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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modern Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and a 2000-year Ice-core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and a 2000-year Ice-core Modern Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing currently active stations. Records in recent decades (time period depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote locations, which represent changing global atmospheric conditions rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year time series of annual values. A spline function has been fit to the data to provide a continuous time series of

2

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final project report describes a three-year long EPRI supplemental project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the United States and internationally.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

3

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update covers the first year of a three-year-long EPRI research project entitled Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production. The report provides a project overview and explains the preliminary results yielded from the first year of on-farm research.

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the first two years of a three-year long project entitled "Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions." This EPRI-sponsored project is investigating an innovative approach to developing large-scale and potentially cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that could be implemented across broad geographic areas of the U.S. and internationally. The tools and information developed in this project will broaden the GHG emissions offset ...

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Proto col for US Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben, JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for US Midwest Agriculture. In Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change,Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. Link to Journal Publication: See Journal of Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

6

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Redu ction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Published Citation: Millar, N; Robertson, GP; Grace, PR; Gehl, RJ; and Hoben; JP. 2010. Nitrogen Fertilizer Management for Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Mitigation in Intensive Corn (Maize) Production: An Emissions Reduction Protocol for U.S. Midwest Agriculture. In Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Volume 15, Number 2, 2010, pp. 185-204. A peer-reviewed journal article that identifies, describes and analyzes socio-economic factors that may encourage or inhibit farmers from participat...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

7

Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Agricultural Crop Production: Experience Validating a New GHG Offset Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project report describes in part the second phase (years four through six, 2010–2012) of a two-phase, six-year long EPRI-sponsored research project entitled “Developing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Offsets by Reducing Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions.” This project investigated an innovative approach to developing large-scale, cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets that potentially can be implemented across broad geographic areas of the ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

Methane and Nitrous Oxide: Their Effects on the Terrestrial Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplified band models are developed for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) bands in the longwave radiation spectrum. The band models are then employed in a radiation model to calculate the seasonally and latitudinally varying contributions of ...

L. Donner; V. Ramanathan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Title Seasonal variations in N2O emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Colm Sweeney, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 39 Issue 16 Keywords atmospheric transport, inverse modeling, nitrous oxide Abstract We estimate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from Central California for the period of December 2007 through November 2009 by comparing N2O mixing ratios measured at a tall tower (Walnut Grove, WGC) with transport model predictions based on two global a priori N2O emission models (EDGAR32 and EDGAR42). Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) models. Regression analyses show that the slopes of predicted on measured N2O from both emission models are low, suggesting that actual N2O emissions are significantly higher than the EDGAR inventories for all seasons. Bayesian inverse analyses of regional N2O emissions show that posterior annual N2O emissions are larger than both EDGAR inventories by factors of 2.0 ± 0.4 (EDGAR32) and 2.1 ± 0.4 (EDGAR42) with seasonal variation ranging from 1.6 ± 0.3 to 2.5 ± 0.4 for an influence region of Central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. These results suggest that if the spatial distribution of N2O emissions in California follows the EDGAR emission models, then actual emissions are 2.7 ± 0.5 times greater than the current California emission inventory, and total N2O emissions account for 8.1 ± 1.4% of total greenhouse gas emissions from California.

10

Simulation of Stratospheric N2O in the NCAR CCM2: Comparison with CLAES Data and Global Budget Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global variability and budgets of stratospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) are studied using output from a stratospheric version of the NCAR Community Climate Model. The model extends over 0–80 km, incorporating an N2O-like tracer with tropospheric ...

William J. Randel; Byron A. Boville; John C. Gille; Paul L. Bailey; Steven T. Massie; J. B. Kumer; J. L. Mergenthaler; A. E. Roche

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

800,000 Year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

create a long-term record to the present. These records are maintained by the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and...

12

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

nitrous oxide emisssions from industrial sources, 1990, 2005, 2008, and 2009 4.5. Waste management sources In 2009, treatment of residential and commercial wastewater produced 92...

13

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

14

Soil–Atmosphere Exchange of Nitrous Oxide, Nitric Oxide, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Logged and Undisturbed Forest in the Tapajos National Forest, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective logging is an extensive land use in the Brazilian Amazon region. The soil–atmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are studied on two soil types (clay Oxisol and sandy loam ...

Michael Keller; Ruth Varner; Jadson D. Dias; Hudson Silva; Patrick Crill; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira Jr.; Gregory P. Asner

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The biogeochemistry of marine nitrous oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric nitrous oxide N?O concentrations have been rising steadily for the past century as a result of human activities. In particular, human perturbation of the nitrogen cycle has increased the N?O production rates ...

Frame, Caitlin H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films using disilane and nitrous oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: disilane, low temperature, nitrous oxide, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, silicon oxide

Juho Song; G. S. Lee; P. K. Ajmera

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Process Modeling of Global Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and is a major ozone-depleting substance. To understand and

Saikawa, E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Vibrational Infrared Lifetime of the Anesthetic nitrous oxide gas in solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lifetime of the asymmetric fundamental stretching 2218 cm$^{-1}$ vibration of the anesthetic gas nitrous oxide (N$_2$O) dissolved in octanol and olive oil is reported. These solvents are model systems commonly used to assess anesthetic potency. Picosecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations have suggested that protein dynamics or membrane dynamics play a role in the molecular mechanism of anesthetic action. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy with 100 fs time resolution is an ideal tool to probe dynamics of anesthetic molecules on such timescales. Pump-probe studies at the peak of the vibrational band yield a lifetime of $55 \\pm 1$ ps in olive oil and $52 \\pm 1 ps$ in octanol. The similarity of lifetimes suggests that energy relaxation of the anesthetic is determined primarily by the hydrophobic nature of the environment, consistent with models of anesthetic action. The results show that nitrous oxide is a good model system for probing anesthetic-solvent interactions using nonlinear infrared spectroscop...

Chieffo, Logan; Shattuck, Jeffrey; Hong, Mi K; Ziegler, Lawrence; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Spatiotemporal modelling in estimation of nitrous oxide emissions from soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nitrous oxide is a major greenhouse gas emission. The aim of this research was to develop and apply statistical models to characterize the complex spatial… (more)

Huang, Xiaodong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Shock-Tube Study of Methane Ignition with NO2 and N2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOx produced during combustion can persist in the exhaust gases of a gas turbine engine in quantities significant to induce regulatory concerns. There has been much research which has led to important insights into NOx chemistry. One method of NOx reduction is exhaust gas recirculation. In exhaust gas recirculation, a portion of the exhaust gases that exit are redirected to the inlet air stream that enters the combustion chamber, along with fuel. Due to the presence of NOx in the exhaust gases which are subsequently introduced into the burner, knowledge of the effects of NOx on combustion is advantageous. Contrary to general NOx research, little has been conducted to investigate the sensitizing effects of NO2 and N2O addition to methane/oxygen combustion. Experiments were made with dilute and real fuel air mixtures of CH4/O2/Ar with the addition of NO2 and N2O. The real fuel air concentrations were made with the addition of NO2 only. The equivalence ratios of mixtures made were 0.5, 1 and 2. The experimental pressure range was 1 - 44 atm and the temperature range tested was 1177 – 2095 K. The additives NO2 and N2O were added in concentrations from 831 ppm to 3539 ppm. The results of the mixtures with NO2 have a reduction in ignition delay time across the pressure ranges tested, and the mixtures with N2O show a similar trend. At 1.3 atm, the NO2 831 ppm mixture shows a 65% reduction and shows a 75% reduction at 30 atm. The NO2 mixtures showed a higher decrease in ignition time than the N2O mixtures. The real fuel air mixture also showed a reduction. Sensitivity Analyses were performed. The two most dominant reactions in the NO2 mixtures are the reaction O+H2 = O+OH and the reaction CH3+NO2 = CH3O+NO. The presence of this second reaction is the means by which NO2 decreases ignition delay time, which is indicated in the experimental results. The reaction produces CH3O which is reactive and can participate in chain propagating reactions, speeding up ignition. The two dominant reactions for the N2O mixture are the reaction O+H2 = O+OH and, interestingly, the other dominant reaction is the reverse of the initiation reaction in the N2O-mechanism: O+N2+M = N2O+M. The reverse of this reaction is the direct oxidation of nitrous oxide. The O produced in this reaction can then speed up ignition by partaking in propagation reactions, which was experimentally observed.

Pemelton, John

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions by agriculture. Nutr.1998. Nitrous oxide emission in three years as affected by2008. Soil-surface gas emissions. p.851-861. In: M.R. Carter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A kinetics study of the atmospheric pressure CVD reaction of silane and nitrous oxide  

SciTech Connect

A mechanistic study of oxide deposition from silane and nitrous oxide between 495{sup 0}C and 690{sup 0}C was performed in a laminar flow, cool wall reactor. Results indicate the existence of two distinct chemical pathways. At high nitrous oxide concentrations, the deposition reaction is dominated by radical chain chemistry initiated by the decomposition of N/sub 2/O. At lower N/sub 2/O concentrations, the decomposition of silane to form silylene (SiH/sub 2/) initiates the deposition. Studies of the reaction of disilane and nitrous oxide confirmed the role of SiH/sub 2/ in the deposition. Reactions involving SiH/sub 2/ are used to explain the observed growth of sub-stoichiometric oxides under low N/sub 2/O conditions.

Chapple-Sokol, J.D.; Giunta, C.J.; Gordon, R.G. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Final Report for DOE grant no. DE-FG02-04ER63883: Can soil genomics predict the impact of precipitation on nitrous oxide flux from soil  

SciTech Connect

Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that is released by microorganisms in soil. However, the production of nitrous oxide in soil is highly variable and difficult to predict. Future climate change may have large impacts on nitrous oxide release through alteration of precipitation patterns. We analyzed DNA extracted from soil in order to uncover relationships between microbial processes, abundance of particular DNA sequences and net nitrous oxide fluxes from soil. Denitrification, a microbial process in which nitrate is used as an electron acceptor, correlated with nitrous oxide flux from soil. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea correlated positively, but weakly, with nitrous oxide production in soil. The abundance of bacterial genes in soil was negatively correlated with gross nitrogen mineralization rates and nitrous oxide release from soil. We suggest that the most important control over nitrous oxide production in soil is the growth and death of microorganisms. When organisms are growing nitrogen is incorporated into their biomass and nitrous oxide flux is low. In contrast, when microorganisms die, due to predation or infection by viruses, inorganic nitrogen is released into the soil resulting in nitrous oxide release. Higher rates of precipitation increase access to microorganisms by predators or viruses through filling large soil pores with water and therefore can lead to large releases of nitrous oxide from soil. We developed a new technique, stable isotope probing with 18O-water, to study growth and mortality of microorganisms in soil.

Egbert Schwartz

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

25

Nitrous oxide (N?O) isotopic composition in the troposphere : instrumentation, observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and regional modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide (N?O) is a significant greenhouse gas and main contributor to stratospheric ozone destruction. Surface measurements of N?O mole fractions have been used to attribute source and sink strengths, but large ...

Potter, Katherine Ellison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nitrous oxide production from radiolysis of simulted high-level nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide gas (N{sub 2}O) is produced by the radiolysis of aqueous nitrate or nitrite solutions in the presence of organic compounds. When ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or N- (2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) is present, the G-value for hydrogen increases and N{sub 2}O become the major gaseous product (G=0.54). A survey of organic compounds indicates the amount of N{sub 2}O formed depends on the structure of the organic. With highly oxidized organics (carbonate, formate, acetate and oxalate), little or no N{sub 2}O is formed. Aromatic and aliphatic organics (sodium tetraphenylborate, benzene, phenol, n-paraffin, and tributylphosphate) produce small amounts of N{sub 2}O. Water soluble, easily oxidized organics (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, n-butanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol) produce large amounts of N{sub 2}O relative to the previous two categories. Nitrous oxide production is not greatly affected by pH between neutral and pH=13, but increases significantly in acid solution. The G-value for N{sub 2}O production in 10 wt% potassium tetraphenylborate slurries has been measured under process conditions important at the Savannah River Site.

Walker, D.D.; Hobbs, D.T.; Tiffany, J.B.; Bibler, N.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Meisel, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Nitrous oxide production from radiolysis of simulted high-level nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide gas (N{sub 2}O) is produced by the radiolysis of aqueous nitrate or nitrite solutions in the presence of organic compounds. When ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or N- (2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) is present, the G-value for hydrogen increases and N{sub 2}O become the major gaseous product (G=0.54). A survey of organic compounds indicates the amount of N{sub 2}O formed depends on the structure of the organic. With highly oxidized organics (carbonate, formate, acetate and oxalate), little or no N{sub 2}O is formed. Aromatic and aliphatic organics (sodium tetraphenylborate, benzene, phenol, n-paraffin, and tributylphosphate) produce small amounts of N{sub 2}O. Water soluble, easily oxidized organics (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, n-butanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol) produce large amounts of N{sub 2}O relative to the previous two categories. Nitrous oxide production is not greatly affected by pH between neutral and pH=13, but increases significantly in acid solution. The G-value for N{sub 2}O production in 10 wt% potassium tetraphenylborate slurries has been measured under process conditions important at the Savannah River Site.

Walker, D.D.; Hobbs, D.T.; Tiffany, J.B.; Bibler, N.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Meisel, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ambient Measurements of the NOx Reservoir Species N2O5 using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The regulated control of pollutants is essential to maintaining good air quality in urban areas. A major concern is the formation of tropospheric ozone, which can be especially harmful to those with lung conditions and has been linked to the occurrence of asthma. Ozone is formed through reactions of oxidized volatile organic compounds with nitrogen oxides, and the accurate modeling of the process is necessary for smart and effective regulations. Ambient measurements are important to understanding the mechanisms involved in tropospheric chemistry. This dissertation describes the characterization of a novel instrument for the ambient measurement of dinitrogen pentoxide, N2O5, and the results of several field studies. This is an important intermediate in the major nighttime loss pathway of nitrogen oxides. The understanding of this process requires correct modeling formation, as any nitrogen oxides not removed at night will result in increased ozone formation at sunrise. Calibration studies have been performed in order to quantify the loss of reactive species within the instrument, and the sampling flow and N2O5 detection have been well characterized. The results of the laboratory measurements are presented. Results are presented from the SHARP Field Study in Houston, TX in the spring of 2009. N2O5 measurements are compared to measurements of other species, including nitric acid and nitryl chloride, which were performed by other research groups. Mixing ratios exceeding 300 ppt were observed following ozone exceedance days, and a dependence of the concentration on both wind speed and direction was noticed. There was a strong correlation determined between N2O5 with HNO3 and ClNO2 indicating both a fast heterogeneous hydrolysis and N2O5 as the primary source of the species. Observed atmospheric lifetimes for N2O5 were short, ranging from several seconds to several minutes. We have also investigated the presence of N2O5 in College Station, TX. Low mixing ratios peaking at approximately 20 ppt were observed, with longer atmospheric lifetimes of up to several hours. The role of biogenic emissions in the NO3-N2O5 equilibrium is discussed.

Geidosch, Justine Nicole

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Formation of N2O and NO2 Across Conventional DeNOx SCR Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated the formation of N2O and NO2 across conventional DeNOx selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. N2O is a particularly strong greenhouse gas, and both N2O and NO2 may adversely impact downstream processes. Additional data related to their formation or reduction across SCR catalysts is desirable.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Regional Sources of Nitrous Oxide over the United States: Seasonal Variation and Spatial Distribution  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents top-down constraints on the magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions over the central United States. We analyze data from tall towers in 2004 and 2008 using a high resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model paired with both geostatistical and Bayesian inversions. Our results indicate peak N{sub 2}O emissions in June with a strong seasonal cycle. The spatial distribution of sources closely mirrors data on fertilizer application with particularly large N{sub 2}O sources over the US Cornbelt. Existing inventories for N{sub 2}O predict emissions that differ substantially from the inverse model results in both seasonal cycle and magnitude. We estimate a total annual N{sub 2}O budget over the central US of 0.9-1.2 TgN/yr and an extrapolated budget for the entire US and Canada of 2.1-2.6 TgN/yr. By this estimate, the US and Canada account for 12-15% of the total global N{sub 2}O source or 32-39% of the global anthropogenic source as reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007.

Miller, S. M.; Kort, E. A.; Hirsch, A. I.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Xu, X.; Tian, H.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Michalak, A. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE Greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from several perialpine and alpine investigated greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from reservoirs located across an altitude gradient in Switzerland. These are the first results of greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs at high elevations

Wehrli, Bernhard

32

Measurements of N2O by the UARS Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder during the Early Northern Winter 1991/92  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of stratospheric nitrous oxide made by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) during the period 28 October 1991–18 January 1992 are presented. The data are consistent with the dynamical fields at the time, and are ...

S. L. Ruth; J. J. Remedios; B. N. Lawrence; F. W. Taylor

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Transport of Trace Chemicals by Planetary Waves in the Stratosphere Part 2: Transport of O3 and N2O by Transient Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of ozone and nitrous oxide by transient planetary wave in the stratosphere is studied on a midlatitude ?-plane with Newtonian cooling. The transport is found for chemically-inert traces when the mean-zonal state is forced from ...

Robert J. Kurzeja

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effect of fresh green waste and green waste compost on mineral nitrogen, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide from a Vertisol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporation of organic waste amendments to a horticultural soil, prior to expected risk periods, could immobilise mineral N, ultimately reducing nitrogen (N) losses as nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and leaching. Two organic waste amendments were selected, a fresh green waste (FGW) and green waste compost (GWC) as they had suitable biochemical attributes to initiate N immobilisation into the microbial biomass and organic N forms. These characteristics include a high C:N ratio (FGW 44:1, GWC 35:1), low total N (14%). Both products were applied at 3 t C/ha to a high N (plus N fertiliser) or low N (no fertiliser addition) Vertisol soil in PVC columns. Cumulative N{sub 2}O production over the 28 day incubation from the control soil was 1.5 mg/N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2}, and 11 mg/N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2} from the control + N. The N{sub 2}O emission decreased with GWC addition (P < 0.05) for the high N soil, reducing cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions by 38% by the conclusion of the incubation. Analysis of mineral N concentrations at 7, 14 and 28 days identified that both FGW and GWC induced microbial immobilisation of N in the first 7 days of incubation regardless of whether the soil environment was initially high or low in N; with the FGW immobilising up to 30% of available N. It is likely that the reduced mineral N due to N immobilisation led to a reduced substrate for N{sub 2}O production during the first week of the trial, when soil N{sub 2}O emissions peaked. An additional finding was that FGW + N did not decrease cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions compared to the control + N, potentially due to the fact that it stimulated microbial respiration resulting in anaerobic micro sites in the soil and ultimately N{sub 2}O production via denitrification. Therefore, both materials could be used as post harvest amendments in horticulture to minimise N loss through nitrate-N leaching in the risk periods between crop rotations. The mature GWC has potential to reduce N{sub 2}O, an important greenhouse gas.

Vaughan, Sarah M., E-mail: s.vaughan@uq.edu.au [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Dalal, Ram C. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Department of Environment and Resource Management, 80 Meiers Rd., Indooroopilly, QLD 4068 (Australia); Harper, Stephen M. [Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Warrego Highway, Gatton, QLD 4343 (Australia); Menzies, Neal W. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cameron KC. Nitrous oxide emissions from two dairy pastureand land use on N 2 O emissions from an imperfectly drainedoptions for N 2 O emissions from differently managed

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N{sub 2}O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N{sub 2}O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nitrous oxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of key operating parameters, the relative importance of coal type, and the potentially significant coal properties for producing N[sub 2]O emissions in an atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) and pressurized bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The generation of N[sub 2]O emissions is quantified in an empirical model based on the experimental data.

Mann, M.D.; Collings, M.E.; Young, B.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Isotopic Analysis of N and O in Nitrite and Nitrate by Sequential Selective Bacterial Reduction to N2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of NO2 - is linked to those of NO3 -, N2O, NH4 +, and N2 gas, the production or consumption in natural aquatic systems is poorly understood. Isotopic data can be used to study the sources independently, reproducible 15N and 18O values were obtained at both natural-abundance levels ((0.2-0.5 for 15N

40

NIST Kevin Douglass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.6 micron atmospheric window region where three critical greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), and methane (CH 4 ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Auxiliary Ligand-Dependent Assembly of Several Ni/Ni-Cd Compounds with N2O2 Donor Tetradentate Symmetrical Schiff Base Ligand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several low-dimensional Ni/Ni-Cd complexes containing N2O2 donor tetradentate symmetrical Schiff base ligand bis(acetylacetone)ethylene-diamine (sy-H2L2), namely, [Ni(sy-L2)]2?HLa?ClO4 (2), (HLa)2?(ClO4)?(NO3) (3), [Ni(sy-L2)X]2](4,4’-bipy) (where La = 5,7-dimethyl-3,6-dihydro-2H-1,4-diazepine, X = ClO4 (4), X=NO3 (5), [Ni(sy-L2)Cd(SCN)2]n (6) and [Ni(sy-L2)?Cd(N3)2]n (7) have been synthesized from [Ni(sy-L2)]2?H2O (1). Complex 2, is three component discrete assembly generated from (HLa)+ moiety bridged with [Ni(sy-L2)] unit and ClO4- anion. A solution containing complex 2 and Cd(NO3)2 results in a mixture of 1 and 3. Further re-crystallization of 1 and 3 with various auxiliary ligands, provides coordination complexes 4 – 7 stabilized by weak hydrogen bonds in which 6 and 7 represent the first 1D heteronuclear complexes based on symmetric acacen-base Schiff base ligand.

Ge, Ying Ying; Li, Guo-Bi; Fang, Hua-Cai; Zhan, Xu Lin; Gu, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Jin Hao; Sun, Feng; Cai, Yue-Peng; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2010-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 12.7 - Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (100-year time horizon) Gas GWP SAR 900 Carbon dioxide (CO2) 1 Methane (CH 4 ) 1 21 Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) 310 HFC-23 11,700 HFC-32 650...

43

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

stationary combustion—primarily from wood com-bustion for residential heating—increased. • Emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2O) increased by 0.4 MMTCO 2e (0.1 ...

44

Premixed Carbon Monoxide–Nitrous Oxide–Hydrogen Flames ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the combustion emission charac- teristics of stationary and mobile power plants. ... present data are in good agreement with the low-hydro- gen data ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

An experimental investigation of the urea-water decomposition and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxides with urea using V2O5-WO3-TiO2 catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two flow reactor studies, using an electrically heated laminar flow reactor over Vanadia based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) honeycomb catalyst, were performed at 1 atm pressure and various temperatures. The experiments were conducted using simulated exhaust gas compositions for different exhaust gases. A quartz tube was used in order to establish inert conditions inside the reactor. The experiments utilized a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer in order to perform both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the reaction products. Urea-water solution decomposition was investigated over V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst over the entire SCR temperature range using the temperature controlled flow reactor. The solution was preheated and then injected into pure nitrogen (N2) stream. The decomposition experiments were conducted with a number of oxygen (O2) compositions (0, 1, 10, and 15%) over the temperature range of 227oC to 477oC. The study showed ammonia (NH3), carbon-dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO) as the major products of decomposition along with other products such as nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with urea-water solution over V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated. Urea-water solution was injected at a temperature higher than the vaporization temperature of water and the flow reactor temperature was varied from 127oC to 477oC. A FTIR spectrometer was used to determine the concentrations of the product species. The major products of SCR reduction were NH3, NO and CO2 along with the presence of other minor products NO2 and N2O. NO removal of up to 87% was observed. The aim of the urea-water decomposition experiments was to study the decomposition process as close to the SCR configuration as possible. The aim of the SCR experiments was to delineate the effect of various parameters including reaction temperature and O2 concentration on the reduction process. The SCR investigation showed that changing parameter values significantly affected the NO removal, the residual NH3 concentration, the temperature of the maximum NO reduction, and the temperature of complete NH3 conversion. In the presence of O2, the reaction temperature for maximum NO reduction was 377?C for ratio of 1.0.

Johar, Jasmeet Singh

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based and pillared interlayer clay-based catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated. The experiments used a number of gas compositions to simulate different combustion gases. A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to determine the concentrations of the product species. The major products were nitric oxide (NO), ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The aim was to delineate the effect of various parameters including reaction temperature, oxygen concentration, NH3-to-NO ratio, space velocity, heating area, catalyst arrangement, and vanadium coating on the removal of nitric oxide. The investigation showed that the change of the parameters significantly affected the removals of NO and NH3 species, the residual NH3 concentration (or NH3 slip), the temperature of the maximum NO reduction, and the temperature of complete NH3 conversion. The reaction temperature was increased from the ambient temperature (25°C) to 450 °C. For both catalysts, high NO and NH3 removals were obtained in the presence of a small amount of oxygen, but no significant influence was observed from 0.1 to 3.0% O2. An increase in NH3-to-NO ratio increased NO reduction but decreased NH3 conversions. For V2O5-WO3/TiO2, the decrease of space velocity increased NO and NH3 removals and broadened the active temperature window (based on NO > 88% and NH3 > 87%) about 50°C. An increase in heating area decreased the reaction temperature of the maximum NO reduction from 350 to 300°C, and caused the active reaction temperature window (between 250 and 400°C) to shift toward 50°C lower reaction temperatures (between 200 and 350°C). The change of catalyst arrangements resulted slight improvement for NO and NH3 removals, therefore, the change might contribute to more gas removals. The catalyst with extra vanadium coating showed higher NO reductions and NH3 conversions than the catalyst without the extra vanadium coating.

Oh, Hyuk Jin

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrous oxide N2O Quantity Value Units Value Units 0.49985 Specific gravity (20 C, 1 atm) 1.83E-03 g cm-3 Mean excitation energy 84.9 eV Minimum ionization 1.819 MeV g-1cm2...

48

Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change (2006) 11: 403427 C Springer 2006 DOI: 10.1007/s11027-005-9006-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-gas emissions from soils (nitrous oxide [N2 O] and methane) [4,5,7,12]. Biochar might also be useful biochar types and production methods [13­15]. Biochar is produced by thermochemical conversion is illustrated in Figure 1. In this paper, we examine the potential opportunities for deployment of biochar

Walter, M.Todd

49

ORIGINAL PAPER Biological nitrogen fixation by common beans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-gas emissions from soils (nitrous oxide [N2 O] and methane) [4,5,7,12]. Biochar might also be useful biochar types and production methods [13­15]. Biochar is produced by thermochemical conversion is illustrated in Figure 1. In this paper, we examine the potential opportunities for deployment of biochar

Lehmann, Johannes

50

Biocharis a relatively new concept that has been promoted primarily as a form of carbon storage but also for its poten-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-gas emissions from soils (nitrous oxide [N2 O] and methane) [4,5,7,12]. Biochar might also be useful biochar types and production methods [13­15]. Biochar is produced by thermochemical conversion is illustrated in Figure 1. In this paper, we examine the potential opportunities for deployment of biochar

51

An Intercomparison of Ground-Based Solar FTIR Measurements of Atmospheric Gases at Eureka, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the results of an intercomparison of vertical column amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen fluoride (HF), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric acid (HNO3), methane (CH4), ozone (O3), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen (N2) ...

C. Paton-Walsh; R. L. Mittermeier; W. Bell; H. Fast; N. B. Jones; A. Meier

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI)

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

APPENDIX F: EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM ALTERNATIVE FUELS FOR MOTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Improving Efficiency and Versatility of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells ... PM 307 (Convention Center ) Pisist The operation and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) ... Macromolecular Crowding Effects by Supported Wox/SiO2 Catalysts ... Center ) Israel E. Wachs1, Soe Lwin1, Wu Zhou2, Chris K. Kiely3, Nikolaos

Delucchi, Mark

54

Quantification of and Controls on Dinitrogen and Nitrous Oxide Fluxes from Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and then 100 g was weighed into each sample jar (490 mL).The jars were sealed on viton gaskets with aluminum lidssepta for gas sampling. The jars were flushed with N 2 for

Yang, Wendy Hui-I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

States 2009 (March 2011), Table 22; and EIA estimates based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories ...

56

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in soils cropped to corn with varying N fertilization. Can.as affected by tillage, corn-soybean-alfalfa rotations, andsoil nitrogen mineralization for corn production in eastern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual Energy Outlook › Energy Disruptions › International Energy Outlook ... 1984: 86: 45: 132: 1: 11: 11: 355: 2: 74: 431: 87: 661:

58

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is the selective oxidation of methane to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Air, oxygen, or carbon dioxide rather than nitrous oxide, are utilized as the oxidizing gas at high gas hourly space velocity but mild reaction conditions (500-700{degrees}C, 1 atm total pressure). All the investigated processes are catalytic, aiming at minimizing gas phase reactions that are difficult to control. During this quarter, solid state {sup 51}V NMR and double catalyst bed experiments were conducted to demonstrate the unfavorable effect of the presence of bulk crystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2} xerogel catalysts on selective oxidation of methane to methanol and formaldehyde. Results are discussed.

Klier, Kamil; Herman, R.G.; Wang, C.B. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test and is most commonly used. Sulfur hexafluoride use has ...

Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nitrous Oxide and Molecular Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions and Aerosol Optical Properties: Experiments and Observations Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D6), doi:10.1029/1096JD03382. Volk, C. M. , et al. (1996),CIRS, Icarus , 191 , 712-721. Volk, C. M. , et al. (1996),Mass Spectrom. , 22, 603-312. Volk, C. M. , et al. (1996),

Croteau, Philip Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nitrous Oxide and Molecular Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions and Aerosol Optical Properties: Experiments and Observations Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through biomass and fossil fuel combustion, which show thatof industrial combustion or biomass burning processes butbiomass burning, based on recent measurements of a combustion

Croteau, Philip Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test… (more)

Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Nitrous Oxide and Molecular Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions and Aerosol Optical Properties: Experiments and Observations Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not included here). The solar spectrum at 625 km in Earth’ssee if structure in the solar spectrum changes the ratio ofnot included here). The solar spectrum at 625 km in Earth’s

Croteau, Philip Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

"GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP)" "(From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP" ,,,"TAR1","AR42" "(1) Carbon Dioxide","CO2","CO2",1,1 "(2) Methane","CH4","CH4",23,25 "(3) Nitrous Oxide","N2O","N2O",296,298 "(4) Hydroflourocarbons" "HFC-23 (trifluoromethane)",15,"CHF3",12000,14800 "HFC-32 (difluoromethane)",16,"CH2F2",550,675 "HFC-41 (monofluoromethane)",43,"CH3F",97,92 "HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane)",17,"CHF2CF3",3400,3500

65

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

66

Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies  

SciTech Connect

Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Quarterly report, March--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is the selective oxidative coupling of methane to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Air, oxygen or carbon dioxide, rather than nitrous oxide will be utilized as the oxidizing gas at high gas hourly space velocity, but mild reaction conditions (500-700 {degrees}C, 1 atm total pressure). All the investigated processes are catalytic, aiming at minimizing gas phase reactions that are difficult to control. The research is divided into the following three tasks: (1) maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}H{sub 4} products over promoted Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (2) selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and (3) catalyst characterization and optimization. Task 1 dealt with the preparation, testing, and optimization of acidic promoted lanthana-based catalysts for the synthesis of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} hydrocarbons and is essentially completed. Task 2 aims at the formation and optimization of promoted catalysts for the synthesis of oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol. Task 3 involves characterization of the most promising catalysts so that optimization can be achieved under Task 2. Accomplishments for this period are presented.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Wang, Chaun-Bao; Shi, Chunlei; Sun, Qun

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Winter and summer nitrous oxide and nitrogen oxides fluxes from a seasonally snow-covered subalpine meadow at Niwot Ridge, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA M. W.Alpine Research, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA D.Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA B. Hall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The European land and inland water CO2, CO, CH4 and N2O balance between 2001 and 2005  

SciTech Connect

Globally, terrestrial ecosystems have absorbed about 30% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions over the period 2000-2007 and inter-hemispheric gradients indicate that a significant fraction of terrestrial carbon sequestration must be north of the Equator. We present a compilation of the CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O balances of Europe following a dual constraint approach in which (1) a land-based balance derived mainly from ecosystem carbon inventories and (2) a land-based balance derived from flux measurements are compared to (3) the atmospheric data-based balance derived from inversions constrained by measurements of atmospheric GHG (greenhouse gas) concentrations. Good agreement between the GHG balances based on fluxes (1294 {+-} 545 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}), inventories (1299 {+-} 200 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) and inversions (1210 {+-} 405 Tg C in CO{sub 2}-eq yr{sup -1}) increases our confidence that the processes underlying the European GHG budget are well understood and reasonably sampled. However, the uncertainty remains large and largely lacks formal estimates. Given that European net land to atmosphere exchanges are determined by a few dominant fluxes, the uncertainty of these key components needs to be formally estimated before efforts could be made to reduce the overall uncertainty. The net land-to-atmosphere flux is a net source for CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, because the anthropogenic emissions by far exceed the biogenic sink strength. The dual-constraint approach confirmed that the European biogenic sink removes as much as 205 {+-} 72 Tg C yr{sup -1} from fossil fuel burning from the atmosphere. However, This C is being sequestered in both terrestrial and inland aquatic ecosystems. If the C-cost for ecosystem management is taken into account, the net uptake of ecosystems is estimated to decrease by 45% but still indicates substantial C-sequestration. However, when the balance is extended from CO{sub 2} towards the main GHGs, C-uptake by terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is offset by emissions of non-CO{sub 2} GHGs. As such, the European ecosystems are unlikely to contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change.

Luyassaert, S [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Abril, G [Laboratoire EPOC, CNRS; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Bastviken, D [Linkoping University; Bellassen, V [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Bergamaschi, P [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Bousquet, P [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Chevallier, F [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Ciais, P. [LSCE/CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Corazza, M [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Dechow, R [Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute; Erb, K-H [Alpen-Adria Universitaet Klagenfurt-Vienna-Graz; Etiope, G [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia; Fortems-Cheiney, A [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Grassi, G [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Hartmann, J [University of Hamburg; Jung, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Lathiere, J [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Lohila, A [Finnish Meteorological institute; Mayorga, E [University of Washington; Moosdorf, N [University of Hamburg; Njakou, D [University of Antwerp; Otto, J [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; Peters, W [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Peylin, P [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Raymond, Peter A [Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; Rodenbeck, C [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Saarnio, S [University of Eastern Finland; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Szopa, S [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Thompson, R [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Verkerk, P [European Forest Institute; Vuichard, N [CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, LSCE; Wang, R [Peking University; Wattenbach, M [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre For Geosciences; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Subtask 1.22 - Microbial Cycling of CH4, CO2, and N2O in a Wetlands Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil microbial metabolic activities play an important role in determining CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems. To verify and evaluate CO{sub 2} sequestration potential by wetland restoration in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), as well as to address concern over restoration effects on CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions, laboratory and in situ microcosm studies on microbial cycling of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O were initiated. In addition, to evaluate the feasibility of the use of remote sensing to detect soil gas flux from wetlands, a remote-sensing investigation was also conducted. Results of the laboratory microcosm study unequivocally proved that restoration of PPR wetlands does sequester atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Under the experimental conditions, the simulated restored wetlands did not promote neither N{sub 2}O nor CH{sub 4} fluxes. Application of ammonia enhanced both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission, indicating that restoration of PPR wetlands may reduce both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission by cutting N-fertilizer input. Enhancement of CO{sub 2} emission by the N-fertilizer was observed, and this observation revealed an overlooked fact that application of N-fertilizer may potentially increase CO{sub 2} emission. In addition, the CO{sub 2} results also demonstrate that wetland restoration sequesters atmospheric carbon not only by turning soil conditions from aerobic to anoxic, but also by cutting N-fertilizer input that may enhance CO{sub 2} flux. The investigation on microbial community structure and population dynamics showed that under the experimental conditions restoration of the PPR wetlands would not dramatically increase population sizes of those microorganisms that produce N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}. Results of the in situ study proved that restoration of the PPR wetland significantly reduced CO{sub 2} flux. Ammonia enhanced the greenhouse gas emission and linearly correlated to the CO{sub 2} flux within the experimental rate range (46-200 kg N ha{sup -1}). The results also clarified that the overall reduction in global warming potential (GWP) by the PPR wetland restoration was mainly contributed from reduction in CO{sub 2} flux. These results demonstrate that restoration of currently farmed PPR wetlands will significantly reduce the overall GWP budget. Remote sensing investigations indicate that while the 15-meter resolution of the imagery was sufficient to delineate multiple zones in larger wetlands, it was not sufficient for correlation with the ground-based gas flux measurement data, which were collected primarily for smaller wetland sites (<250 meters) in the areas evaluated by this task. To better evaluate the feasibility of using satellite imagery to quantify wetland gas flux, either higher-resolution satellite imagery or gas flux data from larger wetland sites is needed.

Dingyi Ye; Bethany Kurz; Marc Kurz

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

72

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Multifunctional Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3) Electric, ferroelectric, magnetic and photonic properties of oxides 4) Theoretical modeling of epitaxial growth, interfaces and microstructures 5) Composition ...

74

Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

76

Why sequence Nitrosomas cryotolerans and Nitrosospira birensis for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrosomas cryotolerans and Nitrosospira birensis for Nitrosomas cryotolerans and Nitrosospira birensis for comparative phylogenomics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria? The process by which ammonia or ammonium is reduced to nitrate or nitrite is known as nitrification. The nitrogen cycle is considered to be one of the most impacted by humans, with factors such as industrially produced fertilizers and nitrogen-fixing crops adding more nitrogen to the terrestrial system than natural sources. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) help mediate the first step of the nitrification process, and in this project researchers focus on the genomes of two of these microbes: Nitrosomonas cryotolerans and Nitrosospira briensis. The role of AOB in the production of nitrous oxide (N2O) remains an important international concern and this sequencing project will improve our ability for

77

The carbon footprint analysis of wastewater treatment plants and nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale biological nitrogen removal processes in Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprint analysis of advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ...

Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

79

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

80

Oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An investigation of urea decomposition and selective non-catalytic removal of nitric oxide with urea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of urea (NH2CONH2) to remove nitric oxide (NO) from exhaust streams was investigated using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor. The experiments used a number of gas compositions to simulate different combustion exhaust gases. The urea was injected into the gases as a urea-water solution. The decomposition processes of the urea-water solutions and urea powder were examined. For both the nitric oxide removal and the urea decomposition experiments, a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to determine the concentrations of the product species. The products from the decomposition were examined every 50 K from 500 K to 800 K. The dominant products were ammonia (NH3), isocyanuric acid (HNCO) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In case of urea-water solution decomposition, for gas temperatures between 550 and 650 K, the highest concentrations were for NH3 and HNCO. On the other hand, the concentrations of CO2 were highest for gas temperatures of about 500 - 550 K. For temperatures above about 650 K, the amount of these three dominant prod-ucts slightly decreased as temperature increased. ivFor the nitric oxide removal (SNCR) experiments, the gas mixture was heated to temperatures between 800 K and 1350 K. Depending on the temperature, gas composition, residence time, and urea feed rate, removal levels of up to 95% were obtained. Other by-products such as N2O were detected and quantified. The effects of the urea/NO (beta) ratio were determined by varying the urea concentration for a constant NO con-centration of 330 ppm. The effects of the levels of oxygen (O2) in the exhaust gases and the residence time also were investigated. Increasing the urea/NO ratio and residence time resulted in higher NO removal and increased the temperature window of the nitric oxide removal.

Park, Yong Hun

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lipid Oxidation Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews state-of-the-art developments in the understanding of the oxidation of lipids and its connection with the oxidation of other biological molecules such as proteins and starch. Lipid Oxidation Pathways Hardback Books Health - Nutrition -

83

Gene Expression by Microbial Communities in Response to Soil Wet-Up: Microbial Resuscitation Strategies, Nitrifier Response Dynamics, and N2O Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field, and sealed in mason jars prior to returning to thehumidity in Berkeley, CA. Jars were kept in the dark at roomperformed in 8-oz. glass jars. For each soil, 5 jars were

Placella, Sarah Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Validation of the Greenhouse Gas Balance of the Netherlands. Observational constraints on CO2, CH4 and N2O from atmospheric monitoring station Lutjewad.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this PhD thesis a method is described to determine the atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions for a large area using in-situ measurements. The method was… (more)

Laan, Sander van der

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields under relatively mild reaction conditions. Results in this document are reported under the headings: methane oxidation over silica, methane oxidation over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, and oxidative coupling of methane over sulfate-doped Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. 24 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Formation Kinetics of Nitric Oxide of Biodiesel Relative to Petroleum Diesel under Comparable Oxygen Equivalence Ratio in a Homogeneous Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interest in biodiesel has piqued with advent of stringent emissions regulations. Biodiesel is a viable substitute for petroleum diesel because biodiesel produces significantly lower particulate and soot emissions relative to petroleum diesel. Higher nitric oxide (NO) emissions for biodiesel, however, are of primary concern in biodiesel-fueled engines. Search for an in-cylinder technique to reduce NO emissions for biodiesel has motivated studies to gain an improved understanding of fundamental factors that drive increase in NO emissions with biodiesel. Potential factors include fuel-bound oxygen, fuel-bound nitrogen and post-flame gas temperature. The role of fuel-bound oxygen however is debated in the literature. The research objective of this study is to computationally determine if biodiesel and petroleum diesel yield equivalent concentrations of NO with the same oxygen equivalence ratio in a 0-D homogeneous reactor, to explain the role of fuel-bound oxygen in biodiesel on increases in NO emissions with biodiesel. The results from this study indicate that the biodiesel surrogate yields higher NO emissions than the n-heptane because of its lower oxygen consumption efficiency. The lower oxygen consumption efficiency for biodiesel is likely because of the slower decomposition of the individual components and the blending ratios of the biodiesel surrogate blend. The relative differences in combustion efficiency of individual components of the biodiesel blend suggest this conclusion. The more efficient burning of the methyl esters relative to the n-heptane in biodiesel surrogate perhaps indicates the favorable role of fuel-bound oxygen in the fuel’s combustion. The low utilization of oxygen by the biodiesel surrogate could not be explained in this study. The dominance of NO2 H ? NO OH and N NO ? N2 O mechanisms during biodiesel combustion however explain the high NO emissions for the biodiesel surrogate relative to the n-heptane. The biodiesel may yield lower NO emissions than the petroleum diesel if the blending ratios for the biodiesel are adjusted such that combustion efficiency of biodiesel and petroleum diesel is same or the NO2 H ? NO OH and N NO ? N2 O mechanisms are suppressed during biodiesel combustion.

Rathore, Gurlovleen K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

88

Photo-oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Smith, R. Davis (Golden, CO)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 45574576, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/4557/2011/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-4557-2011 © Author(s) 2011. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Modeling the Frozen- acterized by low potential vorticity (PV) and high nitrous ox- ide (N2O), was advected poleward and became) chemistry and transport model, the GEOS-5/MERRA Replay model, and the Van Leer Icosahe- dral Triangular

Meskhidze, Nicholas

90

Multifunctional Oxides: Multifunctional Oxides: Synthesis and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy to Explore Magneoelectric Coupling in Multiferroic Oxide Heterostructures: Y-M Sheu1; S. Trugman1; L Yan1; C-P Chuu 1; ...

91

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement performance has not been considered adequately in pavement design. Part of the reason is that the process of asphalt oxidation in pavement is not well understood. This work focused on understanding the asphalt oxidation kinetics and on developing pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation and hardening in pavement under environmental conditions. A number of asphalts were studied in laboratory condition. Based on kinetics data, a fast-rate ? constant-rate asphalt oxidation kinetics model was developed to describe the early nonlinear fast-rate aging period and the later constant-rate period of asphalt oxidation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics parameters for the fast-rate and constant-rate reactions were empirically correlated, leading to a simplified model. And the experimental effort and time to obtain these kinetics parameters were significantly reduced. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanism of asphalt oxidation, two antioxidants were studied on their effectiveness. Asphalt oxidation was not significantly affected. It was found that evaluation of antioxidant effectiveness based on viscosity only is not reliable. The asphalt oxidation kinetics model was incorporated into the pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation in pavement. The pavement oxidation model mimics the oxidation process of asphalt in real mixture at pavement temperatures. A new parameter, diffusion depth, defined the oxygen diffusion region in the mastic. A field calibration factor accounted for the factors not considered in the model such as the effect of small aggregate particles on oxygen diffusion. Carbonyl area and viscosity of binders recovered from field cores of three pavements in Texas were measured and were used for model calibration and validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed model estimates carbonyl growth over time in pavement, layer-by-layer, quite well. Finally, this work can be useful for incorporating asphalt oxidation into a pavement design method that can predict pavement performance with time and for making strategic decisions such as optimal time for maintenance treatments.

Jin, Xin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Technology Innovation Program Transforming America's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Reducing US dependence on foreign oil. # Reducing carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and other ... Separation, sequestration, and utilization of CO2 ...

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

Biruduganti, Munidhar S. (Naperville, IL); Gupta, Sreenath Borra (Naperville, IL); Sekar, R. Raj (Naperville, IL); McConnell, Steven S. (Shorewood, IL)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

Partial oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Doshi, Rajiv (Downers Grove, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multifunctional Oxide Heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is devoted to the rapidly developing field of oxide thin-films and heterostructures. Oxide materials combined with atomic-scale precision in a heterostructure exhibit an abundance of macroscopic physical properties involving the strong coupling between the electronic, spin, and structural degrees of freedom, and the interplay between magnetism, ferroelectricity, and conductivity. Recent advances in thin-film deposition and characterization techniques made possible the experimental realization of such oxide heterostructures, promising novel functionalities and device concepts.

Tsymbal, E Y [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL; Eom, Professor Chang-Beom [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [University of California, Berkeley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Defect Structure of Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of electrical conductors: oxides, sulfides, and nitrides...2 O 4 , NiAl 2 O 4 , (Tl 2 O),

99

Oxidation of gallium arsenide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to gallium arsenide semiconductors and, more particularly, to the oxidation of surface layers of gallium arsenide semiconductors for semiconductor device fabrication.

Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.

1991-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Oxidation/Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... International Symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Oxidation/ ... on combustor liners of a Solar Turbines' industrial gas turbine engine, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Alternative Ozone Control Strategies: Flexible Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrolysis of N2O5, and ultimately leads to the computed reduction in NOx levels. 4. Effects of the different in the source magnitude of LtNOx can lead to a substantial10 reduction in the computed lifetimes of these trace. This increase of O3 at higher altitudes is responsible for the reduction of surface NOx levels simulated at high

102

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Susan Chi Gary T. Rochelle* (gtr@che.utexas.edu, 512-471-7230) The University of Texas at Austin Department of Chemical Engineering Austin, Texas 78712 Prepared for presentation at the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Abstract Oxidative degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA) was studied under typical absorber condition of 55°C. The rate of evolution of NH 3 , which was indicative of the overall rate of degradation, was measured continuously in a batch system sparged with air. Dissolved iron from 0.0001 mM to 1 mM yields oxidation rates from 0.37 to 2 mM/hr in MEA solutions loaded with 0.4 mole CO 2 / mole MEA. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N,N-bis(2- hydroxyethyl)glycine effectively decrease the rate of oxidation in the presence of iron by 40 to

106

Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System, OTDS, provides a method and apparatus for reduction of tritium surface contamination on various items. The OTDS employs ozone gas as oxidizing agent to convert elemental tritium to tritium oxide. Tritium oxide vapor and excess ozone gas is purged from the OTDS, for discharge to atmosphere or transport to further process. An effluent stream is subjected to a catalytic process for the decomposition of excess ozone to diatomic oxygen. One of two configurations of the OTDS is employed: dynamic apparatus equipped with agitation mechanism and large volumetric capacity for decontamination of light items, or static apparatus equipped with pressurization and evacuation capability for decontamination of heavier, delicate, and/or valuable items.

Gentile, Charles A. (Plainsboro, NJ), Guttadora, Gregory L. (Highland Park, NJ), Parker, John J. (Medford, NJ)

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation is essential for further developments in analytical methodology and hyphenated techniques, with which more understanding of the reaction kinetics, mechanism, and implications will take place. ...

108

Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides  

SciTech Connect

The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

1984-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

111

Controlled CO preferential oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

113

JEM Table of Contents: October 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low Temperature Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Oxide Films Using Disilane and Nitrous Oxide [pp. 1507-1510] Juho Song, G.S. Lee, ...

114

Thermally Oxidized Silicon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Illustration of the silicon positions near the Si-SiO2 interface for a 4° miscut projected onto the ( ) plane. The silicon atoms in the substrate are blue and those in the oxide are red. The small black spots represent the translated silicon positions in the absence of static disorder. The silicon atoms in the oxide have been randomly assigned a magnitude and direction based on the static disorder value at that position in the lattice. The outline of four silicon unit cells is shown in black, whereas the outline of four expanded lattice cells in the oxide is shown in blue One of the most studied devices of modern technology is the field-effect transistor, which is the basis for most integrated circuits. At its heart

115

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Molecular water oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

Gratzel, Michael (St. Sulpice, CH); Munavalli, Shekhar (Bel Air, MD); Pern, Fu-Jann (Lakewood, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Tetraalykylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H.sub.e-z ›(n-C.sub.4 H.sub.9).sub.4 N!.sub.z (XM.sub.11 M'O.sub.39).sup.-e The M' (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Myers, Jr., Harry K. (Cochranville, PA); Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Tetraalklylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H{sub e{minus}z}[(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub z}(XM{sub 11}M{prime}O{sub 39}){sup {minus}e}. The M{prime} (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, P.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Shaikh, S.N.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Biological Properties of Zinc Oxide-Coated Anodized Aluminum Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used agar diffusion assays to evaluate the activity of zinc oxide-coated ... Zirconia Stabilisation Nano-Confined by Using Electroless Nickel Cladding .... Metal Oxide Nanofibers Produced by a ForceSpinning Method for Battery Electrodes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrous oxide activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for preparing of an ion exchanger, comprising: treating an ionically inert activated charcoal porous support with an aqueous solution of metal oxychloride selected from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides so as to impregnate the pores of the support with the solution; separating the treated support from excess metal oxychloride solution; converting the metal oxychloride to a hydrous metal oxide precipitate in the pores of the support at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal support have opposite zeta potentials and sufficient to hydrolyze the metal oxychloride. It also describes a process for preparing an ion exchanger comprising: treating granulated activated charcoal with a concentrated solution of a metal oxychloride from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides, degassing the mixture; and treating the resultant mixture with a base selected from the group consisting of ammonium hydroxide and alkali metal hydroxides so as to precipitate the oxychloride within the pores of the activated carbon granules as hydrous metal oxide at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal have opposite zeta potentials.

Weller, J.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

Doped zinc oxide microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book complements Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 1. Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods glycidol Health h

126

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book comprehensively reviews several aspects of cholesterol oxidation products: cholesterol oxidation mechanisms, analytical determination, origin and content of these compounds in foods and biological samples, and their biological effects, with an em

127

Oxygen sensitive, refractory oxide composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxide compositions containing niobium pentoxide and an oxide selected from the group consisting of hafnia, titania, and zirconia have electrical conductivity characteristics which vary greatly depending on the oxygen content.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of new, high efficiency and cleaner burning engines is strongly coupled with the removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from fuels. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein these dibenzothiophene derivatives are oxidized to their corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones is an approach that has gained significant attention. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) convert in a catalytic process dibenzothiophene and its derivatives to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones rapidly at moderate temperatures (60 C) and ambient pressure. The reaction can be performed in both an aqueous system containing an alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol) to solubilize the DBT and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system where the alcohol is present in both phases and facilitates the oxidation. Under a consistent set of conditions using the FeBF{sub 2} TAML activator, the degree of conversion was found to be t-butanol > methanol > ethanol. In the cases of methanol and ethanol, both the sulfoxide and sulfone were observed while for t-butanol only the sulfone was detected. In the two-phase system, the alcohol may function as an inverse phase transfer agent. The oxidation was carried out using two different TAML activators. In homogeneous solution, approximately 90% oxidation of the DBT could be achieved using the prototype TAML activator, FeB*, by sonicating the solution at near room temperature. In bi-phasic systems conversions as high as 50% were achieved using the FeB* TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide at 100 C. The sonication method yielded only {approx}6% conversion but this may have been due to mixing.

Colin P. Horwitz; Terrence J. Collins

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

REVIEW OF PLUTONIUM OXIDATION LITERATURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles ( 250 {micro}m). The particle size ratio is expected to be < 5%, 25%, and 70% for fine, medium and large particles, respectively, for metal temperatures in the 500-600 C range.

Korinko, P.

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

REVIEW OF PLUTONIUM OXIDATION LITERATURE  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles (<15 {micro}m), moderately sized particles (15 < x < 250 {micro}m) and large particles (> 250 {micro}m). The particle size ratio is expected to be < 5%, 25%, and 70% for fine, medium and large particles, respectively, for metal temperatures in the 500-600 C range.

Korinko, P.

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

Multifunctional Oxide - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toshihiko Tani, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, Inc. Scope, Multifunctional oxide ceramics and thin films exhibit fascinating ...

132

Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Climate Change 2001: Climate Change 2001: Working Group I: The Scientific Basis Get Javascript Other reports in this collection 4. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases Contents Executive Summary 4.1 Introduction 4.1.1 Sources of Greenhouse Gases 4.1.2 Atmospheric Chemistry and Feedbacks 4.1.3 Trace Gas Budgets and Trends 4.1.4 Atmospheric Lifetimes and Time-Scales 4.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 4.2.1 Non-CO2 Kyoto Gases 4.2.1.1 Methane (CH4) 4.2.1.2 Nitrous oxide (N2O) 4.2.1.3 Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 4.2.1.4 Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) 4.2.2 Montreal Protocol Gases and Stratospheric Ozone (O3) 4.2.3 Reactive Gases 4.2.3.1 Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) 4.2.3.2 Volatile organic compounds (VOC) 4.2.3.3 Nitrogen oxides (NOx)

133

Oxides for Spintronics - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Multifunctional Oxides. Presentation Title, Oxides for Spintronics. Author(s) ...

134

MESOPOROUS METAL OXIDE MICROSPHERE ELECTRODE COMPOSITIONS AND ...  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The mesoporous metal oxide microsphere ...

135

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Principal accomplishments have been achieved in all three areas of selective catalytic oxidation of methane that have been pursued in this research project. These accomplishments are centered on the development of catalyst systems that produce high space time yields of C{sub 2} hydrocarbon products, formaldehyde, and methanol from methane/air mixtures at moderate temperatures and at ambient pressure. The accomplishments can be summarized as the following: the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst developed here has been further optimized to produce 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630C with CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and tested that produces over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600C.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Controlled CO preferential oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

Meltser, Mark A. (Pittsford, NY); Hoch, Martin M. (Webster, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chemical oxidizers treat wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Based on the inherent benefits of these original oxidation systems, a second generation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) has emerged. These processes combine key features of the first generation technologies with more sophisticated advances in UV technology, such as the new pulsed plasma xenon flash lamp that emits high-energy, high-intensity UV light. Second generation systems can be equipped with a transmittance controller to prevent lamp fouling or scaling. The coupling of the first generation's technology with the new UV sources provides the rapid destruction of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons and humic acids from contaminated water. It also is effective in the treatment of organic laden gases from soil vapor extraction systems. AOPs may promote the oxidation (and subsequent removal) of heavy metals in water, though few data are available to verify the claim. The success of AOPs, including ozonation with UV light, hydrogen peroxide with UV light and advanced photolysis, is linked with their creation of hydroxyl-free radicals (OH[center dot]) that are effective in eliminating contaminants such as formaldehyde, chlorinated hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Hydroxyl free-radicals are consumed in microsecond reactions and exhibit little substrate selectivity with the exception of halogenated alkanes such as chloroform. They can act as chain carriers. Given their power, hydroxyl free-radicals react with virtually all organic solutes more quickly (especially in water) than any other oxidants, except fluorine. There are projects that have found the combination of some AOPs to be the most efficient organic destruction techniques for the job. For example, one project successfully remediated groundwater contaminated with gasoline and Number 2 diesel through successive treatments of ozone and hydrogen peroxide with ultraviolet light, followed by granular activated carbon. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

Stephenson, F.A. (Dames Moore, Phoenix, AZ (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Applications of Oxide Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of the new family of copper-oxide superconductors has opened an area of exciting new materials science with enormous potential for practical developments in technology and engineering. Research was conducted to understand the basic physical properties and the materials characteristics of the high temperature superconductors that control their electrical and mechanical properties, and determine their potential usefulness. Material properties and current carrying capabilites of the new Bismut...

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, which offers many advantages over traditional energy conversion systems including low emission and high efficiency, has become increasingly attractive to the utility, automotive, and defense industries (as shown in Figure 1). As an all solid-state energy conversion device, the SOFC operates at high temperatures (700-1,000 C) and produces electricity by electrochemically combining the fuel and oxidant gases across an ionically conducting oxide membrane. To build up a useful voltage, a number of cells or PENs (Positive cathode-Electrolyte-Negative anode) are electrically connected in series in a stack through bi-polar plates, also known as interconnects. Shown in Figure 2 (a) is a schematic of the repeat unit for a planar stack, which is expected to be a mechanically robust, high power-density and cost-effective design. In the stack (refer to Figure 2 (b)), the interconnect is simultaneously exposed to both an oxidizing (air) environment on the cathode side and a reducing (fuels such as hydrogen or natural gas) environment on the anode side for thousands of hours at elevated temperatures (700-1,000 C). Other challenges include the fact that water vapor is likely to be present in both of these environments, and the fuel is likely to contain sulfide impurities. Also, the interconnect must be stable towards any sealing materials with which it is in contact, under numerous thermal cycles. Furthermore, the interconnect must also be stable towards electrical contact materials that are employed to minimize interfacial contact resistance, and/or the electrode materials. Considering these service environments, the interconnect materials should possess the following properties: (1) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation and corrosion) in both cathodic (oxidizing) and anodic (reducing) atmospheres. (2) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN and other adjacent components, all of which typically have a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the range of 10.5-12.0 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}. (3) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales. (4) Satisfactory bulk and interfacial mechanical/thermomechanical reliability and durability at the SOFC operating temperatures. (5) Good compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials. Until recently, the leading candidate material for the interconnect was doped lanthanum chromite (LaCrO3), which is a ceramic material which can easily withstand the traditional 1000 C operating temperature. However, the high cost of raw materials and fabrication, difficulties in obtaining high-density chromite parts at reasonable sintering temperatures, and the tendency of the chromite interconnect to partially reduce at the fuel gas/interconnect interface, causing the component to warp and the peripheral seal to break, have plagued the commercialization of planar SOFCs for years. The recent trend in developing lower temperature, more cost-effective cells which utilize anode-supported, several micron-thin electrolytes and/or new electrolytes with improved conductivity make it feasible for lanthanum chromite to be supplanted by metals or alloys as the interconnect materials. Compared to doped lanthanum chromite, metals or alloys offer significantly lower raw material and fabrication costs.

Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Selective Oxidation of Organic Substrates to Partially Oxidized Products  

controlled rate of catalysis, utilizing ozone for oxidation of alcohols to ketones or aldehydes, is made possible with this environmentally friendly and versatile technology.

142

Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

PLATES WITH OXIDE INSERTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Planar-type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors are described, particularly those comprising fuel in the oxide form such as thoria and urania. The fuel assembly consists of a plurality of parallel spaced fuel plate mennbers having their longitudinal side edges attached to two parallel supporting side plates, thereby providing coolant flow channels between the opposite faces of adjacent fuel plates. The fuel plates are comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending tubular sections connected by web portions, the tubular sections being filled with a plurality of pellets of the fuel material and the pellets being thermally bonded to the inside of the tubular section by lead.

West, J.M.; Schumar, J.F.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

PREPARATION OF REFRACTORY OXIDE MICROSPHERE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described of preparing thorium oxide in the form of fused spherical particles about 1 to 2 microns in diameter. A combustible organic solution of thorium nitrate containing additive metal values is dispersed into a reflected, oxygen-fed flame at a temperature above the melting point of the resulting oxide. The metal additive is aluminum at a proportion such as to provide 1 to 10 weight per cent aluminum oxide in the product, silicon at the same proportion, or beryllium at a proportion of 12 to 25 weight per cent beryllium oxide in the product. A minor proportion of uranium values may also be provided in the solution. The metal additive lowers the oxide melting point and allows fusion and sphere formation in conventional equipment. The product particles are suitable for use in thorium oxide slurries for nuclear reactors. (AEC)

Haws, C.C. Jr.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Greenhouse gas emissions (CH4, CO2 and N2O) from a newly flooded hydroelectric reservoir in subtropical South Asia : The case of Nam Theun 2 Reservoir, Lao PDR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'augmentation de l'intérêt concernant la part des réservoirs hydroélectrique dans l'augmentation de la concentration atmosphérique des Gaz à Effet de Serre (GES) a amené à… (more)

Deshmukh, Chandrashekhar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Continuous lengths of oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A layered oxide superconductor prepared by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon. A continuous length of a second substrate ribbon is overlaid on the first substrate ribbon. Sufficient pressure is applied to form a bound layered superconductor precursor powder between the first substrate ribbon and the second substrate ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to establish the oxide superconducting phase. The layered oxide superconductor has a smooth interface between the substrate and the oxide superconductor.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); List, III, Frederick A. (Andersonville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Thermal Oxidation of Titanium Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural and Thermal Study of Al2O3 Produced by Oxidation of Al-Powders Mixed with Corn Starch · Study of Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Composite ...

148

(IV) Oxide and Barium Titanate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a first investigation of its kind, a commercially available additive manufacturing platform has been applied to “print” metal oxide gas sensors. The M-Lab from ...

149

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Oxides, Steels, and Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012 ... This discussion will be illustrated with examples from solid oxide fuel cells, lithium ion batteries and high-temperature superconductors.

151

Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide - lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

Ballard, A.H.; Godfrey, T.G. Jr.; Mowery, E.H.

1986-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

Repasky, John Michael

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions. 14 figures.

Katz, J.L.; Chenghung Hung.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Ceramic oxide powders and the formation thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic oxide powders and a method for their preparation. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby two or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein said precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders are determined by process conditions.

Katz, Joseph L. (Baltimore, MD); Hung, Cheng-Hung (Baltimore, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low Temperature Constrained Sintering of Cerium Gadolinium Oxide Films for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, In: S.C. Singhal and M.Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology, U.S. Department ofOxide Films for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications by Jason

Nicholas, Jason.D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A STUDY OF THE FERTILITY AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF RICE SOIL WITH RESPECT TO THE APPLICATION OF BIOCHAR AND SELECTED AMENDMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was carried out to assess the effect of biochar on the carbon dynamics of wetland rice soils and on the growth and grain yield of rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). Pot experiments were conducted with amendments of chemical and organic origins in addition to woodderived biochar. Maximum soil carbon storage was observed with biochar compared to organic amendments such as composts and chemical fertilizer. Major soil carbon sequestration parameters like soil organic carbon (SOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were found to be greater with biochar. Aggregate formation was also significant under biochar trials. Considerable reduction in greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission, especially carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), was observed with biochar. Applications of biochar considerably influenced the growth profile and grain yield of the rice plants compared to other amendments. Hence, these results suggest that biochar of appropriate applied proportion can influence wetland rice soil carbon dynamics and has the potential to combat global warming without compromising productivity. The role of biochar as a green viable carbon negation option is supported by the study since the results showed a positive response towards soil and vegetation carbon Corresponding author:

Shanthi Prabhav; Renuka R; Sreekanth N. P; Babu Padmakumar; A. P Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Environmental proteomics reveals early microbial community responses to biostimulation at a uranium- and nitrate-contaminated site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High performance mass spectrometry instrumentation coupled with improved protein extraction techniques enable metaproteomics to identify active members of soil and groundwater microbial communities. Metaproteomics workflows were applied to study the initial responses (i.e., 4 days post treatment) of the indigenous aquifer microbiota to biostimulation with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) at a uranium-contaminated site. Members of the Betaproteobacteria (i.e., Dechloromonas, Ralstonia, Rhodoferax, Polaromonas, Delftia, Chromobacterium) and Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated aquifer community. Proteome characterization revealed distinct differences in protein expression between the microbial biomass collected from groundwater influenced by biostimulation and groundwater collected up-gradient of the EVO injection points. In particular, proteins involved in ammonium assimilation, EVO degradation, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule formation were prominent following biostimulation. Interestingly, the atypical NosZ of a Dechloromonas sp. was highly expressed suggesting active nitrous oxide (N2O) respiration. c-type cytochromes were barely detected, as was citrate synthase, a biomarker for hexavalent uranium reduction activity, suggesting that metal reduction has not commenced 4 days post EVO delivery. Environmental metaproteomics identified microbial community responses to biostimulation and elucidated active pathways demonstrating the value of this technique for complementing nucleic acid-based approaches.

Chourey, Karuna [ORNL] [ORNL; Nissen, Silke [ORNL] [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL] [ORNL; Pffifner, Susan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

How Portfolio Manager calculates greenhouse gas emissions | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methane, and nitrous oxide) from on-site fuel combustion and purchased electricity and district heating and cooling. Portfolio Manager also enables tracking of avoided emissions...

162

Katharine Gebbie GHG Emissions Speech ? June 2, 2010 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2. We are also releasing other gases – methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride – into the atmosphere that trap heat more effectively than CO ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Global Warming and Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST is producing new suites of primary gas standards for carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrous oxide in air at atmospheric levels ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

OIAF Products and Data Analyses Brochure, May 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992,this report presents the annual estimates of U.S.emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ...

165

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

166

Deflagration studies on waste Tank 101-SY: Test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses test procedures and calibration of equipment to study the flammability and deflagration of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and air in waste tanks. (JL)

Cashdollar, K.L.; Zlochower, I.A.; Hertzberg, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division of AOCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For professionals in lipid oxidation with a major focus in food applications including flavor, instrumentation, chemical analyses, biological oxidation, antioxidants, nutraceuticals, processing and mechanisms Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division of AOCS ...

168

Emergent Phenomena at Complex Oxide Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex Oxide Interfaces by Pu Yu A dissertation submittedOxide Interfaces Copyright 2011 by Pu Yu Abstract Emergentat Complex Oxide Interfaces by Pu Yu Doctor of Philosophy in

Yu, Pu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of “stoves” that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the “final” products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

New manganese catalyst for light alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminophosphates containing manganese in the structural framework are employed for the oxidation of alkanes, for example the vapor phase oxidation of methane to methanol.

Durante, Vincent A. (West Chester, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Walker, Darrell W. (Visalia, CA); Marcus, Bonita K. (Radnor, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Fuel Cell - Solid Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolyzer Research and Development Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid oxide diagram In an SOFC, oxygen from air is reduced to ions at the cathode, which diffuse through the...

172

Interfaces in Nanostructured Functional Oxide Thin Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thin film systems include high temperature superconductors (HTS), thin film solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and other functional oxide systems. Detailed ...

173

Experimental Characterization of Manganese Cobalt Oxide (MCO)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Novel Electrode Material for Symmetrical Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ... High Performance Oxide Protective Coatings for SOFC Components · Influence of Pore ...

174

Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowires via Chemical Vapor Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tinmaterial systems such as indium oxide, gallium oxide and tinand Characterization A. Indium Oxide Nanowires Indium oxide

Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis of Some Uranium Oxide and Mixed Oxide Lattice Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of critical lattice experiments using uranium oxide and mixed-oxide fuel (uranium-plutonium) moderated by clean or borated water was expected to provide information for testing computer programs and nuclear data libraries used in analyzing nuclear reactor cores. Uncertainties inherent in the measurements must be small for experimental information to be of value in such a validation. In general, experimental parameters such as reaction ratios or disadvantage factors (which can be compared with ca...

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare earth oxides-hafnium oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators, fuel cells, and thermoelectric generators. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

FLUORINATION OF OXIDIC NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of volatilizing fissionable material away from fission products, present together in neutron-bombarded uranium oxide, by reaction with an oxygen-fluorine mixture at 350 to 500 deg C is described. (AEC)

Mecham, W.J.; Gabor, J.D.

1963-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This summarizes NREL's FY09 battery materials research activity in developing metal oxide nanostructured anodes to enable high-energy, durable and affordable li-ion batteries for HEVs and PHEVs.

Dillon, A. C.; Riley, L. A.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Ban, C.; Gillaspie, D. T.; Pesaran, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nanostructured Metal Oxide Anodes (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This summarizes NREL's FY09 battery materials research activity in developing metal oxide nanostructured anodes to enable high-energy, durable and affordable li-ion batteries for HEVs and PHEVs.

Dillon, A. C.; Riley, L. A.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Ban, C.; Gillaspie, D. T.; Pesaran, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Oxides having high energy densities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

Blake, R. II.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

Scott Han

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Process for fabrication of metal oxide films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

1990-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

Sullivan, Neal P. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 10 Kinetic Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 10 Kinetic Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Data Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Kinetic Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Data from ...

186

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 6 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation by ESR Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 6 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation by ESR Spectroscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation by ESR Spectrosco

187

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 2 Oxidation of Fish Lipids and Its Inhibition with Tocopherolsh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 2 Oxidation of Fish Lipids and Its Inhibition with Tocopherolsh Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Oxidation of Fish Lipids and Its Inhibition with

188

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2Chapter 3 Oxidation of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Chapter 3 Oxidation of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Oxid

189

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 1 Lipid Oxidation Products and Methods Used for Their Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 1 Lipid Oxidation Products and Methods Used for Their Analysis Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Lipid Oxidation P

190

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 2 Volumetric Analysis of Oxidized Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 2 Volumetric Analysis of Oxidized Lipids Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Volumetric Analysis of Oxidized Lipids

191

Method for hot pressing beryllium oxide articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The hot pressing of beryllium oxide powder into high density compacts with little or no density gradients is achieved by employing a homogeneous blend of beryllium oxide powder with a lithium oxide sintering agent. The lithium oxide sintering agent is uniformly dispersed throughout the beryllium oxide powder by mixing lithium hydroxide in an aqueous solution with beryllium oxide powder. The lithium hydroxide is converted in situ to lithium carbonate by contacting or flooding the beryllium oxide-lithium hydroxide blend with a stream of carbon dioxide. The lithium carbonate is converted to lithium oxide while remaining fixed to the beryllium oxide particles during the hot pressing step to assure uniform density throughout the compact.

Ballard, Ambrose H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Godfrey, Jr., Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mowery, Erb H. (Clinton, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

P-64: A Comparative Study of Metal Oxide Coated Indium-tin Oxide Anodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indium-tin oxide anodes capped with certain oxides of metals enhance while other oxides degrade the hole-injection and quantum efficiencies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The oxides of tin, zinc, praseodymium, yttrium, gallium, terbium and titanium have been investigated. The power efficiency of an OLED with a 1nm thick praseodymium oxide cap is improved by 2.5 times over that of a conventional OLED without an oxide capped anode.

For Organic Light-Emitting; Chengfeng Qiu; Haiying Chen; Zhilang Xie; Man Wong; Hoi Sing Kwok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Oxidants, Antioxidants and Cell Signaling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidants, Antioxidants and Cell Signaling Oxidants, Antioxidants and Cell Signaling Speaker(s): Chandan K. Sen Date: February 17, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Reactive oxygen species represent a common mediator of environmental stress such as during physical exercise, ozone exposure, UV radiation and xenobiotic (pollutant) metabolism. Antioxidant defense systems protect against the ravages of such reactive species. In contrast to the conventional idea that reactive oxygen is mostly a trigger for oxidative damage of biological structures, now we know that low physiologically relevant concentration of reactive oxygen species can regulate a variety of key molecular mechanisms that may be linked with important processes such as immune response, cell-cell adhesion, cell proliferation, inflammation,

194

PREPARATION OF REFRACTORY OXIDE CRYSTALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for preparing uranium dioxide, thorium oxide, and beryllium oxide in the form of enlarged individual crystals. The surface of a fused alkali metal halide melt containing dissolved uranium, thorium, or beryllium values is contacted with a water-vapor-bearing inert gas stream at a rate of 5 to 10 cubic centimeters per minute per square centimeter of melt surface area. Growth of individual crystals is obtained by prolonged contact. Beryllium oxide-coated uranium dioxide crystals are prepared by disposing uranium dioxide crystals 5 to 20 microns in diameter in a beryllium-containing melt and contacting the melt with a water-vapor-bearing inert gas stream in the same manner. (AEC)

Grimes, W.R.; Shaffer, J.H.; Watson, G.M.

1962-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study.

Propp, W.A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 6 Harmonization of Cholesterol Oxidation Product Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 6 Harmonization of Cholesterol Oxidation Product Analysis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

197

Adsorption of Propane on the Magnesium Oxide (100) Surface and Synthesis of Anodized Aluminum Oxide.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work is divided into two parts: the adsorption of propane on the magnesium oxide (100) surface and the synthesis of anodized aluminum oxide. The… (more)

Felty, Michael John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 14 Cholesterol Oxidation Products: Other Biological Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 14 Cholesterol Oxidation Products: Other Biological Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

199

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 13 Cholesterol Oxidation Products and Atherosclerosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 13 Cholesterol Oxidation Products and Atherosclerosis Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

200

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 1 Cholesterol Oxidation Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 1 Cholesterol Oxidation Mechanisms Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press   ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Argonne CNM News: Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Lithium-Ion Battery Applications Hollow iron oxide nanoparticles Transmission electron micrograph of hollow iron oxide nanoparticles....

204

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division July 201/span>3 Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division July 201/span>3 Newsletter Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division July 201/span>3 Newsletter Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division ...

205

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division April 2013 Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division April 2013 Newsletter Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division April 2013 Newsletter Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division ...

206

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryLipid Oxidation & Quality Division2013 Members327 Members as of October 1, 2013, Process Plus LLCCincinnati, OH, USAAbraham, TimothyCargill IncHopkins, MN, USAAbrams, JimCargill Corn Milling NAMemphis, TN, USAAbril, Rube

208

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

Machinable dissolved metal oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powders of a metal oxide superconductor are mixed with sufficient amount (10--80 mol%) of In, Sn, and/or Al, to become nonbrittle, machinable. Preferred superconductors are YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O compounds.

Chen, Chung-Hsuan.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

211

Formulations for iron oxides dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

Horwitz, Earl P. (Argonne, IL); Chiarizia, Renato (Argonne, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Machinable dissolved metal oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powders of a metal oxide superconductor are mixed with sufficient amount (10--80 mol%) of In, Sn, and/or Al, to become nonbrittle, machinable. Preferred superconductors are YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O compounds.

Chen, Chung-Hsuan

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emission Impacts of Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Urban Buses and Farming Tractors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................................... 14 Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields........................................................ 34 Appendix B: Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields) LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas LS low-sulfur LSD low-sulfur diesel MTBE methyl

Argonne National Laboratory

214

Genomic consequences of DNA oxidation by peroxynitrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radicals nitric oxide and superoxide are produced endogenously by activated macrophages and neutrophils and combine in a diffusion-limited reaction to form peroxynitrite, a powerful oxidizing and nitrating agent capable ...

Neeley, William Louis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion  

SciTech Connect

The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

216

Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid oxidation in food systems is one of the most important factors which affect food quality, nutrition, safety, color and consumers’ acceptance. Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol con

217

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division Poster Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division student award for best poster presentation at the AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo. Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division Poster Competition Divisions achievement agricultural analytical application award awards biote

218

Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC IX), S. C. Singhal and J.create connected nanostructured SOFC electrodes is reviewed.of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently

Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

post-Doping of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes,? P.h.D.and Technology of Ceramic Fuel Cells, p. 209, Elsevier, NewI. Birss, in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC IX), S. C. Singhal

Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach ... chemical reaction rates will increase exponentially and environmental attack ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Oxide/Graphene Nanocomposite Functional Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare Earth Activated Oxides for Solid State Lighting · Rare Earth Doped Tellurite and Chalcogenide Planar Waveguide Amplifiers and Lasers · Replacing ...

223

High quality oxide films on substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material.

Ruckman, Mark W. (Middle Island, NY); Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Gao, Yong L. (Henrietta, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Doped Titanium Oxide Nanotube Arrays with Enhanced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Active Titania-Based Nanoparticles for Composite Propellant Combustion ... of Novel Nanostructured Electrolytes for Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ...

225

High quality oxide films on substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material. 4 figures.

Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Gao, Y.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nanostructured Water Oxidation Catalysts - Energy Innovation ...  

Nanostructured Cobalt Oxide Clusters in Mesoporous Silica as Efficient Oxygen-Evolving Catalysts. Angewandte Chemie International Edition. Vol. 28: ...

227

Oxidized Derivatives of Hydroxymethyl Furfural (HMF ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Oxidized Derivatives of Hydroxymethyl Furfural (HMF) Battelle Number(s): ...

228

Evaluation of Commercially Available Oxidation Resistance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oxidation resistance alloy interconnects have been used in planar SOFC systems ... alloys under the SOFC interconnect dual exposure conditions: ...

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

229

Oxide Skin Strength Measurements on Molten Aluminum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, OXIDE SKIN STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS ON MOLTEN ALUMINUM – MANGANESE ALLOYS WITH AND WITHOUT SALT ON SURFACE

230

Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

Landingham, R.L.

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Kinetics of Chromium(III) Oxidation by Manganese(IV) Oxides Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This represents the first study to determine the chemical kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on Mn-oxides. The results focusing on the "chemical" kinetics of Cr(III) oxidation on manganese oxides, i.e., the initial rates of Obtaining and Analyzing Kinetic Data. In Rates of Soil Chemical Processes, Sparks, D. L., Suarez, D. L., Eds

Sparks, Donald L.

233

Electronic structure of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide monolayers  

SciTech Connect

Graphene oxide (GO) monolayers obtained by Langmuir Blodgett route and suitably treated to obtain reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Upon reduction of GO to form RGO C1s x-ray photoelectron spectra showed increase in graphitic carbon content, while ultraviolet photoelectron spectra showed increase in intensity corresponding to C2p-{pi} electrons ({approx}3.5 eV). X-ray excited Auger transitions C(KVV) and plasmon energy loss of C1s photoelectrons have been analyzed to elucidate the valence band structure. The effective number of ({pi}+{sigma}) electrons as obtained from energy loss spectra was found to increase by {approx}28% on reduction of GO.

Sutar, D. S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Central Surface Analytical Facility, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Singh, Gulbagh; Divakar Botcha, V. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity Factors  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting Program > Coefficients Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program (Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emission Coefficients) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Fuel Emission Coefficients Table 1: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion Table 2: Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Transportation Fuels Table 3: Generic Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Stationary Fuel Combustion Table 4: Specific Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Biogenic Fuel Sources Table 5: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Factors for Highway Vehicles Table 6: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Table 7: Methane and Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors for Non-Highway Mobile Combustion

235

Resistance Switching of Electrodeposited Cuprous OxideThin Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

236

Study on Corrosion Behavior of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

237

PROCESS OF PRODUCING REFRACTORY URANIUM OXIDE ARTICLES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for fabricating uranium oxide into a shaped refractory article by introducing a uranium halide fluxing reagent into the uranium oxide, and then mixing and compressing the materials into a shaped composite mass. The shaped mass of uranium oxide and uranium halide is then fired at an elevated temperature so as to form a refractory sintered article. It was found in the present invention that the introduction of a uraninm halide fluxing agent afforded a fluxing action with the uranium oxide particles and that excellent cohesion between these oxide particles was obtained. Approximately 90% of uranium dioxide and 10% of uranium tetrafluoride represent a preferred composition.

Hamilton, N.E.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Semiconductive Properties of Uranium Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES Thomas Meek Materials Science Engineering Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37931 Michael Hu and M. Jonathan Haire Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 August 2000 For the Waste Management 2001 Symposium Tucson, Arizona February 25-March 1, 2001 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________ * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy

239

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

240

Nitric oxide reburning with methane  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with initial findings from the ongoing, three-year DOE program that began on 02/01/1995. The program involves computer simulation studies to aid in planning and conducting a series of experiments that will extend the knowledge of reburning process. The objective of this work is to find nitric oxide reduction effectiveness for various reburning fuels and identify both homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction mechanisms characterizing NO reduction.

Kumpaty, S.K. [Rust Coll., Holly Springs, MS (United States); Subramanian, K. [Subramanian (Kannikeswaran), Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

2008-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

242

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

243

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

244

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

245

Compositional Analysis of the High Molecular Weight Ethylene Oxide Propylene Oxide Copolymer by MALDI Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The composition of narrow distribution poly ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer (Mw ~ 8700 Da) was studied using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The ethylene oxide-propylene oxide copolymer produced oligomers separated by 14 Da. The average resolving power over the entire spectrum was 28,000. Approximately 448 isotopically resolved peaks representing about 56 oligomers are identified. Although agreement between experimental and calculated isotopic distributions was strong, the compositional assignment was difficult. This is due to the large number of possible isobaric components. The purpose of this research is to resolve and study the composition of high mass copolymer such as ethylene oxide-propylene oxide.

Houshia, Orwa Jaber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

CO oxidation on substituted copper chromite spinel oxide catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidation of carbon monoxide was studied on Mg- and Al-substituted CuCr[sub 2]O[sub 4] spinel catalyst at atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 373 and 723 K. The activity of CuCr[sub 2]O[sub 4] decreased even for small replacements of either Cu by Mg or Cr by Al and none of the substituted oxides was as active as CuCr[sub 2]O[sub 4]. In Cu[sub 1[minus]x]Mg[sub x]Cr[sub 2]O[sub 4] catalysts, the activity systematically decreased with increasing x, except for 0.4 < x < 0.6. The decrease in activity is due to a decrease in the active Cu[sup 2+] ions of the catalyst. The increase in activity on increasing x from 0.4 to 0.6 is attributed to the crystallographic phase change, i.e., tetragonal to cubic, in the catalyst. This was also found in the CuCr[sub 2[minus]x]Al[sub x]O[sub 4] catalysts. The decrease in the catalytic activity on substitution of Cr by Al, even when the total copper content is not altered, is due to the reduction of some of the active Cu[sup 2+] ions to Cu[sup 1+] ions. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Murthy, K.S.R.C. (Indian Telephone Industries, Ltd., Banglore (India)); Ghose, J. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fusion Techniques for the Oxidation of Refractory Actinide Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale experiments were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of fusing refractory actinide oxides with a series of materials commonly used to decompose minerals, glasses, and other refractories as a pretreatment to dissolution and subsequent recovery operations. In these experiments, 1-2 g of plutonium or neptunium oxide (PuO2 or NpO2) were calcined at 900 degrees Celsius, mixed and heated with the fusing reagent(s), and dissolved. For refractory PuO2, the most effective material tested was a lithium carbonate (Li2CO3)/sodium tetraborate (Na2B4O7) mixture which aided in the recovery of 90 percent of the plutonium. The fused product was identified as a lithium plutonate (Li3PuO4) by x-ray diffraction. The use of a Li2CO3/Na2B4O7 mixture to solubilize high-fired NpO2 was not as effective as demonstrated for refractory PuO2. In a small-scale experiment, 25 percent of the NpO2 was oxidized to a neptunium (VI) species that dissolved in nitric acid. The remaining neptunium was then easily recovered from the residue by fusing with sodium peroxide (Na2O2). Approximately 70 percent of the neptunium dissolved in water to yield a basic solution of neptunium (VII). The remainder was recovered as a neptunium (VI) solution by dissolving the residue in 8M nitric acid. In subsequent experiments with Na2O2, the ratio of neptunium (VII) to (VI) was shown to be a function of the fusion temperature, with higher temperatures (greater than approximately 400 degrees C) favoring the formation of neptunium (VII). The fusion of an actual plutonium-containing residue with Na2O2 and subsequent dissolution was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of a pretreatment process on a larger scale. Sodium peroxide was chosen due to the potential of achieving higher actinide recoveries from refractory materials. In this experiment, nominally 10 g of a graphite-containing residue generated during plutonium casting operations was initially calcined to remove the graphite. Removal of combustible material prior to a large-scale fusion with Na2O2 is needed due to the large amount of heat liberated during oxidation. Two successive fusions using the residue from the calcination and the residue generated from the initial dissolution allowed recovery of 98 percent of the plutonium. The fusion of the residue following the first dissolution was performed at a higher temperature (600 degrees Celsius versus 450 degrees Celsius during the first fusion). The ability to recover most of the remaining plutonium from the residue suggest the oxidation efficiency of the Na2O2 fusion improves with higher temperatures similar to results observed with NpO2 fusion.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Why Sequence Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? The goal of this project is to obtain complete genome sequences for six different freshwater iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Four of these are oxygen-dependent iron-oxidizing β-proteobacteria, and three of these, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, Gallionella capsiferriformans, and strain TW-2, are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth (that is, obtaining energy by the oxidation of inorganic compounds) using Fe(II) as sole energy source under microaerobic (low-oxygen) conditions. The fourth organism, Leptothrix cholodnii, is a sheath-forming heterotrophic (i.e., using complex organic compounds for nutrition) organism that oxidizes both Fe(II) and Mn(II) and deposits a ferromanganic coating on its sheath. In addition,

250

Mercury Oxidation Performance of Advanced SCR Catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts to oxidize mercury is an important aspect of many utilities’ mercury control strategies. Improved SCR mercury oxidation will facilitate its capture in downstream wet–flue gas desulfurization systems and will generally result in lower emission rates. Recently, catalyst manufacturers have attempted to maximize mercury oxidation through advanced catalyst formulations.This study documents the performance of an advanced ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Solid-oxide fuel cell electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a solid-oxide electrolyte operable at between 600{degrees}C and 800{degrees}C and a method of producing the solid-oxide electrolyte. The solid-oxide electrolyte comprises a combination of a compound having a weak metal-oxygen interactions with a compound having stronger metal-oxygen interactions whereby the resulting combination has both strong and weak metal-oxygen interaction properties.

Bloom, I.D.; Hash, M.C.; Krumpelt, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Metal oxide composite dosimeter method and material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of measuring a radiation dose wherein a radiation responsive material consisting essentially of metal oxide is first exposed to ionizing radiation. The metal oxide is then stimulating with light thereby causing the radiation responsive material to photoluminesce. Photons emitted from the metal oxide as a result of photoluminescence may be counted to provide a measure of the ionizing radiation.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

1963-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Microstructure Design of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The porous heterogeneous cathode microstructure of solid Oxide fuel cells ... Computer Simulations of Realistic Multi-Phase Three-Dimensional Microstructures.

256

Lanthanide doped barium phosphorous oxide scintillators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a lanthanide-doped barium phosphorous oxide useful for detecting nuclear material.

Borade, Ramesh B; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Denzo, Stephen E

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Double perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkali metal doped double perovskites containing manganese and at least one of cobalt, iron and nickel are useful in the oxidative coupling of alkane to higher hydrocarbons.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, B.K.

1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nanostructured manganese oxide clusters supported on ...  

2 evolution at nano-structured Mn oxide clusters in mesoporous silica under very mild conditions for the ?rst time. For driving the catalyst with

260

Batteries with Orthorhombic Sodium Manganese Oxide Cathodes  

Berkeley National Laboratory researchers have discovered a low-cost, low-toxicity manganese oxide for rechargeable lithium and sodium batteries.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Metal Current Collector Protected by Oxide Film  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; ... metal felt made substantially of inexpensive ferritic steel coated with a thin oxide film, ...

262

MULTIPLE OXIDANT CHROMIUM LEACHING FROM HANFORD WASTE  

MULTIPLE OXIDANT CHROMIUM LEACHING FROM HANFORD WASTE USDOE Aluminum Chromium Leaching Workshop January 24th, 2007 Jennifer E. Holland, Ph.D. Chairman, President, CEO

263

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 5 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Products by NMR Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 5 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Products by NMR Spectroscopy Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Analysis of Lipid Oxi

264

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 9 Protein Alterations Due to Lipid Oxidation in Multiphase Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 9 Protein Alterations Due to Lipid Oxidation in Multiphase Systems Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 P

265

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 3 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Gas Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 3 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Gas Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

266

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 4 Kinetic Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity in Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 4 Kinetic Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity in Lipid Oxidation Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4

267

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 2 Extraction and Purification of Cholesterol Oxidation Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 2 Extraction and Purification of Cholesterol Oxidation Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pr

268

Partial oxidation reforming of methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol is an attractive fuel for fuel cell-powered vehicles because it has a fairly high energy density, can be pumped into the tank of a vehicle mush like gasoline, and is relatively easy to reform. For on-board reforming, the reformer must be compact and lightweight, and have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Steam reforming reactors with the tube-and-shell geometry that was used on the prototype fuel cell-powered buses are heat transfer limited. To reach their normal operating temperature, these types of reactors need 45 minutes from ambient temperature start-up. The dynamic response is poor due to temperature control problems. To overcome the limitations of steam reforming, ANL explored the partial oxidation concept used in the petroleum industry to process crude oils. In contrast to the endothermic steam reforming reaction, partial oxidations is exothermic. Fuel and air are passed together over a catalyst or reacted thermally, yielding a hydrogen-rich gas. Since the operating temperature of such a reactor can be controlled by the oxygen-to- methanol ratio, the rates of reaction are not heat transfer limited. Start-up and transient response should be rapid, and the mass and volume are expected to be small by comparison.

Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electrochemical oxidation of organic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method and apparatus for the direct oxidation of organic materials, especially organic wastes, in an electrochemical cell. It fulfills the need for a simple, cost-effective way for generators of small quantities of waste to deal with that waste. It does not use an electron transfer agent, which may be a source of additional hazardous waste. The anode is made of carbon felt; the cathode is platinum; and the electrolyte is a strong oxidizer, preferably nitric acid. The potential difference is 2 to 3 volts; the current density is 0.15 to 0.25 A/cm{sup 2}. The porous barrier is a medium grade alumina frit or an ion exchange membrane. The organic materials are fed to the anode compartment; the resulting oxygen bubbling circumvents the need for stirring or circulating the waste. Many different types of waste (e.g. rubber gloves, TBP, process solutions, etc.) can be fed to the anode compartment without the need to process or store it. 3 figs. (DLC)

Almon, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involved both experimental and modeling efforts. The team was comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective was to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. The results suggested that homogeneous mercury oxidation is below 10% which is not consistent with previous data of others and work which was completed early in this research program. Previous data showed oxidation above 10% and up to 100%. However, the previous data are suspect due to apparent oxidation occurring within the sampling system where hypochlorite ion forms in the KCl impinger, which in turn oxidized mercury. Initial tests with entrained iron oxide particles injected into a flame reactor suggest that iron present on fly ash particle surfaces can promote heterogeneous oxidation of mercury in the presence of HCl under entrained flow conditions. Using the data generated above, with homogeneous reactions accounting for less than 10% of the oxidation, comparisons were made to pilot- and full-scale data. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions, as with the case of iron oxide, and adsorption on solid carbon must be taking place in the full-scale system. Modeling of mercury oxidation using parameters from the literature was conducted to further study the contribution of homogeneous pathways to Hg oxidation in coal combustion systems. Calculations from the literature used rate parameters developed in different studies, in some cases using transition state theory with a range of approaches and basis sets, and in other cases using empirical approaches. To address this, rate constants for the entire 8-step homogeneous Hg oxidation sequence were developed using an internally consistent transition state approach. These rate constants when combined with the appropriate sub-mechanisms produced lower estimates of the overall extent of homogeneous oxidation, further suggesting that heterogeneous pathways play an important role in Hg oxidation in coal-fired systems.

JoAnn Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Title Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Atmospheric Pollution Research Volume 3 Start Page 25 Issue 1 Pagination 25-31 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords health effects, ozone, soot, toxicity Abstract Combustion-generated particles released into the atmosphere undergo reactions with oxidants, which can change the particles' physiochemical characteristics. In this work, we compare the physical and chemical properties and cellular response of particles fresh from a flame with those oxidized by ozone and nitrogen dioxide. The reaction with ozone and nitrogen dioxide does not significantly modify the physical characteristics of the particles (primary particle size, fractal dimension, and surface area). However, oxidation affects the chemical characteristics of the particles, creating more oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, and increases their hydrophilicity. In addition, oxidized soot generates more reactive oxygen species, as measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Furthermore, oxidized soot is 1.5-2 times more toxic than soot that was not reacted with ozone, but the inflammatory response, measured by interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion, is unchanged. These results imply that combustion-generated particles released into the atmosphere will have an increased toxicity on or after high ozone days.

272

Destruction of organic wastes with molten oxidizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of biologically hazardous organic chemical wastes by using liquefied strongly oxidizing inorganic salts, such as the alkali metal nitrates, at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure, to yield inorganic salts, carbon dioxide, and water. The oxidizing salts are regenerated and recycled.

Bradshaw, R.W.; Holmes, J.T.; Tyner, C.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ammonia release method for depositing metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing metal oxides on substrates which is indifferent to the electrochemical properties of the substrates and which comprises forming ammine complexes containing metal ions and thereafter effecting removal of ammonia from the ammine complexes so as to permit slow precipitation and deposition of metal oxide on the substrates.

Silver, G.L.; Martin, F.S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials  

SciTech Connect

Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

Li, Liyu (Richland, WA); King, David L. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Destruction of organic wastes with molten oxidizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of biologically hazardous organic chemical wastes by using liquefied strongly oxidizing inorganic salts, such as the alkali metal nitrates, at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure, to yield inorganic salts, carbon dioxide, and water. The oxidizing salts are regenerated and recycled.

Bradshaw, R.W.; Holmes, J.T.; Tyner, C.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

278

DEHYDRATION OF DEUTERIUM OXIDE SLURRIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for recovering heavy water from uranium oxide-- heavy water slurries. The method consists in saturating such slurries with a potassium nitrate-sodium nitrate salt mixture and then allowing the self-heat of the slurry to raise its temperature to a point slightly in excess of 100 deg C, thus effecting complete evaporation of the free heavy water from the slurry. The temperature of the slurry is then allowed to reach 300 to 900 deg C causing fusion of the salt mixture and expulsion of the water of hydration. The uranium may be recovered from the fused salt mixture by treatment with water to leach the soluble salts away from the uranium-containing residue.

Hiskey, C.F.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Graphite oxidation modeling for application in MELCOR.  

SciTech Connect

The Arrhenius parameters for graphite oxidation in air are reviewed and compared. One-dimensional models of graphite oxidation coupled with mass transfer of oxidant are presented in dimensionless form for rectangular and spherical geometries. A single dimensionless group is shown to encapsulate the coupled phenomena, and is used to determine the effective reaction rate when mass transfer can impede the oxidation process. For integer reaction order kinetics, analytical expressions are presented for the effective reaction rate. For noninteger reaction orders, a numerical solution is developed and compared to data for oxidation of a graphite sphere in air. Very good agreement is obtained with the data without any adjustable parameters. An analytical model for surface burn-off is also presented, and results from the model are within an order of magnitude of the measurements of burn-off in air and in steam.

Gelbard, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu{sub 2}O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu{sub 2}O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu{sub 2}O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu{sub 2}O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

Jernigan, G.G. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials and Chemical Sciences Div.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides from combustion gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the simultaneous removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides from power plant stack gases comprising contacting the stack gases with a supported iron oxide catalyst/absorbent in the presence of sufficient reducing agent selected from the group consisting of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and mixtures thereof, to provide a net reducing atmosphere in the SO.sub.x /NO.sub.x removal zone. The sulfur oxides are removed by absorption substantially as iron sulfide, and nitrogen oxides are removed by catalytic reduction to nitrogen and ammonia. The spent iron oxide catalyst/absorbent is regenerated by oxidation and is recycled to the contacting zone. Sulfur dioxide is also produced during regeneration and can be utilized in the production of sulfuric acid and/or sulfur.

Clay, David T. (Longview, WA); Lynn, Scott (Walnut Creek, CA)

1976-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Characterization of a transient +2 sulfur oxidation state intermediate from the oxidation of aqueous sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation H{sub 2}S to sulfate involves a net transfer of eight electrons and occurs through the formation of several partially oxidized intermediates with oxidation states ranging from {minus}1 to +5. Known intermediates include elemental sulfur (oxidation state 0), polysulfides (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: 0), sulfite (+4) and thiosulfate (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: +5). A noticeable gap in this series of intermediates is that of a +2 sulfur oxidation state oxoacid/oxoanion species, which was never detected experimentally. Here, we present evidence of the transient existence of +2 oxidation state intermediate in the Ni(II)-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous sulfide. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize this species; they suggest that it has a sulfoxylate ion (SO{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) structure.

Vairavmurthy, M.A.; Zhou, Weiqing

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Applications of ReaxFF Reactive Force Fields to Oxidation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, High Temperature Corrosion and Oxidation of Materials ... Carlo tools for studying bulk- and surface oxidation, reactions of surface oxides with water, ... A Study on the Hot Corrosion Resistance of Metal-cemet-glass Coating on ...

285

Chemically Modified Metal Oxide Nanostructure for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanoparticle seeded indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate usingarrays were grown on an indium-tin oxide substrate followedof a double-sided indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate

Wang, Gongming

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nitric Acid Oxidized ZrO$_2$ as the Tunneling Oxide of Cobalt Silicide Nanocrystal Memory Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, ZrO$_2$ formed by the nitric acid oxidation method is proposed to be the tunneling oxide for nonvolatile memory device applications. The sputtered Zr thin film was oxidized ...

Chih-Wei Hu; Ting-Chang Chang; Chun-Hao Tu; Yang-Dong Chen; Chao-Cheng Lin; Min-Chen Chen; Jian-Yang Lin; Simon M. Sze; Tseung-Yuen Tseng

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

METHOD OF OXIDIZING PLUTONIUM ION WITH BISMUTHATE ION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for oxidizing plutonium from the tetravalent state to the hexavalent state by means of bismuthate oxidizing agents.

Garner, C.S.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Template synthesis and surface modification of metal oxides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Porous metal oxide monoliths, specifically silica, titania, zirconia and mixed oxides containing aluminum and yttrium, were prepared in a one-pot synthesis. Macroporosity was induced using… (more)

Drisko, Glenna Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Mechanism-Based Testing Methodology for Improving the Oxidation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Pittsburgh Accomplishments Obj1 Extensive cyclic oxidation data. Advances in oxide stress measurement. Obj2 Advances in indentation of TBCs as an accelerated testing...

290

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications News Release Release Date: July 23, 2013 National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies SOFC Solid oxide fuel cells are among the...

291

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix...

292

CRAD, Safety Basis - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Safety Basis - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to...

293

CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE...

294

CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

295

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to...

296

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash Title Arsenic Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash...

297

Complex Oxides for Highly Efficient Solid-State Energy ...  

Complex Oxides for Highly Efficient Solid-State Energy ... Using complex oxides to directly convert thermal to electrical energy is both ... Thermal P ...

298

Iron catalysis in oxidation by ozone - Energy Innovation Portal  

Bookmark Iron catalysis in oxidation by ozone - Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Iron catalysis in oxidation by ozone - Energy Innovation ...

299

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and...

300

Molten Oxide Electrolysis Application to Steelmaking: A New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is a new steelmaking ... Electrochemical Reduction of Tantalum Oxide in a CaCl2 – CaO Molten Salt Electrolyte.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Process, Synthesis, and Application of Functional Oxides II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2010 ... Nanostructured Functional Oxide Thin Films for High Temperature Superconductors, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Solar Cells: Haiyan Wang1; ...

302

Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large scale capture and sequestration projects. The objectives of this project were to prove at a commercial scale that ECO is capable of extended operations over a range of conditions, that it meets the reliability requirements of a typical utility, and that the fertilizer co-product can be consistently generated, providing ECO with an economic advantage over conventional technologies currently available. Further objectives of the project were to show that the ECO system provides flue gas that meets the inlet standards necessary for ECO{sub 2} to operate, and that the outlet CO{sub 2} and other constituents produced by the ECO{sub 2} pilot can meet Kinder-Morgan pipeline standards for purposes of sequestration. All project objectives are consistent with DOE's Pollution Control Innovations for Power Plants program goals.

Morgan Jones

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.

Hwang, H.Y.

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Initial stages of high temperature metal oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of XPS and UPS to the study of the initial stages of high temperature (> 350/sup 0/C) electrochemical oxidation of iron and nickel is discussed. In the high temperature experiments, iron and nickel electrodes were electrochemically oxidized in contact with a solid oxide electrolyte in the uhv system. The great advantages of this technique are that the oxygen activity at the interface may be precisely controlled and the ability to run the reactions in uhv allows the simultaneous observation of the reactions by XPS.

Yang, C.Y.; O'Grady, W.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Binary and ternary electrocatalysts are provided for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. The binary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate selected from the group consisting of NiWO.sub.4 or CoWO.sub.4 or a combination thereof, and 2) Group VIII noble metal catalyst supported on the substrate. The ternary electrocatalyst includes 1) a substrate as described above, and 2) a catalyst comprising Group VIII noble metal, and ruthenium oxide or molybdenum oxide or a combination thereof, said catalyst being supported on said substrate.

Adzic, Radoslav R. (Setauket, NY); Marinkovic, Nebojsa S. (Coram, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SORPTION OF URANIUM ON ZIRCONIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

The sorption of the ions of uranium, copper, and nickel on hydrous zirconium oxide was investigated at temperatures from 25 to 250 deg C. The experiments were performed by equilibrating 5 ml of the test solution with 0.5 g of zirconium oxide in a titanium autoclave, which was heated by means of a rocking furnace. The sorption of uranium was affected by characteristics of the zirconium oxide, temperatare of equilibration, and concentrations of uranium and of free acid in the uranyl sulfate solutions. Conclusions are drawn concerning the relationship between each of these factors and uranium sorption. (auth)

Goldstein, G.

1961-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Plasma gasification of coal in different oxidants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidant selection is the highest priority for advanced coal gasification-process development. This paper presents comparative analysis of the Powder River Basin bituminous-coal gasification processes for entrained-flow plasma gasifier. Several oxidants, which might be employed for perspective commercial applications, have been chosen, including air, steam/carbon-dioxide blend, carbon dioxide, steam, steam/air, steam/oxygen, and oxygen. Synthesis gas composition, carbon gasification degree, specific power consumptions, and power efficiency for these processes were determined. The influence of the selected oxidant composition on the gasification-process main characteristics have been investigated.

Matveev, I.B.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Applied Plasma Technology, Mclean, VA (USA)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Oil shale oxidation at subretorting temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Green River oil shale was air oxidized at subretorting temperatures. Off gases consisting of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water were monitored and quantitatively determined. A mathematical model of the oxidation reactions based on a shrinking core model has been developed. This model incorporates the chemical reaction of oxygen and the organic material in the oil shale as well as the diffusivity of the oxygen into the shale particle. Diffusivity appears to be rate limiting for the oxidation. Arrhenius type equations, which include a term for oil shale grade, have been derived for both the chemical reaction and the diffusivity.

Jacobson, I.A. Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Why Sequence Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria? Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria? Several environmental problems, such as acid rain, biocorrosion, etc., are caused by sulfur compounds, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). A sustainable process to remove these sulfur compounds is the production of elemental sulfur from H2S-containing gas streams by the use of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. In this process, H2S is absorbed into the alkaline solution in the scrubber unit, followed by the biological oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur and the recycling of water. With this two-step process, a variety of gas streams (i.e., natural gas, synthesis gas, biogas, and refinery gas) can be treated. For the treatment of sulfate-containing waste streams, an extra step has to be introduced: the transformation of sulfate into H2S by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In

310

Oxidative Treatment Method - Energy Innovation Portal  

The present invention provides a method for oxidizing a substance (e.g., in a waste stream, drinking water, a paper pulp slurry, or on a surface), which uses free ...

311

Oxidation of methionine residues in protein pharmaceuticals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) of free methionine. Therefore, the environments surrounding different methionine sites in G-CSF mainly provide spatial restriction to the access to the solvent but do not affect oxidation in a specific manner, ...

Chu, Jhih-Wei, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Green method to produce propylene oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search Argonne Home > Center for Nanoscale Materials > CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights News Research Highlights Newsletters CNM Images on Flickr Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Green method to produce propylene oxide conversion of propylene to polyene oxide via silver nanoclusters Simulation of propylene to propylene oxide conversion via silver nanoclusters supported on an alumina surface. Propylene oxide is an important chemical whose current industrial production is energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Attempts to solve this problem by using catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with

313

Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

Armstrong, T.R.; Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

316

Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings ...  

... (Indium Tin Oxide) ... Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC January 2013 tdc_IN06076_0113_mn

317

Nitrogen oxide delivery systems for biological media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo are associated with a variety of cellular modifications thought to be mutagenic or carcinogenic. These processes are likely mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as ...

Skinn, Brian Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Direct Electroreduction of Oxides in Molten Fluorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, up to now, the use of chloride salts is still problematic partially because ... Electrochemical Reduction of Tantalum Oxide in a CaCl2 – CaO Molten Salt ...

319

Deoxyribose oxidation chemistry and endogenous DNA adducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endogenous and exogenous oxidants react with cellular macromolecules to generate a variety of electrophiles that react with DNA produce cytotoxic and mutagenic adducts. One source of such electrophiles is deoxyribose in ...

Zhou, Xinfeng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

Baozhen, Li (Essex Junction, VT); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singhal, Subhash C. (Murrysville, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Modeling of solid oxide fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) model of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)s is developed to investigate the effect of various design and operating conditions on the cell performance and to examine the underlying ...

Lee, Won Yong, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Zhang, Chuanlun (Columbia, MO); Roh, Yul (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels.

Droege, Michael W. (Livermore, CA); Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Hair, Lucy M. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The present invention is especially advantageous for making metal oxides other than silica that are prone to forming opaque, cracked aerogels. 6 figs.

Droege, M.W.; Coronado, P.R.; Hair, L.M.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Senkov, Oleg N. (Moscow, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Aluminum doped zinc oxide for organic photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) was grown via magnetron sputtering as a low-cost alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Postdeposition ozone treatment resulted in devices with lower series resistance, increased open-circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency double that of devices fabricated on untreated AZO. Furthermore, cells fabricated using ozone treated AZO and standard ITO displayed comparable performance.

Murdoch, G. B.; Hinds, S.; Sargent, E. H.; Tsang, S. W.; Mordoukhovski, L.; Lu, Z. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Thin Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) design that can be fabricated entirely using low-temperature, thin-film processing is described. Potential advantages of the cell are reduced materials costs and improved fuel-cell characteristics. The critical design feature is the use of thin (approximately equal to 50 nanometers), catalytically-active oxide layers on a < 10 micrometer thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supported electrolyte to minimize reaction overpotentials and ohmic losses. Doped ceria at th...

1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

330

Process for etching mixed metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Process for etching mixed metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO); Duenow, Joel N. (Golden, CO); Barnes, Teresa (Evergreen, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Golden, CO)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Study of Catalytic Oxidation and Oxide Adsorption for the Removal of Tritium from Air  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and procedure were developed for studying the containment of tritium using catalytic conversion to the oxide followed by oxide adsorption. Data were obtained on the catalytic oxidation of elemental tritium and tritiated volatile hydrocarbons from pump oils between 23 and 538 degrees C. Oxidation efficiencies as high as 99.99997% (decontamination factor = 3.3 million) were obtained for total tritium levels of 1 ppm and a tritiated hydrocarbon level of approximately 0.2 ppb. In addition, a mathematical study was made to derive equations for the conceptual design of an "Emergency Containment System" for containment of tritium following an accidental release to room air.

Bixel, John C.; Kershner, Carl J.

1972-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

THE MICROPOROSITY OF BERYLLIUM OXIDE POWDER  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium oxide produced in the thermal decomposition of complex compounds is characterized by the low bulk weight and the inferior pressing properties. An investigation was made of the causes of the deterioration of the pressing properties of beryllium oxide. Beryllium oxide with a bulk weight of 0.107 g/cm/sup 3/ is pressed into briquets ai a pressure of 1 io 1.5 t/cm/sup 2/. It was found thai the amount of pressure applied does not change the properties of the pressed articles. The microporosity of the beryllium oxide sample was investigated as dependent on the sintering temperature. The main cause for the inferior pressing and the low bulk weight of beryllium oxide powder is the high microporosily of ihe sample. An increase of ihe densiiy of beryllium oxide does not only bring about a decrease of the microporosity bui also a change of the grain size. The properties of thue initial beryllium were investigated by means of a small-angle x-ray analysis. (TCO)

Astrakhantsev, S.M.; Umanskii, Ya.S.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Solid oxide fuel cell with monolithic core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell in which fuel and oxidant gases undergo an electrochemical reaction to produce an electrical output includes a monolithic core comprised of a corrugated conductive sheet disposed between upper and lower generally flat sheets. The corrugated sheet includes a plurality of spaced, parallel, elongated slots which form a series of closed, linear, first upper and second lower gas flow channels with the upper and lower sheets within which a fuel gas and an oxidant gas respectively flow. Facing ends of the fuel cell are generally V-shaped and provide for fuel and oxidant gas inlet and outlet flow, respectively, and include inlet and outlet gas flow channels which are continuous with the aforementioned upper fuel gas and lower oxidant gas flow channels. The upper and lower flat sheets and the intermediate corrugated sheet are preferably comprised of ceramic materials and are securely coupled together such as by assembly in the green state and sintering together during firing at high temperatures. A potential difference across the fuel cell, or across a stacked array of similar fuel cells, is generated when an oxidant gas such as air and a fuel such as hydrogen gas is directed through the fuel cell at high temperatures, e.g., between 700 C and 1,100 C. 8 figs.

McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.

1988-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

336

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Novel Support Structure for Ceramic ...  

Coal gasification ; Selective oxidation of hydrocarbons ; ADVANTAGES: Economical ; Increased reliability : ABSTRACT: Berkeley Lab ...

337

Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA); Bierl, Thomas W. (West Chester, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Simultaneous constraint and phase conversion processing of oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making an oxide superconductor article includes subjecting an oxide superconductor precursor to a texturing operation to orient grains of the oxide superconductor precursor to obtain a highly textured precursor; and converting the textured oxide superconducting precursor into an oxide superconductor, while simultaneously applying a force to the precursor which at least matches the expansion force experienced by the precursor during phase conversion to the oxide superconductor. The density and the degree of texture of the oxide superconductor precursor are retained during phase conversion. The constraining force may be applied isostatically.

Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Riley, Jr., Gilbert N. (Marlborough, MA); Hellstrom, Eric E. (Madison, WI); Larbalestier, David C. (Madison, WI); DeMoranville, Kenneth L. (Jefferson, MA); Parrell, Jeffrey A. (Roselle Park, NJ); Reeves, Jodi L. (Madison, WI)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

Direct-Coupling O? Bond Forming Pathway in Cobalt Oxide Water Oxidation Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a catalytic mechanism for water oxidation in a cobalt oxide cubane model compound, in which the crucial O–O bond formation step takes place by direct coupling between two CoIV(O) metal oxo groups. Our results are ...

Wang, Lee-Ping

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 7 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation by Differential Scanning Calorimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 7 Analysis of Lipid Oxidation by Differential Scanning Calorimetry Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books BAB4134A719DCAA7BC0E57797CDA7C80 AOCS Press Downloadable pd

342

Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

"A New Class of Creep Resistant Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite recent progress in the development of SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), their application in industrial gas turbines for distributed energy (DE) systems has been limited. The poor oxidation resistance of the non-oxide ceramics warrants the use of envrionmental barrier coatings (EBCs), which in turn lead to issues pertaining to life expectancy of the coatings. On the other hand, oxide/oxide CMCs are potential replacements, but their use has been limited until now due to the poor creep resistance at high temperatures, particularly above 1200 oC: the lack of a creep resistant matrix has been a major limiting factor. Using yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) as the matrix material system, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in oxide/oxide CMCs by introducing innovations in both the structure and composition of the matrix material, thereby leading to high temperature matrix creep properties not achieved until now. An array of YAG-based powders with a unique set of particle characteristics were produced in-house and sintered to full density and compressive creep data was obtained. Aided in part by the composition and the microstructure, the creep rates were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially. Even after accounting for porosity and a smaller matrix grain size in a practical CMC component, the YAG-based matrix material was found to creep slower than the most creep resistant oxide fiber available commercially.

Dr. Mohit Jain, Dr. Ganesh Skandan, Prof. Roger Cannon, Rutgers University

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

DETERMINATION OF TETRAVALENT URANIUM IN THORIUM OXIDE-URANIUM OXIDE MIXTURES. PARTS I, II, AND III  

SciTech Connect

For the determination of milligram quantities of uranium(N) in thorium oxide-uranium oxide mixtures which may also contain uranium(VI), it was necessary to devise a means of dissolving the sample so as to prevent any air oxidation of the uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). For this determination, the conventional potassium dichromate volumetric method was used except that the sample was dissolved under reflux in 7 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ which contained an excess of standard dichromate solution. Following the dissolution of the sample, this excess was determined by back titration with a standard solution of iron(II). Barium diphenylaminesulfonate was used as the indicator. Initial tests on the dissolution of samples of thorium oxide-uranium oxide in hot HC1O/sub 4/ and hot HCI are described. (auth)

Menis, O.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermo-Oxidation of Tokamak Carbon Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation of dust and flakes collected from the DIII-D tokamak, and various commercial dust specimens, has been measured at 350 ºC and 2.0 kPa O2 pressure. Following an initial small mass loss, most of the commercial dust specimens showed very little effect due to O2 exposure. Similarly, dust collected from underneath DIII-D tiles, which is thought to comprise largely Grafoil™ particulates, also showed little susceptibility to oxidation at this temperature. However, oxidation of the dust collected from tile surfaces has led to ~ 18% mass loss after 8 hours; thereafter, little change in mass was observed. This suggests that the surface dust includes some components of different composition and/or structure – possibly fragments of codeposited layers. The oxidation of codeposit flakes scraped form DIII-D upper divertor tiles showed an initial 25% loss in mass due to heating in vacuum, and the gradual loss of 30-38% mass during the subsequent 24 hours exposure to O2. This behavior is significantly different from that observed for the oxidation of thinner DIII-D codeposit specimens which were still adhered to tile surfaces, and this is thought to be related to the low deuterium content (D/C ~ 0.03 – 0.04) of the flakes.

J.W. Davis; B.W.N. Fitzpatrick; J.P. Sharpe; A.A. Haasz

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

XPS Determination of Uranium Oxidations States  

SciTech Connect

This contribution is both a review of different aspects of the XPS spectra that can help one determine U oxidation states and a personal perspective on how to effectively model the XPS of complicated mixed valence U phases. After a discussion of the valence band, the focus lingers on the U4f region, where the use of binding energies, satellite structures, and peak shapes is discussed in some detail. Binding energies were shown to be very dependent on composition/structure and consequently unreliable guides to oxidation state, particularly where assignment of composition is difficult. Likewise, the spin orbit split 4f7/2 and 4f5/2 peak shapes do not carry significant information on oxidation states. In contrast, both satellite-primary peak binding energy separations, as well as intensities too lesser extent, are relatively insensitive to composition/structure within the oxide-hydroxide-hydrate system and can be used to both identify and help quantify U oxidation states in mixed valence phases. An example of the usefulness of the satellite structure in constraining the interpretation of a complex multivalence U compound is given.

Ilton, Eugene S.; Bagus, Paul S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Why Sequence a Methane-Oxidizing Archaean?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Methane-Oxidizing Archaeon? a Methane-Oxidizing Archaeon? Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose atmospheric concentration has increased significantly because of anthropogenic activities and fluctuated naturally over glacial and interglacial cycles. While the importance of methane in Earth's climate dynamics has been well established, the global processes regulating its oceanic cycling remain poorly understood. Although there are high rates of methane production in many marine sedimentary environments (including a number that have been targeted as petroleum reserves), net methane sources from the ocean to the atmosphere appear to be small. This is due in large part to a biogeochemical process known as the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Microbially mediated AOM reduces methane flux from ocean to atmosphere, stimulates subsurface microbial

349

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dissolving uranium oxide--aluminum fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium oxide-aluminum fuel was studied to provide basic data for dissolving this type of enriched uranium fuel at the Savannah River Plant. The studies also included the dissolution of a similar material prepared from scrap uranium oxides that were to be recycled through the solvent extraction process. The dissolving behavior of uranium oxide-aluminum core material is similar to that of U-Al alloy. Dissolving rates are rapid in HNO/sub 3/-Hg(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions. Irradiation reduce s the dissolving rate and increases mechanical strength. A dissolution model for use in nuclear safety analyses is developed, . based on the observed dissolving characteristics. (auth)

Perkins, W.C.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid Oxide Fuel Cells FE researchers at NETL have developed a unique test platform, called the multi-cell array (MCA), to rapidly test multiple fuel cells and determine how they degrade when contaminants exist in the fuel stream, such as might occur when using syngas from a coal gasifier. FE researchers at NETL have developed a unique test platform, called the multi-cell array (MCA), to rapidly test multiple fuel cells and determine how they degrade when contaminants exist in the fuel stream, such as might occur when using syngas from a coal gasifier. Fuel cells are an energy user's dream: an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions that runs almost silently and has few

352

Method for fluorination of uranium oxide  

SciTech Connect

Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Growth of oxide exchange bias layers  

SciTech Connect

An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bia layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200.degree. C., the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 .ANG./sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous.

Chaiken, Alison (Fremont, CA); Michel, Richard P. (Bloomington, MN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene  

SciTech Connect

We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Windl, Wolfgang [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Supercritical water oxidation of landfill leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Thermal analysis of NH{sub 3} in supercritical water oxidation reaction. > Research on the catalytic reaction of landfill leachate by using response surface method. > Kinetic research of supercritical water oxidation of NH{sub 3} with and without MnO{sub 2} catalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, ammonia as an important ingredient in landfill leachate was mainly studied. Based on Peng-Robinson formulations and Gibbs free energy minimization method, the estimation of equilibrium composition and thermodynamic analysis for supercritical water oxidation of ammonia (SCWO) was made. As equilibrium is reached, ammonia could be totally oxidized in SCW. N{sub 2} is the main product, and the formation of NO{sub 2} and NO could be neglected. The investigation on SCWO of landfill leachate was conducted in a batch reactor at temperature of 380-500 deg. C, reaction time of 50-300 s and pressure of 25 MPa. The effect of reaction parameters such as oxidant equivalent ratio, reaction time and temperature were investigated. The results showed that COD and NH{sub 3} conversion improved as temperature, reaction time and oxygen excess increased. Compared to organics, NH{sub 3} is a refractory compound in supercritical water. The conversion of COD and NH{sub 3} were higher in the presence of MnO{sub 2} than that without catalyst. The interaction between reaction temperature and time was analyzed by using response surface method (RSM) and the results showed that its influence on the NH{sub 3} conversion was relatively insignificant in the case without catalyst. A global power-law rate expression was regressed from experimental data to estimate the reaction rate of NH{sub 3}. The activation energy with and without catalyst for NH{sub 3} oxidation were 107.07 {+-} 8.57 kJ/mol and 83.22 {+-} 15.62 kJ/mol, respectively.

Wang Shuzhong, E-mail: s_z_wang@yahoo.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Guo Yang [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Chen Chongming [Hebei Electric Power Research Institute, Shijizhuang, Hebei 050021 (China); Zhang Jie; Gong Yanmeng; Wang Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering of Xi' an Jiao Tong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

OXIDATIVE METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM NEPTUNIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described of separating neptunium from plutonium in an aqueous solution containing neptunium and plutonium in valence states not greater than +4. This may be accomplished by contacting the solution with dichromate ions, thus oxidizing the neptunium to a valence state greater than +4 without oxidizing any substantial amount of plutonium, and then forming a carrier precipitate which carries the plutonium from solution, leaving the neptunium behind. A preferred embodiment of this invention covers the use of lanthanum fluoride as the carrier precipitate.

Beaufait, L.J. Jr.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

Tubular solid oxide fuel cell demonstration activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This reports on a solid oxide fuel cell demonstration program in which utilities are provided fully integrated, automatically controlled, packaged solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems. These field units serve to demonstrate to customers first hand the beneficial attributes of the SOFC, to expose deficiencies through experience in order to guide continued development, and to garner real world feedback and data concerning not only cell and stack parameters, but also transportation, installation, permitting and licensing, start-up and shutdown, system alarming, fault detection, fault response, and operator interaction.

Ray, E.R.; Veyo, S.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Process for preparing active oxide powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

Berard, Michael F. (Ames, IA); Hunter, Jr., Orville (Ames, IA); Shiers, Loren E. (Ames, IA); Dole, Stephen L. (Burnt Hills, NY); Scheidecker, Ralph W. (Ames, IA)

1979-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigation of the Local Structure of Graphene Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the local structure of graphene oxide is presented. Graphene oxide is understood to be partially oxidized graphene. Absorption peaks corresponding to interlayer states suggest the presence of pristine graphitic nanoislands in graphene oxide. Site-projected partial density of states of carbon atoms bonded to oxygen atoms suggests that the broadening of the peak due to interlayer states in the carbon K-edge spectrum of graphene oxide is predominantly due to formation of epoxide linkages. Density functional theory suggests that multilayers of graphene oxide are linked by peroxide-like linkages.

S Saxena; T Tyson; E Negusse

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Counterflow diffusion flame synthesis of ceramic oxide powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic oxide powders and methods for their preparation are revealed. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby one or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein the precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The nature of the ceramic oxide powder produced is determined by process conditions. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders may be varied by the temperature of the flame, the precursor concentration ratio, the gas stream and the gas velocity.

Katz, Joseph L. (Baltimore, MD); Miquel, Philippe F. (Towson, MD)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Counterflow diffusion flame synthesis of ceramic oxide powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic oxide powders and methods for their preparation are revealed. Ceramic oxide powders are obtained using a flame process whereby one or more precursors of ceramic oxides are introduced into a counterflow diffusion flame burner wherein the precursors are converted into ceramic oxide powders. The nature of the ceramic oxide powder produced is determined by process conditions. The morphology, particle size, and crystalline form of the ceramic oxide powders may be varied by the temperature of the flame, the precursor concentration ratio, the gas stream and the gas velocity. 24 figs.

Katz, J.L.; Miquel, P.F.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oxidation pretreatment to reduce corrosion of 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb stainless steel. II. Surface morphology and oxide characterization  

SciTech Connect

Improved corrosion behavior of 20%Cr-25%Ni-Nb steel resulting from a low pressure oxidation pretreatment in CO/sub 2/ has been related to changes in elemental composition and distribution in the oxide scale. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, electron microprobe, and X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to investigate the properties of the oxide scale formed on both untreated and pretreated specimens when oxidized at 823 K and 923 K in a CO/sub 2/-1%CO atmosphere. A sputter ion plating technique has been used to separate the oxide from the metal and the incorporation of chromium and silicon at the metal-oxide interface has been investigated at grain centers and grain boundaries by depth profiling. The improvement in oxide adhesion and oxidation rates, using data from Parts I and II of this study, is assessed in terms of oxide formation by solid-state displacement reactions.

Tempest, P.A.; Wild, R.K.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Engineering Escherichia coli for molecularly defined electron transfer to metal oxides and electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-thiogalactopyranoside Indium tin oxide Microbial fuel cellone type of electrode: indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glasssurface, specifically indium tin oxide (ITO), with nanoscale

Jensen, Heather Marie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (N O), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The PlasmaPen is being researched as an alternative method of tritium surface decontamination. In the course of generating plasma in the atmosphere, ozone and nitrous oxide are...

368

CX-010282: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low Temperature Nitrous Oxide Storage and Reduction Using Engineered Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/14/2013 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

369

The use of onboard diagnostics to reduce emissions in automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emissions from automobiles are very harmful and include gases such as Carbon Dioxide, Nitrous Oxide, and Sulfur Dioxide. One of the main reasons OBD was created was to control emissions however it currently only monitors ...

Perez, Alberto, Jr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000 Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Executive Summary on the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

quintana in Monkey (Macaca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Luttropp, M. E., Mazze, R. I., and Kosek, J. C. Carcinogen bioassay of nitrous oxide in mice. Anesthesiology 64: 747- 750(1986). 49. Baden, J. M., Kundomal, Y. R., Mazze, R. I., and Kosek, J. C. Carcinogen

Brown, James W.

384

CX-010281: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Location(s): Kentucky Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory Work at the University of Kentucky will focus on (i) the development of passive nitrous oxide (NOx)...

385

Meridional Distribution of Stratospheric Trace Constituents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically stratified stratospheric tracers such as methane and nitrous oxide tend to have constant mixing ratio surfaces that slope downward toward the poles in the meridional plane. The equilibrium tracer slope results from the competition ...

James R. Holton

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atomic Scale Characterization of Complex Oxide Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Complex oxides exhibit the most disparate behaviors, from ferroelectricity to high Tc superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance to insulating properties. For these reasons, oxide thin films are of interest for electronics and the emerging field of spintronics. But epitaxial complex oxide ultrathin films and heterostructures can be significantly affected or even dominated by the presence of interfaces and may exhibit intriguing new physical properties quite different from the bulk. A study of the relations between structure and chemistry at the atomic scale is needed to understand the macroscopic properties of such "interface-controlled" materials. For this purpose, the combination of aberration corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) represents a very powerful tool. The availability of sub- ngstr m probes allows a level of unprecedented detail when analyzing not only the interface structure with sensitivity to single atoms, but also the interface chemistry. In this work state of the art STEM-EELS will be applied to the study of different oxide interfaces in heterostructures with titanates, manganites and cuprates based on the perovskite structure.

Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Timothy J [ORNL; Tian, Wei [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Pena, V. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Sefrioui, Z. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Santamaria, J. [Universidad Complutense, Spain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Manufacturing Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..............................................................................17 Figure 18: Truck Featuring a Delphi SOFC APU Solutions SOFC Solid oxide fuel cell kg Kilogram TGC The Gas Company km/h Kilometer per hour UAV Unmanned fuel cells (SOFC) for residential use. In South Korea, a new government program is supporting up to 80

388

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Title Spectroscopic ellipsometry of electrochemical precipitation and oxidation of nickel hydroxide films Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1998 Authors Kong, Fanping, Robert Kostecki, Frank R. McLarnon, and Rolf H. Muller Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 313-314 Pagination 775-780 Keywords effective medium approximation, electrochemical precipitation, inhomogeneous films, nickel hydroxide, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to investigate the electrochemical precipitation of nickel hydroxide films. By use of optical models for inhomogeneous films it was found that a specific precipitation current density produced the most compact and homogeneous film structures. The density of nickel hydroxide films was derived to be 1.25-1.50 g/cm3. The redox behavior of precipitated nickel hydroxide films was studied with an effective-medium optical model. Incomplete conversion to nickel oxyhydroxide and a reduction in film thickness were found during the oxidation cycle.

389

Resistive Switching Characteristics of Mixed Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forming free bipolar switching was observed in case of Graphene Oxide. The switching ... A New Class of Molecularly-tailored Nanomaterials and Interfaces For Energy Conversion and Thermal Management · A Review of ... Novel Bimetallic Plasmonic Nanomaterials ... The Surface Energy of the Al-Cu-Fe Quasicrystal.

390

Metal current collect protected by oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive current collects and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical devices having as current interconnects a ferritic steel felt or screen coated with a protective oxide film.

Jacobson, Craig P. (Lafayette, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advanced Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cells have many potential utility applications including new multi-megawatt central power plants, repowering existing plants, and dispersed generation. A newly designed 25 kW planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system offers simplicity of construction, low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of by product heat, and straight-forward system integration.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

394

Air-Oxidation of a [(Co  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII. Presentation Title, Air-Oxidation of a [(Co 50Cr15C15Mo14B6)97.5Er2.5]93Fe7 Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 725 oC.

395

CATALYZED OXIDATION OF URANIUM IN CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given wherein carbonate solutions are employed to leach uranium from ores and the like containing lower valent uranium species by utilizing catalytic amounts of copper in the presence of ammonia therein and simultaneously supplying an oxidizing agent thereto. The catalysis accelerates rate of dissolution and increases recovery of uranium from the ore. (AEC)

Clifford, W.E.

1962-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

Texture Control in Cerium Oxide Films (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conclusions are: (1) Texture control is possible in cerium oxide by epitaxial growth or adjusting the substrate angle; (2) Biaxial (111) texture emerges with inclined angle depositions on glass; and (3) Biaxial (200) texture emerges by epitaxial growth on YSZ.

van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Leenheer, A. J.; Perkins, J. D.; Teplin, C. W.; Ginley, D. S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to develop approaches to direct catalytic oxidation of methane over oxides that are doubly doped with transition metal ions. The desired process aims at employing a double redox mechanism, where one redox couple is utilized for activation of oxygen and another for the trapping of CH{sub 3} radicals. The methyl radicals can either recombine, giving C{sub 2} hydrocarbons, or be converted, via electron transfer reaction, to carbocations. The latter species can react with surface OH{sup {minus}} groups to form methanol or formaldehyde. To choose from several possible catalytic systems, this research initially involved the characterization of the micromorphology and crystalline dimensions of zinc oxide catalysts doped with Cu, Fe, and Sn by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the determination of surface composition and oxidation states by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was carried out. A newly constructed high temperature catalytic testing system has been calibrated (flow meters and temperature controllers), tested for possible gas leaks and integrated with a gas chromatographic analytical unit. A preliminary catalytic test study over a Cu/Fe/ZnO sample was performed. The following products of the methane coupling reaction was found: C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O together with CO{sub 2}. The maximum space time yield of 14 mmol C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/g cat/h was obtained at 848{degrees}C.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sojka, Z.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Complex defects in the oxidation of uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are reporting EPR results obtained with uranium powder samples fully oxidized in dry air, water vapor, and air/water vapor mixtures. The results reported previously are confirmed and additional paramagnetic centers, associated with chemisorbed species, have been identified. The temperature dependence of the g-value for these centers from room temperature to 10K is also reported.

MacCrone, R.K.; Sankaran, S.; Shatynski, S.R.; Colmenares, C.A.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

On the Design of Oxide Films, Nanomaterials, and Heterostructures for Solar Water Oxidation Photoanodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high-surface-area SnO 2 aerogels, Kucheyev et al. 39previously in SnO 2 aerogels 39 and nanoribbons. 41 It isstudy of titanium oxide aerogels, and through comparisons

Kronawitter, Coleman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Free Energies of Novel Metal Oxides and Metal Oxide Surfaces at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The deposition of metal oxides on nuclear fuel rods in ... melds first principles calculations with experimental free energies of formation, we have ... and Pressures using Thermodynamics Informed by Density Functional Theory.

404

Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom. 2 figs.

Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Bannister, R.L.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies July 23, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies What does this project do? For more information on DOE's efforts to make solid oxide fuel cells an efficient and economically compelling option, please visit: The NETL Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program Webpage Solid oxide fuel cells are among the cleanest, most efficient power-generating technologies now being developed. They provide excellent electrical efficiencies and are capable of operating on a wide variety of fuels, from coal and natural gas to landfill waste and hydrogen. And with continued advancements, solid oxide fuel cells can provide clean

406

Mechanical Testing of Ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels typically contain a fine dispersion of nanoscopic Y(Al, Ti) oxides. The presence of such ODS particles leads .... Behavior of Molybdenum · What Next in Gas Turbine Materials ...

407

Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom.

Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Wen-Ching (Export, PA); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Porous anodic aluminum oxide scaffolds; formation mechanisms and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) can be created with pores that self-assemble into ordered configurations. Nanostructured metal oxides have proven to be very useful as scaffolds for growth of nanowires and nanotubes ...

Oh, Jihun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Near room temperature lithographically processed metal-oxide transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fully lithographic process at near-room-temperature was developed for the purpose of fabricating transistors based on metal-oxide channel materials. The combination of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the source/drain electrodes, ...

Tang, Hui, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Functionalization of Graphene and Graphene Oxide for Biosensing and Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in our group about graphene biofunctionalization are discussed. In particular, the functionalization of graphene and graphene oxide, biosensing and bioimaging by using graphene-based nanomaterials, and some fundamental studies of graphene and graphene oxide have been summarized.

Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Ying; Du, Dan; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Note on Graphite Oxidation by Oxygen and Moisture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Simplified equations of graphite oxidation are reviewed for semi-infinite slab, finite slab, and cylinder geometries, using the principal assumptions of linearized oxidation kinetics and quasi-steady state oxidation profile. All equations are coupled to a general surface mass transfer boundary condition. The equations include those for oxidant concentration distribution, surface oxidation rate, burnoff profile, and oxidation efficiency. This review also covers some areas that may not be well recognized. The key role of the effective diffusivity is highlighted, with a brief review of measured values. The temperature-dependence of the surface oxidation rate is shown to be more complex than usually shown for the diffusion-affected zone. Assumption of linear kinetics permits ready estimation of equilibration time for development of the quasi-steady burnoff profile. In addition, approximations for the time-steady hydrogen concentration profiles are developed for the case of oxidation by H2O. All cited methods can be readily evaluated by spreadsheet calculation.

Wichner, Robert [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fuels, such as uranium dioxide (UO2) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels, have been used in current light water reactors (LWRs) to produce about 15% of the ... of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory and ...

414

Preignition oxidation characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results obtained from a static reactor are presented for the oxidation of a variety of fuels. Pressure and temperature histories of the reacting fuel/oxidizer mixtures were obtained. Measurements of the stable reaction intermediate and product species were made using gas chromatographic analysis. One aspect of this work involved detailed studies of the oxidation chemistry of relatively low molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons: propane, propene, and n-butane. The oxidation chemistry of these fuels was examined at temperatures in the range 550-750 K, equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 4.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The main characteristics and features of the oxidation mechanisms were determined for each fuel in each temperature regime. The experimental results from propene and propane were used to develop a low and intermediate temperature kinetic mechanism for these fuels based on a low temperature acetaldehyde mechanism of Kaiser et al. and a high temperature propene/propane mechanism of Westbrook and Pitz. General preignition characteristics of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons and binary mixtures of these fuels were also studied. The low temperature/cool flame ignition characteristics of dodecane were investigated at temperatures in the range 523-623 K, equivalence s ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The preignition characteristics of binary mixtures of dodecane and the aromatic component tetralin were examined. The addition of the tetralin had the overall effect of decreasing the ignition tendency of the mixture, although this effect was nonlinear with respect to the amount of tetralin added.

Wilk, R.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ... Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy.

416

Thief Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov January 2012 Significance * Oxidizes heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury, in gas streams * Uses partially combusted coal ("Thief" carbon) * Yields an inexpensive catalyst * Cheap enough to be a disposable catalyst * Cuts long-term costs * Simultaneously addresses oxidation and adsorption issues Applications * Any process requiring removal of heavy

417

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride: Ceramic Nano-particles via a ...  

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride: Ceramic Nano-particles via a Hydrothermal Method. Battelle Number(s): 12234. ... Potential Industry Applications. ...

418

Shear Punch Testing of Spark Plasma Sintered Ferritic Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are excellent ... Enhanced Control of Powder Yields from Close-Coupled Gas Atomization ...

419

Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone - Energy Innovation Portal  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Industrial Technologies Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone Ames ...

420

Method for producing high quality oxide films on substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material.

Ruckman, Mark W. (Middle Island, NY); Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Gao, Yong L. (Henrietta, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Atomic-scale Chemical Quantification of Oxide Interfaces Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Multifunctional Oxides. Presentation Title, Atomic-scale Chemical ...

422

Chemists Measure Copper Levels in Zinc Oxide Nanowires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nikoobakht. Analysis of copper incorporation into zinc oxide nanowires. ACS Nano Articles ASAP, published online Jan. 12, 2008.

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to ...  

Using metal oxide semiconductor nanoparticles to target and control biological molecules could fuel medical breakthroughs in many areas, including ...

424

Available Technologies: Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide Nanoink  

Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. Monitoring and Imaging; Remediation; ... indium tin oxide while offering comparable optical and electronic properties.

425

Method for producing high quality oxide films on substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material. 4 figures.

Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Gao, Y.L.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Linking Structure to Photocatalytic Activity in Layered Aurivillius Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Opacified, Reinforced Aerogel for Thermal Insulation of Thermoelectric Generators and Other Advanced Energy Systems · Oxide Ceramic Materials for ...

427

Oxidation and Corrosion Resistance of Structural Alloys in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Properties, Processing, and Performance of Steels and Ni-Based Alloys for Advanced Steam Conditions. Presentation Title, Oxidation and ...

428

Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon Production ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon ... Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies.

429

and Submicron Oxide Powders for Optoelectronic and Renewable ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among various materials processes, Umicore develops technologies and manufactures various oxide powders for optoelectronic and renewable energy ...

430

Use of oxides in thermochemical water-splitting cycles for solar heat sources. Copper oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several oxides can be decomposed to oxygen and a lower oxide at temperatures that might be feasible with a solar heat source. Heat might be directly transmitted to the solid through an air window, rather than quartz, with release of oxygen to the atmosphere. The cycle utilizing CuO, I/sub 2/, and Mg (OH)/sub 2/ is similar to the previous Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ - CoO cycle. We are concentrating on the reformation of CuO. At 448 K the rate is favorable; for example, the yield rises about linearly with time to 92% at 1.17 h and more slowly thereafter. The only difficulty is the formation of CuI as a metastable intermediate. The oxidation of CuI is thermodynamically very favorable, but its rate limits completion. Excess Mg(OH)/sub 2/ appears to increase the rate but not to the point where IO/sub 3//sup -/ oxidation of CuI competes with oxidation of Cu/sub 2/O. Nevertheless, the batch runs suggest that about 98% of the maximum possible MgI/sub 2/ could be formed. Cuprous iodide complexes formed in the concentrated MgI/sub 2/ may give the necessary improvement by providing a solution path for their oxidation by iodate. Work of others pertaining to the cycle is briefly discussed.

Jones, W.M.; Bowman, M.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Hafnium-Praseodymium-Indium Oxide System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The HfO/sub 2/-PrO/sub 1.83/-In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system has been studied at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop alternative, highly electrically conducting oxides as electrode and interconnection materials for solid oxide fuel cells. A coprecipitation process was developed for synthesizing single-phase, mixed oxide powders necessary to fabricate powders and dense oxides. A ternary phase diagram was developed, and the phases and structures were related to electrical transport properties. Two new phases, an orthorhombic PrInO/sub 3/ and a rhombohedral Hf/sub 2/In/sub 2/O/sub 7/ phase, were identified. The highest electronic conductivity is related to the presence of a bcc, In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ solid solution (ss) containing HfO/sub 2/ and PrO/sub 1.83/. Compositions containing more than 35 mol % of the In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ss have electrical conductivities greater than 10/sup /minus/1/ (ohm-cm)/sup /minus/1/, and the two or three phase structures that contain this phase appear to exhibit mixed electronic-ionic conduction. The high electrical conductivities and structures similar to the Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/(HfO/sub 2/) electrolyte give these oxides potential for use as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells. 21 refs.

Bates, J.L.; Griffin, C.W.; Weber, W.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electrode electrolyte interlayers containing cerium oxide for electrochemical fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is made having a porous fuel electrode (16) and a porous air electrode (13), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) therebetween, where the air electrode surface opposing the electrolyte has a separate, attached, dense, continuous layer (14) of a material containing cerium oxide, and where electrolyte (16) contacts the continuous oxide layer (14), without contacting the air electrode (13).

Borglum, Brian P. (Edgewood, PA); Bessette, Norman F. (N. Huntingdon, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

CATALYTIC RECOMBINATION OF RADIOLYTIC GASES IN THORIUM OXIDE SLURRIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the coinbination of hydrogen and oxygen in aqueous thorium oxide-uranium oxide slurries is described. A small amount of molybdenum oxide catalyst is provided in the slurry. This catalyst is applicable to the recombination of hydrogen and/or deuterium and oxygen produced by irradiation of the slurries in nuclear reactors. (AEC)

Morse, L.E.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, Allegheny County, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Integration of low dimensional crystalline Si into functional epitaxial oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we show that by efficiently exploiting the growth kinetics during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) one could create Si nanostructures of different dimensions. Examples are Si quantum dots (QD) or quantum wells (QW), which are buried into an ... Keywords: Epitaxial gadolinium oxide, Nonvolatile memories, Oxide-semiconductor-oxide quantum well, Resonant tunneling diode, Si quantum dots

Apurba Laha; E. Bugiel; R. Dargis; D. Schwendt; M. Badylevich; V. V. Afanas'ev; A. Stesmans; A. Fissel; H. J. Osten

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

High-quantum efficiency, long-lived luminescing refractory oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A crystal having a high-quantum efficiency and a long period of luminescence is formed of an oxide selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide and calcium oxide and possessing a concentration ratio of H.sup.- ions to F centers in the range of about 0.05 to about 10.

Chen, Yok (Oak Ridge, TN); Gonzalez, Roberto (Knoxville, TN); Summers, Geoffrey P. (Stillwater, OK)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Growth of gadolinium oxide films for advanced MOS structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated properties of insulating gadolinium oxide (Gd"2O"3) films in connection with the replacement of silicon oxide (SiO"2) gate dielectrics in new generation of CMOS devices. The Gd"2O"3 layers were grown using metal organic chemical ... Keywords: Gadolinium oxide, High-? dielectric, MOCVD, MOS structure

R. Lupták; K. Fröhlich; A. Rosová; K. Hušeková; M. apajna; D. Machajd?k; M. Jergel; J. P. Espinós; C. Mansilla

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2Chapter 1 Chemistry and Reactions of Singlet and Triplet Oxygen in Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Chapter 1 Chemistry and Reactions of Singlet and Triplet Oxygen in Lipid Oxidation Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Lipid Oxidation PathwaysChapter 3 Competitive Oxidation between a-Tocopherol and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at Thermoxidation Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Oxidation Pathways Chapter 3 Competitive Oxidation between a-Tocopherol and Unsaturated Fatty Acids at Thermoxidation Conditions Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Downloadable pd

442

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 3 Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometry in the Analysis of Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 3 Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometry in the Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Ultraviolet-Visible

443

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 9 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Meat and Meat Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 9 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Meat and Meat Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutritio

444

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 8 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Milk and Dairy Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutriti

445

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioche

446

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 10 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Seafood and Seafood Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 10 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Seafood and Seafood Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

447

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 7 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Egg and Egg Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 7 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Egg and Egg Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition

448

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

449

Sol-gel synthesis of vanadium phosphorous oxides for the partial oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vanadium phosphorous oxide (VPO) is traditionally manufactured from solid vanadium oxides by synthesizing VOHPO[4subscript][dot in middle of line]0.5H[2subscript]O (the precursor) followed by in-situ activation to… (more)

Salazar, Juan Manuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Structural and electrochemical characterization of two proton conducting oxide thin films for a microfabricated solid oxide fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of proton conducting oxide materials as an electrolyte offers the potential to reduce the operating temperature of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), leading to improved thermal management and material compatibility. ...

Capozzoli, Peter M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 12 Origin and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Biological Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 12 Origin and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Biological Samples Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bi

452

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 16 Determination of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods and Biological Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 16 Determination of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods and Biological Samples Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition

453

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 5 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Thin-Layer Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 5 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by Thin-Layer Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - B

454

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 4 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 4 Determination of Cholesterol Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health -

455

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 17 Biological Effects of Phytosterol Oxidation Products, Future Research Areas and Concluding Remarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 17 Biological Effects of Phytosterol Oxidation Products, Future Research Areas and Concluding Remarks Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology

456

Edwin Frankel Award for Best Paper in Lipid Oxidation and Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizing the best paper relating to lipid oxidation or quality published by AOCS. Edwin Frankel Award for Best Paper in Lipid Oxidation and Quality Lipid Oxidation and Quality agricultural analytical Antioxidants aocs articles Biological Oxidation bio

457

Kinetic Consequences of Chemisorbed Oxygen Atoms during Methane Oxidation on Group VIII Metal Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v for the oxidation of bulk Pt metals. The bulk oxidation isbulk, cluster size and metal coordination effects on thermodynamic tendencies of bulk oxidation,O s * sites at metal surfaces. Bulk oxidation exposes Pd 2+

Chin, Ya Huei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

MOLECULAR ACCESSIBILITY IN OXIDIZED AND DRIED COALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Changes in physical and chemical structure of the micropore system in eight solvent swelled Argonne Premium Coal Sample (APCS) coals upon weathering were studied using the EPR spin probe method. Spin probes, which are allowed to diffuse into the coal structure during swelling, are trapped when the swelling solvent is removed. Excess spin probes are removed from the coal surface and larger pores so that only the presence of spin probes trapped in pores which closely approximate the size of the spin probe are detected. Detailed explanations and illustrations of the experimental procedure used are given. Careful examination of the weathering process on coal as a function of rank was accomplished using the EPR spin probe method. The retention of spin probes in eight APCS coals provided valuable insight into both the loss of water and the oxidation which occur during the weathering process. The results could be explained in terms of the autoxidation process observed in other polymeric systems. It was shown that initial oxidation of coal can result in increased cross-linking in the coal structure. As the oxidation process continued, both the covalent and hydrogen bonded character of the coal were significantly altered. The retention character of some coals during oxidation was shown to change by as much as three orders of magnitude. Experiments were performed to study the effects of short term oxidation and dehydration on coal structure by exposing the coal samples to argon or oxygen for time periods up to five minutes. The results indicate that the structure of coal is extremely sensitive to environmental changes and exhibits significant changes in as little as 30 seconds. Exposure of Illinois No.6 coal to argon or oxygen for 30 seconds caused a decrease in the retention of polar spin probes by as much as an order of magnitude. The studies presented here suggest that the structure of coal is dynamic in nature, and has an intimate relationship with the nature of its environment. This method has been shown to be very sensitive to structural changes brought about in coal by oxidation and dehydration, and can be used to follow changes in coal during the swelling process. Additional ideas for future studies using the EPR spin probe method are also discussed.

Lowell D. Kispert

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Torsional texturing of superconducting oxide composite articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of texturing a multifilamentary article having filaments comprising a desired oxide superconductor or its precursors by torsionally deforming the article is provided. The texturing is induced by applying a torsional strain which is at least about 0.3 and preferably at least about 0.6 at the surface of the article, but less than the strain which would cause failure of the composite. High performance multifilamentary superconducting composite articles having a plurality of low aspect ratio, twisted filaments with substantially uniform twist pitches in the range of about 1.00 inch to 0.01 inch (25 to 0.25 mm), each comprising a textured desired superconducting oxide material, may be obtained using this texturing method. If tighter twist pitches are desired, the article may be heat treated or annealed and the strain repeated as many times as necessary to obtain the desired twist pitch. It is preferred that the total strain applied per step should be sufficient to provide a twist pitch tighter than 5 times the diameter of the article, and twist pitches in the range of 1 to 5 times the diameter of the article are most preferred. The process may be used to make a high performance multifilamentary superconducting article, having a plurality of twisted filaments, wherein the degree of texturing varies substantially in proportion to the radial distance from the center of the article cross-section, and is substantially radially homogeneous at any given cross-section of the article. Round wires and other low aspect ratio multifilamentary articles are preferred forms. The invention is not dependent on the melting characteristics of the desired superconducting oxide. Desired oxide superconductors or precursors with micaceous or semi-micaceous structures are preferred. When used in connection with desired superconducting oxides which melt irreversibly, it provides multifilamentary articles that exhibit high DC performance characteristics and AC performance markedly superior to any currently available for these materials. In a preferred embodiment, the desired superconducting oxide material is BSCCO 2223.

Christopherson, Craig John (Grafton, MA); Riley, Jr., Gilbert N. (Marlborough, MA); Scudiere, John (Bolton, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NREL Demonstrates Efficient Solar Water Splitting by Metal Oxide Photoabsorber (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

New development demonstrates that inexpensive and robust metal oxide photoabsorbers hold great promise as photoanodes for water oxidation.

Not Available

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

PREPARATION OF HIGH-DENSITY, COMPACTIBLE THORIUM OXIDE PARTICLES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for preparing millimeter-size, highdensity thorium oxide particles suitable for fabrication into nuclear reactor feel elements by means of vibratory compaction. A thorium oxide gel containing 3.7 to 7 weight per cent residual volatile nitrate and water is prepared by drying a thorium oxide sol. The gel is then slowly heated to a temperature of about 450DEC, and the resulting gel fragments are calcined. The starting sol is prepared by repeated dispersion of oxalate-source thorium oxide in a nitrate system or by dispersion of steam-denitrated thorium oxide in water. (AEC)

McCorkle, K.H.; Kleinsteuber, A.T.; Schilling, C.E.; Dean, O.C.

1962-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

Why sequence carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? carbon monoxide oxidizing thermophiles? Many microbes that use carbon monoxide as an energy source are found in high temperature environments such as geothermal areas. Researchers think that these carboxydotrophs may be involved in reducing potentially toxic carbon monoxide hotspots by combine with water to form hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which are in turn used for thermophilic energy conservation and carbon sequestration mechanisms. The project focuses on sequencing two closely related microbes, one of which is Carboxydothermus hydrogenformans. A strain of C. hydrogenformans has been grown in hydrogen-enriched synthesis gas (syngas), which contains a mix of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Researchers are interested in sequencing both microbial strains to track the genome's evolution and

465

Sintered electrode for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell fuel electrode is produced by a sintering process. An underlayer is applied to the electrolyte of a solid oxide fuel cell in the form of a slurry, which is then dried. An overlayer is applied to the underlayer and then dried. The dried underlayer and overlayer are then sintered to form a fuel electrode. Both the underlayer and the overlayer comprise a combination of electrode metal such as nickel, and stabilized zirconia such as yttria-stabilized zirconia, with the overlayer comprising a greater percentage of electrode metal. The use of more stabilized zirconia in the underlayer provides good adhesion to the electrolyte of the fuel cell, while the use of more electrode metal in the overlayer provides good electrical conductivity. The sintered fuel electrode is less expensive to produce compared with conventional electrodes made by electrochemical vapor deposition processes. The sintered electrodes exhibit favorable performance characteristics, including good porosity, adhesion, electrical conductivity and freedom from degradation.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Warner, Kathryn A. (Bryan, TX)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

Anderson, M.A.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Halving the Casimir force with conductive oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of Micro- and NanoElectroMechanical Systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the electrostatic force arising from trapped charges overcomes the Casimir attraction, leaving no room for exploitation of Casimir force engineering at ambient conditions. Here we show that, in the presence of a conductive oxide, the Casimir force can be the dominant interaction even in air, and that the use of conductive oxides allows one to reduce the Casimir force up to a factor of 2 when compared to noble metals.

S. de Man; K. Heeck; R. J. Wijngaarden; D. Iannuzzi

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

468

Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal ZrO[sub 2] particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K[sub IC]). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5] (211) on the ZrO[sub 2] particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO[sub 2] coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K[sub IC] of 4.5 MPa(m)[sup 0.5].

Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Kullberg, Marc L. (Lisle, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

ELECTROLYTIC OXIDATION OF ZIRCONIUM IN NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Zirconiurn alloys used in the fabrication of nuclear fuel elements can be disintegrated and converted to insoluble oxides by electrolytic treatment in concentrated nitrate solutions. This reaction shows promise as a technique for reprocessing nuclear fuels clad with Zircaloy-2. For a particular applied voltage, nitric acid achieves the highest rate of attack, but the reaction can be carried out at rates of 2 mg/(cm/sup 2/)(min) or greater in either 7.5M sodium nitrate or 2.3M aluminum nitrate. A reaction rate of 7 mg/(cm/sup 2/) (min) can be easily attained in either 8M nitric acid or 7.5M sodium nitrate. The rate of reaction is a function of the temperature and tho applied voltage. An as-yet unsolved problem is the carry--down of uranium with the insoluble zirconium oxide product. (auth)

Bomar, M.R.

1961-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

471

Cleanup of plutonium oxide reduction black salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes pyrochemical processes employed to convert direc oxide reduction (DOR) black salts into discardable white salt and plutonium metal. The DOR process utilizes calcium metal as the reductant in a molten calcium chloride solvent salt to convert plutonium oxide to plutonium metal. An insoluble plutonium-rich dispersion called black salt sometimes forms between the metal phase and the salt phase. Black salts accumulated for processing were treated by one of two methods. One method utilized a scrub alloy of 70 wt % magnesium/30 wt % zinc. The other method utilized a pool of plutonium metal to agglomerate the metal phase. The two processes were similar in that calcium metal reductant and calcium chloride solvent salt were used in both cases. Four runs were performed by each method, and each method produced greater than 93% conversion of the black salt.

Giebel, R.E.; Wing, R.O.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

472

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

474

Self-Organized Ultrathin Oxide Nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect

Sub-2-nm (down to one-unit cell) uniform oxide nanocrystals and highly ordered superstructures were obtained in one step using oleylamine and oleic acid as capping and structure directing agents. The cooperative nature of the nanocrystal growth and assembly resulted in mesoscopic one-dimensional ribbon-like superstructures made of these ultrathin nanocrystals. The process reported here is general and can be readily extended to the production of many other transition metal (TiO2, ZnO, Nb2O5) and rare earth oxide (Eu2O3, Sm2O3, Er2O3, Y2O3, Tb2O3, and Yb2O3) systems.

Huo, Ziyang; Tsung, Chia-kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Fardy, Melissa; Yan, Ruoxue; Li, Yadong; Yang, Piedong; Zhang, Xiaofeng

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

475

Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

Reichner, Philip (Plum Boro, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

FUNDAMENTALS OF MERCURY OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involves two experimental scales and a modeling effort. The team is comprised of University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and University of Connecticut. The objective is to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters to be studies include HCl, NOx, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. This report summarizes Year 1 results for the experimental and modeling tasks. Experiments in the drop tube are just beginning and a new, speciated mercury analyzer is up and running. A preliminary assessment has been made for the drop tube experiments using the existing model of gas-phase kinetics.

JoAnn S. Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Andrew Fry; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Improved fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro{sub 2} particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (123) to improve it fracture toughness (K{sub IC}). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} (211) on the ZrO{sub 2} particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO{sub 2} coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K{sub IC} of 4.5 MPa(m){sup 0.5}.

Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys  

SciTech Connect

Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte that operates at temperatures ranging from 600{degree}C to 800{degree}C is discussed. The electrolyte conducts charge ionically as well as electronically. The ionic conductors include molecular framework structures having planes or channels large enough to transport oxides or hydrated protons and having net-positive or net-negative charges. Representative molecular framework structures include substituted aluminum phosphates, orthosilicates, silicoaluminates, cordierites, apatites, sodalites, and hollandites.

Krumpelt, M.; Bloom, I.D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Myles, K.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrous oxide n2o" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Structural Evolution of Carbon During Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs iOn the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and rnicroporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, C02 and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be "hidden" or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and C02 surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM studies has confined that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering,. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

Adel F. Sarofim; Angelo Kandas

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

482

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Method for making monolithic metal oxide aerogels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transparent, monolithic metal oxide aerogels of varying densities are produced using a method in which a metal alkoxide solution and a catalyst solution are prepared separately and reacted. The resulting hydrolyzed-condensed colloidal solution is gelled, and the wet gel is contained within a sealed, but gas permeable, containment vessel during supercritical extraction of the solvent. The containment vessel is enclosed within an aqueous atmosphere that is above the supercritical temperature and pressure of the solvent of the metal alkoxide solution.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Spectroscopic studies of metal growth on oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal/oxide chemistry and metal cluster growth on oxides are fundamental to our understanding of the catalytic activity and selectivity of metal catalysts, thus considerable research recently has addressed the physical and chemical properties of metal clusters on well-defined oxide surfaces. In this work, the nucleation and growth modes of Ag on TiO?(110)(1x1) and (1x2) surfaces, Ag on ultra-thin Al?O? films, and Au on ultra-thin SiO? films were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In general, Ag grows three-dimensionally (3D) on both TiO?(110) and Al?O? film at 300 K. The growth mode of Au at fractional monolayer coverages is quasi-two dimensional (2D); at higher coverages, three-dimensional growth of Au was found. In these three systems, Ag/TiO?, Ag/Al?O?, and Au/SiO?, no strong chemical interaction was observed between metal clusters and substrates. Sintering was observed for all metal clusters upon annealing. A non-zero order desorption was observed for Ag/Al?O? and Au/SiO? in temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies. The desorption activation energies decrease with decreasing metal coverages.

Luo, Kai

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involves both experimental and modeling efforts. The team is comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective is to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters to be studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. This report summarizes Year 3 results for the experimental and modeling tasks. Experiments have been completed on the effects of chlorine. However, the experiments with sulfur dioxide and NO, in the presence of water, suggest that the wet-chemistry analysis system, namely the impingers, is possibly giving erroneous results. Future work will investigate this further and determine the role of reactions in the impingers on the oxidation results. The solid-phase experiments have not been completed and it is anticipated that only preliminary work will be accomplished during this study.

JoAnn S. Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Andrew Fry; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

487

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

488

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (1) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (2) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (3) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (4) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (5) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (6) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method.

Bianco, Robert; Buckman, William R. Jr.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Complete oxidation of methane on palladium catalysts. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report for grant DE-FG02-00ER15026. It summarizes all the accomplishments in these 8 sections: (1) Adaptations on Existing Unit and Construction of New Unit; (2) Turnover Rate and Reaction Orders for the Complete Oxidation of Methane on a Palladium Foil in Excess Dioxygen; (3) Surface area increase on Pd foils after oxidation in excess methane; (4) UV Raman spectroscopic study of hydrogen bonding in gibbsite and bayerite between 93 and 453 K; (5) Coverage of Palladium Catalysts by Oxidized Silicon During Complete Oxidation of Methane; (6) Kinetics of Methane Oxidation under lean conditions over Pd and PdO; (7) An Explanation for the Hysteresis on the Oxidation of Methane; and (8) Structure of Pd(111) after oxidation in O{sub 2}.

Ribeiro, Fabio H.

2003-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

491

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action AP-XPS Measures MIEC Oxides in Action Print Wednesday, 25 May 2011 00:00 Oxide materials with mixed ionic-electronic conductivity (MIEC) can conduct both electrons and oxygen ions. MIEC oxides have broad applications, including use in solid-oxide fuel cells, high-temperature electrolysis for synthetic fuel production, and oxygen-separating membranes for chemical processes or NOx-free combustion; however, their surface activity under reaction conditions has been difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain, until recently. A team from the University of Maryland and Sandia National Laboratories joined ALS scientists on Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 to overcome the vacuum limitations of conventional XPS instruments using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS), providing the first in situ measurements of local surface oxidation states and electric potential in active MIEC electrodes.

492

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,776,780 entitled "Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir), and Thief carbons. The catalyst materials will adsorb the oxidizing agents HCl, Cl 2 , and other halogen species in the flue gas stream that are produced when fuel is combusted. These adsorbed oxidizing agents can then react with elemental mercury in the stream, which is difficult to capture, and oxidize it to form Hg (II) species,

493

Atomistic modeling of ultra-thin surface oxide growth on a ternary alloy : oxidation of Al-Ni-Fe.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing variable-charge molecular dynamics, surface oxide film growth on aluminum-nickel-iron alloys has been studied at 300 and 600 K. The dynamics of oxidation and oxide growth is strongly dependent on the composition of the initial alloy and the ambient temperature. Higher content of Ni and Fe in Al alloys is found to reduce the oxide growth kinetics; 15% Ni + 15% Fe Al alloy yielded 30-40% less growth at 400 ps oxygen exposure compared to pure Al. We observe dopant segregation, which disrupts the interaction between O atoms and Al atoms in the alloy, leading to a nonlinear oxide growth profile in the case of ternary Al-Ni-Fe alloy. Compared to oxidation at 300 K, 30% more oxide layer was yielded at 600 K, due to the elevated temperature. The simulated oxide kinetics indicates that the growth rate of anion surpasses the cation rate with higher sensitivity to the stoichiometry of the base metal substrate. Charge state analysis provides insights into the evolution of cation and anion species as the oxide layer grows. In particular, due to higher correlation, Fe shows a high rate of oxidation when the content is high, whereas the rate of Ni oxidation is consistently low. Density profile analysis suggests the segregation of dopant atoms below the growing ultrathin oxide layer, showing the presence of a layer-by-layer mode of oxide layer even with disordered structure. Coordination number (Z, the number of oxygen atoms around an aluminum atom) of aluminum oxide has been used to identify how the initial oxidation transitions into equilibrated states. Z = 3 is dominant in the early stages of oxidation and at the interface between oxide and bulk substrate, but it transitions quickly to Z = 4 (45%) and 5 (35%) as the oxide equilibrates and approaches its self-limiting thickness. Even though growth kinetics is dependent on the base metal stoichiometry, the composition of the oxide microstructure is not significantly affected, primarily segregating dopant elements, i.e., Ni and Fe outside of the oxide layer.

Byoungseon, J.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; Ramanathan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); (Harvard Univ.)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

494

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Enhanced ionic conductivity in oxide heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices used to generate energy out of hydrogen. In a fuel cell, two conducting electrodes are separated by an electrolyte that is permeable to ions (either hydrogen or oxygen, depending on the fuel-cell category) but not to electrons. An electrode catalytic process yields the ionic species, which are transported through the electrolyte, while electrons blocked by the electrolyte pass through the external circuit. Polymeric membrane (PEMFC) or phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) operating at low temperatures are the preferred option for transportation because of their quite large efficiencies (50%), compared with gasoline combustion engines (25%). Other uses are also being considered, such as battery replacements for personal electronics and stationary or portable emergency power. Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), operating at high temperatures, are a better option for stationary power generation because of their scalability. Here O{sup 2-} ions are the mobile species that travel at elevated temperatures (800-1000 C) through a solid electrolyte material to react with H{sup +} ions in the anode to produce water (Fig. 1). The high operating temperatures of solid oxide fuel cells are a major impediment to their widespread use in power generation. Thus, reducing this operating temperature is currently a major materials research goal, involving the search for novel electrolytes as well as active catalysts for electrode kinetics (oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation). Among oxide-ion conductors, those of anion-deficient fluorite structures such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), xY{sub 2}O{sub 3}:(1-x) ZrO{sub 2}, are extensively used as electrolytes in SOFCs. Doping with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is known to stabilize the cubic fluorite structure of ZrO{sub 2} and to supply the oxygen vacancies responsible for the ionic conduction. These materials are characterized by a large number of mobile oxygen vacancies, which are randomly distributed in the structure, and thus give rise to a completely disordered anion (oxygen) sublattice. Traditionally, the main strategy to reduce the operating temperature has been to search for novel electrolyte materials with larger oxide-ion conductivity values. Only recently has the use of artificial nanostructures appeared as a promising new direction for dramatically improved properties.

Garcia-Barriocanal, Javier [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Sefrioui, Z. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Iborra, Enrique [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain; Leon, C. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Santamaria, J. [Universidad Complutense, Spain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides. Progress report, August 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

Ekerdt, J.G.

1992-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

497

INFLUENCE OF OXIDE GROWTH AND METAL CREEP ON STRAIN DEVELOPMENT IN THE STEAM-SIDE OXIDE IN BOILER TUBES  

SciTech Connect

This effort is concerned with developing a quantitative description of the exfoliation behavior of oxide scales grown inside steam tubes in a pressure boiler. Consideration of the development of stress/strain in growing oxides has included expansion mismatch-induced strains during thermal cycling as well as inelastic mechanical effects from oxide/alloy creep phenomena and volume change from oxide growth. The magnitude of the parameters used has been closely matched to actual boiler operating practice. The creep model used was validated against published data. Representation of oxide growth-induced strain was found to be a difficult challenge because the processes involved are not fully understood. In addition to the traditional uniaxial (radial) and dilatational models, lateral growth models are discussed in the context of experimentally-derived criteria, such as the level of elastic strains involved in oxide exfoliation. It was found that strain variation in the oxide cannot be neglected.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O'Brien

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies associated with spent fuel oxidation (Section 5).

Hanson, B.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.