Sample records for nitrogen group stanford

  1. Stanford University Engineering Informatics Group (http://eil.stanford.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Engineering Web Services David Liu Department of Electrical Engineering Jim Cheng Department of Civil Engineering Service and Integration Mediators (Content and Access) Information Exchange (DBMS, PSL, IFC, XML) Service Integration (FICAS) Engineering Application Services #12;Stanford UniversityStanford University66

  2. stanford hci group / cs376 http://cs376.stanford.eduScott Klemmer 19 October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemmer, Scott

    1 stanford hci group / cs376 http://cs376.stanford.eduScott Klemmer · 19 October 2006 Distributed with Ed Hutchins in the spring of 05... #12;3 Integration of Thinking and Doing Clearboard's tech

  3. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and other high precision products...

  4. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Radiator Labs Columbia University Radiator Labs developed a low-cost, easily installed radiator retrofit that converts radiator heating systems into a controlled-zoned system,...

  5. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The...

  6. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System HighlightsCornell Researchers,

  7. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy Sciences (BES)Standards

  8. stanford hci group / cs376 Scott Klemmer 17 October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemmer, Scott

    1 stanford hci group / cs376 Scott Klemmer · 17 October 2006 Remote Collaboration Paul Badger is highly culturally dependent e.g., Southern Europe has closer boundaries for personal space than America (tables) The Papier-Mâché toolkit (vision, rfid, barcode) iROS and the PatchPanel (interactive rooms

  9. Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional Variation The Computationalof

  10. STANFORD HCI GROUP & AIM LAB Dynamic Checklists for Operating Room Crises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemmer, Scott

    -time synchronization between input devices. Stanford HCI / Kristen Leach, Jesse Cirimele, Leslie Wu, Justin Lee, Tonya current prototype of a dynamic checklist for Asystole. Our current EHR and condensed vitals section

  11. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 34105 Stanford Geothermal, California SGP-TR-72 A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD BY John Forrest Dee June 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

  12. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on earlySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary

  13. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Proceedings that stand as one of the prominent literature sources in the field of geothermal energySTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94105 SGP-TR- 61 GEOTHERMAL APPENDIX A: PARTICIPANTS IN THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM '81/'82 . 60 APPENDIX B: PAPERS PRESENTED

  14. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-35 SECOND ANNUAL #12;INTRODUCTION The research e f f o r t of t h e Stanford Geothermal Program is focused on geothermal reservoir engineering. The major o b j e c t i v e of t h e protiram is t o develop techniques f o

  15. Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    s Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University Stanford, California RADON MEASUEMENTS I N GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS ? d by * ** Alan K. Stoker and Paul Kruger SGP-TR-4 January 1975 :: raw at Lcs Alams S c i and water, o i l and n a t u r a l gas wells. with radon i n geothermal reservoirs. Its presence i n

  16. STANFORD DINING --Jane Lathrop Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    the Acterra Award for Sustainability and PG&E award for Leadership in Applying Green Building Design and have and Leland Stanford. We take the time and effort to source the most sustainable ingredients while building contribute to the prestige of Stanford · Community building opportunities · Enhanced quality of life

  17. Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    1 Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 2 Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. *Correspondence to: Noah A. Rosenberg, Department of Biology, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA. E-mail: noahr@stanford.edu. KEY WORDS

  18. Stanford University Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University Hearing Conservation Program April 2006 #12;Stanford University HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM CONTENTS PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION #12;HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM 1.0 INTRODUCTION "It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain

  19. Effect of nitrogen-containing groups on enhanced capacitive behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ji-Il [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253 Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253 Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, electrochemical properties of surface treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are studied in supercapacitors. Nitrogen and oxygen functional groups containing MWNTs are prepared by urea and acidic treatments, respectively. The surface properties of the MWNTs are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta-potential measurements. The textural properties are characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherm at 77 K using the BET eqaution, BJH method, and HK method. The electrochemical properties of the MWNTs are accumulated by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectra, and charge-discharge cycling performance in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at room temperature. As a result, the functionalized MWNTs lead to an increase in capacitance as compared with pristine MWNTs. It suggests that the pyridinic and pyridinic-N-oxides nitrogen species have effects on the specific capacitance due to the positive charge, and thus an improved electron transfer at high current loads results, the most important functional groups affecting capacitive behaviors. - Graphical Abstract: The N{sub 1s} spectra of nitrogen functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes are measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Highlights: > Facile method of increasing elemental composition of nitrogen functional groups on carbon materials. > Increased specific capacitance multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) for electrode materials as high as general chemical activation process. > Enhanced capacitive behaviors via introducing pyridinic and pyridinic-N-oxides nitrogen species onto the MWNTs. > Improvement of electron transfer at high current loads.

  20. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

  1. Stanford London 2005 Slide 1 Technology Entrepreneurship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Stanford London 2005 Slide 1 Technology Entrepreneurship: A Personal Top 10 List Stanford Club;Stanford London 2005 Slide 2 "Don't Hate Me `Cause I'm a Weenie!" Then... Now... #12;Stanford London 2005 Slide 3 A Stanford University Legacy #12;Stanford London 2005 Slide 4 Stanford and Silicon Valley

  2. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD February 1 9 8 5 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

  3. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract

  4. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT OCTOBER 1 ­ DECEMBER 31, 1996 #12;1 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL that in the vertical case. 1.2 INTRODUCTION The process of boiling in porous media is of significance in geothermal

  5. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM QUARTERLY REPORT JANUARY 1 - MARCH 31, 1997 #12;2 1 AN EXPERIMENTAL in geothermal systems as well as in many other applications such as porous heat pipes, drying and nuclear waste

  6. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

  7. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford...

  8. HEAR2T and the Stanford Heart Network Stanford's Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    intervention pro- gram could reduce the incidence of cardiac events (heart attack, bypass, etc.) by 40 their cardiovascular health and take action to reduce their risk for a heart attack or stroke. The Stanford HEART modelHEAR2T and the Stanford Heart Network Stanford's Approach SPRCHeart Healthy Communities (continued

  9. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Department of Energy since 1975. research i n geothermal r e s e r v o i r engineering techniques t h a t w iSTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD,CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-5 1 GEOTHERMAL Implications of Adsorption and Formation Fluid Composition on Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation . . 40 TASK 5

  10. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

  11. Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, California A LABORATORY MODEL OF STWLATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by A. Hunsbedt P. Kruger created by artificial stimulation of geothermal reservoirs has been con- structed. The model has been used

  12. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT-03-80SF11459

  13. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Science STANFORD staff who have helped me finish this project. Financial support was provided by the Geothermal

  14. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of PetroleumStanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy Sciences (BES)StandardsStanford

  16. Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015 Ph: 650-725-5399. Fax Stanford Social Innovation Review Spring 2009 Copyright © 2009 by Leland Stanford Jr. University All Rights Reserved #12;40 STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW · Spring 2009 ( ) On April 22, 1990,an estimated 200

  17. . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR- 80 DEPLETION MODELING OF LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY Gudmund 01sen June 1984 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under

  18. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORTI UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-85 ANALYSIS OF THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR MODEL EXPERIMENTS

  19. Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD Stanford University Lucile Radiology LPCH Thank you Par Lab Briefer, lighter, safer anesthesia for pediatric MRI #12; practice #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH Current Solution INVASIVE LIMITS ACCESS

  20. STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejerano, Gill

    STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center 450 that the new Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center opened on January 6, 2014. This new state previously received infusion treatments in the Infusion Treatment Area (ITA) at the Stanford Cancer Center

  1. Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University Pieter Abbeel, Stanford Dennis Akos, University of Colorado Andrew Y. Ng, Stanford University BIOGRAPHY Morgan Quigley and Pieter

  2. STANFORD UNIVERSITY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    20062007 Mechanical Engineering Student Services Building 530, Room 125 (650) 7257695 FAX (650) 7234882STANFORD UNIVERSITY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Academic Year Revised 9/06 #12;MECHANICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 20062007 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Clickable

  3. STANFORD CANCER CENTER Patient Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    PRESCRIBED: Printed on 100% post-consumer recycled paper, with vegetable-based inks. #12;STANFORD CANCER any animal feces (i.e., cat litter) of any kind. OK to pet your animal, just wash your hands, keep

  4. Sustainable Stanford Greening Infrastructure & Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainability coordinators Work with Office of Sustainability as staff to assist and coordinate with building;1717 Building Level Conservation Solicit participation for the campus Building Level Sustainability Program #12Sustainable Stanford Greening Infrastructure & Choices Fahmida Ahmed Office of Sustainability #12

  5. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

  6. Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanujam, Nimmi

    Stanford Social Innovation Review 518 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5015 Ph: 650-725-5399. Fax: 650-723-0516 Email: info@ssireview.com, www.ssireview.com Design Thinking for Social Innovation By Tim Brown & Jocelyn Wyatt Stanford Social Innovation Review Winter 2010 Copyright 2007 by Leland Stanford Jr

  7. https://spectrum.stanford.edu/education-mentoring Contact us at Stanford-edplan-initiative@lists.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    https://spectrum.stanford.edu/education-mentoring Contact us at Stanford-edplan-initiative@lists.stanford.edu IRB Update Wednesday, June 26, 2013 12:00PM ­ 1:00PM Li Ka Shing Center, Rm. 130 291 Campus Drive updates and FYIs to the research community on IRB-related topics. The workshop will provide guidance

  8. stanford hci group Programming by a Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemmer, Scott

    Developers End Users 14 #12;E d ( d t il ) li tiEnd-users run (and tailor) applications in the d.mix wiki tags: tag=divat("a Plain") inner html + info.secret + ".jpg" tag=div.at( a.Plain ).inner_html flickr.annotate_photopage_tags(doc) (d /"di ") j t{ } h d |di |(doc/"div").reject{...}.each do |div| tag = div.at("a.Plain

  9. SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearchInnovationSPEAR3Deadlines Beam7 - March

  10. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Science STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program, Department of Energy contract DE-AT03-80SFl1459 for their financial report Geothermal Program, Department of Energy contract DE-AT03-80SF11459 for their financial report. Also we would

  11. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Departnent Geothermal Energy Extraction Scheme .............................................. 2 3.1 Experimental SetupStanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD

  12. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the DepartmentStanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-81 TRACER TEST ANALYSIS OF THE KLAMATH FALLS GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator center stanford Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    e Stanford University, Stanford, CA (092010 - present) Ph. D. in Applied Physics Advisor: Prof... . Zhi-Xun Shen Stanford University, Stanford, CA (092007 - ... Source:...

  14. Stanford University Mercury Thermometer Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University Mercury Thermometer Replacement Program Instructions for Reuniting Separated Fluid Column of Non-Mercury Thermometer Heating Method Heat the thermometers bulb in an upright position of the thermometer. Note that over filling the expansion chamber will break the thermometer. Tap the thermometer

  15. NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

  16. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

  17. Navillum Nanotechnologies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

  18. Mesdi Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

  19. Radiator Labs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

  20. SolidEnergy Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

  1. MELISSA KEMP Stanford University, Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadly, Elizabeth

    EXPERIENCE Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA Fall 2010 - Present Department of Biology, Advisor: Dr Senior Thesis Previews. Williamstown, Massachusetts . August 2009. #12; 3 Population genetics

  2. SSRLUO 2015 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos, NM (SSRL UEC Chair) Jordi Cabana, University of Illinois at Chicago, IL Kelly Chacn, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR Justin Chartron, Stanford...

  3. Stanford Geothermal Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Geothermal Workshop is one of the world's longest running technical meetings on geothermal energy. The conference brings together engineers, scientists and managers...

  4. Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University Pieter Abbeel, Stanford Dennis Akos, University of Colorado Andrew Y. Ng, Stanfod University BIOGRAPHY Morgan Quigley and Pieter

  5. Stanford University March 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    Stanford University · March 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web on the other are part of the competitive free-market process, with which the FCC should not meddle. The problem's Institute for Economic Policy Analysis and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics. From 1981 to 2003, he

  6. Stanford University June 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    's compensating policies for small schools One example of such a policy failure comes from the government of India of learning and Compensating Policies for Small Schools: Addressing Schooling Inequalities in Rural India1Stanford University · June 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web

  7. With her undergraduate degree from Stanford, Susan Conger-Austin *83 was looking for something different for graduate school. Although

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Circa 1983 With her undergraduate degree from Stanford, Susan Conger-Austin *83 was looking, Susan raves about the "stellar group" that was her class of 14 graduate students and about

  8. Stanford University Committee on Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Energy Management 4. Report on Stanford Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) programs ­ Larry Gibbs ­Professor of Pathology ·Nancy Olson ­Community Member, Palo Alto ·Jeffrey Wine ­Professor of Psychology, Associate Director of Sustainability and Energy Management 4. Report on Stanford Environment, Health

  9. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Department and by the Geothermal & Hydrology Technologies Division of the U.S. Dept. of Energy, project No.: DE-AT03-80SF11459. -iv

  10. Tayo Oguntebi tayo@stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olukotun, Kunle

    with transactional memory. Member of the Pervasive Parallelism Laboratory, a broad effort across several research prototypes Expected Graduation date: 2012 M.S. ­ Stanford University, Stanford, California ElectricalView, MATLAB; Systems/Controls Proficient in French: Studied in Metz, France - Summer 2005 INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE

  11. Stanford University Sustainable Design & Construction Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    March 14, 2014 Y2E2 Building, Room 292E 473 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 #12;Sustainable DesignStanford University Sustainable Design & Construction Program 2014-2015 Admitted Student Open House for sophisticated structural/construction engineers " Support Design-Build Firms, Design Firms, Construction Firms

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ... Name, Vol. V, No. N, Month 20YY, Pages 10? ... A great deal of research has been done on the topic of position estimation in ad-hoc networks ([Ganesan et...

  14. July 2012 for revisions contact rbedgar@stanford.edu USP List Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for revisions contact rbedgar@stanford.edu Lance Lougee SLAC [lancel@slac.stanford.edu] Lance Phillips EHS [lagwagon@stanford.edu] Merry Weeks Sch Engineering [mweeks@stanford.edu] Michele Armstrong EHS [michelea

  15. Stanford University School of Medicine Privacy Office medprivacy@stanford.edu | 650.725.1828

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    devices used for Stanford business, including personally-owned devices. This applies to all members questions. Personal mobile devices. If you use your personal mobile device for work purposes (including, visit http://med.stanford.edu/datasecurity. Back-up and encrypt devices. The School of Medicine Data

  16. Stanford Anesthesia 50th Year Celebration Registration Category

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    Ford, James

    Stanford Anesthesia 50th Year Celebration Registration Category Please select a registration Department of Anesthesia will not assume any responsibility for any injuries or other negative occurrences indicate your affiliation with Stanford Anesthesia Anesthesia Resident Anesthesia Fellow Anesthesia Faculty

  17. Method of preparing nitrogen containing semiconductor material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barber, Greg D.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of combining group III elements with group V elements that incorporates at least nitrogen from a nitrogen halide for use in semiconductors and in particular semiconductors in photovoltaic cells.

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford University, Stanford, CA, spistone@stanford.edu 2 GeothermEx Inc., Richmond, CA ABSTRACT Carbon CO2 sequestration via subsurface fluid loss. In order to entertain this idea seriously in water, as can be observed in carbonated beverages. Furthermore, you can observe that the CO2 gas comes

  19. Stanford University November 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalta, Edward N.

    , most notably China, have large shale gas reserves. Current landed prices for liquefied natural gas (LNG:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief Energy industry observers have called the development of unconventional natural gas the shale for a controlled release of the natural gas trapped inside are the two major breakthroughs

  20. Stanford University September 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    other major sectors of the U.S. economy? Many of the core ideas advocated by health care reformers:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief Will information technology transform the health care sector the way it has transformed are premised on patients, physicians, and health care organizations having access to complete electronic

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    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford UniverSity Postdoctoral Scholars Health Care Reform and Your Health Insurance Options Effective January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act -- also known as "health care reform" -- will require the impact of health care reform and to feel confident about your personal coverage decisions

  2. Rok Sosic, Jure Leskovec Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    available by Stack Overflow https://archive.org/download/stackexchange/stackoverflow.com-Posts.7z 5.2GB and Jure Leskovec, Stanford University 3 #12; Task: Find top Java experts on Stack Overflow Possible approaches for finding experts: Use Stack Overflow reputation score: Not Java specific No control Count

  3. Stanford Center for Position, Navigation & Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    contributing exciting, novel new technologies, and together can play a leading role in this technology to rejuvenate the GLONASS system · Japan is also active with QZSS. #12;6 Outline A. Navigation & time technology;2 Stanford Center for Position Navigation and Time · The implementation of GPS in 1973 began this technology

  4. Stanford University Dept. of Project Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond, Jennifer L.

    Stanford University Dept. of Project Management Compacting the Sand for the Hot Water Piping Hall Wilbur Hall Kim H Resid Green Library Crothers Hall Main Quad Knight Management Center (see INSET Hse. Clock Tower Galvez Modular Sweet Hall Bookstore Law School Crothers Memorial Encina Commons

  5. Stanford Geothermal Program ml Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program ml Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Department Geothermal Program, for which am very thankful. iI #12;I am primarily indebted to my wife Martha. Her loving

  6. Stanford Center for Position, Navigation and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    --ACES: Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space Bryant Walker Smith--Legal Aspects of Vehicle Automation Michael O Collision Avoidance System (ACAS X)" 15 9:30am 30 Beiker, Sven Stanford CARS "Automated vehicles are coming "Legal aspects of Vehicle Automation" 17 11:00am 30 Shaw, Stuart Lockheed Martin "GPS III Signal

  7. SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM

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    Stanford University

    SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 October 1, 1978 through December 31, 1978. Research is performed under t h e Department of Energy Contract

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT t o U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LAWRENCE BERKELEY PRESENTATIONS & PUBLICATIONS APPENDIX A: STANDARD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM WEEKLY SEMINAR ii 1 4 23 35 49 58 60 63 65 Geothermal Program has maintained momentum built up under the previous National Science Foundation support

  9. increased in the case of dry matter or organic matter (apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) 87.3 and 89.o for groups i and 6). The digestibility of nitrogen increased in the same propor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    increased in the case of dry matter or organic matter (apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) = 87.3 and 89.o for groups i and 6). The digestibility of nitrogen increased in the same propor- tions p. ioo MPC). The maize protein concentrate studied has the advantage of being remarkably digestible

  10. Nitrogen sorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  11. Nitrogen sorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  12. Nitrogen sorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  13. Nitrogen sorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas. 5 figs.

  14. Tackling Big Challenges Using Tiny Crystals | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference Room 108A Speaker: Matteo Cargnello, Stanford Univeristy Program Description Fossil fuels are not endless and their extensive use is causing irreversible climate...

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  16. DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of the Department's worker safety and...

  17. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to be prepared in the next 24 months, and the planned cost and schedule for each NEPA review identified. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center...

  18. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University along a borehole at the site was consistent with results from FMI and PTS logging. INTRODUCTION

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University unit at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) were used. Results indicate

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 911, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 9­11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: IMPORTANT LESSONS FROM FENTON HILL Donald W. Brown Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663, MS-D443 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 USA e-mail: dwb@lanl.gov ABSTRACT The concept of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy originated

  2. 9/18/09 2:24 PMSLAC Today, Tuesday -August 18, 2009 Page 1 of 7http://today.slac.stanford.edu/a/2009/08-18.htm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temple, Blake

    Implications for Our Energy Future Aug 19 (1:30 p.m.) Theory Seminar: Dark Matter and the Transient Sky Aug 19://today.slac.stanford.edu/a/2009/08-18.htm A Kid's Day participant launches a soda bottle water rocket. (Photo by Nicholas Bock by different lab departments, launching water rockets in the main quad, making liquid nitrogen ice cream

  3. Stanford-Berkeley Summer School 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions HopBL7-2Stanford-Berkeley

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Resources Engineering 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220, USA e-mail: liljam@stanford.edu ABSTRACT The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource distribution in the field can be estimated by measuring potential differences between various points

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University 367 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA e and geometry are key for the optimum energy extraction from geothermal resources. Existing fracture systems, enhanced geothermal systems do not require natural convective hydrothermal resources, but rather

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    significantly increase the costs of geothermal power plants, rendering less the feasibility of utilizationPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 - A METHODOLOGY FOR OPTIMAL GEOTHERMAL

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 ASSESSMENT OF GEOTHERMAL POTENTIAL AT UNGARAN VOLCANO.Prof.Soedarto, Semarang, Indonesia. 2 Department of Earth Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    attention in the last five decades. Geothermal heating and cooling are possible in zones having a normalPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 SUSTAINABILITY OF GEOTHERMAL DOUBLETS

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and its heat source. INTRODUCTION The Kizildere geothermal field, which is situated within the MTPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY IMAGE OF THE KIZILDERE

  10. STANFORD UNIVERSITY DIVING SAFETY MANUAL Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grove CA 93950 #12;2 CONTENTS Section Page 1.00 GENERAL POLICY 4 1.10 STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCIENTIFIC.40 RECORD MAINTENANCE 9 2.00 DIVING REGULATIONS FOR SCUBA (OPEN CIRCUIT, COMPRESSED AIR) 10 2.10 INTRODUCTION 10 2.20 PRE-DIVE PROCEDURES 10 2.30 DIVING PROCEDURES 11 2.40 POST-DIVE PROCEDURES 12 2

  11. Stanford University Occupational Health Center Protecting Your Health and Safety at Work Central to supporting and promoting a culture of safety at Stanford is the Stanford University Occupational Health

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    Kay, Mark A.

    to supporting and promoting a culture of safety at Stanford is the Stanford University OccupationalStanford University Occupational Health Center Protecting Your Health and Safety at Work Central Health Center (SUOHC). The SUOHC is part of the Office of Environmental Health & Safety and has two

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    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

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    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    the development of a sustainable built environment, including buildings, infrastructure, renewable energy systems Sustainability and the Built Environment The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford the CEE Department's strategic goal of Engineering for Sustainability and engage with colleagues

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    Puglisi, Joseph

    /13 Research Compliance Office STANFORD measures and improves, when necessary, compliance with organizational measures and improves, when necessary, the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of the Human Research to assess compliance with organizational policies and procedures and applicable laws, regulations, codes

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Geodesic spaces : momentum :: Groups : symmetry Vaughan Pratt Stanford University BLAST 2010 a · b denoting b rotated 90 degrees about a. End of reprise. 3. This talk; Geodesic spaces At FMCS. as points evenly spaced along a geodesic , right distributivity expresses a symmetry of about an arbitrary

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Harold S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including observed nitrogen dioxide, Pure Appl. Geophys,Stratosphere Observation of Nitrogen Dioxide Rates of Ozoneby photolysis of nitrogen dioxide and regeneration of ozone:

  17. THE NITROGEN OXIDES CONTROVERSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Harold S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    including observed nitrogen dioxide," Pure App. Geophys.HN0 ) and probably nitrogen dioxide (N0 ) at a few parts perorganic molecule and nitrogen dioxide. Several examples

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    clean, renewable, and safe baseload geothermal power generation. INTRODUCTION Newberry VolcanoPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University and shift stimulation to new fractures. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration will allow geothermal

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, 94720, USA ABSTRACT Interactions between hydrothermal fluids and rock alter mineralogy, leading permeability reduction in fractured and intact Westerly granite due to high-temperature fluid flow through core

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, proppant will need to withstand high temperatures, acidified fluids, acid treatments, and cleanouts while in equilibrium with fluids of varying composition. TOUGHREACT was used to model one dimensional flow

  1. ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World Version 1.0

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    Quake, Stephen R.

    ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World Version 1.0 May, 2012 Walter and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history. #12;ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial....................................................................................................................................22 Geospatial technology

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    Li, Fei-Fei

    Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality Request for Proposals The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality (CPI), a National Poverty Research Center funded by the Office

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    Ohta, Shigemi

    and High Energy Physics Laboratory I. INTRODUCTION In the history of nuclear and high energy physics ENERGY PHYSICS" H. Alan Schwettmant Stanford University Stanford, California Department of Physics there have been a few pioneer- The High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) at Stanford ing laboratories which

  4. STANFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 2014

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    Straight, Aaron

    horse on Stanford's Palo Alto Stock Farm, commemorate pre-university days. Samuel Morris, dean. The Palo Alto Stock Farm was still much in evidence, not only its former racetracks and paddocks, but also streets now gone, foreshortened, or redirected, the book reveals changes fostered by population growth

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Replacement Guidelines Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University 17 November 2005 This document describes the guidelines for replacing laptop and desktop computers at Environmental Health and Safety. PC laptop and desktop computers will be replaced a) on an ongoing basis where

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    Stanford University School of Medicine Responsible Conduct of Research Session 6: Tissue Use Makeup Cases Please choose one case and write a 3-5 page paper that answers the questions that accompany many years gathering tissue samples from women with breast cancer. All donors gave permission

  7. stanford hci group / cs376 http://cs376.stanford.eduScott Klemmer 26 September 2006

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    Klemmer, Scott

    Topics in Human-Computer Interaction (setup whiteboard) This course is a broad graduate- computer interaction. So the natural next question is, "what is human-computer interaction?" Human-Computer of user interfaces. Topics include computer-supported cooperative work; audio, speech, and multimodal

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of Energy Resources Engineering 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA, 94305, USA e-mail: egillj opposed to time). The interwell connectivity is represented by a kernel function, which can be estimated via deconvolution. A nonparametric kernel estimation method is illustrated by deconvolving synthetic

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , are as follows: (a) reduce the operations and maintenance cost; (b) reduce the power plant cost; (c) choose, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 OPTIMIZATION OF THE ECONOMICS OF ELECTRIC POWER FROM) developed to date, numerical simulation of idealized EGS reservoirs, economic sensitivity analysis

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for the simulation of steam flow in a geothermal power plant network". The fluid movement is governed. In the pipeline network of geothermal power plant the steam flows from high to low pressure and heat flows from, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 GeoSteamNet: 2. STEAM FLOW SIMULATION IN A PIPELINE

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    .aniko@uni-miskolc.hu ABSTRACT Hungary has decided to implement its first geothermal pilot power plant for electricity production The implementation of the first Hungarian geothermal pilot power plant occurred in 2004. After a comprehensive sitePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1988; Smedley, 2002). Development of geothermal fields for power generation tends to increase the rate to constructing the geothermal power plant. The geothermal field is located in a Moil valley terraces set withinPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation project in Desert Peak (Nevada) geothermal field. As partPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM K.M. Kovac1 , Susan J. Lutz2 , Peter S. Drakos3 , Joel Byersdorfer4 , and Ann Robertson

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    was elaborated to prepare the implementation of the first Hungarian geothermal pilot power plant. The hydraulicPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University FOR TRACER TRANSPORT IN A FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Aniko Toth, Peter Szucs and Elemer Bobok University

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 2010 PRESENT STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY IN TURKEY capacity in Turkey is about 100 MWe, while that of direct use installations is around 795 MWt. Direct use, solar, etc. Geological studies indicate that the most important geothermal systems of Turkey are located

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University was performed during one year on one site but injection pump failure and well damage lead to abandonment of the reservoir to the injected fluid paths. MODEL DESCRIPTION In this study we carried out numerical simulations

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DIRECTIONAL WELLS AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL Costa Rica. Since 2009, the Costa Rican Electricity Company (ICE) has drilled 7 deep directional boreholes (in addition to the 9 existing vertical boreholes). The purpose of directional drilling has been

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes/University of Utah, U.S. Geothermal Inc. and Apex HiPoint Reservoir Engineering. The primary objective

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University is of primary concern in geothermal reservoir engineering. Based on a tracer circulation test performed at the European Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) test site at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, three different

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University National Laboratory National Security Engineering Division, L-188 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 e to complete an EGS reservoir project are (Figure 1): (1) finding and characterizing a site by drilling

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS hydraulic fractures formed in naturally fractured crystalline rock masses. The propped fractures were formed on injection of thin or low viscosity fluids (e.g. water) at pressures that are below the fracture opening

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    reservoirs where there exist coupled interactions among fluid and heat flow, and mechanical response, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 SIMULATION OF FLUID FLOW IN FRACTURED PORO and fracture pressure variation. This is accomplished by considering fluid flow and heat transport in a 2D

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DESIGNING THERMAL-PHYSICAL, POWER out at expeditious development rates and there are about a million power plants of this type-energy power plant, that supplies consumers with heat within constrained by them parameters, standard

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    in waste Hot reservoir: earth Cold reservoir: atmosphere Electricity Energy in raw materials Maintenance Energy Restoration Energy Heat Engine Energy in waste Figure 1: Geothermal heat engine converting raw, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 ENERGY RETURN ON ENERGY INVESTMENT, AN IMPORTANT FIGURE

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 FIELD EXPERIMENTS FOR STUDYING ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION to study CO2 sequestration in solid minerals by injecting CO2 dissolved water into a high temperature as carbonate minerals. INTRODUCTION For the global warming problems, it is considered to reduce CO2 emission

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ARE GEOTHERMAL ENERGY RETURNS ON INVESTMENT as the investment energy for the next generation system. In the case of geothermal energy that means using on geothermal EROI of closing the loop is examined. The benefit of using geothermal energy, as compared

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Future of Geothermal Energy (MIT, 2006 level geothermal systems model to enable the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies ProgramPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    reveals that faster cooling rate which is equivalent to the fluid injection rate in geothermal operationsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN HOT DRY GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Xiaoxian Zhou1 , Atilla Aydin1 , Fushen Liu2 , David D. Pollard1 1

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University in a reservoir has been an essential part in the planning process for geothermal projects for the past 30 years of groundwater (for heating and/or cooling). The tool may be used in a preliminary planning phase to study

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system before significant cooling occursPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University cooling. Results indicate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Subir K. Sanyal Geotherm This paper first describes the salient features of the various types of geothermal energy resources) geopressured systems, and (6) magma energy. Of these six types, only hydrothermal systems have been

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY of the Caribbean islands have great potential for Geothermal Energy. These islands have been formed partially for geothermal energy. The only operating geothermal plant in the Caribbean is at Bouillante in Guadeloupe

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University as the dynamic properties of the fluid flowing both through the wellbore and the reservoir. It is known that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, which produces fluid at temperatures in the range of 100-130 °C. Since 1979, the geothermal resource has the fluids from the entire region into distinctive units. This characterization provided valuable clues

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University MWe. A geochemical assessment of the field is made based on analytical data of fluids sampled in the initial aquifer fluids were modeled. Results indicate that "excess enthalpy" discharged by some wells

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University (the better the fluid flow, the lower the calcite content). This suggests that the fracture zones acting as flow pathways for the circulation of deep and hot fluids. These are crucial conditions

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Geothermal wells producing acidic fluid have been abandoned because of high corrosion potential on casing. In the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica, there are geothermal wells producing acidic fluid. For these wells, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 ANALYSIS OF NEUTRALIZATION REACTION IN A GEOTHERMAL

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Energy Geothermal Wayang Windu Ltd., 2. Geothermal Laboratory ITB, Bandung. mulyadiPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-DOMINATED TWO-PHASE ZONE OF THE WAYANG WINDU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAVA, INDONESIA Mulyadi1 and Ali Ashat2 1. Star

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . The legislative framework in South Australia (Petroleum and Geothermal Energy Act 20001 ) and the behavior by the Petroleum and Geothermal Energy Act 2000 (P&GE Act), Figure 1.Geothermal licenses in South AustraliaPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    River geothermal site (from U.S. Geothermal Inc.) #12;Department of Energy from 1975 to 1982PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Earl Mattson1 , Mitchell Plummer1 , Carl Palmer1 , Larry Hull1 , Samantha Miller1

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    -elastic deformation with damage evolution, and groundwater flow are solved using the Explicit Finite Difference Lagrangian Method for solid deformation and the Finite Element Method for fluid mass conservation. Rock, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013 SGP-TR-198 MODELING RESERVOIR STIMULATION INDUCED BY WELLBORE

  2. Stanford University June 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    a competitive domestic rare earths minerals production industry; a domestic rare earth processing, refining's green economy? Background REEs consist of a group of 17 elements including scandium, yttrium, and the 15 for the adoption of many of these clean technologies in the hope of boosting our nation's economy and environmental s

  3. Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: Missouri References:InformationStanford- Global

  4. Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: Missouri References:InformationStanford-

  5. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

  6. Computer Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional Variation The Computational QueueComputer

  7. Analysis and Modeling of Skywave Behavior Sherman Lo, Stanford University, Robert Wenzel, Booz Allen Hamilton, Per Enge,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Analysis and Modeling of Skywave Behavior Sherman Lo, Stanford University, Robert Wenzel, Booz Allen Hamilton, Per Enge, Stanford University 1.0 Introduction Skywave signals are an inherent part

  8. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Agnew, Stephen F. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, William H. (Buena Park, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  9. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from atmospheric nitrogen could, in principle, be more energy-efficient. This is particularly attractive giv

  10. Place Learning in Dynamic Real-World Environments Brian Yamauchi1 (yamauchi@robotics.stanford.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    Place Learning in Dynamic Real-World Environments Brian Yamauchi1 (yamauchi@robotics.stanford.edu) Pat Langley2 (langley@robotics.stanford.edu) Institute for the Study of Learning and Expertise 2164 Staunton Court, Palo Alto, CA 94306 Abstract In this paper, we present an approach for mobile robot

  11. Place Learning in Dynamic RealWorld Environments Brian Yamauchi 1 (yamauchi@robotics.stanford.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    Place Learning in Dynamic Real­World Environments Brian Yamauchi 1 (yamauchi@robotics.stanford.edu) Pat Langley 2 (langley@robotics.stanford.edu) Institute for the Study of Learning and Expertise 2164 Staunton Court, Palo Alto, CA 94306 Abstract In this paper, we present an approach for mobile robot

  12. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland,0162112°,St. Charles isStallings,StandardizedStanekStanford

  14. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ng, Henry K. (Naperville, IL); Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  15. SUPRI (Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute) heavy oil research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Aziz, K.; Castanier, L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the work performed under Department of Energy contract FG19-87BC14126 during the period February 22, 1987 to February 21, 1990. During that period the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute has published twenty-two technical reports and professional papers. This report presents in general terms the scope of work of SUPRI which is divided in five main projects: reservoir properties, in-situ combustion, improvement of steam injection by additives, well-to-well formation evaluation, and field support services. The results obtained during the period of performance of the contract are then presented in the form of abstracts from the technical reports and papers written during the period of performance.

  16. High-nitrogen explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naud, D. (Darren); Hiskey, M. A. (Michael A.); Kramer, J. F. (John F.); Bishop, R. L. (Robert L.); Harry, H. H. (Herbert H.); Son, S. F. (Steven F.); Sullivan, G. K. (Gregg K.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The syntheses and characterization of various tetrazine and furazan compounds offer a different approach to explosives development. Traditional explosives - such as TNT or RDX - rely on the oxidation of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by the oxygen carrying nitro group to produce the explosive energy. High-nitrogen compounds rely instead on large positive heats of formation for that energy. Some of these high-nitrogen compounds have been shown to be less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine (BDT), several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. The compound, 3,3{prime}-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, detonates as a half inch rate stick despite having no oxygen in the molecule. Using perfluoroacetic acid, DAAT can be oxidized to give mixtures of N-oxide isomers (DAAT03.5) with an average oxygen content of about 3.5. This energetic mixture burns at extremely high rates and with low dependency on pressure. Another tetrazine compound of interest is 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine(DGT) and its dinitrate and diperchlorate salts. DGT is easily synthesized by reacting BDT with guanidine in methanol. Using Caro's acid, DGT can be further oxidized to give 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine-1,4-di-N-oxide (DGT-DO). Like DGT, the di-N-oxide can react with nitric acid or perchloric acid to give the dinitrate and the diperchlorate salts. The compounds, 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB - the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it has a greater CJ pressure and detonation velocity. In an effort to reduce the critical diameter of TATB without sacrificing its insensitivity, we have studied the explosive performances of TATB mixed with DAAzlF (X-0561) and TATB mixed with DAAF (X-0563).

  17. Stanford University School of Engineering 171 Undergraduate Handbook 2005-2006 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    , mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, and science including physicsStanford University School of Engineering 171 Undergraduate Handbook 2005-2006 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING -- ABET ACCREDITATION CRITERIA APPLY -- The environmental engineering profession works to protect

  18. Combustion Group Group members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy 2014 #12;Combustion Group Combustion Physics and Modeling Pollutants, Emissions, and Soot Formation Thermoacoustics and Combustion Dynamics Research focus § Examine mechanisms responsible for flame stabilization

  19. 4, 23012331, 2004 Nitrogen oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) were performed simul- taneously with aerosolACPD 4, 2301­2331, 2004 Nitrogen oxides measurements in an Amazon site A. M. Cordova et al. Title and Physics Discussions Nitrogen oxides measurements in an Amazon site and enhancements associated with a cold

  20. Transition metal complexes with multidentate phosphorous/nitrogen ligands. Synthesis, characterization and reactivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozenel, Sergio Santiago

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    groups attached to phosphorous were substituted for methylgroups attached to phosphorous were substituted for methylwith multidentate phosphorous/nitrogen ligands. Synthesis,

  1. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

  2. Created by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP) Department of Management Science and Engineering in the School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    and Engineering in the School of Engineering Stanford University Global Innovation Tournament Organizer Toolkit and Engineering in the School of Engineering Stanford University OVERVIEW & BACKGROUND Organizing and running of these challenges requires creativity, teamwork, execution, and value creation. ORGANIZING & RUNNING A TOURNAMENT

  3. Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Li, Guosheng; Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) is obtained by exposing graphene to nitrogen plasma. N-graphene exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and H2O2 reduction than graphene, and much higher durability and selectivity than the widely-used expensive Pt. The excellent electrochemical performance of N-graphene is attributed to nitrogen functional groups and the specific properties of graphene. This indicates that N-graphene is promising for applications in electrochemical energy devices (fuel cells, metal-air batteries) and biosensors.

  4. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  5. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  6. University Safety Partners Mission Statement The University Safety Partners (USP) is a group of appointed representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the work environment at Stanford. The role of University Safety Partners is to: · Advise the UniversityUniversity Safety Partners Mission Statement The University Safety Partners (USP) is a group of appointed representatives who are responsible for the administration of the University's health and safety

  7. Nitrogen chemistry during oil shale pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Myongsook S.; Crawford, R.W.; Foster, K.G.; Alcaraz, A.

    1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Real time evolution of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN), two major nitrogen-containing volatiles evolved during oil shale pyrolysis, was measured by means of a mass spectrometer using chemical ionization and by infrared spectroscopy. While the on-line monitoring of NH{sub 3} in oil shale pyrolysis games was possible by both techniques, HCN measurements were only possible by IR. We studied one Green River Formation oil shale and one New Albany oil shale. The ammonia from the Green River oil shale showed one broad NH{sub 3} peak maximizing at a high temperature. For both oil shales, most NH{sub 3} evolves at temperatures above oil-evolving temperature. The important factors governing ammonia salts such as Buddingtonite in Green River oil shales, the distribution of nitrogen functional groups in kerogen, and the retorting conditions. The gas phase reactions, such as NH{sub 3} decomposition and HCN conversion reactions, also play an important role in the distribution of nitrogen volatiles, especially at high temperatures. Although pyrolysis studies of model compounds suggests the primary nitrogen product from kerogen pyrolysis to be HCN at high temperatures, we found only a trace amount of HCN at oil-evolving temperatures and none at high temperatures (T {gt} 600{degree}C). 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. STANFORD PEER-TO-PEER MULTICAST (SPPM) OVERVIEW AND RECENT EXTENSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girod, Bernd

    ., Palo Alto, CA Work performed while on leave from Ericsson Eurolab, Herzogenrath, Germany 2. STANFORD to its scalability and its potentially lower cost for delivering media streams to a large population population of fixed and mobile devices with different decoding and display capabilities. Now with Dyyno, Inc

  9. Geospatial Data Provider Workshop The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and Stanford University invite you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane, Greg

    1 Geospatial Data Provider Workshop The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and Stanford of geospatial data. The workshop is tentatively scheduled to take place March 7-8 in Santa Barbara. Background at specific types of at-risk content. Our project, the National Geospatial Digital Archive (NGDA; http

  10. ICORR '99: International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, Stanford, CA AUTONOMY AND LEARNING IN MOBILE ROBOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    - 1 - ICORR '99: International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, Stanford, CA AUTONOMY AND LEARNING IN MOBILE ROBOTS George A. Bekey Computer Science Department University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-0781 bekey@robotics.usc.edu http://www-robotics.usc.edu/ Abstract Recent trends

  11. Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2002-03 Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2002-03 · Stanford University #12;The most basic into new opportunities. Jasper Ridge is faced with limits to growth and is susceptible to the strains Sedgwick, and Irene Brown; Nona Chiariello (Jasper Ridge Research Coordinator), as well as myself

  12. Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2003-04 Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve Annual Report 2003-04 · Stanford University #12;The mission of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is to contribute to the understanding of the Earth's natural systems. For Jasper Ridge, that means understanding the urban presence of humans as an integral dimension

  13. Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    .E geothermal energy from artificially stimu- lated systems by in-place flashing was studied experimentally. Although improved geothermal energy recovery from stimulated reservoirs by in-place flashing appears promStanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research i n Engineering and Earth Sciences

  14. Self-Assembling Tile Systems that Heal from Small Fragments Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Ashish

    Self-Assembling Tile Systems that Heal from Small Fragments Holin Chen Stanford University holin systems have proved to be a useful model for understanding self-assembly at the nano scale. Self-healing tile systems, introduced by Winfree, have the property that the self-assembled shape can recover from

  15. Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford University's Leslie buildings use energy, and each year we conducted an energy audit of a local building, most often a house in town. We conducted energy audits of two Oberlin College buildings, the Wright Laboratory of Physics

  16. PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, Philip

    PowerNet: Energy Use & Energy Waste powernet.stanford.edu 345,281 kWh $ 36,255 Device Type Measured lights, etc. Current Energy Use of Computing Systems Monday: Holiday What About Waste? Network Traffic on Core Switches Label Switch Type Active Ports (gigabit each) Data trace (# days) a HP 5412zl 120 150 b

  17. ARM - Measurement - Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARM DatagovMeasurementsNitrogen ARM Data

  18. INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

  19. The design of stable high nitrogen systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartakovsky, V.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general strategy for the design of high nitrogen systems with an adequate degree of stability has been elaborated. The design of nitro compounds in which terminal nitro groups are bonded to the chain of several heteroatoms is a specific case within the strategy. In the process of working out the strategy a number of new high nitrogen systems (dinitrazenic acid or dinitroamide HN{sub 3}O{sub 4} and its salts, nitrodiazene oxides RN{sub 3}O{sub 3} and tetrazine dioxides) were discovered. A new of new types of nitro compounds (bicyclo nitro-bis-hydroxylamine, nitrohydrazine, nitrohydroxylamine, sulfo-N-nitroimide and bis-N-nitroimide) were synthesized. This study opens new prospects in the field of the synthesis of high energy materials.

  20. Type B Accident Investigation of the January 28, 2003, Fall and Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by John S. Muhlestein, Director, Stanford Site Office (DOE/SC), U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Better Buildings Case Competition 2014 Stanford participated for the first time this year to The Better Buildings Case Competition's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Better Buildings Case Competition 2014 Stanford participated for the first time this year to The Better Buildings Case Competition's third edition sustainability issues faced by the industry. One of six topics ranging from how

  2. SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITY Waste audits from campus buildings reveal that 30% of the trash Stanford sends to the landfill is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    How To... SUSTAINABILITY OPPORTUNITY Waste audits from campus buildings reveal that 30 on campus have active composting programs. Interested buildings and departments can start a voluntary office;MORE INFORMATION SUSTAINABLE STANFORD'S WASTE REDUCTION EFFORTS http://sustainable

  3. Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

  4. What Happens to Nitrogen in Soils?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Hossner, L. R.

    2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the chemistry of nitrogen, the processes by which nitrogen is added to and removed from the soil, and methods of preventing nitrogen losses on agricultural lands....

  5. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning...

  7. Text of email from Don Winterstein to Stuart Crampin via anisotropists@sep.stanford.edu -Anisotropists Digest 147: dated 06/02.96

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @sep.stanford.edu - Anisotropists Digest 147: dated 06/02.96 Date: Tue, 06 Feb 96 17:04:00 PST From: "Winterstein, Donald f -DWIN

  8. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    recipients. The Australian Geothermal Energy Group (AGEG) has also seen significant changes and developments. Additionally the joint AGEG ­ Australian Geothermal Energy Association (AGEA) Geothermal Reporting Code Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence at the University of Queensland, the Western Australian Geothermal

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    are all directed at achieving the Australian Geothermal Energy Group's (AGEG) aspirational targets (the Australian Geothermal Energy Association, AGEA) and the AGEG is to see geothermal energy providing the lowest cost, emissions-free, renewable base load energy for centuries to come. This paper summarizes: (1

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Australia and Western Australia, that have been established with complementary programs to achieve research for industry and government to access research services Geothermal energy development in Australia will be best and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, SA, 5000, Australia e-mail: alexandra

  13. Managing Nitrogen Fertilizer in Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hons, F. M.; McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Nichols, Robert L.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Boman, R. K.; Saladino, V. A.; Jahn, R. L.; Stapper, J. R.

    2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To be profitable, cotton producers must manage fertilization efficiently. This publication reports the results of a 5-year study that showed over-fertilization with nitrogen is a common problem. There are specific recommendations for soil testing...

  14. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

  15. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

  16. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen NITROGEN 18.1.2004 4-1 Chapter 4 Nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of the nitric oxide is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide, so the environmental effects of emissions of bothZevenhoven & Kilpinen NITROGEN 18.1.2004 4-1 Chapter 4 Nitrogen 4.1 Introduction Probably the most damaging of the hazardous nitrogen compounds formed during combustion are nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen

  17. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen NITROGEN 13.4.2002 4-1 Chapter 4 Nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    of the nitric oxide is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide, so the environmental effects of emissions of bothZevenhoven & Kilpinen NITROGEN 13.4.2002 4-1 Chapter 4 Nitrogen 4.1 Introduction Probably the most damaging of the hazardous nitrogen compounds formed during combustion are nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen

  18. "Best practices" for student start-ups Innovation and the translation of inventions into products that serve the public are deeply ingrained in Stanford's culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    "Best practices" for student start-ups 8-2-12 Innovation and the translation of inventions to avoiding either perceived or actual conflict of interest issues with respect to start-ups. Both Stanford of interest (COI) when licensing Stanford intellectual property to a start-up is considered. OTL makes

  19. Introduction to the Proceedings of the Sixth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop, Stanford Geothermal Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, Henry J. Jr.; Kruger, Paul; Donaldson, Ian G.

    1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on thenumerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed i n these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented . Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey ( U.S.G.S.) , Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would l i k e t o thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Leland Stanford University - CA 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here HomeGunnison- NYLeland Stanford University

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  2. Group X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  3. EFFECT OF NITROGEN OXIDE PRETREATMENTS ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF CELLULOSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrevik, R.K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxygen react to give nitrogen dioxide, which rapidly reactsis simultaneous, the nitrogen dioxide formed reacts withaccomplished by absorbing nitrogen dioxide in water, usually

  4. ME346A Introduction to Statistical Mechanics Wei Cai Stanford University Win 2011 Handout 11. Applications to Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    ME346A Introduction to Statistical Mechanics ­ Wei Cai ­ Stanford University ­ Win 2011 Handout 11. Applications to Fluids February 23, 2011 Contents 1 Ideal gas model review 1 2 Van der Waals model 2 3 Virial In this lecture, we will discuss fluids beyond the ideal gas limit. This means we need to account for interactions

  5. Stanford University Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Exploiting Partial Channel Knowledge at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulraj, Arogyaswami

    Stanford University Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Exploiting Partial Channel Knowledge at the Transmitter in MISO and MIMO Wireless SPAWC 2003 Rome, Italy June 18 Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Outline Introduction Perfect CSI

  6. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  7. Can Eutrophication Influence Nitrogen vs. Phosphorus Limitation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Can Eutrophication Influence Nitrogen vs. Phosphorus Limitation? George Gregory Bates College, originating largely from septic systems and fertilizers, have caused significant eutrophication in freshwater nitrogen and phosphorus grew the highest concentration of phytoplankton, but eutrophic ponds grew a mean

  8. IN THIS ISSUE Nitrogen on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    AGRONOMY NOTES July 2005 IN THIS ISSUE COTTON Nitrogen on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim Dean. #12;2 Nitrogen on Cotton Now is the time to apply N

  9. Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Tropical Forests: Ecosystem-Level Patterns and Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cusack, Daniela F.; Silver, Whendee; McDowell, William H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was kept in open plastic containers and maintained nearconditions in open plastic containers Biological Nitrogen

  10. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OXIDES OF NITROGEN Nitrogen Dioxide (N0 2) Nitrous Oxide (NFigure 7. Emissions of nitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (by AiResearch(8)) . Nitrogen dioxide emissions from a

  11. Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

  12. Automata groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muntyan, Yevgen

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -presentation. We also find the L-presentation for several other groups generated by three-state automata, and we describe the defining relations in the Grigorchuk groups G_w. In case when the sequence w is almost periodic these relations provide an L...

  13. Machine Intelligence and Robotics Report of the NASA Study Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Raj

    Intelligence Laboratory Department of Computer Science Stanford University Dr. Ralph C. Gonzalez Professor, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Dr. Elliott C. Levinthal Adjunct Professor of Genetics Stanford University and Applied Psychology Massachusetts Institute of Technology Dr. William M. Whitney Manager for Information

  14. Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

  15. 150-MW S-band klystron program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Phillips, R.M.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two S-Band klystrons operating at 150 MW have been designed, fabricated and tested at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during the past two years for use in an experimental accelerator at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. Both klystrons operate at the design power, 60 Hz repetition rate, 3 {micro}s pulsewidth, with an efficiency {gt} 40%, and agreement between the experimental results and simulations is excellent. The 535 kV, 700 A electron gun was tested by constructing a solenoidal focused beam stick which identified a source of oscillation, subsequently engineered out of the klystron guns. Design of the beam stick and the two klystrons is discussed, along with observation and suppression of spurious oscillations. Differences in design and the resulting performance of the Klystrons is emphasized.

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  17. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    WITH DOUBLE POROSITY BEHAVIOR 6 7 A-1 - Material Balance............. 67 A- 2 - Derivation of Characterstic. REFERENCES....................................... 6 3 8 . APPENDIX A DERIVATION OF CHARACTERISTIC EQUATION Equation with Pseudo-Steady State Interporosity Flow Assumption... 6 9 A-3 - Derivation of Characteristic

  18. STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Reservoir-Under Injection........................................................... 12 Measurements ...................................................................................... 19 Thermal Stress Effects................................................................... 33 4.2 4.3 4.4 INJECTION TECHNOLOGY

  19. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Contracts issued by Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy San Francisco Operations Office No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy #12;#12;1 , .... TABLE n t e r e s t t o the geothermal energy community. The topic f o r panel analysis f o r the Sixth

  20. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149SpeedingRenewable Energy Agricultural

  1. Stanford Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y Research i n Engineering and Earth stimulation is expected to increase the productivity of geothermal reservoirs by providing increased

  2. Lignite-based nitrogenous fertilizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baris, H.; Dincer, S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of lignite from Elbistan was oxidized by nitric acid in two stages, using relatively dilute acid in the first stage and concentrated acid in the second stage, and then the oxidized product was ammoniated so that a coal-based fertilizer could be produced. The experiments of all the stages were designed by a 1/2 X full factorial design. It was observed that base exchange capacity and nitrogen content of coal-based fertilizers produced in this work were as good as or better than those obtained by other investigators.

  3. Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, H.L.

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

  4. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NITROGEN METABOLISM AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassham, James A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RG and JA Bassham, Photosynthesis by isolated chloroplasts.chloroplasts during photosynthesis. Plant Physiol ~0:22H-2?NITROGEN METABOLISM AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS James A. Bassham,

  5. Mechanisms of plant species impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , this microbial nitrogen loop is driven by plant-supplied carbon and provides a strong negative feedback through by an increase in the relative nitrogen content in decomposing litter and a much lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratio by a microbial nitrogen loop. Nitrogen is released from the soil organic matter and incorporated into microbial

  6. Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually. Emissions. (fertilizers that use nitric acid or ammonium bicarbonate result in emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous oxide, ammonia and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.) ~Indirect: Phosphorus in excess causes eutrophication

  7. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. February 2010 Pasture Nitrogen Balance Worksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Agronomy Guide ­ Table 1.2-14A N Recommendation (lb/A) 3 Planned Fertilizer (lb/A) 1 Residual Manure N 4 Residual Legume N (lb/A) 5 Net Nitrogen Requirement (lb/A) Calculation of Uncollected Manure Nitrogen Available N/A deposited at this stocking rate is under N balanced rate; may need

  9. NITROGEN ISOTOPES IN PALEOCLIMATE JULIAN P. SACHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    denitrification, the conversion of nitrate to N2 gas with its subsequent loss to the atmosphere (25-180 Tg N of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and is the precursor to petroleum deposits it is important to understand nitrogen of nitrogen is atmospheric dinitrogen gas (N2), consisting of 3.9 x 109 Tg N (Wada and Hattori, 1990

  10. Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support in a precision farming context. Keywords: Carbon balances, carbon sequestration, decompositionCarbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model

  11. Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, shielded metal arc, self-shielded metal arc, and submerged arc welding are reviewed. Calcu- lations upon heating is also discussed. Introduction Oxygen and nitrogen ~ontamination of weld metal

  12. Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 3: Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction Compounds of nitrogen. Silicate can play a regulating role in the growth of such organisms that carry shells of silicate. Most important are diatoms, which may form phytoplankton blooms under conditions of sufficient silicate

  13. Nutrient Management Module No. 3 Nitrogen Cycling,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    , it is important to first understand the various transformations that N undergoes within the soil. Nitrogen Cycling to be the sum of ammonium and nitrate, although urea, a type of organic N, may also be plant available. Nitrogen a fraction) by dry yield (in lb/ac). It's useful to compare actual uptake rates to N fertilizer rates

  14. SSRL ETS Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE AwardsNA-00197-1 Nov. 15, 20105,1-4STANFORD

  15. Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    red power plants. Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) is one of the sixeffects, including nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ground-levelgradually oxidized to nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) once emitted

  16. Using Petiole Analysis for Nitrogen Management in Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Hickey, M. G.; Stichler, Charles

    1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For cotton growers, maintaining proper nitrogen balance is a major concern. Petiole analysis, the laboratory analysis of the nitrogen content of leaf stems, can be coupled with plant monitoring to form an effective nitrogen management program...

  17. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  18. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  19. Nitrogen Fixation and Dentrification in Sediments of Eutrophic Mediterranean-Type Estuaries: Seasonal Patterns and Responses to Anthropogenic Nitrogen Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Tonya Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and mechanisms controlling sediment nitrogen fixation in aKane T & Fong P. 2007. Sediment nitrogen fixation in UpperKane T & Fong P. 2007. Sediment nitrogen fixation in Upper

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen oxideAmmonia Sensors for Vehicle on-board Emissions Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen...

  1. ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations castingops.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  2. Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds Accelerated by Evaporation of Water from Secondary Formation of Nitrogen- and Sulfur-Containing Light-Absorbing Compounds...

  3. Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications. Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications. Abstract: Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) is obtained by...

  4. Abstract.-Stable nitrogen (/ll5Nl and carbon (/ll3CI isotope measure-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    540 Abstract.-Stable nitrogen (/ll5Nl and carbon (/ll3CI isotope measure- ments were used and the Gulfof Mexico Loop Current. Use of stable isotopes to assess groups of king mackerel, Scomberomorus caval), the carbon isotopic composition of a food source is not substantially altered during assimilation. De

  5. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Brears, Timothy (Durham, NC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  6. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Brears, Timothy (Durham, NC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  7. Nitrogen oxide delivery systems for biological media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinn, Brian Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo are associated with a variety of cellular modifications thought to be mutagenic or carcinogenic. These processes are likely mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as ...

  8. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  9. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Lam, Hon-Ming (Hong Kong, HK); Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun (Woodside, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION Nitrogen recovery from shrimp pond efuent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzen, Kai

    the water as ammonia (total ammonia nitrogen, TAN), through either direct excretion by animals or ammoni

  11. Microfluidic Facility, Harvard Medical School LIQUID NITROGEN TANK HANDLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, Johan

    Microfluidic Facility, Harvard Medical School LIQUID NITROGEN TANK HANDLING HMS microfluidics/microfabrication facility has one high pressure liquid nitrogen tank which supplies the nitrogen for some equipment normal operation. In case the liquid nitrogen tank is malfunctioning and requires to be shut down or replaced make

  12. The Global Nitrogen Cycle in the 21st century Journal: Philosophical Transactions B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Peter; Stanford University, CA, USA, Leach, Allison; University of Virginia, Bouwman, Lex; Netherlands://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/issue-ptrsb Submitted to Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B - Issue #12;ForReview Only Page 1 of 27 http of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, 4 Stanford University, CA, USA. 5 PBL Netherlands Environmental

  13. Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

  14. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Nitrogen is a natural and necessary part of every healthy ecosystem, but too much nitrogen in our rivers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ), sewage treatment plants, and animal ma- nure. Once in water, nitrogen can change in chemical form

  16. A link between donors, volunteers, staff & friends of Stanford Blood Center FALL / WINTER 2008 give blood volunteer donate money host a blood drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Hobee's, Palo Alto JJ&F, Palo Alto Stanford Floral Design, Palo Alto Message from the nursing staff for making our Canteen area more comfortable for donors: Andronico's, Los Altos Better Bagels, Mountain View the spectrum of the patient population. From young mothers with children to grandmothers, from a young college

  17. STANFORD, KIRK ALAN. Strengthening of Steel Structures with High Modulus Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) Materials: Bond and Development Length Study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT STANFORD, KIRK ALAN. Strengthening of Steel Structures with High Modulus Carbon Fiber. The current research program proposed the use of a new high modulus carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP-up of carbon fiber sheets and the adhesives for bonding of pre-cured laminate strips. The bond behavior of FRP

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus Nitrogen Synergism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

  19. Availability of Nitrous Nitrogen to Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Sterges, A. J.

    1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V, .=DL ULL LI~C a~ailability 01 ILILKLL~: IIILIU~~I~ LU curn, l~aa, 8011 31LY3 1 27.3 .53 .I447 1 I 1 5: 1250 .I349 ic nitrogen ( 37.P' 1 -59 1 .2195 ru.. nv / 36.6 .57 1 .2086 I -2141 1 .O7b/ I 1. gm. nitrous nitrogen 30.2 1 .64 1 .I933 1... .12 -.01 ' .09 V1 -- I w 01 ---- I ------ el M - 1 --O6 X * ---- ------ U1 $ !z - --- i d $ --- - I -20 2 Y * F - I M 4 M .34 I --- .20 M .14 5 nitrogen --- --- -.02 .14 -.48 -.01 -12 .18 .OS...

  20. Characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.A.; Latham, D.R.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from the separation and characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil samples were obtained. Two samples of Paraho shale oil were hydrotreated by Chevron Research Company such that one sample contained about 0.05 wt. percent nitrogen and the other sample contained about 0.10 wt. percent nitrogen. A separation method concentrate specific nitrogen compound types was developed. Characterization of the nitrogen types was accomplished by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, potentiometric titration, and elemental analysis. The distribution of nitrogen compound types in both samples and in the Paraho crude shale oil is compared.

  1. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complexes between nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, nitrous1992) Indoor ozone and nitrogen dioxide: A potential pathwaybed of SiO 2 pellets. Nitrogen dioxide is introduced from a

  2. Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millstein, Dev

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , (2008a). Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions fromstudy of indoor nitrogen dioxide levels and respiratoryand modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) concentrations. All

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic nitrogen cycle Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biological nitrogen fixation of gaseous nitrogen. The water cycle is important to ecosystem... and Nitrogen Cycles As ... Source: Barboza, Perry - Institute of Arctic Biology,...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - acquire organic nitrogen Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and microorganisms can die of nitrogen defi- ciency, surrounded... nitrogen. Nitrogen fertilizer is applied at planting to these legumes when grown on sandy or low organic......

  5. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, S.M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nitrogen mobilization and recycling in trees. Photosynthesisloci mapping for nitrogen recycling in rice. Journal ofNitrogen Assimilation and Recycling Stphanie M. Bernard 1

  6. Enzymatic solubilization of nitrogenous constituents of carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, James Cannon

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of enzyme concentration upon nitrogen so1ubi 1i zed in carrot tops ( 10g dry weight) . Conditions of assay: pH = 3. 5, i ncubati on time = 20 hr, incubation temperature = 45'C. 24 hydrolysis. These data confirm earlier reports that -. 01% is the pro... roots and tops, a concentration of 1. 0% A-12-C at pH 3. 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble ni trogenous consti tuents . For car~ot roots, a concentration of 1. 0/ ficin at pH 4, 5 provided the maximum increase in soluble nitrogen. With carrot...

  7. Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upadhyay, Jeetendra; Auvermann, Brent W.; Bush, K. Jack; Mukhtar, Saqib

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    together by one of nature?s strongest chemical bonds. As a result, converting dinitrogen to other forms of nitrogen requires a lot of energy to break that bond. Some natural processes that can break dinitrogen apart include lightning and nitrogen...- cultural Engi- neer; Research Technician II; Associate Profes- sor and Exten- sion Agricultural Engineer?Waste Management, The Texas A&M System E-464 02-08 J. K. Upadhyay, B. W. Auvermann, K. J. Bush, and S. Mukhtar* Texas AgriLife Extension...

  8. Biexciton emission from single isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen pairs in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamiya, Kengo; Fukushima, Toshiyuki; Yagi, Shuhei; Hijikata, Yasuto; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku , Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Katayama, Ryuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied photoluminescence (PL) from individual isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen (NN) pairs in GaAs. Sharp emission lines due to exciton and biexciton were observed from individual isoelectronic traps in nitrogen atomic-layer doped (ALD) GaAs. The binding energy of biexciton bound to individual isoelectronic traps was approximately 8 meV. Both the exciton and biexciton luminescence lines show completely random polarization and no fine-structure splitting. These results are desirable to the application to the quantum cryptography used in the field of quantum information technology.

  9. Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 SCIENCE Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapour, inert gases. On the basis of proton affinity, the major constituents of air and breath (nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide

  10. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

  11. First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a High-Performance Cathode for Li-S Batteries. First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a...

  12. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  13. Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream (1st Grade) Lesson Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    substance. Materials: 5 or more Liters of liquid nitrogen (gloves, goggles, and lab coat recommended the liquid nitrogen and safety gear you wear have fun with it!) 4. Mix heavy cream, half & half, and sugar

  14. Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air Cutting NOx from Diesel Engines with Membrane-Generated Nitrogen-Enriched Air 2005 Diesel Engine...

  15. Introduction Air Quality and Nitrogen Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Global update 2005. Primary sources of air pollutants include combustion products from power generationIntroduction Air Quality and Nitrogen Dioxide Air pollution can be defined as "the presence effects to man and/or the environment". (DEFRA) "Clean air is considered to be a basic requirement

  16. groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

  17. OXYGEN ADSORPTION ON NITROGEN CONTAINING CARBON SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    OXYGEN ADSORPTION ON NITROGEN CONTAINING CARBON SURFACES Alejandro Montoya, Jorge O. Gil, Fanor-rich site of the carbon basal plane of graphite and then, it dissociates into oxygen atoms.1,2 Oxygen atoms at the edge of the carbon surface can form covalent bonds with oxygen. These sites can chemisorb

  18. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor has been designed in order to retard the formation of nitrogen oxides by injection of reburning fuel. The design and the rebuilding of the new combustor was completed. Several new features were incorporated in the new design so that it would last longer. The design and construction of the furnace are discussed in this report. (VC)

  19. Evolutionary tradeoffs can select against nitrogen fixation and thereby maintain nitrogen limitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menge, Duncan

    . evolutionary ecology model Biological nitrogen (N) fixation--the conversion of atmo- spheric N2 gas) but is equally important to explaining the paradox of N limitation. Unlike the successional question

  20. Nitrogen limiation and nitrogen fixation during alkane biodegradation in a sandy soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toccalino, P.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Boone, D.R. (Oregon Graduate Institute of Science Technology, Portland, OR (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaking underground storage tanks are a significant source of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water. Hydrocarbon biodegradation studies have been conducted in both ground water and topsoil regions, but few studies have been done on the unsaturated zone between these two. This study examines the effects of Nitrogen on propane and butane biodegradiations in an unsaturated sandy soil. Results indicate that nitrogen additions initially stimulated both propane and butane oxidizing organisms in the soil, but that propane-amended soil became N limited whereas butane-amended soil eventually overcame its N limitations by fixing Nitrogen and that nitrogen fixing organisms grew in butane amended but not in propane amended soil. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Relation of Soil Nitrogen, Nitrification and Ammonification to Pot Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................ 6 Relation of the Crops to the Total Nitrogen of the Soil ........... 7 Relation of the Different Crops ................................. 8 Relation of Surface Soil to Subsoil ............................. 13 Acid Soils Compared with Non-Acid... of Production of Nitrates to the Results of the Pot Ex- periments ................................................ 21 Extensive Work ............................................ 24 Relation of Nitric Nitrogen to Nitrogen Removed by First Crop .... 24...

  2. QuestionQuestion How does nitrogen deposition affect roadside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    al. 2004. Concentrations of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at roadside verges, and their contributionQuestionQuestion How does nitrogen deposition affect roadside plant community composition? 1. Is there a gradient of nitrogen deposition to freeway verges from traffic exhaust? 2. Are there other sources of N

  3. Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and absolute contributions of nitric acid (HNO3) and NOx (nitric oxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2)) to totalTropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition, and Chemistry at Harvard Forest A thesis. Steven C. Wofsy Cassandra Volpe Horii Tropospheric Reactive Nitrogen Speciation, Deposition

  4. On-Road Emission Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    , nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrous acid (HONO) produced by internalOn-Road Emission Measurements of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds from Three California Cities G A R Y measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds from light-duty vehicles. At the San Jose and wLA sites

  5. Air Pollution XVI 247 Emissions of Nitrogen Dioxide from Modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Air Pollution XVI 247 Emissions of Nitrogen Dioxide from Modern Diesel Vehicles G.A. Bishop and D negative implications for local photochemical ozone production. Keywords: Nitrogen dioxide, automobile strategies, Lemaire [1] suggests that nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was forgotten as a separate component of the NOx

  6. Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Emily M.

    '' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

  7. Nitrogen use in switchgrass grown for bioenergy across the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Nitrogen use in switchgrass grown for bioenergy across the USA V.N. Owens a , D.R. Viands b , H Available online 17 August 2013 Keywords: Nitrogen removal Switchgrass Bioenergy Nitrogen use efficiency as a forage, conservation, and bioenergy crop [1e5]. It offers a number of distinct benefits including broad

  8. NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    temperature superconductor) power devices, such as HTS transformers, fault current limiters, and terminals power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath of subcooled liquid nitrogen system for an HTS transformer, operating at around 65 K. This system consists

  9. Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen ?-doping technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen ?-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen ?-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

  10. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  11. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the invention may be used to engineer organisms to overexpress wild-type or mutant P-PII regulatory protein. Engineered plants that overexpress or underexpress P-PII regulatory protein may have increased nitrogen assimilation capacity. Engineered organisms may be used to produce P-PII proteins which, in turn, can be used for a variety of purposes including in vitro screening of herbicides. P-PII nucleotide sequences have additional uses as probes for isolating additional genomic clones having the promoters of P-PII gene. P-PII promoters are light- and/or sucrose-inducible and may be advantageously used in genetic engineering of plants.

  12. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. (Tennessee Valley Authority (US)); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (US)); Cropp, J.W. (Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau, Chattanooga, TN (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  13. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and User ExecutiveCentralDepartment

  14. Selmer groups as flat cohomology groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?esnavi?ius, K?stutis

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a prime number p, Bloch and Kato showed how the p Selmer group of an abelian variety A over a number field K is determined by the p-adic Tate module. In general, the pm1-Selmer group Selpmn A need not be determined ...

  15. 1. Tsubono Group 1 1 Tsubono Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    optical fiber Test of the law of gravitation at extremely small distance references [1] Y. Aso, M. Ando1. Tsubono Group 1 1 Tsubono Group Research Subjects: Experimental Relativity, Gravitational Wave Physics, Laser Inter- ferometer Member: Kimio TSUBONO and Masaki ANDO The detection of gravitational waves

  16. QEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    and a framework that details timelines, leadership, resource allocation, and an assessment plan that is clearlyQEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group The topic of the QEP should fit should be supported by a thorough understanding of the institutional context and by assessment data

  17. Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description AHR Scholar-Architecture Scholar ART Honors - Architecture Honors H04 Honors - Allied Medical Prof Honors H05 Honors - Arts & Sciences Honors H14 Honors - Envir&Natural Resources Honors H15 Honors - Food, Agr, & Envir Sci Honors H16 Honors

  18. Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Grula

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

  19. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and User ExecutiveCentralDepartmentSynchrotron Radiation

  20. About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the batteries found in small electronic devices. Innovative Solar Cells A new process that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate...

  1. Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|Physics ResearchLCLS Sign RegisterSynchrotron

  2. STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    particle beams, and we look forward to interesting results on plasma focusing. Best personal regards

  3. Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grula, J W

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

  4. Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Wijmans, Johannes G.; Da Costa, Andre R.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using methane-selective membranes for the first stage and nitrogen-selective membranes for the second stage. The process enables the nitrogen content of the gas to be substantially reduced, without requiring the membranes to be operated at very low temperatures.

  5. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  6. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauterbach, Jochen (Newark, DE); Snively, Christopher M. (Clarks Summit, PA); Vijay, Rohit (Annandale, NJ); Hendershot, Reed (Breinigsville, PA); Feist, Ben (Newark, DE)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  7. Nitrogen Directed C-H Activation and Functionalization Stoltz Literature Group Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    -H Functionalization Chelation Assistance II. C-H/Olefin coupling III. C-H Carbonylation IV. Ru/Rh C-H Arylation V. Pd hydrocarbons, such as those found in gas and oil C HH HH H H H H H H C-H bond strengths . 105 kcal/mol 110 kcal)3 O Si(OEt)3 Murai, Nature. 1993, 366, 529. 93% Success of these reactions is attributed to chelation

  8. Nitrogen oxides emission trends in Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides from space provide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Chapter 5 Nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia Abstract Monthly emission estimates present first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric

  9. Nitrogen Deposition in the Southern High Plains Nitrogen is necessary for life on earth, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    . As a result, converting dinitrogen to other forms of nitrogen requires a lot of energy to break that bond from the air. Photosynthetic energy in plants and chemical energy in soil microorganisms also can originated from industrial fertilizer production since the early 1900s, when the Nobel Prize-winning German

  10. Increasing Price of Nitrogen Nitrogen fertilizer is often the largest contributor to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    events; the distribution of more than 5,700 publications; and access to web-based guidance on deep and associated costs. Since 2007, the importance of deep-soil testing for nitrogen management has been-sampling methods and procedures. Economic and Environmental Impact The economic impact of deep-soil testing

  11. Nitrogen-incorporation induced changes in the microstructure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the microstructure of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films. Abstract: Nitrogen doped tungsten oxide (WO3) films were grown by reactive magnetron sputter-deposition by varying the...

  12. Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a new technology with the potential to reduce operating costs and increase productivity in bar and flat-rolled products for the steel industry. Nitrogen Control in...

  13. Absorption of Foliar-Applied Nitrogen by Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wax, and nitrogen-15 absorption. Crop Science 37:807-811.water- deficit stress, and the absorption of foliar-appliedgrowth favorable for N absorption and translocation. Four

  14. Global Proteomics Reveal An Atypical Strategy for Carbon/Nitrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crucial to global oxygen production and worldwide carbon and nitrogen cycles. These microalgae are robust organisms capable carbon neutral biofuel production. Synechocystis sp....

  15. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAE Paper 750173, 1975. L. , Fifteenth Symposium Combustion,The Combustion Institute, International Pittsburgh, on 64.chemistry of products of combustion: nitrogenous The

  16. alter carbon nitrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen Physics Websites Summary: and for carbon sequestration (Jandl et al. 2007). Soil acidification and carbon sequestration are...

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical Biosensing. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical Biosensing. Abstract: Chemical doping with foreign...

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of...

  19. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call...

  1. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

  2. Long Term by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

  3. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  4. Hydrogen Analysis Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  5. Toward Institutional Sustainability: A Nitrogen Footprint for the Marine Biological Maggie Notopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    amounts of resources including electricity and food to maintain their daily activities. Food purchases of reactive nitrogen (Nr), all nitrogen compounds other than N2, associated with their use. Most of the Nr: Reactive Nitrogen, Nitrogen Footprint, Sustainability, Fertilizer, Nitrogen Uptake Factors, Virtual

  6. Continuous improvement in nitrogen rejection unit design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, J.V. [Process Systems International, Inc., Westborough, MA (United States); Maloney, J.J. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and fabrication of Nitrogen Rejection Units (NRU) has advanced considerably over the past 15 years. Improvements have been made in all aspects of producing an NRU plant and cold box. This paper presents the primary areas involved that have seen these improvements. (1) Process design: the two-column process has been superseded by an approach which utilizes multiple flash drums and one column. This leads to a smaller and lower cost cold box. With low nitrogen content feeds, the prefractionater recovers half the methane as a high pressure residue gas and reduces the cold box size. (2) Mechanical Design: improved software enables the design process to be more accurate, eliminate piping and equipment interferences, reduce the size of the box and save design time. (3) Manufacturing: the interfacing of the 3D software design tools and the manufacturing process enables the shop floor personnel to reduce the manufacturing time by 10%. All of these individual improvements have reduced the real cost of an NRU substantially over the past 15 years.

  7. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  8. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  9. Stanford. Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y R e s e a r c h

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    t o Dr. Giancarlo E. F a c c a , a n e a r l y pioneer i n the field of geothermal energy, whoStanford. Geothermal Program I n t e r d i s c i p l i n a r y R e s e a r c h i n E n g i n e e r o r n i a .... A PHYSICAL MODEL OF A GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM --ITS DESI3N AND CONSTRUCTION AND ITS

  10. How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great Britain's forests? Protecting our forests from pollutant deposition is and has been a topical issue for some time. Nitrogen, as well as being an essential nutrient for trees, is one of the most important of these pollutants. This article

  11. Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance Stephanie L for supercapacitor applications. Surface modification increases the amount of nitrogen by four times when compared elements in highly porous carbon used for electric double-layer supercapacitors.1 These elements modify

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics of Temperate and Subarctic Heath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics of Temperate and Subarctic Heath Ecosystems with Emphasis on Cold-season cycling of carbon and nitrogen in temperate and subarctic heath ecosystems. Over the last three years, I spend many hours introducing me to modeling carbon exchange, thank you. Also thanks to Karina Clemmensen

  13. Nitrogen Dynamics in Sandy Freshwater Sediments (Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of added 15NH4 + from lake water passing over dark sediment cores. Sediment-water fluxes of nitrogen at the sediment- water interface is derived from ammonium pro- duced from organic matter mineralization in surface ABSTRACT. Sediment-water nitrogen fluxes and transformations were examined at two sites in Sagi- naw Bay

  14. Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

  15. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aulich, Ted R. (Grand Forks, ND); Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Jiang, Junhua (Grand Forks, ND)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia, at low temperature and pressure, preferably at ambient temperature and pressure, utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen or hydrogen equivalent. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source or a hydrogen equivalent such as carbon monoxide or a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be aqueous, non-aqueous, or solid.

  16. Ecological Modelling 192 (2006) 143159 Nitrogen transformation and transport modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    model; Transformation; Transport; Nitrification; Denitrification; RT3D 1. Introduction Nitrogen of this paper are to develop a nitro- gen transport and transformation model for saturated groundwater systemsEcological Modelling 192 (2006) 143­159 Nitrogen transformation and transport modeling

  17. Nitrogen Loading and Attenuation in the West Falmouth Harbor Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    in nitrogen loading due to the opening of the wastewater treatment plant and increased septic inputs Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and septic tanks arrive in the form of plumes of higher nitrogen. The treatment plant provides secondary treatment to the incoming wastewater but is not designed to provide

  18. Quantum optics with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yiwen Chu; Mikhail D. Lukin

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the electronic level structure of the nitrogen-vacancy in diamond and some common experimental techniques to study its optical properties at low temperatures. We then summarize several recent experiments and advances in using nitrogen-vacancy centers for quantum optics.

  19. GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BARRETT, CIAN ADAMS, NICOLE BARTON, MICHAEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA ANDERSON FITZSIMONS, DENISEBINCHY, SUSAN CARLEY, JESSE CONWAY, AILBHE BROOKE, HENRY CONLAN, DEIRDRE, CAOIMHE HESKIN, CLODAGH MC GOVERN, MARIE-CLAIREMURRAY, AINE GROGAN, CLARE GERARD, ALLISON MC QUAID, RACHEL

  20. Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

  1. Effects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal plant disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    . Keywords: biodiversity, ecosystem, elevated carbon dioxide, nitrogen enrichment, parasites, plant pathogensEffects of elevated CO2 , nitrogen deposition, and decreased species diversity on foliar fungal Three components of global change, elevated CO2 , nitrogen addition, and decreased plant species

  2. Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant richness

  3. 6/4/2013 Page 1 of 12 Nitrogen Dioxide SOP Standard Operating Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    6/4/2013 Page 1 of 12 Nitrogen Dioxide SOP Standard Operating Procedures Nitrogen Dioxide and Nitric Oxide Print a copy and insert into your laboratory the precautions and safe handling procedures for the use of Nitrogen Dioxide

  4. Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant enrichment, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant

  5. Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates #12 Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission es- timates / by Bas Subject headings: satellite retrieval / nitrogen dioxide / ozone / air pollution / emis- sion estimates

  6. Eddy-covariance observations of the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of nitrogen oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Kyung-Eun

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Kesselmeier, J. : Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) uptake byM. : Leaf uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in a tropicalMorikawa, H. : Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide gas is a plant

  7. Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

  8. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) nitrogen trailers propane tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.

    1998-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is the evaluation and authorization of the onsite transport of propane tanks that are mounted on the Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Characterization Project`s nitrogen trailers. This SEP authorizes onsite transport of the nitrogen trailers, including the propane tanks, until May 31, 1998. The three nitrogen trailers (HO-64-4966, HO-64-4968, and HO-64-5170) are rated for 1,361 kg (30,000 lb) and are equipped with tandem axles and pintel hitches. Permanently mounted on each trailer is a 5,678 L (1,500 gal) cryogenic dewar that is filled with nitrogen, and a propane fired water bath vaporizer system, and a 454 L (1 20 gal) propane tank. The nitrogen trailer system is operated only when it is disconnected from the tow vehicle and is leveled and stabilized. When the trailers are transported, the propane tanks are isolated via closed supply valves.

  9. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

  10. Nitrogen doped zinc oxide thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Sonny X.

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To summarize, polycrystalline ZnO thin films were grown by reactive sputtering. Nitrogen was introduced into the films by reactive sputtering in an NO{sub 2} plasma or by N{sup +} implantation. All ZnO films grown show n-type conductivity. In unintentionally doped ZnO films, the n-type conductivities are attributed to Zn{sub i}, a native shallow donor. In NO{sub 2}-grown ZnO films, the n-type conductivity is attributed to (N{sub 2}){sub O}, a shallow double donor. In NO{sub 2}-grown ZnO films, 0.3 atomic % nitrogen was found to exist in the form of N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}. Upon annealing, N{sub 2}O decomposes into N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In furnace-annealed samples N{sub 2} redistributes diffusively and forms gaseous N{sub 2} bubbles in the films. Unintentionally doped ZnO films were grown at different oxygen partial pressures. Zni was found to form even at oxygen-rich condition and led to n-type conductivity. N{sup +} implantation into unintentionally doped ZnO film deteriorates the crystallinity and optical properties and leads to higher electron concentration. The free electrons in the implanted films are attributed to the defects introduced by implantation and formation of (N{sub 2}){sub O} and Zni. Although today there is still no reliable means to produce good quality, stable p-type ZnO material, ZnO remains an attractive material with potential for high performance short wavelength optoelectronic devices. One may argue that gallium nitride was in a similar situation a decade ago. Although we did not obtain any p-type conductivity, we hope our research will provide a valuable reference to the literature.

  11. A Second Poincare' Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Aldrovandi; J. G. Pereira

    1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of the sourceless Einstein's equation with weak and strong cosmological constants are discussed by using In\\"on\\"u-Wigner contractions of the de Sitter groups and spaces. The more usual case corresponds to a weak cosmological-constant limit, in which the de Sitter groups are contracted to the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to the Minkowski space. In the strong cosmological-constant limit, however, the de Sitter groups are contracted to another group which has the same abstract Lie algebra of the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to a 4-dimensional cone-space of infinite scalar curvature, but vanishing Riemann and Ricci curvature tensors. In such space, the special conformal transformations act transitively, and the equivalence between inertial frames is that of special relativity.

  12. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

  13. Response of photosynthesis and nitrogen nutrition in Juglans nigra L. with different nitrogen fertilizers Michael Nicodemus and Douglass F. Jacobs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response of photosynthesis and nitrogen nutrition in Juglans nigra L. with different nitrogen INTRODUCTION N fertilization has been shown to positively affect photosynthesis in most studies N fertilization and photosynthesis is largely due to ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase (RUBISCO

  14. Tribal Topic Group Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Caucus created a mission statement and resolution: - All Tribes with cultural ties to Yucca Mountain should be invited to join TEC - Ongoing funds to support Tribal Topic Group...

  15. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA...

  16. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  17. Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitrogen dioxide based on a widely tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitrogen dioxide based on a widely tunable external cavity quantum: Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy, external-cavity quantum cascade laser, nitrogen dioxide, trace

  18. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High Performance Supercapacitors. In Situ One-Step Synthesis of Hierarchical Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon for High...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - accessible critical nitrogen Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air & Waste Summary: for concentrations and isotopes to avoid storage artifacts. Bucket collection has been criticized because nitrogen... Matter and Nitrogen Isotopic...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nitrogen loads Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and in the water running down tree trunks. We investigated how nitrogen pollution affected which... how well the species could recover from high levels of nitrogen exposure....

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - affect additional nitrogen Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nitrate solution to determine what happened to the nitrogen and how the deposition affected... on a range of key microbial activities. The nitrogen additions decreased the rate...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-induced atmospheric nitrogen Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and in the water running down tree trunks. We investigated how nitrogen pollution affected which... how well the species could recover from high levels of nitrogen exposure....

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic nitrogen fixation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Mathematics 85 Nitrogen isotope dynamics of the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Robert C. Thunell,1 Summary: . In recent budgets of oceanic fixed nitrogen, N2...

  4. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hennessey, John (President, Stanford University)

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  5. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

  6. Group Accident Insurance Certificate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Group Accident Insurance Certificate Regents of the University of New Mexico #12;#12;Life Insurance Company GROUP ACCIDENT CERTIFICATE THIS CERTIFICATE PROVIDES LIMITED COVERAGE. PLEASE READ YOUR. THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED UNDER AN ACCIDENT ONLY POLICY. IT DOES NOT PAY BENEFITS FOR LOSS CAUSED BY SICKNESS. GA

  7. Release of fuel-bound nitrogen during biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; Masutani, S.M.; Ishimura, D.M.; Turn, S.Q.; Kinoshita, C.M.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of four biomass feedstocks (leucaena, sawdust, bagasse, and banagrass) with significantly different fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) content was investigated to determine the effects of operational parameters and nitrogen content of biomass on the partitioning of FBN among nitrogenous gas species. Experiments were performed using a bench-scale, indirectly heated, fluidized-bed gasifier. Data were obtained over a range of temperatures and equivalence ratios representative of commercial biomass gasification processes. An assay of all major nitrogenous components in the gasification products was performed for the first time, providing a clear accounting of the evolution of FBN. Important findings of this research include the following: (1) NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} are the dominant species evolved from fuel nitrogen during biomass gasification; >90% of FBN in feedstock is converted to NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}; (2) relative levels of NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2} are determined by thermochemical reactions in the gasifier; these reactions are affected strongly by temperature; (3) N{sub 2} appears to be primarily produced through the conversion of NH{sub 3} in the gas phase; (4) the structural formula and content of fuel nitrogen in biomass feedstock significantly affect the formation and evolution of nitrogen species during biomass gasification.

  8. Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group | Focus Group Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000 Rev.Group Members Sabina Aponte,

  9. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  10. Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

  11. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

  12. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses in infants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen dioxide is an oxidant gas that contaminates outdoor air and indoor air in homes with unvented gas appliances. A prospective cohort study was carried out to test the hypothesis that residential exposure to NO2 increases incidence and severity of respiratory illnesses during the first 18 months of life. A cohort of 1,205 healthy infants from homes without smokers was enrolled. The daily occurrence of respiratory symptoms and illnesses was reported by the mothers every 2 wk. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as lower respiratory tract. Indoor NO2 concentrations were serially measured with passive samplers place in the subjects' bedrooms. In stratified analyses, illness incidence rates did not consistently increase with exposure to NO2 or stove type. In multivariate analyses that adjusted for potential confounding factors, odds ratios were not significantly elevated for current or lagged NO2 exposures, or stove type. Illness duration, a measure of illness severity, was not associated with NO2 exposure. The findings can be extended to homes with gas stoves in regions of the United States where the outdoor air is not heavily polluted by NO2.

  13. Electric Vehicle Research Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    .................................................................................9 From diesel to electric: a new era in personnel transport for underground coal minesElectric Vehicle Research Group Annual Report 2012 #12;Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................8 C2-25 Electric Vehicle Drivetrain

  14. Prochlorococcus genetic transformation and genomics of nitrogen metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolonen, Andrew Carl

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prochlorococcus, a unicellular cyanobacterium, is the most abundant phytoplankton in the oligotrophic, oceanic gyres where major plant nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are at nanomolar concentrations. ...

  15. The nitrogen cycle and ecohydrology of seasonally dry grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parolari, Anthony Joseph

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes and, specifically, the organization of ecosystem traits with the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles. Observations from a factorial irrigation- ...

  16. Solid Nitrogen at Extreme Conditions of High Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, A; Gregoryanz, E

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the phase diagram of nitrogen in a wide pressure and temperature range. Recent optical and x-ray diffraction studies at pressures up to 300 GPa and temperatures in excess of 1000 K have provided a wealth of information on the transformation of molecular nitrogen to a nonmolecular (polymeric) semiconducting and two new molecular phases. These newly found phases have very large stability (metastability) range. Moreover, two new molecular phases have considerably different orientational order from the previously known phases. In the iota phase (unlike most of other known molecular phases), N{sub 2} molecules are orientationally equivalent. The nitrogen molecules in the theta phase might be associated into larger aggregates, which is in line with theoretical predictions on polyatomic nitrogen.

  17. Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Diane J.

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF[subscript 3]) has potential to make a growing contribution to the Earths radiative budget; however, our understanding of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited. Based on a ...

  18. Spin properties of very shallow nitrogen vacancy defects in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Okai, Benjamin Kwasi

    We investigate spin and optical properties of individual nitrogen vacancy centers located within 110 nm from the diamond surface. We observe stable defects with a characteristic optically detected magnetic-resonance ...

  19. Variable energy positron measurements at nitrogen ion bombarded steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, G.; Kolitsch, A. [Research Centre Rossendorf, Inc., Dresden (Germany); Schut, H.; Veen, A. van [TU Delft (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen ion bombardment of steel samples has been studied by utilizing the Delft variable energy positron beam facility. The energy of the beam was varied between 250 eV and 25 keV and a line-shape parameter S describing the annihilation radiation has been measured. By use of the VEPFIT fitting program, up to five different layers, each having different densities, could be identified and characterized. The results show that carbon layers deposited during nitrogen implantation can be observed. A relation between the measured depth profiles of nitrogen, carbon and oxygen by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and the results of positron annihilation is given and discussed. The wear and friction properties of the steel surfaces before and after nitrogen implantation are presented.

  20. An experimental investigation of nitrogen gas produced during...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD Peacock, M Oostrom, and TW Wietsma.2007."An experimental investigation of nitrogen gas produced during denitrification."Ground Water 45(4):461-467. Authors: JD Istok MM Park AD...

  1. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McCluskey, M.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Tarun, M.C. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Iqbal, M. Zafar [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations [Lyons, Janotti, and Van de Walle, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 252105 (2009)] indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. The deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  2. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun [Hong Ik University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Kun Hyung [Korea Gas Corporation, Incheon, 406-130 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  3. atomic nitrogen doping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chris Greene 3:30 - 3:50 Nick Brewer, Wisconsin, Left-handed electromagnetic waves in rare-earth doped Kemner, Ken 154 4, 26412665, 2007 Nitrogen retention Physics Websites...

  4. The relationship between iron and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium spp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Phoebe Dreux

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trichodesmium spp. are considered the dominant nitrogen (N) fixing cyanobacteria in tropical and subtropical oceans, regimes frequently characterized by low iron (Fe). Limited information exists about what levels of Fe ...

  5. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  6. anthropogenous nitrogen deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F. J. Mazac Jr. 1,3 , R. L. Jahn 3 and J. R. Stapper 3 1 Department of Soil...- 9, 2004, San Antonio, TX. (In press). Gerwing, J. Soil test to save nitrogen costs. The Corn &...

  7. anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F. J. Mazac Jr. 1,3 , R. L. Jahn 3 and J. R. Stapper 3 1 Department of Soil...- 9, 2004, San Antonio, TX. (In press). Gerwing, J. Soil test to save nitrogen costs. The Corn &...

  8. The nitrogen specific uptake of three strains of Prochlorococcus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Eli

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Nitrogen uptake of Prochlorococcus under a range of light conditions was investigated. Strains of Prochlorococcus isolated from three locations were used: Mediterranean Sea (CCMP 1378), Sargasso Sea (CCMP 1375), and Pacific Ocean (H36-16). Cultures grown...

  9. Mapping the location and configuration of nitrogen in diamond nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, A. S.; Sternberg, M.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Oxford

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how impurities such as nitrogen are included in diamond nanoparticles is expected to be important for use in future nanodevices, such as qubits for quantum computing. Most commercial diamond nanoparticles contain approximately 2-3% nitrogen, but it is difficult to determine experimentally whether it is located within the core or at the surface of the nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration and potential energy surface of substitutional nitrogen in diamond nanoparticles, directly comparing results of different sizes, shapes and surface chemistry. The results predict that nitrogen is metastable within the core of both hydrogenated and dehydrogenated particles, but that the binding energy, coordination and preferred location is dependent upon the structure of the nanoparticle as a whole.

  10. Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane separation process combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment.

  11. Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, K.

    1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane separation process is described which is combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C{sub +2} hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment. 10 figs.

  12. Determination of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in high purity magnesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roche, Neil Gerard

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF CARBON, NITROGEN, AND OXYGEN IN HIGH PURITY MAGNESIUM A Thesis by NEIL GERARD ROCHE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial i'ulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1981 Major Subject: Chemistry DETERMINATION OF CARBON, NITROGEN, AND OXYGEN IN HIGH PURITY MAGNESIUM A Thesis by NEIL GERARD ROCHE Approved as to style and content by: E. A. Schweikert (Chairman of Committee) G. J. Bastiaans (Member) L...

  13. Reactions of nitrogen heterocycle-organolithium intermediates with lead halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jerry Neal

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACTIONS OF NITROGEN HETEROCYCLE- ORGANOLITHIUM INTERMEDIATES WITH LEAD HALIDES A Thesis by JERRY HEAL KINNEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree ot MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1970 Major Subject: Chemistry REACTIONS OF NITROGEN HETEROCYCLE- ORGANOLITHIUM INTERMEDIATES WITH LFAD HALIDES A Thesis JERRY NEAL KINNEY Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi ee) (Head of Department) (Member...

  14. Assessment of soil nitrogen oxides emissions and implementation in LOTOS-EUROS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    the formation and transport of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, particulate matter and other species throughout EuropeAssessment of soil nitrogen oxides emissions and implementation in LOTOS-EUROS Date 18 March 2013, climate and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen availability is in turn determined by N-deposition from

  15. Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, J A

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

  16. Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 27792787 First detection of nitrogen from NOx in tree rings: a 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abies; Air pollution; Dendroecology; Nitrogen deposition; Stable isotopes; Nitrogen dioxide 1Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 2779­2787 First detection of nitrogen from NOx in tree rings 2004; accepted 27 February 2004 Abstract Nitrogen isotope analysis (d15 N) of tree rings is potentially

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LLC 2019-06-06 ADVANCED MATERIALS RESEARCH CTR MEXICO 2018-05-14 AGENCIA ESTATAL CSIC SPAIN 2017-10-17 AIST NATIONAL METROLOGY INSTITUTE OF JAP 2020-01-05 AIST-ELECTRONICS &...

  18. Gio Wiederhold Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederhold, Gio

    , selection of partic­ ipants, and randomization of treatments. Such controls are absent in data mining. Data linkages, but that discovery also depends on human recognition of unexpected phenomena. Such discoveries are significant factors. Careful clinical 1 #12; trials try to eliminate such bias by careful study design

  19. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the continuous generating capacity of binary-cycle, medium-enthalpy geothermal power with solar thermal technology. SOURCE: Laura Garchar Characterizing and Predicting Resource...

  20. Construction New Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Mark

    Stadium Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center Peterson (550) d.school 610 570 560 CERAS Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower Owen Bolivar House Haas Center Galvez

  1. Jure Leskovec Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    contents Textual, Multimedia (image, videos, etc.) Billions of connections Behaviors, preferences, Not Authenticated 8/21/2011 Jure Leskovec:Social Media Analytics (KDD '11 tutorial) 7 #12; Consumer Brand Analytics What are people saying about our brand? Marketing Communications Significant spending on marketing

  2. PULSE at Stanford University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Para buscarBurbank,Nita5 STAT.PUBLIC

  3. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1 Special Report: OAS-RA-14-01Awards | DepartmentLaura

  4. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1 Special Report: OAS-RA-14-01Awards | DepartmentLauraJay

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|Crystal Structure and Functional

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|Crystal Structure and FunctionalThe

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|Crystal Structure and

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|Crystal Structure andBotulinum

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|Crystal Structure

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|CrystalClosingElement-Specific

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I.|CrystalClosingElement-SpecificX-rays

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions Hop in Superionic

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions Hop in SuperionicEnzyme

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions Hop in

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions Hop inStructure of the

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions Hop

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions HopBL7-2 XRD Rapid Access

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions HopBL7-2 XRD Rapid

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 ByWatching Ions HopBL7-2 XRD RapidSSRL

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy Sciences (BES)Standards

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy Sciences

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy SciencesAdvance notification of

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy SciencesAdvance notification

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy SciencesAdvance notificationSSRL

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy SciencesAdvance

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff Basic Energy SciencesAdvanceAccess to High

  12. Measurement of nitrogen content in a gas mixture by transforming the nitrogen into a substance detectable with nondispersive infrared detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Miller, Michael A. (San Antonio, TX)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining the amount of nitrogen in a gas mixture. The constituent gases of the mixture are dissociated and transformed to create a substance that may measured using nondispersive infrared adsorption techniques.

  13. Finite group symmetry breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gaeta

    2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite group symmetry is commonplace in Physics, in particular through crystallographic groups occurring in condensed matter physics -- but also through the inversions (C,P,T and their combinations) occurring in high energy physics and field theory. The breaking of finite groups symmetry has thus been thoroughly studied, and general approaches exist to investigate it. In Landau theory, the state of a system is described by a finite dimensional variable (the {\\it order parameter}), and physical states correspond to minima of a potential, invariant under a group. In this article we describe the basics of symmetry breaking analysis for systems described by a symmetric polynomial; in particular we discuss generic symmetry breakings, i.e. those determined by the symmetry properties themselves and independent on the details of the polynomial describing a concrete system. We also discuss how the plethora of invariant polynomials can be to some extent reduced by means of changes of coordinates, i.e. how one can reduce to consider certain types of polynomials with no loss of generality. Finally, we will give some indications on extension of this theory, i.e. on how one deals with symmetry breakings for more general groups and/or more general physical systems.

  14. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  15. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  16. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u [Open University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  17. Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Byung Il

    Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH J.H . Park et al. #12;'s of FeinCsm e tal The chargeandorbitalordering geom etryin YB a C o 2 O 5 S. K. Kwon etal .Magnetism Theory

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup October 11, 2007 More...

  20. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  1. Statistical investigations on nitrogen-vacancy center creation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonov, D., E-mail: d.antonov@physik.uni-stuttgart.de; Huermann, T.; Aird, A.; Wrachtrup, J. [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [3. Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Roth, J.; Trebin, H.-R. [Institut fr Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universitt Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut fr Theoretische und Angewandte Physik, Universitt Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Mller, C.; McGuinness, L.; Jelezko, F. [Institut fr Quantenoptik, Universitt Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)] [Institut fr Quantenoptik, Universitt Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Isoya, J. [Graduate School of Library, Information and Media Studies, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8550 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Library, Information and Media Studies, University of Tsukuba, 1-2 Kasuga, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8550 (Japan); Pezzagna, S.; Meijer, J. [Institut fr Experimentelle Physik II, Linnstrasse 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)] [Institut fr Experimentelle Physik II, Linnstrasse 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum information technologies require networks of interacting defect bits. Color centers, especially the nitrogen vacancy (NV{sup ?}) center in diamond, represent one promising avenue, toward the realisation of such devices. The most successful technique for creating NV{sup ?} in diamond is ion implantation followed by annealing. Previous experiments have shown that shallow nitrogen implantation (<10?keV) results in NV{sup ?} centers with a yield of 0.01%0.1%. We investigate the influence of channeling effects during shallow implantation and statistical diffusion of vacancies using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Energy barriers for the diffusion process were calculated using density functional theory. Our simulations show that 25% of the implanted nitrogens form a NV center, which is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  2. Direct visualization of atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Geng; Lu, Jianchen; Du, Shixuan, E-mail: sxdu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: feng@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Gao, Hong-Jun [Institute of Physics and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Xiao [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Berger, Reinhard; Feng, Xinliang, E-mail: sxdu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: feng@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Mllen, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated atomically precise nitrogen-doped chevron-type graphene nanoribbons by using the on-surface synthesis technique combined with the nitrogen substitution of the precursors. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy indicate that the well-defined nanoribbons tend to align with the neighbors side-by-side with a band gap of 1.02?eV, which is in good agreement with the density functional theory calculation result. The influence of the high precursor coverage on the quality of the nanoribbons is also studied. We find that graphene nanoribbons with sufficient aspect ratios can only be fabricated at sub-monolayer precursor coverage. This work provides a way to construct atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons.

  3. Humic substances and nitrogen-containing compounds from low rank brown coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demirbas, A.; Kar, Y.; Deveci, H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is one of the sources of nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs). Recovery of NCCs from brown coals in high yield was carried out from tars of stepwise semicoking of brown coals. Humic acids have been shown to contain many types of nitrogen compounds. Humic acids are thought to be complex aromatic macromolecules with amino acids, amino sugars, peptides, and aliphatic compounds that are involved in the linkages between the aromatic groups. Humic acids extracted from peats, brown coals, and lignites, are characterized using different techniques. Humic substances (HSs) have several known benefits to agriculture. The properties of humic substances vary from source to source, because they are heterogeneous mixtures of biochemical degradation products from plant and animal residues, and synthesis activities of microorganisms. HSs have been considered to be a significant floculant in surface water filtration plants for the production of drinking water as well as the processing of water. HSs are produced from chemical and biological degradation of plant and animal residues and from synthetic activities of microorganisms.

  4. Personality and group interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hair, Elizabeth Catherine

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that "prize Chips will be awarded equally to each person in the group based on the total number of blocks still standing in the tower at the end of the 15 seconds". b) In the contrient condition, subjects were told that "Prize Chips will be awarded only... to the individual with the most blocks still standing in the tower at the end of the 15 seconds. If there are any ties in terms of the number blocks on the tower and there is no clear winner, then no prize chips will be distributed". 6. Only one tower may...

  5. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations During theALSSafetyCommunications Group

  6. Relation of the Total Nitrogen of the Soil to its Needs as Shown in Pot Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DSorghum 32.2 19091122 H ag ensp o rt loam ___ C om 18.0 24.3 1908 D1127 H o u s to n c lay __________ C om 27.8 39.3 1908 D1580 H ou s ton b lack c lay loamH ou s ton b lack c lay -------Denison clay lo am ____ M usta rd 6.2 ???? 1908 D1599 M... rangeburg clay C omM usta rd 9.74.5 47.9)5.0 0.58 .0563 19111909 DDSC ora 15.0 43.0 1910 DD A verage ___ 10.96 17.98A verage (5)-------------- 0.57 .0991 - 13- TABLE 4.?Group 7. 0.121? .14% TOTAL NITROGEN. L a b o ra ?to ry N o. H o u s to n b lack...

  7. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  8. Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

  9. Technical Data Sheet: TDS 15 DIFRAM100: RAPID AIR MONITOR -NITROGEN DIOXIDE (NO2).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Technical Data Sheet: TDS 15 DIFRAM100: RAPID AIR MONITOR - NITROGEN DIOXIDE (NO2). Description: A plastic (H.D.P.E.) circular diffusive sampler containing a sorbent for measuring gaseous nitrogen dioxide

  10. Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During: Layachi S, Rogerieux F, Robidel F, Lacroix G, Bayat S (2012) Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon

  11. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Terra Nitrogen Company saved 497,000 MMBtu and 3.5 million yearly after upgrading the steam system in its ammonia plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.:...

  12. Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements Tim Arnolda,1's radiative budget; however, our understand- ing of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited together with an atmo- spheric model and inverse method, we estimate that the global emissions of NF3

  13. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  14. Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson USDA-Forest Service, NCFES, Rhinelander, WI, U.S.A. Introduction Growth of trees and all plants depends up- on maintaining a positive carbon balance despite to multiple environ- mental stresses (Chapin et aL, 1987; Osmond et al., 1987). Light, carbon, water

  15. Surface morphology of atomic nitrogen on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Zhu; Trenary, Michael, E-mail: mtrenary@uic.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 West Taylor Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 West Taylor Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Jin Yang, Hyun [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Kim, Yousoo, E-mail: ykim@riken.jp [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface morphology of chemisorbed N on the Pt(111) surface has been studied at the atomic level with low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When N is coadsorbed with O on the surface, they form a mixed (2 2)-N+O structure. When the surface is covered with N atoms only, isolated atoms and incomplete (2 2) patches are observed at low coverages. In a dense N layer, two phases, (?3 ?3)R30-N and p(2 2)-N, are found to coexist at temperatures between 360 and 400 K. The (?3 ?3)R30 phase converts to the (2 2) phase as temperature increases. For both phases, nitrogen occupies fcc-hollow sites. At temperatures above 420 K, nitrogen starts to desorb. The p(2 2)-N phase shows a honeycomb structure in STM images with three nitrogen and three platinum atoms forming a six-membered ring, which can be attributed to the strong nitrogen binding to the underlying Pt surface.

  16. Original article Effect of abomasal infusion of aspartate on nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effect of abomasal infusion of aspartate on nitrogen balance and plasma amino) Abstract - We investigated the effect of abomasally infused aspartate (Asp) on N balance and plasma amino infusions of water or water containing 40 or 80 g Asp/d. Steers were fed twice daily a diet containing 473 g

  17. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forest Colleen2 Ecological Society of America, 2008 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;+ [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] + C and N storage in biomass #12;+ Net primary production

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /nutrient ratios, pH and nutrient contents according to the tree species (Vesterdal and Raulund-Rasmussen 1998ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract · Background Among forest management practices, forest tree

  19. RIS-M-2230 THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF NITROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    viscosity Liquid enthalpy density heat capacity - conductivity dynamic viscosity Surface tension Conven Temperature Pressure Latent heat of evaporation Gas enthalpy density - heat capacity conductivity - dynamic of nitrogen liquid and gas (1 to 6 bar) are presented. The approximations are polynomials worked out

  20. Recirculating Liquid Nitrogen System for Operation of Cryogenic Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    is provided by a LN2-cooled radiation shroud, which reduces the radiative heat load on the cryosail. Since Engineering, Mitchell.Walker@ae.gatech.edu #12;2 nitrogen shroud, the heat transfer calculated by Eqn. (1 operating temperature. This is seen notionally by equation 1: Eqn. (1) where Q is the rate of heat transfer