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)]. R{sub 100} was assessed for a series of GE, Siemens, Philips, and Toshiba CT scanners with multiple settings of scan field of view, tube voltage, and bowtie filter.Results: The calculated D{sub L}(0) and D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} in PMMA and water cylinders were consistent with the measurements on two GE CT scanners (LightSpeed 16 and VCT) by Dixon and Ballard [Med. Phys. 34, 33993413 (2007)], the measurements on a Siemens CT scanner (SOMATOM Spirit Power) by Descamps et al. [J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 13, 293302 (2012)], and the Monte Carlo simulations by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 45474554 (2009)].Conclusions: D-caret{sub eq} and D{sub L}(0) can be calculated using the alternative approach. The authors have provided the required ?(CTDI{sub 100}) and H(L) data in two previous papers. R{sub 100} is presented for a majority of multidetector CT scanners currently on the market, and can be easily assessed for other CT scanners or operating conditions not covered in this study. The central to peripheral D{sub eq} ratio is about 1.50 and 1.12 times of R{sub 100} for the 32- and 16-cm diameter PMMA phantom, respectively.

  11. Effects of ray profile modeling on resolution recovery in clinical CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, Christian [Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Knaup, Michael [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kachelrie, Marc, E-mail: marc.kachelriess@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexander University (FAU), Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. However, among vendors and researchers, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these goals. The authors are focusing on the aspect of geometric ray profile modeling, which is realized by some algorithms, while others model the ray as a straight line. The authors incorporate ray-modeling (RM) in nonregularized iterative reconstruction. That means, instead of using one simple single needle beam to represent the x-ray, the authors evaluate the double integral of attenuation path length over the finite source distribution and the finite detector element size in the numerical forward projection. Our investigations aim at analyzing the resolution recovery (RR) effects of RM. Resolution recovery means that frequencies can be recovered beyond the resolution limit of the imaging system. In order to evaluate, whether clinical CT images can benefit from modeling the geometrical properties of each x-ray, the authors performed a 2D simulation study of a clinical CT fan-beam geometry that includes the precise modeling of these geometrical properties. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and a Forbild thorax phantom with circular resolution patterns representing calcifications in the heart region are simulated. An FBP reconstruction with a RamLak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The FBP is compared to iterative reconstruction techniques with and without RM: An ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm without any RM (OSC), an OSC where the forward projection is modeled concerning the finite focal spot and detector size (OSC-RM) and an OSC with RM and with a matched forward and backprojection pair (OSC-T-RM, T for transpose). In all cases, noise was matched to be able to focus on comparing spatial resolution. The authors use two different simulation settings. Both are based on the geometry of a typical clinical CT system (0.7 mm detector element size at isocenter, 1024 projections per rotation). Setting one has an exaggerated source width of 5.0 mm. Setting two has a realistically small source width of 0.5 mm. The authors also investigate the transition from setting one to two. To quantify image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through the resolution patterns to define a contrast factor (CF) for contrast-resolution plots, and the authors compare the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with respect to the ground truth of the circular resolution patterns. To independently analyze whether RM is of advantage, the authors implemented several iterative reconstruction algorithms: The statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm OSC, the ordered subsets simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OSSART) and another statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, denoted with ordered subsets maximum likelihood (OSML) algorithm. All algorithms were implemented both without RM (denoted as OSC, OSSART, and OSML) and with RM (denoted as OSC-RM, OSSART-RM, and OSML-RM). Results: For the unrealistic case of a 5.0 mm focal spot the CF can be improved by a factor of two due to RM: the 4.2 LP/cm bar pattern, which is the first bar pattern that cannot be resolved without RM, can be easily resolved with RM. For the realistic case of a 0.5 mm focus, all results show approximately the same CF. The NCC shows no significant dependency on RM when the source width is smaller than 2.0 mm (as in clinical CT). From 2.0 mm to 5.0 mm focal spot size increasing improvements can be observed with RM. Conclusions: Geometric RM in iterative reconstruction helps improving spatial resolution, if the ray cross-section is significantly larger than the ray sampling distance. In clinical CT, however, the ray is not much thicker than the distance between neighboring ray centers, as the focal spot size is small and detector crosstalk is negligi

  12. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

  13. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

  14. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirota, Shozo, E-mail: hirota-s@hyo-med.ac.jp; Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ueda, Ken [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Research and Development Center (Japan); Baba, Rika [Hitachi Limited, Central Research Laboratory (Japan)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

  15. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  16. Application of X-ray CT for investigating fluid flow and conformance control during CO2 injection in highly heterogeneous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakravarthy, Deepak

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    were performed using homogeneous and heterogeneous cores and a 4th generation X-Ray CT scanner was used to visualize heterogeneity and fluid flow in the core. Porosity and saturation measurements were made during the course of the experiment...

  17. Phase behavior of carbon dioxide in admixture with n-butane, n-decane, n-butylcyclohexane, and n-butylbenzene at 344 K and approximately 9600 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, H.C.; Swift, G.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bubble point pressure data were acquired at 344 K and about 9600 kPa on ternary mixtures of carbon dioxide and n-butane with paraffinic (n-decane), naphthenic (n-butylcyclohexane), and aromatic (n-butylbenzene) compounds to determine what effect differences in compound type might have on carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon miscibility of such systems. The data on carbon dioxide-n-butane-n-decane, when compared with those from the literature, showed good agreement. This suggests that the remaining data reported here are reliable. The data were regressed by using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state to determine interaction coefficient sets for phase behavior prediction. These sets of interaction coefficients were used to calculate carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon miscibility. No significant difference in miscibility was found as the heavy hydrocarbon compound was changed from paraffinic to naphthenic to aromatic type.

  18. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Held, M; Morin, O; Pouliot, J [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens.

  19. Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

  20. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.; (GSKNC); (Duke); (UNC)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  1. Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

  2. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Universit de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Lige (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: We examine influence of the image resolution on ?CT-based morphological analysis. Surface properties influence accuracy of ?CT-based morphology of porous structures. Total porosity was the least sensitive to surface complexity and scan voxel size. The beam thickness analysis was overestimated by the surface roughness. Voxel size customization can significantly reduce a cost of the ?CT-based analysis.

  3. CT measurements of two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs commonly divides the reservoir into two continua - the matrix system and the fracture system. Flow equations are written presuming that the primary flow between grid blocks occurs through the fracture system and that the primary fluid storage is in the matrix system. The dual porosity formulation of the equations assumes that there is no flow between matrix blocks while the dual permeability formulation allows fluid movement between matrix blocks. Since most of the fluid storage is contained in the matrix, recovery is dominated by the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the high conductivity fractures. The physical mechanisms influencing this transfer have been evaluated primarily through numerical studies. Relatively few experimental studies have investigated the transfer mechanisms. Early studies focused on the prediction of reservoir recoveries from the results of scaled experiments on single reservoir blocks. Recent experiments have investigated some of the mechanisms that are dominant in gravity drainage situations and in small block imbibition displacements. The mechanisms active in multiphase flow in fractured media need to be further illuminated, since some of the experimental results appear to be contradictory. This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

  4. MicroCT-Based Skeletal Models for Use in Tomographic Voxel Phantoms for Radiological Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley Bolch

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The University of Florida (UF) proposes to develop two high-resolution image-based skeletal dosimetry models for direct use by ICRP Committee 2s Task Group on Dose Calculation in their forthcoming Reference Voxel Male (RVM) and Reference Voxel Female (RVF) whole-body dosimetry phantoms. These two phantoms are CT-based, and thus do not have the image resolution to delineate and perform radiation transport modeling of the individual marrow cavities and bone trabeculae throughout their skeletal structures. Furthermore, new and innovative 3D microimaging techniques will now be required for the skeletal tissues following Committee 2s revision of the target tissues of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. This target tissue had been defined in ICRP Publication 30 as a 10-?m cell layer on all bone surfaces of trabecular and cortical bone. The revised target tissue is now a 50-?m layer within the marrow cavities of trabecular bone only and is exclusive of the marrow adipocytes. Clearly, this new definition requires the use of 3D microimages of the trabecular architecture not available from past 2D optical studies of the adult skeleton. With our recent acquisition of two relatively young cadavers (males of age 18-years and 40-years), we will develop a series of reference skeletal models that can be directly applied to (1) the new ICRP reference voxel man and female phantoms developed for the ICRP, and (2) pediatric phantoms developed to target the ICRP reference children. Dosimetry data to be developed will include absorbed fractions for internal beta and alpha-particle sources, as well as photon and neutron fluence-to-dose response functions for direct use in external dosimetry studies of the ICRP reference workers and members of the general public

  5. A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg [Medicsight PLC, Kensington Centre, 66 Hammersmith Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

  6. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning systemMultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was printed using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in areas of above 40% of the prescription dose. The final inverse treatment plan was comprised of 43 beams ranging from 5 to 12.5 mm in diameter (2.5 mm size increments are available up to 15 mm in diameter collimation). Using the Xsight Spine Tracking module, the CyberKnife system could not reliably identify and track the tiny mouse spine; however, the CyberKnife system could identify and track the fiducial markers on the 3D mold.In vivo positional accuracy analysis using the 3D mold generated a mean error of 1.41 mm 0.73 mm when fiducial markers were used for position tracking. Analysis of the dissected brain confirmed the ability to target the correct brain volume. Conclusions: With the use of a stereotactic body mold with fiducial markers, microCT imaging, and resolution down-sampling, the CyberKnife system can successfully perform small-animal radiotherapy studies.

  7. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dosevolume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  8. Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

  9. Tumor Tracking Method Based on a Deformable 4D CT Breathing Motion Model Driven by an External Surface Surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassi, Aurora, E-mail: aurora.fassi@mail.polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Schaerer, Jol; Fernandes, Mathieu [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Universit Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Lon Brard, Lyon (France); Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Sarrut, David [CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, Universit Lyon 1, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Lon Brard, Lyon (France); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a tumor tracking method based on a surrogate-driven motion model, which provides noninvasive dynamic localization of extracranial targets for the compensation of respiration-induced intrafraction motion in high-precision radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The proposed approach is based on a patient-specific breathing motion model, derived a priori from 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (CT) images. Model parameters (respiratory baseline, amplitude, and phase) are retrieved and updated at each treatment fraction according to in-room radiography acquisition and optical surface imaging. The baseline parameter is adapted to the interfraction variations obtained from the daily cone beam (CB) CT scan. The respiratory amplitude and phase are extracted from an external breathing surrogate, estimated from the displacement of the patient thoracoabdominal surface, acquired with a noninvasive surface imaging device. The developed method was tested on a database of 7 lung cancer patients, including the synchronized information on internal and external respiratory motion during a CBCT scan. Results: About 30 seconds of simultaneous acquisition of CBCT and optical surface images were analyzed for each patient. The tumor trajectories identified in CBCT projections were used as reference and compared with the target trajectories estimated from surface displacement with the a priori motion model. The resulting absolute differences between the reference and estimated tumor motion along the 2 image dimensions ranged between 0.7 and 2.4 mm; the measured phase shifts did not exceed 7% of the breathing cycle length. Conclusions: We investigated a tumor tracking method that integrates breathing motion information provided by the 4-dimensional planning CT with surface imaging at the time of treatment, representing an alternative approach to point-based externalinternal correlation models. Although an in-room radiograph-based assessment of the reliability of the motion model is envisaged, the developed technique does not involve the estimation and continuous update of correlation parameters, thus requiring a less intense use of invasive imaging.

  10. Using Synchrotron X-Ray Nano-CT to Characterize SOFC Electrode Microstructures in Three-Dimensions at Operating Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearing, P.R.; Bradley, R.S.; Gelb, J.; Lee, S.N.; Atkinson, A.; Withers, P.J.; Brandon, N.P. (Manchester); (Xradia); (ICL)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, developments in tomography tools have provided unprecedented insight into the microstructure of electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells, enabling researchers to establish direct links between electrode microstructure and electrochemical performance. Here we present results of high resolution, synchrotron X-ray nano computed tomography experiments, which have enabled microstructural characterisation of a mixed ionic electronic conducting lanthanum strontium cobalt iron oxide (LSCF) cathode with sub-50nm resolution at operating temperature. Using the uniquely non-destructive nano-CT platform, it is possible to characterise microstructural evolution processes associated with heating and operation in-situ.

  11. Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

  12. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Warren G.; Rudko, D. A.; Braam, Nicolas A.; Jirasek, Andrew [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wells, Derek M. [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to introduce a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner for three-dimensional (3D) radiation dosimetry. Methods: Two techniques of fan-beam creation were evaluated: a helium-neon laser (HeNe, {lambda} = 543 nm) with line-generating lens, and a laser diode module (LDM, {lambda} = 635 nm) with line-creating head module. Two physical collimator designs were assessed: a single-slot collimator and a multihole collimator. Optimal collimator depth was determined by observing the signal of a single photodiode with varying collimator depths. A method of extending the dynamic range of the system is presented. Two sample types were used for evaluations: nondosimetric absorbent solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, each housed in 1 liter cylindrical plastic flasks. Imaging protocol investigations were performed to address ring artefacts and image noise. Two image artefact removal techniques were performed in sinogram space. Collimator efficacy was evaluated by imaging highly opaque samples of scatter-based and absorption-based solutions. A noise-based flask registration technique was developed. Two protocols for gel manufacture were examined. Results: The LDM proved advantageous over the HeNe laser due to its reduced noise. Also, the LDM uses a wavelength more suitable for the PRESAGE{sup TM} dosimeter. Collimator depth of 1.5 cm was found to be an optimal balance between scatter rejection, signal strength, and manufacture ease. The multihole collimator is capable of maintaining accurate scatter-rejection to high levels of opacity with scatter-based solutions (T < 0.015%). Imaging protocol investigations support the need for preirradiation and postirradiation scanning to reduce reflection-based ring artefacts and to accommodate flask imperfections and gel inhomogeneities. Artefact removal techniques in sinogram space eliminate streaking artefacts and reduce ring artefacts of up to {approx}40% in magnitude. The flask registration technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  13. Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S. [Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Physics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Computer Science, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physics, and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Toshiba Stroke Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution (<4 lp/mm). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems have better resolution (>10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 {mu}m pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 {mu}m pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 {mu}m diameter) are approximately 192{+-}21 and 313{+-}38 {mu}m for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA, FFOV FPD data need not be of the highest quality, and thus may be acquired at lower dose compared to a standard FPD acquisition. These results indicate that this system could provide the basis for high resolution images of regions of interest in patients with a reduction in the integral dose compared to the standard FPD approach.

  14. Palmetto Clean Energy (PaCE) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: For a limited time, generators of 6 kilowatts or less of renewable energy can now take advantage of a premium $0.10 per kilowatt hour. This premium is available on a first-come-first...

  15. 2011 International Pittsburgh Coal Conference Pittsburgh, PA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Sequestration in Unmineable Coal with Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery: The Marshall County Project James E conducted in Marshall County, West Virginia, USA, to evaluate enhanced coal bed methane recovery enhanced coal bed methane (CBM) pilot test in Marshall County, West Virginia. This pilot test was developed

  16. CLEO CONF 963 ICHEP96 PA05078

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Urheim, 18 A.J. Weinstein, 18 F. W¨urthwein, 18 D.M. Asner, 19 D.W. Bliss, 19 W.S. Brower, 19 G. Masek, 22 D.L. Kreinick, 22 T. Lee, 22 Y. Liu, 22 G.S. Ludwig, 22 J. Masui, 22 J. Mevissen, 22 N.B. Mistry. Yelton, 23 G. Brandenburg, 24 R.A. Briere, 24 D. Kim, 24 T. Liu, 24 M. Saulnier, 24 R. Wilson, 24 H

  17. CLEO CONF 9617 ICHEP96 PA07091

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D.M. Asner, 22 M. Athanas, 22 D.W. Bliss, 22 W.S. Brower, 22 G. Masek, 22 H.P. Paar, 22 J. Gronberg. Liu, 2 M. Saulnier, 2 R. Wilson, 2 H. Yamamoto, 2 T. E. Browder, 3 F. Li, 3 J. L. Rodriguez, 3 T P.C. Kim, 25 D.L. Kreinick, 25 T. Lee, 25 Y. Liu, 25 G.S. Ludwig, 25 J. Masui, 25 J. Mevissen, 25 N

  18. Arco chimie focuses on PA at FOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.

    1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Arco Chimie France (Fos-sur-Mer), at a recent meeting at its southern France manufacturing site, emphasized that future strategy is strongly focused on its propylene oxide (PO) and derivatives activities. The F2.5 billion ($466 million)-Fe billion/year operation manufactures 200,000 m.t./year of PO, about 70% for captive use and the balance for the merchant market; 550,000 m.t./year of methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE); 97,000 m.t./year of polyols; and 70,000 m.t./year of propylene glycols. There has been talk of Arco modifying its Fos MTBE plant to make it flexible for ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) output; the parent company already operates an MTBE/ETBE pilot unit at Corpus Christi, TX. But Arco Chimie notes there is insufficient bioethanol feedstock availability to convert all production to ETBE. The company would also require investment in new storage capacity for ethanol and ETBE. However, France's biofuels program is not yet clearly defined, and it is politically sensitive because it depends heavily on government subsidies offered to farmers. That, says Arco, makes it impossible to have an accurate idea of how much ethanol will be available.

  19. Microsoft Word - PA MP FY02.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronic InputNuclear MaterialsTBD 1) 1 2

  20. ZERH Arch Designer PA rev (2)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department ofDepartmentLieve LaurensThe A ppraisal P rocess: Be Y our O

  1. Additional Information on the ERDF PA approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T op Document:Adding NewCERCLA ARAR

  2. Additional Information on the ERDF PA approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T op Document:Adding NewCERCLA ARARto

  3. Additional Information on the ERDF PA approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building TechnologiesS1!4T op Document:Adding NewCERCLA

  4. PA.03 A' EROSPACE~CORPORATI'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1% - :NEW;ORAU 89/K-79OoEr'

  5. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  6. Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NJ Galloway City 143,900 NJ Gloucester City 564,900 NJ Hackensack City 201,700 NJ Hamilton City 835,300 NJ Hillsborough City 153,100 NJ Hoboken City 161,100 NJ Howell City...

  7. Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model (PRISM) This article has been:10.1088/0266-5611/27/11/115012 Multi-energy CT based on a prior rank, intensity and sparsity model and sparsity of a multi-energy image, and intensity/spectral characteristics of base materials. Furthermore, we

  8. 3/26/13 Section of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find -chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320-20130320,0,298755.story 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freedman, David J.

    - chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing-visual-information-0320 of brain does more than expected, Universityof Chicago scientists find - chicagotribune.com www.chicagotribune.com/health/ct-x-monkeys-processing and troubleshooting HOME PROTECTION PLANS From foundation to fixtures FESTIVAL OF HOMES Five financial things every

  9. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  10. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR brachytherapy planning.

  11. EU contract number RII3-CT-2003-506395 CARE-Note-07-004-SRF Radiation hardness tests of piezoelectric actuators with fast neutrons at liquid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RII3-CT-2003-506395 CARE-Note-07-004-SRF Introduction Motorized Fast Active Cold Tuning System (FACTS frequency in SRF cavities of various projects and Test facilities (e.g., TESLA [1], Test Facility (TTF) [2], XFEL [3], ILC [4]). The motorized mechanical part of the FACTS is used for long range (i.e., 1.9 mm

  12. A detailed pore characterization in 2D and 3D by means of optical and fluorescence microscopy combined with high-resolution X-ray CT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    combined with high-resolution X-ray CT. Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic about oil reservoirs, aquifers, building stone weathering). In the past, the pore network was mainly/or laboratory work: Precise sampling of the geological material. Petrographical research with optical

  13. ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 49 Issue 2.2 ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD.P. Donovan G-J van Zadelhoff #12;ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638

  14. ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL/CT Page 1 of 25 Issue 1.3 ATLAS ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD-J van Zadelhoff #12;ATLAS ­ ATLID Algorithms and Level 2 System Aspects ATBD Contract No 22638/09/NL

  15. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

  16. Three-dimensional multiphase segmentation of X-ray CT data of porous materials using a Bayesian Markov random field framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Ramaprasad; Tuller, Markus; Fink, Wolfgang; Wildschild, Dorthe (Oregon State U.); (Ariz)

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancements in noninvasive imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) have led to a recent surge of applications in porous media research with objectives ranging from theoretical aspects of pore-scale fluid and interfacial dynamics to practical applications such as enhanced oil recovery and advanced contaminant remediation. While substantial efforts and resources have been devoted to advance CT technology, microscale analysis, and fluid dynamics simulations, the development of efficient and stable three-dimensional multiphase image segmentation methods applicable to large data sets is lacking. To eliminate the need for wet-dry or dual-energy scans, image alignment, and subtraction analysis, commonly applied in X-ray micro-CT, a segmentation method based on a Bayesian Markov random field (MRF) framework amenable to true three-dimensional multiphase processing was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, several heuristic and deterministic combinatorial optimization schemes required to solve the labeling problem of the MRF image model were implemented and tested for computational efficiency and their impact on segmentation results. Test results for three grayscale data sets consisting of dry glass beads, partially saturated glass beads, and partially saturated crushed tuff obtained with synchrotron X-ray micro-CT demonstrate great potential of the MRF image model for three-dimensional multiphase segmentation. While our results are promising and the developed algorithm is stable and computationally more efficient than other commonly applied porous media segmentation models, further potential improvements exist for fully automated operation.

  17. ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have become the gold standard for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have these results to their human counterparts. Current small-animal PET scanners are very costly and complicated for Gamma-Ray Imaging, we are developing a novel small-animal PET scanner that utilizes common modular

  18. High resolution cortical thickness measurement from clinical CT data G.M. Treece, A.H. Gee, P.M. Mayhew and K.E.S. Poole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drummond, Tom

    ) methods of assessing hip structure, most notably with multi-detector computed tomography, MDCT (Bouxsein and technically limited by thresholding errors caused by relatively low resolution data sets. Ideally, we wouldHigh resolution cortical thickness measurement from clinical CT data G.M. Treece, A.H. Gee, P

  19. 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    Patents 1. Birru, D., C.-T. Chou, and A. Seyedi, "Coordination in Wireless Networks Having Devices with Different Physical Layer Transmission Schemes," US Patent 8233505, Jul. 31, 2012. 2. Birru, D. and A. Seyedi, "Cost-Effective Preamble Structure for High-Speed Communication of Packetized System," US Patent 8

  20. 54 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-15,NO. 1, MARCH 1968 Synthesis of a Class of n-Port Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thulsiraman, Krishnaiyan

    54 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUIT THEORY, VOL. CT-15,NO. 1, MARCH 1968 Synthesis of a Class of n-Port ports is connected to a voltage source keep- ing all the other ports short circuited, then all the short-circuited ports are at the same potential. The Zn-node network with a pair of equal conductances joining any two

  1. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, H [Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Guo, M [Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Lee, K [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Xing, L [Stanford UniversitySchool of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gao, H [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed.

  2. Correspondence: M. Kathleen Kelly, Department of PhysicalTherapy, 6035 ForbesTower, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. Tel.: + 1 412 383 6637; Fax: + 1 412 383 6629; E-mail: KellyK2@msx.upmc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Dan

    Correspondence: M. Kathleen Kelly, Department of PhysicalTherapy, 6035 ForbesTower, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA. Tel.: + 1± 412± 383± 6637; Fax: + 1± 412± 383± 6629; E-mail: KellyK2. KATHLEEN KELLY1 , GEORGE E. CARVELL1,2 , JED A. HARTINGS2 and DANIEL J. SIMONS2 1 Department of Physical

  3. Si m pa rele: Annexes I et II, Si m pa rele: Annexe III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and text in English. Updated periodically. N 4 - Strategy of Aristide Government for Social and Economic Reconstruction (August 1994). 1994. Pp. iv-9. Official document setting forth recovery plan for Haiti. Introduction and text in English. N 5... Peyi Dayiti. 1995. Pp. v-71. Haitian-language version of N 5, in Pressoir-Faublas orthography. Introduction in English. N 7 - Samuel G. Perkins, "On the Margin of Vesuvius": Sketches of St. Domingo, 1785-1793. 1995. Pp. vi-75. First-hand account...

  4. Interstat Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -comment zine. Our columns of zine and con listings are not integral to our original intent. The most complete and most professional update of zines (with reviews) is available from Scuttlebut, 3830 Mintwood, Pittsburgh, PA 15201. Likewise, Spectrum, Kzinti... will be available as de tails are finalized. Contributors welcomed. Includes "Nlmoy letter writing campaign". Send SASE for more info to: Karen MacLeod, 316 North Surrey Ave, Ventnor, N.J.08406, or David Lomazoff, 5505 Miriam Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19124. TREXINDEX...

  5. Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans, respectively. The corresponding rectal V{sub 45Gy} (V{sub 60Gy}) were 58.7% (27.3%), 48.1% (20.7%), 43.8% (16.1%), and 44.9% (16.8%). The results for bladder were comparable among three schemes. Paired two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed and it was found that ART and reoptimization provide better target coverage and better OAR sparing, especially rectum sparing. Conclusions: The interfractional organ motions and deformations during prostate-bed irradiation are significant. The online adaptive replanning scheme is capable of effectively addressing the large organ deformation, resulting in cumulative doses equivalent to those originally planned.

  6. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These factors include magnitude of the carbon tax, energy- intensity of the economy, and the tax base, among of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin Region (parts of PA, NY and NJ) were analyzed. The impacts of a $25 per ton carbon tax on the region's economy are modestly negative. GRP (Gross Regional Product

  7. Statistical modeling of medical indexing processes for biomedical knowledge information discovery from text

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresp, Volker

    Munich, Germany bundschu@dbs.ifi.lmu.de Mathaeus Dejori Integrated Data Systems Dep. Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East Princeton, NJ 08540, USA mathaeus.dejori@siemens.com Shipeng Yu CAD & Knowledge Solutions Siemens Medical Solutions 51 Valley Stream Parkway Malvern, PA 19355, USA shipeng.yu@siemens

  8. Bayesian Color Constancy for Outdoor Object Recognition Yanghai Tsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Robert

    University Siemens Corporate Research Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Princeton, NJ 08540 {ytsin,rcollins,tk}@cs.cmu.edu rameshv@scr.siemens.com Abstract Outdoor scene classification is challenging due to irregular geometry-overlapping spectral sensitivity functions. The generalized diagonal transform [5] performs better than the diagonal

  9. Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

  10. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  11. Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

  12. Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

  13. Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

  14. Influence of radiation therapy on the lung-tissue in breast cancer patients: CT-assessed density changes and associated symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.; Svane, G. (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative electron density of lung tissue was measured from computer tomography (CT) slices in 33 breast cancer patients treated by various techniques of adjuvant radiotherapy. The measurements were made before radiotherapy, 3 months and 9 months after completion of radiation therapy. The changes in lung densities at 3 months and 9 months were compared to radiation induced radiological (CT) findings. In addition, subjective symptoms such as cough and dyspnoea were assessed before and after radiotherapy. It was observed that the mean of the relative electron density of lung tissue varied from 0.25 when the whole lung was considered to 0.17 when only the anterior lateral quarter of the lung was taken into account. In patients with positive radiological (CT) findings the mean lung density of the anterior lateral quarter increased 2.1 times 3 months after radiotherapy and was still increased 1.6 times 6 months later. For those patients without findings, in the CT pictures the corresponding values were 1.2 and 1.1, respectively. The standard deviation of the pixel values within the anterior lateral quarter of the lung increased 3.8 times and 3.2 times at 3 months and 9 months, respectively, in the former group, as opposed to 1.2 and 1.1 in the latter group. Thirteen patients had an increase in either cough or dyspnoea as observed 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. In eleven patients these symptoms persisted 6 months later. No significant correlation was found between radiological findings and subjective symptoms. However, when three different treatment techniques were compared among 29 patients the highest rate of radiological findings was observed in patients in which the largest lung volumes received the target dose. A tendency towards an increased rate of subjective symptoms was also found in this group.

  15. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallas, Raya R; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy, so-called "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover all steps from therapy planning to follow-up to fulfill the high demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gains growing importance in the treatment process and established phantoms (such as the Alderson head) cannot be used for those tests, novel multimodality phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study for such a customizable multimodality head phantom. We used a set of patient CT images as the basis for the anthropomorphic head shape. The recipient - consisting of an epoxy resin - was produced using rapid prototyping (3D printing). The phantom recipient includes a nasal air cavity, two soft tissues volumes and cranial bone. Additionally a spherical tumor volume was positioned in the center. The volumes were filled with dipotassium phosphate-based cranial bone surrogate, agarose gel, and distilled water. The tumor volume was filled with normoxic dosimetr...

  16. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  17. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudeck, O. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)], E-mail: oliver.dudeck@charite.de; Okuducu, A. F. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Neuropathology (Germany); Jordan, O. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Tesmer, K.; Pech, M. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany); Weigang, E. [Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Ruefenacht, D. A. [University Hospital of Geneva, Neuroradiology Section (Switzerland); Doelker, E. [University of Geneva, School of Pharmacy (Switzerland); Felix, R. [Charite, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  18. Aufgabe 3-17: Ein 2 m-Tank enthlt zu Beginn Luft (RL = 0,287 kJ/kgK) im Zustand 1 (22C, 100 kPa, u1 = 210,49 kJ/kg). Der Tank ist ber ein Ventil mit einer Leitung verbunden.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    ?bung 6: Aufgabe 3-17: Ein 2 m³-Tank enthält zu Beginn Luft (RL = 0,287 kJ/kgK) im Zustand 1 (22°C, 100 kPa, u1 = 210,49 kJ/kg). Der Tank ist über ein Ventil mit einer Leitung verbunden. In dieser. Die Luft strömt solange in den Tank, bis im Tank derselbe Druck herrscht wie in der Leitung. Dann wird

  19. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)] [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States)] [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)] [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  20. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program rates facilities on everything from reducing greenhouse gas emissions to green building certification to green purchasing. PPPL has actively improved its...

  1. NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ------------ A Prime q Subcontractk- 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, etr) -L------- Contract...

  2. u.s. DI!PARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NJ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    inventory, and information collection activities that are directly conservation of fish, wildlife, related to the conservation of fish and wildlife resources or to the...

  3. Contributions to the Paleontology of New Jersey (II) STOP 5: GINGERBREAD CASTLE STROMATOLITES, HAMBURG, NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    Allentown Dolomite (Middle Cambrian ­ lowermost Ordovician), a shallow water, nearshore carbonate energy environments. The higher energy environment is also reinforced by the many storm layers present larger ooids. Dark gray rip-up clasts occur near the interface of the two layers. Figure 4. Edgewise

  4. Partial list: N.J. Balmforth,I. Friggard, J. Feng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuske, Rachel

    . Ward, R. Kuske,A. Peirce, D. Schoetzau, B. Wetton U. Ascher, M. Friedlander, C. Greif, F. Herrmann, O waves of increased calcium is generated. Stricker (1996) Del. Biol. (nemertean worm egg) Waves

  5. MICROANALYSIS OF NY/NJ HARBOR SEDIMENTS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.FENG,H.LANZIROTTI,A.MARINKOVIC,N.ET AL.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments found in the New York/New Jersey Harbor are widely contaminated with organic and inorganic compounds of anthropogenic origin. As a result, the environmental health of the Harbor has deteriorated and the efficient operation of the Port compromised by difficulties in disposing of sediments resulting from maintenance and improvements of navigational channels. Knowledge of the properties of the sediments on a micro-scale is useful in understanding the transport of contaminants through the environment, for developing effective methods for sediment decontamination, and for subsequent beneficial use of the cleaned sediments. We have investigated several properties of these sediments using synchrotron radiation techniques. These include computed microtomography using absorption and fluorescence contrast mechanisms, x-ray microscopy, microbeam x-ray fluorescence, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for measurements of microstructure, distribution of metals on individual sediment particles, and chemical forms of the contaminants on a micrometer scale. Typical results obtained with these techniques are presented.

  6. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 88 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8525

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    horses do not need to be stabled in a barn if there is shelter from the elements in the form of a run or no shelter will grow a longer hair coat (page 1, left). This longer, denser hair coat will help keep them in winter as long as it has a naturally thick hair coat and is adapted to the cold. There are a wide variety

  7. The Redbeds Annual Newsletter, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of NJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -food biofuels, solar power, and wind energy; and 3) a business school that is ranked in the top 10 donation in its history, to construct a building for the Rutgers Business School (RBS) on the Livingston/SAS and the School of Arts and Sciences. The donation recognizes the growing importance of environmental and energy

  8. Admission Office Princeton University P.O. Box 430 Princeton, NJ 08542-0430 Visual arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is for students who have devoted a significant amount of time and energy to one or more of these art forms and who areacode/number(pleasedonotincludecountrycode) CurrentsecondaryschoolCommonApplicationID,ifavailable school, or you are the choreographer. On-campus auditions arenotoffered;however,ifyouareabletovisit campus while

  9. Admission Office Princeton University P.O. Box 430 Princeton, NJ 08542-0430 Visual arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    ), vol. 6 (August 2007). "China's Energy Governance: Perception and Reality," Audits of the Conventional: China's Energy Boom and the Rise of Local Government Entrepreneurs", Harvard Kennedy School Case Study Approach to Energy Governance: State Management of China's Coal and Electric Power Supply Industries

  10. Center for Health & Counseling Services 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, NJ 07430-1680

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    : Counseling Services: 201-684-7522 Health Services: 201-684-7536 www.ramapo.edu New Jersey's Public Liberal Arts College Lyme Disease The New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services announced on April 10 Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin. While there are effective

  11. New Jersey Solar Power LLC NJ Solar Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: New

  12. Transferring the Wayne, NJ, Site to Beneficial Reuse | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 th ,TopDepartment ofTransactionalFacility

  13. H. B. Fry, Staff Assistant NJ-, i.4 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION CCSJCERMZIQ THE M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\l pGreen River, Utah,' :

  14. US & NJ Local Government Fiscal Pressures -Managing to Maintain Credit Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    oversight programs may be constrained to provide additional assistance to distressed localities. »Fixed revenues » Inadequacy of financial tools to weather financial disruptions » Outsized enterprise risk

  15. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModificationEnzyme-FunctionalizedCirculatoryo r t

  16. N.J. DEP recognizes PPPL as state's top environmental steward | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModificationEnzyme-FunctionalizedCirculatoryo r tPlasma

  17. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tindall Homes, Columbus, NJ

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32DepartmentWells |of Energy NewSince 2008,Quadrant Homes,

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker and Williams Co - NJ 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » SitesNJFertilizer Works

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Pulverizing Co - NJ 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison- NY 38 Rare- IAJ T Baker

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison-Engineer

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfaltz and Bauer Inc - Richfield - NJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePAOsborne Co - OH 34PantexDisposal28

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Pipe and Foundry Co - NJ 23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MOTracerlab Inc -TwinUTPipe and

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Radium Corp - NJ 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site - MOTracerlab Inc -TwinUTPipe

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vitro Corp of America - NJ 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami - FL06

  6. NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28 1% - :NEW YORIC Ledoux and Co.I

  7. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: John Hubert Associates, EXIT-0, North Cape May, NJ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment ofCaldwell and JohnsonGreenhillHubert

  8. **NO SCIENCE ON SATURDAY TODAY** NJ Regional High School Science Bowl |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrinceton Plasmareactions. | EMSLPhysics Lab

  9. Predicting target vessel location on robot-assisted coronary artery bypass graft using CT to ultrasound registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Daniel S.; Linte, Cristian; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Wedlake, Chris; Moore, John; Barron, John; Patel, Rajni; Peters, Terry [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); and Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Although robot-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (RA-CABG) has gained more acceptance worldwide, its success still depends on the surgeon's experience and expertise, and the conversion rate to full sternotomy is in the order of 15%-25%. One of the reasons for conversion is poor pre-operative planning, which is based solely on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) images. In this paper, the authors propose a technique to estimate the global peri-operative displacement of the heart and to predict the intra-operative target vessel location, validated via both an in vitro and a clinical study. Methods: As the peri-operative heart migration during RA-CABG has never been reported in the literatures, a simple in vitro validation study was conducted using a heart phantom. To mimic the clinical workflow, a pre-operative CT as well as peri-operative ultrasound images at three different stages in the procedure (Stage{sub 0}--following intubation; Stage{sub 1}--following lung deflation; and Stage{sub 2}--following thoracic insufflation) were acquired during the experiment. Following image acquisition, a rigid-body registration using iterative closest point algorithm with the robust estimator was employed to map the pre-operative stage to each of the peri-operative ones, to estimate the heart migration and predict the peri-operative target vessel location. Moreover, a clinical validation of this technique was conducted using offline patient data, where a Monte Carlo simulation was used to overcome the limitations arising due to the invisibility of the target vessel in the peri-operative ultrasound images. Results: For the in vitro study, the computed target registration error (TRE) at Stage{sub 0}, Stage{sub 1}, and Stage{sub 2} was 2.1, 3.3, and 2.6 mm, respectively. According to the offline clinical validation study, the maximum TRE at the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery was 4.1 mm at Stage{sub 0}, 5.1 mm at Stage{sub 1}, and 3.4 mm at Stage{sub 2}. Conclusions: The authors proposed a method to measure and validate peri-operative shifts of the heart during RA-CABG. In vitro and clinical validation studies were conducted and yielded a TRE in the order of 5 mm for all cases. As the desired clinical accuracy imposed by this procedure is on the order of one intercostal space (10-15 mm), our technique suits the clinical requirements. The authors therefore believe this technique has the potential to improve the pre-operative planning by updating peri-operative migration patterns of the heart and, consequently, will lead to reduced conversion to conventional open thoracic procedures.

  10. Design and evaluation of a variable aperture collimator for conformal radiotherapy of small animals using a microCT scanner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Edward E.; Zhou Hu; Chatterjee, Raja; Keall, Paul J.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Contag, Christopher H.; Boyer, Arthur L. [Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, Texas 76508 (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment of small animals with radiation has in general been limited to planar fields shaped with lead blocks, complicating spatial localization of dose and treatment of deep-seated targets. In order to advance laboratory radiotherapy toward what is accomplished in the clinic, we have constructed a variable aperture collimator for use in shaping the beam of microCT scanner. This unit can image small animal subjects at high resolution, and is capable of delivering therapeutic doses in reasonable exposure times. The proposed collimator consists of two stages, each containing six trapezoidal brass blocks that move along a frame in a manner similar to a camera iris producing a hexagonal aperture of variable size. The two stages are offset by 30 deg. and adjusted for the divergence of the x-ray beam so as to produce a dodecagonal profile at isocenter. Slotted rotating driving plates are used to apply force to pins in the collimator blocks and effect collimator motion. This device has been investigated through both simulation and measurement. The collimator aperture size varied from 0 to 8.5 cm as the driving plate angle increased from 0 to 41 deg. . The torque required to adjust the collimator varied from 0.5 to 5 N{center_dot}m, increasing with increasing driving plate angle. The transmission profiles produced by the scanner at isocenter exhibited a penumbra of approximately 10% of the collimator aperture width. Misalignment between the collimator assembly and the x-ray source could be identified on the transmission images and corrected by adjustment of the collimator location. This variable aperture collimator technology is therefore a feasible and flexible solution for adjustable shaping of radiation beams for use in small animal radiotherapy as well as other applications in which beam shaping is desired.

  11. Quantitative CT of lung nodules: Dependence of calibration on patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size for single- and dual-energy techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Way, Ted W.; Schipper, Mathew J.; Larson, Sandra C.; Christodoulou, Emmanuel G. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5842 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium concentration may be a useful feature for distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules in computer-aided diagnosis. The calcium concentration can be estimated from the measured CT number of the nodule and a CT number vs calcium concentration calibration line that is derived from CT scans of two or more calcium reference standards. To account for CT number nonuniformity in the reconstruction field, such calibration lines may be obtained at multiple locations within lung regions in an anthropomorphic phantom. The authors performed a study to investigate the effects of patient body size, anatomic region, and calibration nodule size on the derived calibration lines at ten lung region positions using both single energy (SE) and dual energy (DE) CT techniques. Simulated spherical lung nodules of two concentrations (50 and 100 mg/cc CaCO{sub 3}) were employed. Nodules of three different diameters (4.8, 9.5, and 16 mm) were scanned in a simulated thorax section representing the middle of the chest with large lung regions. The 4.8 and 9.5 mm nodules were also scanned in a section representing the upper chest with smaller lung regions. Fat rings were added to the peripheries of the phantoms to simulate larger patients. Scans were acquired on a GE-VCT scanner at 80, 120, and 140 kVp and were repeated three times for each condition. The average absolute CT number separations between the calibration lines were computed. In addition, under- or overestimates were determined when the calibration lines for one condition (e.g., small patient) were used to estimate the CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules for a different condition (e.g., large patient). The authors demonstrated that, in general, DE is a more accurate method for estimating the calcium contents of lung nodules. The DE calibration lines within the lung field were less affected by patient body size, calibration nodule size, and nodule position than the SE calibration lines. Under- or overestimates in CaCO{sub 3} concentrations of nodules were also in general smaller in quantity with DE than with SE. However, because the slopes of the calibration lines for DE were about one-half the slopes for SE, the relative improvement in the concentration estimates for DE as compared to SE was about one-half the relative improvement in the separation between the calibration lines. Results in the middle of the chest thorax section with large lungs were nearly completely consistent with the above generalization. On the other hand, results in the upper-chest thorax section with smaller lungs and greater amounts of muscle and bone were mixed. A repeat of the entire study in the upper thorax section yielded similar mixed results. Most of the inconsistencies occurred for the 4.8 mm nodules and may be attributed to errors caused by beam hardening, volume averaging, and insufficient sampling. Targeted, higher resolution reconstructions of the smaller nodules, application of high atomic number filters to the high energy x-ray beam for improved spectral separation, and other future developments in DECT may alleviate these problems and further substantiate the superior accuracy of DECT in quantifying the calcium concentrations of lung nodules.

  12. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Division of Imaging and Applied Mathematics (OSEL/CDRH), US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20905 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate total organ doses calculated using our database are within 1% of those calculated using Monte Carlo simulations with the same geometry and scan parameters for all organs except red bone marrow (within 6%), and within 23% of published estimates for different voxelized phantoms. Results from the example of using the database to estimate organ dose for coronary angiography CT acquisitions show 2.1%, 1.1%, and -32% change in breast dose and 2.1%, -0.74%, and 4.7% change in lung dose for reduced kVp, tube current modulated, and partial angle protocols, respectively, relative to the reference protocol. Results show -19.2% difference in dose to eye lens for a tilted scan relative to a nontilted scan. The reported relative changes in organ doses are presented without quantification of image quality and are for the sole purpose of demonstrating the use of the proposed database. Conclusions: The proposed database and calculation method enable the estimation of organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans utilizing any spectral shape and angular tube current modulation scheme by taking advantage of the precalculated Monte Carlo simulation results. The database can be used in conjunction with image quality studies to develop optimized acquisition techniques and may be particularly beneficial for optimizing dual kVp acquisitions for which numerous kV, mA, and filtration combinations may be investigated.

  13. Comparison of Planned Versus Actual Dose Delivered for External Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Cone-Beam CT and Deformable Registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, Yasmin; Kim, Leonard; Wloch, Jennifer; Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the adequacy of dose delivery to the clinical target volume (CTV) using external beam (EB) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with EB APBI underwent cone beam CT (CBCT) before each fraction and daily helical CT (HCT) scans to determine setup errors and calculate the dose per fraction. For 12 patients, an in-house image-intensity-based deformable registration program was used to register the HCTs to the planning CT and generate the cumulative dose. Treatment was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. EB APBI constraints from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Phase III protocol were used. Results: The mean setup error per CBCT registration was 9 {+-} 5 mm. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed only one patient (8%) with a decrease in the CTV V90 (8% underdosage). All other patients demonstrated adequate target coverage. PTV{sub E}VAL V90 was on average 3% (range, 0%-16%) less than planned. For the ipsilateral breast, four patients had an increase in V50 ({<=}1% increase) and three patients had an increase in V100 ({<=}9% increase). Only one patient showed an increase >5%. Four patients had an increase in ipsilateral lung V30 (maximum 3%), and one had an increase in heart V5 (1%). Four patients had an increase in MaxDose (maximum 89 cGy). Conclusions: The current CTV-to-PTV margin of 10 mm appears sufficient for {approx}92% of patients treated with EB APBI. Although expansion of the population PTV margin to 14 mm would provide {approx}97% confidence level for CTV coverage, online image guidance should be considered.

  14. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI): A Completed Reference Database of Lung Nodules on CT Scans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) methods for lung nodule detection, classification, and quantitative assessment can be facilitated through a well-characterized repository of computed tomography (CT) scans. The Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and Image Database Resource Initiative (IDRI) completed such a database, establishing a publicly available reference for the medical imaging research community. Initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), further advanced by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), and accompanied by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) through active participation, this public-private partnership demonstrates the success of a consortium founded on a consensus-based process. Methods: Seven academic centers and eight medical imaging companies collaborated to identify, address, and resolve challenging organizational, technical, and clinical issues to provide a solid foundation for a robust database. The LIDC/IDRI Database contains 1018 cases, each of which includes images from a clinical thoracic CT scan and an associated XML file that records the results of a two-phase image annotation process performed by four experienced thoracic radiologists. In the initial blinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed each CT scan and marked lesions belonging to one of three categories (''nodule{>=}3 mm,''''nodule<3 mm,'' and ''non-nodule{>=}3 mm''). In the subsequent unblinded-read phase, each radiologist independently reviewed their own marks along with the anonymized marks of the three other radiologists to render a final opinion. The goal of this process was to identify as completely as possible all lung nodules in each CT scan without requiring forced consensus. Results: The Database contains 7371 lesions marked ''nodule'' by at least one radiologist. 2669 of these lesions were marked ''nodule{>=}3 mm'' by at least one radiologist, of which 928 (34.7%) received such marks from all four radiologists. These 2669 lesions include nodule outlines and subjective nodule characteristic ratings. Conclusions: The LIDC/IDRI Database is expected to provide an essential medical imaging research resource to spur CAD development, validation, and dissemination in clinical practice.

  15. Airflow Characteristics of Direct-Type Kitchen Hood Systems in High-Rise Apartment Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Samsung C&T, South Korea 2 Introduction ? Today?s high-rise apartment buildings exhibit high degree of air-tightness. ? They are also subjected to stack effect and seasonal, unpredictable, wind pressure variations. ? Therefore, it is questionable... characteristics for alt0 16 32CMH 0Pa 42CMH 0Pa 74CMH 16Pa 477CMH 984CMH 355CMH 815CMH 173CMH 26Pa 0CMH 0CMH 0CMH 54CMH 0Pa 158CMH 1Pa 35CMH 0Pa 74CMH 18Pa (a)?On?3rd?floor?at?12:00,?Jan?1st 1.5m/s North 50CMH 1Pa 23CMH 0Pa 75CMH 18Pa...

  16. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  17. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  18. Validity of Fusion Imaging of Hamster Heart obtained by Fluorescent and Phase-Contrast X-Ray CT with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Takeda, T.; Lwin, Thet Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M. [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Fukami, T.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Hyodo, K. [Institute of Material Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hontani, H. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent X-ray CT (FXCT) to depict functional information and phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) to demonstrate morphological information are being developed to analyze the disease model of small animal. To understand the detailed pathological state, integration of both functional and morphological image is very useful. The feasibility of image fusion between FXCT and PCCT were examined by using ex-vivo hearts injected fatty acid metabolic agent (127I-BMIPP) in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Fusion images were reconstructed from each 3D image of FXCT and PCCT. 127I-BMIPP distribution within the heart was clearly demonstrated by FXCT with 0.25 mm spatial resolution. The detailed morphological image was obtained by PCCT at about 0.03 mm spatial resolution. Using image integration technique, metabolic abnormality of fatty acid in cardiomyopathic myocardium was easily recognized corresponding to anatomical structures. Our study suggests that image fusion provides important biomedical information even in FXCT and PCCT imaging.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of the Supernova Legacy Survey Sample with {\\Lambda}CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Maier, Robert S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of Type~Ia SNe has thus far produced the most reliable measurement of the expansion history of the Universe, suggesting that $\\Lambda$CDM offers the best explanation for the redshift--luminosity distribution observed in these events. But the analysis of other kinds of source, such as cosmic chronometers, gamma ray bursts, and high-$z$ quasars, conflicts with this conclusion, indicating instead that the constant expansion rate implied by the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is a better fit to the data. The central difficulty with the use of Type~Ia SNe as standard candles is that one must optimize three or four nuisance parameters characterizing supernova luminosities simultaneously with the parameters of an expansion model. Hence in comparing competing models, one must reduce the data independently for each. We carry~out such a comparison of $\\Lambda$CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe, using the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample of 252 SN~events, and show that each model fits its individually reduced data...

  20. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUC{sub OBS1}=0.80 [0.73,0.86] vs AUC{sub ANN1}=0.88 [0.82,0.92]) as that of the second observer and the corresponding ANN (AUC{sub OBS2}=0.87 [0.83,0.91] vs AUC{sub ANN2}=0.90 [0.85,0.94]). Moreover, the ANN-predicted indices were generated in a fraction of the time required to obtain the observer-assigned indices. Conclusions: ANN-predicted assessability indices performed similar to observer-assigned assessability indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores from the physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using computerized methods for identifying images with diagnostic clinical indices in cardiac CT images.

  1. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maier, Joscha, E-mail: joscha.maier@dkfz.de [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrie, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, University of ErlangenNrnberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the HDTV algorithm shows the best performance. At 50 mGy, the deviation from the reference obtained at 500 mGy were less than 4%. Also the LDPC algorithm provides reasonable results with deviation less than 10% at 50 mGy while PCF and MKB reconstruction show larger deviations even at higher dose levels. Conclusions: LDPC and HDTV increase CNR and allow for quantitative evaluations even at dose levels as low as 50 mGy. The left ventricular volumes exemplarily illustrate that cardiac parameters can be accurately estimated at lowest dose levels if sophisticated algorithms are used. This allows to reduce dose by a factor of 10 compared to today's gold standard and opens new options for longitudinal studies of the heart.

  2. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors previous work [K. Taguchi et al., Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects, Med. Phys. 38(2), 10891102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

  3. DOCKET NO. PA02-2-000 STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    linked, and dysfunctions in each fed off one another. Spot gas prices drove electricity prices of the alternative gas price inputs would result in higher refunds for electricity. - Staff found that many trading prices. - Electricity prices in California's spot markets were affected by economic withholding

  4. PATTERNS OF CIGARETTE SMOKING. PA'ITERNS OF CIGARETTE SMOKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    a transient decline during the Great Depression, consumption increased from 665 cigarettes per capita in 1920 as 1854 (42,48), consumption did not increase dramatically until after 1909. As shown in Figure 1, per capita consumption of all types of cigarettes increased by more than tenfold from 1900 to 1920. Despite

  5. CITIES AND MILEAGE IN PA Abingdon Heights 252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    (Longwood) 86 King of Prussia 125-135 Kings Gap 139 Kinzers 34 Kutztown 116 Lafayette Hill 130 Lake City Newtown (Bucks County) 150 Newtown (near Wilkes Barre) 225 Norristown 128 North Wales 135 Northampton 180

  6. Microsoft Word - CX_PA-Sappho-LLIP-L0254.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project area. There will be no tree removal as a result of this project. Erosion and sediment controls will be implemented as necessary to eliminate any effects from potential...

  7. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies through verify storage permanence and track plume movement. * Geospatial data resources-Developing resources to improve access to geospatial data for public...

  8. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to offshore hydrocarbon production and the recovery of unconventional resources like shale gas, estimating CO 2 storage potential in various types of geologic formations, and...

  9. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestration Core Flow Laboratory Background Sequestration of CO 2 and production of coalbed methane (CBM) can affect the strata in various ways. For example, coal can swell...

  10. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    priations) to the FutureGen Industrial Alliance (Alliance) to build FutureGen 2.0-a clean coal repowering program and CO 2 pipeline and storage network. The FutureGen 2.0 Program...

  11. apparent pa2 analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectral evolution, with 16 of them being smooth tails directly following the prompt Zhang, Bing 4 Analysis of the apparent lack of power in the cosmic microwave...

  12. NOAA PA 200455 Datos relacionados con la resaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de sus oficinas transmiten un Surf Zone Forecast (Pronóstico para las zonas de oleaje). Cuando.ripcurrents.noaa.gov www.usla.org Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje indica la presencia de la resaca. De acuerdo con adentro. Un cambio en la configuración del oleaje. ¿ Qué debo hacer si la resaca me atrapa? Mantenga la

  13. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Fossil Energy R&D 1 Bezdek, R. Wendling, R., The Return on Investment of the Clean Coal Technology Program in the USA. Energy Policy, Vol. 54, March 2013, pp. 104-112 2...

  14. Hanford Site Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment (PA) Current

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable Projects HTS CableMay 2009 Hanford SiteMaterial

  15. QER Public Meeting in Pittsburgh, PA: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans | Department of- East | Department ofand

  16. P.A. Capdau Charter School | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on OurSemprius ConfidentialandEnergySite

  17. PA Sangli Bundled Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy CoFirstNovos Sistemas deOstseeoftechnic GmbHPA

  18. Microsoft Word - PA_Viewing_Your_Position_Description_QRG.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruarySavebased on an

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Aeroprojects Inc - PA 22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » Sites » SitesNew MexicoAdrian -

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Canonsburg Industrial Park - PA 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »Hill -Elmore - OHCallite