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1

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

2

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

3

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

4

Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Networking Group Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group Manager (650) 926-2901 | email Jerry Camuso SSRL Computer and Networking (650) 926-2994 | email Networking Support The Networking group provides connectivity and communications services for SSRL. The services provided by the Networking Support Group include: Local Area Network support for cable and wireless connectivity. Installation and maintenance of network printers and queues. Telephony installations and support. Printing Support The Networking group provides printer maintenance and support for SSRL Beamline Printers and plotters. The following models are supported: HP - Designjet large format plotters HP - Color and B/W Laserjet, Inkjet, Deskjet, Officejet

5

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mesdi Systems Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and other high precision products that will improve their performance and lifetime with advanced coatings and quality control. Learn More Navillum Nanotechnologies University of Utah Navillum Nanotechnologies developed a process to fabricate quantum dots and other types of semiconducting nanocrystals. When used in liquid crystal displays (LCD), quantum dots improve energy efficiency by up to 35 percent and in solar panels can increase efficiency up to 45 percent. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high-performing nanomaterials for gas storage and

6

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high-performing nanomaterials for gas storage and separation applications. NuMat has developed materials that will fundamentally change the economics of gas storage in natural gas vehicles - supporting the gradual displacement of foreign oil. Learn More Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing

7

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Radiator Labs Columbia University Radiator Labs developed a low-cost, easily installed radiator retrofit that converts radiator heating systems into a controlled-zoned system, which significantly increases the efficiency of radiator heating while improving occupant comfort. Learn More Navillum Nanotechnologies University of Utah Navillum Nanotechnologies developed a process to fabricate quantum dots and other types of semiconducting nanocrystals. When used in liquid crystal displays (LCD), quantum dots improve energy efficiency by up to 35 percent and in solar panels can increase efficiency up to 45 percent. Learn More Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and other high precision products that

8

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

materials that will fundamentally change the economics of gas storage in natural gas vehicles - supporting the gradual displacement of foreign oil. Learn More Mesdi...

9

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

applications. NuMat has developed materials that will fundamentally change the economics of gas storage in natural gas vehicles - supporting the gradual displacement of foreign oil...

10

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content Skip to search content Skip to search SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource An Office of Science User Facility Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News SSRL News and Events Science Highlights Press Releases SSRL Newsletter Photon Science Seminars SSRL Presents User Resources User Resources User Portal Schedules Deadlines Forms & Applications Beam Lines Beam Lines Map By Number By Technique Photon Source Parameters SPEAR3 Status Science at SSRL Science at SSRL Science Highlights Photon Science Faculty SSRL Imaging Group SSRL SMB Program Publications Publications & Reports SSRL Headline News SSRL Fact Sheet SSRL Brochure SLAC Discovery Brochure SPEAR3 SPEAR3

11

Stanford University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Prof. Wendy Mao create amorphous diamond Stanford University Dept. of Sustainability and Energy Management Stanford School of Engineering San Francisco, bordered by the Bay and...

12

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. E- mail: manchoso@cs.stanford.edu. Department of Management Science and...

13

Stanford Geothermal Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

R. Horn

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Content Owner: Lisa Dunn |...

15

PULSE at Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging...

16

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

17

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-926-4100 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SSRL Facility Research Associate for Small Angle X-ray Scattering The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has) program. This position has a component (roughly 50%) that involves beam line development at SSRL

Ford, James

18

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 CONVERTING GEOTHERMAL PLAYS TO PROJECTS and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia e

Stanford University

19

Stanford, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford, California: Energy Resources Stanford, California: Energy Resources (Redirected from Stanford, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.424106°, -122.1660756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.424106,"lon":-122.1660756,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Name Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Name Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light shines brilliantly these days at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)". The Secretary of Energy sent these words to be conveyed at the formal opening of...

23

Team | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Team Research team: John R. Bargar (SLAC), Research manager and co-principle investigator, bargar@slac.stanford.edu Scott Fendorf (Stanford), co-principle investigator, fendorf@stanford.edu Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford), gordon.brown@stanford.edu Sharon Bone (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Noémie Janot (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Morris Jones (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Collaborators: D.S. Alessi (University of Alberta) R. Bernier-Latmani (EPFL) J.A. Davis (LBNL) J. Dynes (Canadian Light Source) P.A. Fox (LBNL) E. Herndon (Kent State) D.E. Giammar (WUStL) D.E. Graham (ORNL) B. Gu (ORNL) E. Ilton (PNNL) L. Liang (ORNL) P.E. Long (LBNL) B. Mann (ORNL) P.S. Nico (LBNL) L. Pasa-Tolic (EMSL) P. Persson (University of Lund) T. Regier (Canadian Light Source) J.O. Sharp (School of Mines)

24

Annual Planning Summaries: Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Annual Planning Summaries: Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Document(s) Available For Download January 11, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary...

25

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correlation between Nitrogen-dopant Bond Type and Electronic Effects in Single-layer Graphene February 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications...

26

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. User Agreements All user experiments must be run under the terms of a User Agreement executed by the appropriate institutional officer(s) at your institution and their counterpart at Stanford University. A single User Agreement covers all experimenters from that institution (User Institution = "user"). Collaborators who are not coming to SSRL do not require a User Agreement.

27

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled SSRL Science Summary - September 2012 Figure 1. XWnt8 has an unusual two-domain structure. Wnts are a family of signaling proteins that regulate the development and growth of an organism, as well as tissue regeneration and wound healing. Misregulated Wnt signaling is associated with the development of many types of cancers, including colon cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, and degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. Understanding of how Wnt proteins bind and activate Frizzled receptors is important for the development of effective anti-Wnt and anti-Frizzled drugs for the treatment of Wnt-related disease. To understand how Wnts function, a team of researchers from Stanford

28

Stanford University Precourt Institute for Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency · 2009 ­ Precourt Institute for Energy Current Faculty Stanford History ManyStanford University Precourt Institute for Energy The Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Lynn Orr Director Stanford University Senate February 18, 2010 #12;2 Observations · Energy

Ford, James

29

DOE Solar Decathlon: Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford University Stanford University Start.Home solardecathlon.stanford.edu For the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013, Stanford University designed the Start.Home to provide energy efficiency at the push of a button to a new generation of environmentally conscious occupants. With modular architecture and advanced controls to optimize each component, the house aims to spark a revolution by lowering the entry barrier for an ultra-efficient house and making sustainability trendy, social, and affordable. Design Philosophy The Start.Home is built on a simple, three-by-three modular grid and integrates core, public, and private modules as well as multiple technologies to optimize value and energy efficiency. These spaces can be added or subtracted to allow the house to grow with the family by filling

30

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 of 13 10/16/2006 FACILITY EMERGENCY PLAN February, 2006 SSRL Safety Office Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE SSRL EMERGENCY PLAN SECTION A: SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES 1.0 SSRL Emergency Personnel 1.1 SLAC Person - In - Charge (PIC) 1.2 SSRL Beamline Duty Operator

Ford, James

31

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN: 2013 - 2018 MEETING THE SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE FEBRUARY 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2 Synchrotron Radiation - A Unique Tool .................................................................................................................. 1 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource .......................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Looking into the Future: Building a New User Facility Paradigm at SSRL ....................................................... 4

32

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

prokaryotic GlnRS species exists. A group led by Edward Snell of the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute has recently used data from SSRL to develop a model of the...

33

Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Name Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resolution. These activities include efforts supported by DOE BES, NIH NIBIB, and the SSRL SMB Program supported by NIH NCRR and DOE BER. Beam Line 2-3 Hard-x-ray microprobe...

35

Introduction 3 About The Stanford Department of Public Safety 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Vaden Health Center for smoking cessation information and programs. Holiday Fire Safety Information://www.stanford.edu/group/svab/, (650) 7253190 The Health Library at the Vaden Health Center is a comprehensive resource center sexual assault. The library is located on the 2nd floor of Vaden at the Health Promotion Services

Ford, James

36

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Group Zorlu Plaza, Avcilar stanbul, 34310, TURKEY e-mail: aygun.guney@zorlu.com ABSTRACT Geothermal well that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

Stanford University

37

SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons

38

SSRL Users' Organization | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U. Tennessee; Christopher Kim, Chapman U. (SNUG Chair); Hendrik Ohldag, Stanford U. The SSRL Users' Organization (SSRLUO) is broadly concerned with representing the interests of...

39

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 January 2007 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during October and November 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Since the 2004 Type A electrical accident, SSO and SLAC have made improvements in many aspects of ES&H programs. However, the deficiencies in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Linac map showing SPEAR The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons were circulated at

42

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) The ongoing and projected Environmental...

43

Stanford University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PatBrownLabHomePagePapers.html Brubaker, Ben - Department of Mathematics, Stanford University http:math.stanford.edubrubaker Brunet, Anne - Department...

44

July 4, 1997 The Stanford InfoBus and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 4, 1997 1 of 30 The Stanford InfoBus and Its Service Layers Augmenting the Internet Project Computer Science Department Stanford University, CA 94305 The Stanford InfoBus is a prototype service layers pro­ vided by the Stanford InfoBus: protocols for managing items and collections (DLIOP

Gravano, Luis

45

SSRL Site Map | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Global Menu DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Main menu Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News...

46

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ASSESSMENT OF LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL Fujimitsu and Sachio Ehara Geothermic Laboratory, Earth Resources Engineering Department, Kyushu University

Stanford University

47

COMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Data 2.1 Performance and Utilization Data 2.2 Failure Data 5 5 6 3. Preliminary Analysis 3.1 Load Profiles 3.2 Failure Profiles 7 3.3 Analysis and Discussion of Preliminary Results Some ReliabilityCOMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY I I STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES DEPARTMENT OF ElECTRiCAl

Stanford University

48

NREL: News - NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

313 313 NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Devices could charge battery-powered products in the future January 10, 2013 It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A scientific paper, "Peel and Stick: Fabricating Thin Film Solar Cells on Universal Substrates," appears in the online version of Scientific Reports, a subsidiary of the British scientific journal Nature. Peel-and-stick, or water-assisted transfer printing (WTP), technologies were developed by the Stanford group and have been used before for nanowire

49

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Stanford University Solar Decathlon 2011 Construction Drawings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSULTANTS CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN 01 10/11/2012 80% DOE/NREL DD SUBMISSION 02 11/20/2012 80% DOE/NREL RE-SUBMISSION 03 02/14/2013 100% DOE/NREL CD SUBMISSION 04 04/05/2013 100% DOE/NREL CD RE-SUBMISSION 05 08/22/2013 100% AS-BUILT SUBMISSION 8/22/2013 12:23:07 PM G-001 COVER PAGE 104 DEREK OUYANG ANRAN LI STANFORD UNIVERSITY Y2E2 BUILDING RM 254 273 VIA ORTEGA STANFORD, CA 94305 STANFORDSD@GMAIL.COM SOLARDECATHLON.STANFORD.EDU 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E SHEET TITLE LOT NUMBER: DRAWN BY: CHECKED BY: COPYRIGHT: CLIENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 WWW.SOLARDECATHLON.GOV TEAM NAME: ADDRESS: CONTACT: CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN 01 10/11/2012 80% DOE/NREL DD SUBMISSION 02 11/20/2012 80% DOE/NREL RE-SUBMISSION

51

Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials at SSRL Radioactive Materials at SSRL Contact Information SSRL Safety Officer (650) 926-3861 SSRL Radiation Protection Group (650) 926-4299 SSRLRadMat@SLAC.STANFORD.EDU Throughout the course of an SSRL Experimental Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other materials. There is no minimum quantity for declaring the use of radioactive samples at SSRL. The purpose of this procedure is to enable Users, SSRL and SLAC staff to know what radiological controls will be implemented for these materials, based on the isotope, its toxicity risk and radiological controls. Radioactive materials at SSRL are classified into 4 classification Groups based on the radiotoxicity tables, see below.

52

Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management.  

SciTech Connect

Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus deltoides Bartr. and Platanus occidentalis L.) and broad (Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Pinus taeda L.) site requirements while grown with a range of nutrient and water resources. We constructed N budgets by measuring N concentration ([N]) and N content (N{sub C}) of above- and belowground perennial and ephemeral tissues, determined N uptake (N{sub UP}), and calculated N use efficiency (NUE). Forest stands regulated [N] within species-specific operating ranges without clear temporal or treatment patterns, thus demonstrating equilibrium between tissue [N] and biomass accumulation. Forest stand N{sub C} and N{sub UP} increased with stand development and paralleled treatment patterns of biomass accumulation, suggesting productivity is tightly linked to N{sub UP}. Inclusion of above- and belowground ephemeral tissue turnover in N{sub UP} calculations demonstrated that maximum N demand for narrow-sites adapted species exceeded 200 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} while demand for broad-site adapted species was below this level. NUE was species dependent but not consistently influenced by N availability, suggesting relationships between NUE and resource availability were species dependent. Based on early stand development, species with broad site adaptability are favored for woody cropping systems because they maintain high above- and belowground productivity with minimal fertilization requirements due to higher NUE than narrow site adapted species.

Aubrey, Doug, P.; Coyle, David, R. Coleman, Mark, D.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

53

Stanford v. Roche, Microsoft and other Supreme Court Cases |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

other Supreme Court Cases Stanford v. Roche, Microsoft and other Supreme Court Cases LBNLDOE meeting0.pdf recentcaselaw lally drysdale.pdf More Documents & Publications...

54

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC, Stanford Team Focuses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC, Stanford Team Focuses on High-Energy Electrons to Treat Cancer By Diane Rezendes Khirallah February 9, 2012 Accelerator physicists at SLAC and cancer specialists from...

55

2008-09 Stanford University Parking and Circulation Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residences, under construction School of Engineering Center Nanotechnology Building, under construction Li Ka Shing Center Stanford Institutes of Medicine, under construction...

56

SSRL in SLAC Today | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in SLAC Today Subscribe to SSRL in SLAC Today feed URL: https:news.slac.stanford.edutagsprograms-facilitieslightsourcesstanford-synchrotron-radiation-lightsource-ssrl...

57

Norwich University, Stanford University and Kentucky/Indiana...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy, (202) 779-3295 Jason.Lutterman@ee.doe.gov Norwich University, Stanford University and Team KentuckyIndiana Take the Affordability Contest and University of...

58

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPERATURE DURING POWER GENERATION IN OIL FIELDS Bin Gong1 , Hongbin Liang2 , Shouliang Xin2 , and Kewen Li Stanford, CA94305, USA e-mail: kewenli@stanford.edu 1 Peking University, 2 PetroChina ABSTRACT The effects in these petroleum reservoirs. As Erdlac et al (2007) reported, Texas has thousands of oil and gas wells

Stanford University

59

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL FLUID FLOW MONITORING BY THE REPEAT GRAVITY MEASUREMENT AT THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAPAN -APPLICATION OF HYBRID GRAVITY

Stanford University

60

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 SUSTAINABILITY OF GEOTHERMAL DOUBLETS-in the natural energy flow will slowly replenish the geothermal system and it will again be available

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS FROM SABALAN GEOTHERMAL FIELD, N-W IRAN Haeri A.,1 Strelbitskaya S., Porkhial S2 ., Ashayeri, A1 . 1

Stanford University

62

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

Stanford University

63

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street Stanford the effect of shear-induced pore dilation, injection schedule, and the characteristic displacement scale dc/dynamic friction in McClure and Horne (2010). The effect of increasing characteristic displacement scale, dc

Stanford University

64

Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proprietary Research Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research follows the guidelines for implementation by the Stanford University Faculty Senate and is executed through a Proprietary User Agreement. Proprietary Research is subject to the Department of Energy's full-cost recovery requirement for facility charges for the use of user facilities and advance payment of those charges. The facility charges are established as a dollar rate for each shift of beam time. Experimenters interested in conducting Proprietary Research should contact the User Research Administration Manager well in advance of the anticipated need for beam time as the legal and financial procedures involved may take

65

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

66

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Group Steering Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania Joel Butler Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sally Dawson Brookhaven National Laboratory Helen Edwards Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Himel Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stephen Holmes Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Young-Kee Kim, Chair Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory/ University of Chicago Andrew Lankford University of California, Irvine David McGinnis Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sergei Nagaitsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Vladimir Shiltsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Maury Tigner Cornell University Hendrik Weerts Argonne National Laboratory Contributors Neutrino Physics Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania

67

Brought to You by Stanford Office of Sustainability, 340 Bonair Siding, Stanford. Visit us at http://sustainable.stanford.edu Sustainability on the Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air. energy recovery Y2E2 uses the conditioned air exiting the building to pre-cool or pre ducts on the roof, essentially taking the edge off the outside air before it is conditioned. onsite as emissions from university population commute and air travel. stanford energy and climate plan (2008 -2009

Nur, Amos

68

Groups  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

groups/all/feed en Buildings groups/all/feed en Buildings http://en.openei.org/community/group/buildings Description: This group is dedicated to discussions about green buildings, energy use in buildings, occupant comfort in buildings, and building technologies. The OpenEI Buildings Community Group will be dedicated to discussions, blogs, and postings about new building technologies, green buildings, energy use in buildings, and occupant experience (comfort levels) in green buildings.group/buildings" target="_blank">read more architecture building reviews buildings technology comfort energy use facilities management green building LEED technologies usgbc

69

Phase and amplitude detection system for the Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system to measure and stabilize the rf power sources in the Stanford Linear Accelerator is described. This system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 microsecond 2856 MHz rf pulse and will be used for phase feedback control and for amplitude and phase jitter detection. This paper discusses the measurement system performance requirements for the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider, and the design and implementation of the phase and amplitude detection system. The fundamental software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

Fox, J.D.; Schwarz, H.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

SPLASH: Stanford parallel applications for shared-memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the Stanford Parallel Applications for Shared-Memory (SPLASH), a set of parallel applications for use in the design and evaluation of shared-memory multiprocessing systems. Our goal is to provide a suite of realistic applications that will ...

Jaswinder Pal Singh; Wolf-Dietrich Weber; Anoop Gupta

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

72

Stanford Green Dorm Project --Photovoltaic Mini-Report --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and promotional purposes. Technology Overview Photovoltaic (PV) cells are semiconductor devices that convert light and the overall installation of modules is called an array. Diagram of photovoltaic cell. (httpStanford Green Dorm Project -- Photovoltaic Mini-Report -- Paul Kreiner ­ May 7, 2004 Purpose PVs

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

73

Computer Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accounts Each user group must have a computer account. Additionally, all persons using these accounts are responsible for understanding and complying with the terms outlined in the...

74

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 DISTRICT HEATING MODELLING AND SIMULATION Lei Haiyan1 air pollution and save conventional energy, geothermal energy as a heat source for district heating. This paper describes the geothermal resource and district heating system in Tianjin. Heat load for one sample

Stanford University

75

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 34469, Turkey 2 Stanford University, Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street works and in different mathematical forms. This can be seen in the classic paper of Harper and Jordan of parameters with poor predictive capacity. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT We gratefully acknowledge PNOC-EDC (now Energy

Stanford University

76

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

given by l v q q . 1 1 1 - + = . (5) Using numerical formulae for (1b) and for specific volumes was 23.4 m/s which occurred at 1.0=p MPa and 000626.0=q , i.e. at atmospheric pressure, when the vapour1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

77

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROPERTIES AND FRACTURE ORIENTATIONS ON FAULT ACTIVATION Souheil M. Ezzedine1,2 , Joseph P. Morris3 , Lee G. Glascoe1 , Laura Chiaramonte4 , Tarabay H. Antoun4 , Walter W. McNab4 1 Lawrence Livermore National-mail: ezzedine1@llnl.gov 2 Stanford University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 396 Via Ortega

Stanford University

78

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THERMAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL to the thermal energy contained in the fractured volume comprising the reservoir. One approach to EGS resource crustal heat flow is most favorable for EGS development (Figure 1), were included in the recent USGS

Stanford University

79

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy@egi.utah.edu ABSTRACT Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) can be developed in reservoirs otherwise lacking sufficient

Stanford University

80

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Kelly Blake and Nicholas C. Davatzes Temple University 1901 North 13th Street structures in image logs of wells from the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF), CA record variation in the azimuth

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Talang geothermal field lies in Solok Regency- West Sumatra Province. Low gravity anomaly (bouguer source of the geothermal system in the area. The gravity anomaly leneament trending NW-SE coincident

Stanford University

82

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY Füsun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Aygün Güney, Aye Alpagut Bükülmez In Kizildere Geothermal Field, there were 25 drilled wells until 2009, 9 of which are currently being produced

Stanford University

83

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University electrical generation capacity of a geothermal system. The methodology consists of combining probability of a geothermal reservoir to obtain the probability distribution function for the stored energy ("heat in place

Stanford University

84

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT OF THE RESULTS IN THE DESIGN OF THE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS. G. Partasides1 , A. Lizides1 , S. Kassinis1 , G. Florides

Stanford University

85

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL FIELD - A RECENTLY DESIGNED DIGITAL BOREHOLE LOG DATA SHEET USING MICROSOFT EXCEL of the borehole log data compiled at the Pailas Geothermal Borehole Field (rate of penetration, weight on bit, mud

Stanford University

86

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University problems associated with geothermal utilization. Hellisheiði Power Plant annually emits around 13000 tons of 2011. H2S will be separated from other geothermal gases at a pilot gas separation plant, dissolved

Stanford University

87

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University THE SOLUTION OF GEOTHERMAL HEAT-CARRIER Belova .P. Research Geotechnological Centre, Far Eastern Branch of geothermal power plants operation. Silica extraction from the solution of geothermal plants and its cleaning

Stanford University

88

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1@kyudai.jp ABSTRACT The natural state model was developed in the Takigami geothermal field, using TOUGH2 simulator

Stanford University

89

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University APPRAISAL SYSTEM FOR DEEP GEOTHERMAL ENERGY SYSTEMS IN AQUIFERS W.A. van Leeuwen, C.N.P.J. Maaijwee and N.a.vanleeuwen@geo.uu.nl ABSTRACT Pursuit and use of geothermal energy in the Netherlands is developing steadily. However, in order

Stanford University

90

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT OLKARIA I, KENYA Cornel O. Ofwona Geothermal Development Company Ltd., P. O. Box 100746 - 00101 Nairobi, Kenya e-mail: cofwona@gdc.co.ke ABSTRACT Exploitation of Olkaria geothermal field started in 1981 when

Stanford University

91

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-THERMAL INFRARED BAND AND MAGNETOTELLURIC METHOD TO SIMULATE A GEOTHERMAL SITTING AT MT. CIREMAI, WEST JAVA at surface is crucial for geothermal exploration. Since field observations to map surface manifestation

Stanford University

92

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail: sass@geo.tu-darmstadt.de ABSTRACT The investigation and exploration of potential deep geothermal important in the exploration of potentially engineered geothermal systems and of mid to low enthalpy

Stanford University

93

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Geothermal System (EGS) were coupled with wellbore flow simulations. The 3D reservoir simulations used at par with H2O based EGS. The total exergy that can be generated in 1 km2 area of a geothermal reservoir

Stanford University

94

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Earl Mattson1 , Mitchell Plummer1 , Carl Palmer1 , Larry Hull1 , Samantha Miller1 and Randy Nye2 1 Idaho National Laboratory PO Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2107 2 US Geothermal Inc 1505

Stanford University

95

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University TEMPERATURE DATA OBTAINED AT AND AROUND THE LAS PAILAS GEOTHERMAL PROJECT AND IN RINC?N DE LA VIEJA NATIONAL the existence of subsoil thermal anomalies that may be correlated with local faults in the Pailas Geothermal

Stanford University

96

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University out in Salavatli geothermal field, Turkey. Since reinjection returns as relatively colder water seismometers at the Salavatli, Kök, Aydin, Turkey geothermal area was deployed in May 2010 in connection

Stanford University

97

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail:john.lund@nrel.gov ABSTRACT A geothermal direct-use project utilizes a natural resource, a flow of geothermal fluid, aquaculture ponds, and industrial processes. Geothermal utilization requires matching the varied needs

Stanford University

98

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University FOR GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION AT JEMEZ PUEBLO IN NEW MEXICO Lianjie Huang1 and Michael Albrecht2 1 Los Alamos Geothermal Technology Center 4200 West Jemez Road, Suite 301-13 Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA e-mail: michael

Stanford University

99

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District of Renewable Energy of PRC" had clearly explained that geothermal energy belongs to renewable energy

Stanford University

100

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Germany iulia.ghergut@geo.uni-goettingen.de ABSTRACT In fluid-based geothermal reservoirs, thermal between "heat exchange area" and RTD features of a geothermal reservoir feel natural, but act highly

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University CASING IN A HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL Gunnar Skúlason Kaldal1 *, Magnús ?. Jónsson1 , Halldór@hi.is ABSTRACT The production casing of a high temperature geothermal well is subjected to multiple thermo

Stanford University

102

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University ON OPTIMAL LOCATION AND SIZE OF A HEAT SINK IN A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Y. Feng, M. Tyagi and C.D. White Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, 70802, USA E-mail: yfeng1@tigers.lsu.edu ABSTRACT Geothermal

Stanford University

103

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University BINARY POWER PLANTS IN REMOTE GEOTHERMAL AREAS OF INDONESIA Huenges E., K. Erbas, M. Jaya, and A. Saadat in remote areas. Geothermal is one of these and has huge resources in Indonesia. Today, geothermal provides

Stanford University

104

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL FIELD, SW-ICELAND Samuel W. Scott1 , Ingvi Gunnarsson2 , Andri Stefánsson1 , Stefán Arnórsson1 sampling campaign has recently been carried out at the Hellisheiði geothermal field in southwest Iceland

Stanford University

105

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Berkeley, California 94720 e-mail: Kboyle@lbl.gov ABSTRACT The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir experiences, and processing system. INTRODUCTION Geological Setting The Geysers geothermal reservoir is located just south

Stanford University

106

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SOFTWARE S. Alcaraz1 , R. Lane2 , K. Spragg2 , S. Milicich1,3 , F. Sepulveda4 and G. Bignall1 1 Geothermal is an innovative 3-D modelling visualisation software and resource management tool, developed

Stanford University

107

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN KOTAMOBAGU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NORTH SULAWESI, INDONESIA Riogilang, H.1, 3 , Itoi, R.1 , Taguchi, S2 from thermal spring, river, and shallow well in Kotamobagu geothermal field. Temperature of waters

Stanford University

108

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi Stevinweg 1 Delft, 2628 CN, The Netherlands e-mail: h.salimi@tudelft.nl ABSTRACT The Delft Geothermal

Stanford University

109

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated

Stanford University

110

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DESIGNING THERMAL-PHYSICAL, POWER out at expeditious development rates and there are about a million power plants of this type-energy power plant, that supplies consumers with heat within constrained by them parameters, standard

Stanford University

111

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the near the bottom at the hot aquifer level, a convection cell is induced and the well becomes very nearly providing around 171o F over the entire well depth and obviously creating a convection cell bringing hot, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 DESIGN OF A CONVECTION CELL FOR A DOWNHOLE HEAT

Stanford University

112

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Figure 1a) was grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated of Chemistry, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617, Stanford University. | Department of Chemistry, Stanford University. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Cui, Yi

113

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Stanford, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

24106°, -122.1660756° 24106°, -122.1660756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.424106,"lon":-122.1660756,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

User Financial Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Accounts Financial Accounts Why Have a User Financial Account? Each user group should establish a user financial account to procure gases, chemicals, supplies or services to support your experiment at SLAC's user facilities and to send samples, dewars, or other equipment between SLAC and your institution. Establishing/Renewing a User Financial Account The most common method of establishing or renewing a user financial account is by providing a purchase order (PO) (or a letter from the financial officer of the user institution). The PO should be made to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the amount of estimated expenditures (the suggested minimum is $1,000). The PO should include the expiration date, user names, funding agency, grant/contract number and whether expenditures

116

Staff Resources | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Resources Staff Resources General Online Time and Effort System (online form) SSRL Weekly Reports Beam Line Coordination Minutes SLAC BIS Home Page SLAC only (forms, property purchasing, and more) Administrative Contacts SSRL General Phonelist SSRL Organizational Chart BL Ops Staff Support Website (VMS log in) Mailing List Management (SSRL only) - Login SLAC Budget Office SLAC only (petty cash info) SLAC Conference Rooms SLAC Staff Resources SLAC/SSRL Tours - contact SSRL Building Manager, Administration and SLAC Security. Requisitions & Property SLAC Shipper Request PeopleSoft Procurement Requisitions (training required) Offsite Property Use Form New Vendor Request Computing SLAC e-mail on the Web SLAC Unix password SSRL Computer Network Group SSRL Computing Help Request Form

117

Photon Source Parameters | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters SSRL Beam Line Map | Beam Lines by Techniques | Beam Lines by Number Beam Energy 3 GeV Injection Energy 3 GeV Current 300-500 mA Fill Pattern 270 bunches distributed in six groups of 45 with 17 bunch gaps in between Circumferenc 234.137 Radio Frequency 476.315 MHz Bunch Spacing 2.1 n Horizontal Emittance 10 nm*rad Vertical Emittance 14 pm*rad Critical Energy 7.6 keV Energy Spread 0.097 Lifetime 12 hours @ 350 mA e- size (x,y) Dipole: 140, 14 µm rms Standard ID: 310, 8 µm rms Chicane ID: 300, 5 µm rms e- divergence (x,y) Dipole: 180, 2.9 µrad rms Standard ID: 33, 1.7 µrad rms Chicane ID: 34, 2.9 µrad rms Bunch Length 20 psec rms (6.0 mm rms) Straight sections for IDs (available ID length) 9 x 2.3 m 4 x 3.7 m 2 x 1.5 m (Chicane)

118

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department January 3, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist For over 100 years, Stanford University has advanced knowledge and transformed lives through innovative academic programs, research and outreach. The school is recognized internationally as a top research

119

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department January 3, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist For over 100 years, Stanford University has advanced knowledge and transformed lives through innovative academic programs, research and outreach. The school is recognized internationally as a top research

120

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations April 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued Preliminary Notices of Violation (PNOVs) to three contractors - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of the Department's worker safety and health regulations. Stanford University is the managing and operating contractor for DOE's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), located in Menlo Park, California. At the time the violations occurred, Pacific Underground Construction was performing work at SLAC under subcontract to

123

MODULAR BRANCHING RULES FOR 2-COLUMN DIAGRAM REPRESENTATIONS OF GENERAL LINEAR GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline for doing work at SSRL Goals: 1. Work effectively, efficiently and safely 2. Compliance://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/general/isems/ 3. Compliance with SLAC operating directives as found on the SSRL safety web page http://www-ssrl processes given in http://www- ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/safety/index.html. 5. Ensure procedures are up to date

Baranov, Alexander

124

User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Access Policy Facility Access Policy 1. Summary The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science national user facility that provides synchrotron radiation to researchers in many fields of science and technology, including biology, catalysis, chemistry, energy, engineering, forensics, geoscience, materials science, medicine, molecular environmental science, and physics. With a pioneering start in 1974, the facility was upgraded to a state-of-the-art third generation lightsource in 2004, providing major improvements in emittance, ring current and new or upgraded beam lines. SSRL's research programs include both the x-ray and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. SSRL is primarily supported by the DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences

125

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas. 5 figs.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nitrogen sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-sorbing and -desorbing compositions and methods of using the same are disclosed, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.; Edlund, D.J.; Miller, W.K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

129

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

130

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

131

California Stanford University of University Institute of University California of Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Stanford University of University Institute of University California of Southern Technology California ____________________________________________________________ February 15, 2011 Dear Representative, As Congress considers funding options for the remainder of fiscal year (FY) 2011, California

Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

132

Stanford Universitys U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STANFORD POINTS APPROACH EQUALS EXCEEDS ECLIPSES 0-60% 61-80% 81-90% 91-100% A. LIVABILITY 1 Is the operation of the house's lighting, entertainment, and other controls intuitive?...

133

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large Scale Use of Biofuels on Food, Agriculture, and Trade One of the targets of the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals is to cut that target has been slow. If food availability or the ability to purchase food further declines, there could

Nur, Amos

134

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Environmental, Resource, and Trade Implications of Biofuels This sheet summarizes some of the primary insights that arose from the Workshop on the Environmental, Resource and Trade Implications of Biofuels, which included 40 leading representatives

Nur, Amos

135

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large-Scale Biofuel Use on Climate models (LCAs) of biofuels attempt to capture all of the GHG emissions associated with a fuel from sources facility; the conversion of the feedstock to a finished biofuel; the distribution of the finished biofuel

Nur, Amos

136

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large-Scale Biofuel Use on Water in the Gulf of Mexico. 1. Over the next five years, large-scale use of biofuels could further degrade water quality. In the short term, the impact of biofuels on water quality is simply the impact of intensified

Nur, Amos

137

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen Previous Video (Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Pennies) Shattering Pennies Liquid Nitrogen Cooled...

138

Stage I-IIA Non-Bulky Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Is Further Distinction Based on Prognostic Factors Useful? The Stanford Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the United States, early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is defined as asymptomatic stage I/II non-bulky disease. European groups stratify patients to more intense treatment by considering additional unfavorable factors, such as age, number of nodal sites, sedimentation rate, extranodal disease, and elements of the international prognostic score for advanced HL. We sought to determine the prognostic significance of these factors in patients with early-stage disease treated at Stanford University Medical Center. Methods and Materials: This study was a retrospective analysis of 101 patients treated with abbreviated Stanford V chemotherapy (8 weeks) and 30-Gy (n = 84 patients) or 20-Gy (n = 17 patients) radiotherapy to involved sites. Outcomes were assessed after applying European risk factors. Results: At a median follow-up of 8.5 years, freedom from progression (FFP) and overall survival (OS) rates were 94% and 97%, respectively. From 33% to 60% of our patients were unfavorable per European criteria (i.e., German Hodgkin Study Group [GHSG], n = 55%; European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, n = 33%; and Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte, n = 61%). Differences in FFP rates between favorable and unfavorable patients were significant only for GHSG criteria (p = 0.02) with there were no differences in OS rates for any criteria. Five of 6 patients who relapsed were successfully salvaged. Conclusions: The majority of our patients deemed unfavorable had an excellent outcome despite undergoing a significantly abbreviated regimen. Application of factors used by the GHSG defined a less favorable subset for FFP but with no impact on OS. As therapy for early-stage disease moves to further reductions in therapy, these factors take on added importance in the interpretation of current trial results and design of future studies.

Advani, Ranjana H., E-mail: radvani@stanford.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Maeda, Lauren S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Baer, David M. [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California (United States); Mason, Joseph [Northern California Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, California (United States); Rosenberg, Saul A.; Horning, Sandra J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the 7: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 8, 1995 EA-1107: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center September 8, 1995 EA-1107: Final Environmental Assessment

140

http://www.slac.stanford.edu/~quarkpt/slaconly/lcc0121.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 August 2003 Sensitivity to Interaction Region Solenoid Horizontal Motion Peter Tenenbaum and Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA Abstract: Horizontal motion of a linear collider's Interaction Region solenoid magnet will cause vertical motion of the beam at the collision point. An expression relating the two effects is derived, and a tolerance on the solenoid's position is estimated. Sensitivity to Interaction Region Solenoid Horizontal Motion P. Tenenbaum, T.O. Raubenheimer LCC-Note-0121 August 13, 2003 Abstract Horizontal motion of a linear collider's Interatction Region solenoid magnet will cause vertical motion of the beam at the collision point. An expression relating the two effects is derived, and a tolerance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Order R2-2005-0022, May 18, 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION ORDER No. R2-2005-0022 RESCISSION of: ORDER No. 85-88, WASTE DISCHARGE REQUIREMENTS and ADOPTION of: SITE CLEANUP REQUIREMENTS for: STANFORD UNIVERSITY and the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY for the property located at the: STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER 2575 SAND HILL ROAD MENLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY FINDINGS: The California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region (Water Board) finds that: 1. Purpose of Order This Order establishes Site Cleanup Requirements for the investigation and remediation of impacted soil and groundwater resulting from historical spills and leaks that have occurred during the course of operations of the Stanford Linear

142

ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use May 25, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Kristina Pflanz Writer & Contractor, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy What does this project do? Researchers are seeking a breakthrough on the human behavioral side of energy use. They have made a long-term goal of reducing average residential energy use by over 20 percent.

143

Biofuels6a.doc Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels6a.doc Woods Institute for the Environment · 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C · Stanford, CA 94305 · http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large-Scale Biofuel Use practices can significantly influence the environmental effects of biofuels. The choices farmers make

Nur, Amos

144

(Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs. (KJD)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

California Stanford University of University of Institute of University California Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Stanford University of University of Institute of University California Southern Technology California March 13, 2012 The Honorable Dianne Feinstein 331 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510-0504 Dear Senator Feinstein: On behalf of California's research universities, we write

Southern California, University of

146

SAXS Beamline 1-4 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to date it has been adapted for an electrochemical cell; humidity chamber; multi-sample oven, from various experimental groups; etc). If you have your own sample environment you...

147

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

148

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-12-03 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) 3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-12-03 AN12038 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The project scope includes the construction of a new computer facility (21,500 square feet) capable of providing 3 MW of data center potential. The new two-story facility will provide infrastructure for a multitude of server racks. There are three fenced service yards outside the building, one for chillers, one for new electrical substation equipment, and one for emergency generators. The ground floor will be utilized for electrical and receiving area; the second floor will have a server room, mechanical room, conference

150

While You Are Here | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

While You Are Here While You Are Here To Enter the Site After Hours You Must Have a Picture I.D and Your Safety Training Must Be Current. You should plan to arrive at SSRL between 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Holidays. A knowledgeable person from your group should be available for consultation by the SSRL staff readying the beam line for your group the morning you are scheduled to go on line. A Safety Checklist (SCL) must be completed by the Operations staff before your experiment will be put on line. This cannot be done if your spokesperson has not signed the Safety Review Summary form (see Section 2, Safety Review of Scheduled Experiments). If you arrive after hours and are listed on the User Support Form you will be allowed entry after providing proof of identification (usually a drivers

151

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available This data set, prepared by Elizabeth Holland and colleagues, contains data for wet and dry nitrogen-species deposition for the United States and...

154

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream If you have access to liquid nitrogen and the proper safety equipment and training, try this in place of your normal cryogenics demonstration Download...

155

Stanford University  

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Engineering Ernest Ryu, Civil Engineering Nicholas Tatonetti, Biomedical Informatics Basic Energy Sciences John Goodfellow, Engineering Michael Kozina, Applied Physics Artit...

156

STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivered to the power plants is about 330 kg/s. Around 1,235 kg/s of residual (separated) geothermal water the second half of 2006. The geothermal reservoir conditions around PGM-29 seem to be somewhat different from geothermal field. #12;PRESSURE RESPONSE Reservoir pressure has been monitored routinely at the Miravalles

Stanford University

157

Glossary Term - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lepton Previous Term (Lepton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Mercury) Mercury Liquid Nitrogen Liquid nitrogen boils in a frying pan on a desk. The liquid state of the element...

158

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole BouleVard., Golden, Colorado 80401 Received, Stanford University. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NANO LETTERS 2009 Vol. 9, No. 1 279-282 10

Fan, Shanhui

159

SSRL and LCLS are national user facilities operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SSRL Users' Organization Meeting Friday, August 12, 2011 The SSRL Users Organization Executive requested that the Klein award description on the SSRL website be clarified to distinguish the Spicer Young description will be modified accordingly: The Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award: https://www-conf.slac.stanford.edu/ssrl

Wechsler, Risa H.

160

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Microsoft PowerPoint - 04CifernoStanford - Capture Project Summary.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program US Perspective on CO 2 Capture and Separation Jared P. Ciferno - National Energy Technology Laboratory Global Climate and Energy Project April 27, 2004 Stanford University GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 Presentation Outline * Carbon Sequestration Program * Pre-Combustion CO 2 Technologies * Post-Combustion CO 2 Technologies * Oxy-Fuel Technologies * Modeling and Assessment Tools * On-Site NETL R & D GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 03 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 Carbon Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure 7 Regional Partnerships * Engage regional, state, local

163

In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford  

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X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology limits EV (electric vehicles) to a short travel range, slow recharge, and costly price tag. Li-ion batteries promise the high specific capacity required for EVs to travel 300+ miles on a single charge with a number of possible earth abundant anode and cathode materials; however, set backs such as capacity fading hinder the full capability of these rechargeable batteries. In order to accurately characterize the dynamic electrochemical processes at the

164

Understanding Nitrogen Fixation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from atmospheric nitrogen could, in principle, be more energy-efficient. This is particularly attractive giv

Paul J. Chirik

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reading Comprehension - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Liquid Nitrogen Nitrogen is the most common substance in Earth's _________ crust oceans atmosphere trees . In the Earth's atmosphere, nitrogen is a gas. The particles of a gas move very quickly. They run around and bounce into everyone and everything. The hotter a gas is, the _________ slower faster hotter colder the particles move. When a gas is _________ cooled warmed heated compressed , its particles slow down. If a gas is cooled enough, it can change from a gas to a liquid. For nitrogen, this happens at a very _________ strange warm low high temperature. If you want to change nitrogen from a gas to a liquid, you have to bring its temperature down to 77 Kelvin. That's 321 degrees below zero _________ Kelvin Celsius Centigrade Fahrenheit ! Liquid nitrogen looks like water, but it acts very differently. It

166

Nitrogen spark denoxer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

Ng, Henry K. (Naperville, IL); Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Sekar, Ramanujam R. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nitrogen Fixation by Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When some of the uncertainties associated with lightning are reviewed, it becomes difficult to support a large production of fixed nitrogen from the lightning shock wave.

G. A. Dawson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Top-Off Injection and Higher Currents at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a 234 m circumference storage ring for 3 GeV electrons with its synchrotron radiation serving currently 13 beamlines with about 27 experimental stations. It operated for long time with 100 mA peak current provided by usually three injections per day. In July 2009, the maximum beam current was raised to 200 mA. Over the period from June 2009 to March 2010, Top-Off operation started at every beamline. Top-Off, i.e., the injection of electrons into the storage ring with injection stoppers open, is necessary for SSRL to reach its design current of 500 mA. In the future, the maximal power of the injection current will also soon be raised from currently 1.5 W to 5 W. The Radiation Protection Department at SLAC worked with SSRL on the specifications for the safety systems for operation with Top-Off injection and higher beam currents.

Bauer, Johannes

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

169

Experiences from First Top-Off Injection at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) is moving toward Top-Off injection mode, SLAC's Radiation Protection Department is working with SSRL on minimizing the radiological hazards of this mode. One such hazard is radiation that is created inside the accelerator concrete enclosure by injected beam. Since during Top-Off injection the stoppers that would otherwise isolate the storage ring from the experimental area stay open, the stoppers no longer prevent such radiation from reaching the experimental area. The level of this stray radiation was measured in April 2008 during the first Top-Off injection tests. They revealed radiation dose rates of up to 18 microSv/h (1.8 millirem/h) outside the experimental hutches, significantly higher than our goal of 1 microSv/h (0.1 millirem/h). Non-optimal injection increased the measured dose rates by a factor two. Further tests in 2008 indicated that subsequent improvements by SSRL to the injection system have reduced the dose rates to acceptable levels. This presentation describes the studies performed before the Top-Off tests, the tests themselves and their major results (both under initial conditions and after improvements were implemented), and presents the controls being implemented for full and routine Top-Off injection.

Bauer, J.M.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nitrogen Deposition Data Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Cycle Data Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set prepared by Elisabeth Holland and colleagues titled "Global N Cycle: Fluxes and N2O Mixing Ratios...

171

Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

172

Controls Group  

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Status and Schedule Safety and Training Divisions APS Engineering Support Division AES Groups Accelerator Systems Division ASD Groups X-ray Science Division XSD Groups...

173

[1] D. Alderson and K. S. Hoo. The role of economic incentives in securing cyberspace. Technical report, CISAC, Stanford University, November 2004. [ bib | .pdf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] D. Alderson and K. S. Hoo. The role of economic incentives in securing cyberspace. Technical report, CISAC, Stanford University, November 2004. [ bib | .pdf ] In the last eight years, every significant public policy initiative to address the safety and security of U.S. national information

Briesemeister, Linda

174

SolidEnergy Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally designs and synthesizes high-performing nanomaterials for gas storage and separation applications. NuMat has developed materials that will fundamentally change the economics of gas storage in natural gas vehicles - supporting the gradual displacement of foreign oil. Learn More Mesdi Systems

175

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Freeze the Rainbow! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! What happens when the world's most beloved cryogenic liquid meets one of the most common household appliances? Find out when we try to microwave liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A little while ago we received an email from Star of the Sea Catholic School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, asking what happens when you place liquid nitrogen in a microwave. Well, I just happen to have some liquid nitrogen! Steve: And I just happen to have a microwave!

176

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze the Rainbow! Freeze the Rainbow! Previous Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!) Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen... Steve: ...meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol! Joanna: While a mix of 70 percent ethylene glycol and 30 percent water doesn't freeze until 60 degrees below zero, it's still no match for liquid nitrogen. At 321 degrees below zero, liquid nitrogen easily freezes

177

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

178

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Menlo Park, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Segelke, Scott (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Methane/nitrogen separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nitrogen-doped Graphene and Its Electrochemical Applications  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) is obtained by exposing graphene to nitrogen plasma. N-graphene exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and H2O2 reduction than graphene, and much higher durability and selectivity than the widely-used expensive Pt. The excellent electrochemical performance of N-graphene is attributed to nitrogen functional groups and the specific properties of graphene. This indicates that N-graphene is promising for applications in electrochemical energy devices (fuel cells, metal-air batteries) and biosensors.

Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Li, Guosheng; Shao, Guocheng; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quantum groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of Quantum groups, although rather young, since the expression Quantum ... introduction of a suitable form of the quantum group, the algebra A...

182

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nitrogen fixation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

Chen, Hao-Lin (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Using r-Space Phase Information in EXAFS to Characterize Possible Off-center Displacements in PbTe Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase Previous Pause Next Supporting the User Community ginter Register Submit Proposals Request Beam Time Check-In Visiting scientists ("users") from universities, industries and laboratories around the world use SSRL experimental facilities to conduct experiments across a broad range of scientific, engineering, and environmental disciplines. Our Experimental Facilities SPEAR Plot Click for Full Status Beam Lines Labs Schedules

185

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE The Stanford Synchrotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Cells A new process that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate electricity could offer more than double the efficiency of existing...

186

About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

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and leads to major advances in energy production, environmental remediation, nanotechnology, new materials and medicine. SSRL also provides unique educational experiences and...

187

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!  

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Antifreeze! Antifreeze! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! A burning candle is placed in a container of liquid nitrogen! Filmed in front of a live studio audience. Well, they were live when we started... [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Steve: Now, then. I'm a little bit afraid to ask this next question because I think I already know the answer, but is anyone in here feeling a little... dangerous? You're willing to take a chance? Because I am willing to do an experiment they haven't let me do since 'The Incident.' Now, because of the danger, I cannot have a volunteer. I must do this on my

188

Nitrogen chiller acceptance test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the inspection and testing requirements for the Nitrogen Chiller unit. The Chiller will support the Rotary Mode core Sampling System during the summer. The Chiller cools the Nitrogen Purge Gas that is used when drilling in tank wastes to cool the drill bit.

Kostelnik, A.J.

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Superconductors...  

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Main Index Next Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen Superconductors What happens when a magnet is placed on a superconductor? Play the video to find...

191

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Instant Liquid Nitrogen  

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Freezing Balloons! Freezing Balloons! Previous Video (Freezing Balloons!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Flowers!) Shattering Flowers! Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Need a bunch of balloons blown-up quickly? Liquid nitrogen to the rescue! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We've been making videos for a while now and we've learned that people like balloons and liquid nitrogen! Steve: So... Here you go! Balloon: Crackling... Balloon: Pop! Joanna: Ooh! Balloon: Pop! Balloon: Pop! Steve: If you'd like to know the science of what's going on behind this, please one of our first videos, "Liquid Nitrogen Experiments: The Balloon."

192

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Relative Humidity in Limited Streamer Tubes for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's BaBar Detector  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center studies the decay of B mesons created in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. The outermost layer of the detector, used to detect muons and neutral hadrons created during this process, is being upgraded from Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) to Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs). The standard-size LST tube consists of eight cells, where a silver-plated wire runs down the center of each. A large potential difference is placed between the wires and ground. Gas flows through a series of modules connected with tubing, typically four. LSTs must be carefully tested before installation, as it will be extremely difficult to repair any damage once installed in the detector. In the testing process, the count rate in most modules showed was stable and consistent with cosmic ray rate over an approximately 500 V operating range between 5400 to 5900 V. The count in some modules, however, was shown to unexpectedly spike near the operation point. In general, the modules through which the gas first flows did not show this problem, but those further along the gas chain were much more likely to do so. The suggestion was that this spike was due to higher humidity in the modules furthest from the fresh, dry inflowing gas, and that the water molecules in more humid modules were adversely affecting the modules' performance. This project studied the effect of humidity in the modules, using a small capacitive humidity sensor (Honeywell). The sensor provided a humidity-dependent output voltage, as well as a temperature measurement from a thermistor. A full-size hygrometer (Panametrics) was used for testing and calibrating the Honeywell sensors. First the relative humidity of the air was measured. For the full calibration, a special gas-mixing setup was used, where relative humidity of the LST gas mixture could be varied from almost dry to almost fully saturated. With the sensor calibrated, a set of sensors was used to measure humidity vs. time in the LSTs. The sensors were placed in two sets of LST modules, one gas line flowing through each set. These modules were tested for count rate v. voltage while simultaneously measuring relative humidity in each module. One set produced expected readings, while the other showed the spike in count rate. The relative humidity in the two sets of modules looked very similar, but it rose significantly for modules further along the gas chain.

Lang, M.I.; /MIT; Convery, M.; /SLAC; Menges, W.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Element-Specific and Real-Time Observation of CO-Ru Chemisorption Bond Element-Specific and Real-Time Observation of CO-Ru Chemisorption Bond Breaking with Soft X-ray Spectroscopy March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure An international collaboration of scientists, including several from SSRL, has taken advantage of the broad range of photon science capabilities available at the lab to investigate a proposal that adsorption and desorption of a molecule to a surface - both fundamental processes of interfacial chemistry - proceed through a transient "precursor" state in which the molecule is weakly bound to the surface. Their research focused on carbon monoxide adsorption/desorption on metal surfaces; although a large number of spectroscopic studies have been devoted to this reaction,

196

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Watching Ions Hop in Superionic Nanomaterials Watching Ions Hop in Superionic Nanomaterials March 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure For the first time, ultrafast x-ray scattering and spectroscopic measurements carried out at SSRL, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) captured the atomic-level dynamics of a superionic nanocrystal as it transformed. Superionic materials are multi-component solids which can simultaneously display characteristics of both a solid and a liquid: Above a critical temperature associated with a structural phase transition, one atomic species in the material exhibits liquid-like ionic conductivities and dynamic disorder within the rigid crystalline structure of the other. Applications such as electrochemical storage materials and resistive

197

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell The Long-sought Structure of α-Catenin Defines Its Functions for Cell-cell Interactions June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Full-length α-catenin crystal structure reveals its dimeric asymmetric arrangement. The individual domains are colored individually (dimerization domain in yellow, vinculin binding domain in green, M-fragment in cyan, and the F-actin binding domain in magenta). A: View onto the vinculin binding domains. B: View onto the dimerization domains. Cell-cell interactions play an important role in the development, architecture, maintenance, and function of tissues in all higher organisms. Cells use specialized protein complexes to bind each other. These complexes define the attachment sites known as adherens junctions and consist of

198

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone Nanoscale Examination of Microdamage in Sheep Cortical Bone April 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Lead-uranyl acetate staining of damage morphologies in notched bone samples. (A, B) Staining of lacunae and canaliculi in the compressive region seen in 20 of the 23 samples; (C, D) Cross hatching damage around notch tip in the tensile region observed in 10 of 23 samples; (E, F) Crack propagating from notch tip in the tensile region in a single sample. Staining appears white due to high attenuation of lead-uranyl acetate, with bone tissue appearing grey and voids black. Scale bar: A,C,E = 50 μm; B,D,F = 5 μm. Sample created in the longitudinal plane of the bone.] An important factor contributing to bone fractures is the accumulation of

199

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Read Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Superlattices X-ray Reflectivity X-ray reflectometry is a technique for investigating the near-surface structure of many materials. It probes the electron density with a depth resolution of less than one nm for depths of up to several hundred nm. The method involves measuring the reflected X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray incidence angle (typically small angles are used). The method is used for studies of thin films and multilayers of metals, semiconductors and polymers. It can accurately determine films thickness, density, average roughness, and the roughness correlation function. Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering and Diffraction on Thin Films Grazing incidence X-ray scattering or diffraction (GIXS) refers to a method

200

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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this problem is to explore the phases next to superconductivity on the temperature-doping phase diagram. The pseudogap phase above Tc has been a particular stumbling block because...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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and redox reactions, and tying this complex delithiation behavior to a combination of kinetic limitations due to macroscopic defects in the crystals and thermodynamic effects....

202

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Discoveries Point to Better Batteries SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the modern world. They support the storage and distribution of electricity generated by different mechanisms, enabling the use of green power sources when the resource itself is unavailable (for example, solar energy at night or wind energy on a calm day). Such devices also provide energy portability for consumer electronics and zero-emission options for transportation, in either hybrid or fully-electric vehicles. Many impressive battery technologies exist today, but the understanding of their operation is somewhat limited, which makes it very challenging to improve

203

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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X-rays Illuminate Frustrated Materials X-rays Illuminate Frustrated Materials SSRL Science Summary - August 2012 Figure 1. Two sets of Cu spin orientations on a hexagon from the honeycomb lattice; either the "green" or "blue" set of spins describe the magnetic arrangement at a given time, illustrating that there is no preferred spin orientation; i.e the spins are "frustrated". Credit: Satoru Nakatsuji, University of Tokyo The electronic, spin, and ionic structures of closely packed atoms in solids are strongly co-dependent and interactions of these three lattices, whether innate or due to subtle manipulation, can cause exotic properties to emerge. The strong coupling among these lattices can also suppress a physical property through "frustration," the term for an incompatibility of

204

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Botulinum Neurotoxin is Bio-shielded by NTNHA in a Handshake Complex Botulinum Neurotoxin is Bio-shielded by NTNHA in a Handshake Complex SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure A single reconstructed slice and a volume rendering of the tomography sequence. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) invade motor neurons at their junctions with muscular tissue, where the toxins disable the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and subsequently paralyze the affected muscles. Accidental BoNT poisoning primarily occurs through ingestion of food products contaminated by Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium that produces BoNTs. However, BoNTs by themselves are fragile and sensitive to low pH environments and digestive proteases. So how do they survive the harsh environment of the host's gastrointestinal tract? Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Research Institute and the Medical School of

205

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Illuminating the Multiconfigurational Ground State of Elemental and Illuminating the Multiconfigurational Ground State of Elemental and Intermetallic Compounds of Uranium and Plutonium SSRL Science Summary - October 2012 Figure Resonant x-ray emission spectra of actinide metals: Spectra show the emitted photon intensity as a function of the incident photon beam energy, EI, and the transfer energy, ET. Upper panel shows a sharp resonance dominated by a single uranium valence configuration. Bottom panel shows the broader resonance for the ground-state phase of elemental plutonium that is made up of differing amounts of three resonances = three valences. The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of U and Pu elements and intermetallics remain poorly understood despite decades of effort, and currently represent an important scientific frontier toward understanding

206

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Using X-rays to Find an Evolutionary Step in the Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis approximately 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago revolutionized life on Earth. For most modern-day terrestrial life, oxygen has become indispensable. At the heart of oxygenic photosynthesis is the production of oxygen from water - a process mediated by the water-splitting manganese cluster of Photosystem II. Little is known about how oxygenic photosynthesis originally evolved, although some have hypothesized a manganese-oxidizing photosystem as a precursor step. Researchers from the California Institute of Technology, SSRL, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have now found geological

207

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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telecommunications and manufacturing. Close window SSRL Scientists About SSRL Directory | History | Organization | Video Plus Sign Overview As one of the pioneering...

208

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the source. However, at higher rates of injection, an isothermal zone develops close to the injection well pressures fall. As a result of the potential significant reduction in well flow rates, injection is now, there is a risk of breakthrough of cooler injected fluid at the production wells. If cold fluid reaches

Stanford University

209

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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charge for LHe use during scheduled beam time. Orders for gases and cryogenics (including overhead and sales tax) will be charged to your user account. Prior to your scheduled...

210

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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through a gating mechanism of conformational changes. If this proves correct, the tight sequestering of RNA and likely conformational change needed for replication and...

211

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst Nanoscale Chemistry under Realistic Working Conditions SSRL Science Summary - November 2012 Figure Snapshot of 3D elemental mapping (see Rock on Fire)...

212

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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the Excel spreadsheet Download and save the Excel spreadsheet to your computer. You can enter data about your planned shipment of radioactive materials to SLAC. The Excel file is...

213

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Berkeley National Laboratory. His research focuses mainly on the behavior of technetium in nuclear waste and nuclear wasteforms. In addition, his research examines...

214

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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StateCountyCity Research Area: (hold Ctrl to select multiple options) Biological & Life Sciences Medical Applications Chemistry Materials Science Physics Polymers Earth Sciences...

215

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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in the September 10 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. These findings will likely facilitate further elucidation of FDTS's mechanism and...

216

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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protein synthesis. Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute, Florida State University and the University of Texas Houston have established an essential role for an...

217

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Beam Line 10-2 in parallel with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at Wayne State University to map and quantify iron and calcium on the same slices of human brain, thus...

218

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Office of Biological and Environmental Research (FWP 10094) and Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Primary Citation J. R. Bargar, K. H. Williams, K. M. Campbell, P. E. Long,...

219

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VoluntaryAssoc DOEBES DOEBER DOD DVA NASA NIST USDA OtherUS Govt StateCountyCity Research Area: (hold Ctrl to select multiple options) Biological & Life Sciences Medical...

220

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Institute of Science David Baker, University of Washington Ian Wilson, The Scripps Research Institute 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS: 99, Menlo Park, California, 94025, USA Tel:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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of in vitro evolution allows the generation of model systems and the study of basic principles of complex natural evolution. This in vitro directed evolution method has...

222

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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supported by the Northeastern Center for Chemical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, scientists from Lawrence Berkeley...

223

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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investigation was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DOE-BES) Chemical and Geosciences Programs, the National Science Foundation (NSF)...

224

STANFORD GEOTHERMAL QUARTERLY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generator to the fluid and constant heat losses through the lines in the saturated zone. This allows us of the problems arise from the lack of the understanding of the mechanics and dynamics of this complex process tomography (CT) scanner, we visualized the process and determined the three- dimensional fluid distributions

Stanford University

225

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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access? Scheduling Information Shifts Requested: 3 6 Samples: Sample Concentrations: EnergiesEdges: Crystal Orientation for Si(220): phi0 phi90 no preference Temperature...

226

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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access? Scheduling Information Shifts Requested: 3 6 Samples: Sample Concentrations: EnergiesEdgesTechnique(XRF, XAS, XRD): Crystal Orientation for Si(220): phi0 phi90 or...

227

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Water-Rock Reactions Produce Hydrogen Gas at Temperatures within the Limits of Life June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications and Lisa E....

228

The Stanford Dash Multiprocessor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on bus transactions. The RAC is lockup-free in that it can handle several outstanding remote requests to ease the programming bur- den. Handling the coherence problem in the compiler is attractive. but cur is similar to many scalable objects residing in local memory by dis- the longer latency of remote references

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

229

Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Oxides Emission Control Options for Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers Ravi K. Srivastava and Robert E. Hall U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division, Research Triangle Park, NC Sikander Khan and Kevin Culligan U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Clean Air Markets Division, Washington, DC Bruce W. Lani U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Environmental Projects Division, Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increas- ingly important to implement state-of-the-art NO x con- trol technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NO x control

230

METHOD OF FIXING NITROGEN FOR PRODUCING OXIDES OF NITROGEN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for fixing nitrogen from air by compressing the air, irradiating the compressed air in a nuclear reactor, cooling to remove NO/ sub 2/, compressing the cooled gas, further cooling to remove N/sub 2/O and recirculating the cooled compressed air to the reactor.

Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Atmospheric Nitrogen Fixation by Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production Of nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) by lightning flashes has been computed from a model of gaseous molecular reactions occurring as heated lightning-channel air cools by mixing with surrounding ambient air. The effect of ozone (O3) on ...

R. D. Hill; R. G. Rinker; H. Dale Wilson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

Schmidt, G.W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nucleation and Characteristics of Liquid Nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments on a refrigerating catalyst?liquid nitrogen (LN)?in different cloud chambers and their results. The nucleation threshold temperature of liquid nitrogen is 0C, and when the temperature less than ?2C, the ice ...

Cao Xuecheng; Wang Weimin

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen Show!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insulators! Insulators! Previous Video (Insulators!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Superconductors!) Superconductors! Liquid Nitrogen Show! All of your favorite liquid nitrogen experiments all in one place! Flowers! Balloons! Racquetballs! Nothing is safe! Just sit back, relax, and enjoy the show! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Usually, every couple years, Jefferson Lab hosts an Open House. This is the one time the public and come and tour our accelerator and end stations. Steve: During the 2010 Open House, our cameraman snuck into one of the ongoing cryo shows that are held throughout the day. He missed half of it. So if you want to see the entire thing, check our website to see when the

235

Mesdi Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally

236

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally

237

National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally

238

NuMat Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing

239

Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O[sub 2]/cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N[sub 2]. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N[sub 2] at a much quicker rate than unexcited N[sub 2], greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed. 1 fig.

Chen, H.L.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Nitrogen fixation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

Chen, Hao-Lin (Walnut Creek, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Bevatron liquid nitrogen circulation system  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen liquefier and computer controlled valving system have been added to the Bevatron cryoliner vacuum system to cut operating costs by reducing liquid nitrogen consumption. The computer and interface electronic systems, which control the temperatures of twenty-eight liquid nitrogen circuits, have been chosen and designed to operate in the Bevatron's pulsating magnetic field. The nitrogen exhaust is routed back to a liquefier, of about five kilowatt capacity, liquefied, and rerouted through the cooling circuits. A description of the system and operating results are presented.

Hunt, D.; Stover, G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen ...  

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers United States Patent. Patent Number: 8,152,988: Issued: April 10, 2012: Official Filing:

243

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NITROGEN METABOLISM AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RG and JA Bassham, Photosynthesis by isolated chloroplasts.chloroplasts during photosynthesis. Plant Physiol ~0:22H-2?NITROGEN METABOLISM AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS James A. Bassham,

Bassham, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following Topic Groups are no longer active; however, related documents and notes for these archived Topic Groups are available through the following links:

245

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

Security Technologies Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Technologies Group. Welcome. Our group develops measurement science in support of performance-based standards ...

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Construction and Operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), California (DOE/EA-1426) (2/28/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), California. AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1426, evaluating the proposed action to construct and operate the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Based upon the information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed federal action does not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969.

248

nitrogen oxides | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279720 Varnish cache server nitrogen oxides Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago)

249

NITROGEN K-SHELL PHOTOABSORPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable atomic data have been computed for the spectral modeling of the nitrogen K lines, which may lead to useful astrophysical diagnostics. Data sets comprise valence and K-vacancy level energies, wavelengths, Einstein A-coefficients, radiative and Auger widths, and K-edge photoionization cross sections. An important issue is the lack of measurements that are usually employed to fine-tune calculations so as to attain spectroscopic accuracy. In order to estimate data quality, several atomic structure codes are used and extensive comparisons with previous theoretical data have been carried out. In the calculation of K photoabsorption with the Breit-Pauli R-matrix method, both radiation and Auger dampings, which cause the smearing of the K edge, are taken into account. This work is part of a wider project to compute atomic data in the X-ray regime to be included in the database of the popular XSTAR modeling code.

GarcIa, J. [Catholic University of America, IACS, Physics Department, Washington DC 20064 (United States); Kallman, T. R.; Witthoeft, M.; Behar, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mendoza, C. [Centro de Fisica, IVIC, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P. [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Bautista, M.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Klapisch, M. [ARTEP, Inc., Ellicott City, MD 21042 (United States)], E-mail: javier@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: michael.c.witthoeft@nasa.gov, E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov, E-mail: behar@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov, E-mail: claudio@ivic.ve, E-mail: palmeri@umons.ac.be, E-mail: quinet@umons.ac.be, E-mail: bautista@vt.edu, E-mail: marcel.klapisch.ctr@nrl.navy.mil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

251

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Freezing Balloons!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Season Two Bloopers Season Two Bloopers Previous Video (Season Two Bloopers) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party!) Instant Liquid Nitrogen Balloon Party! Freezing Balloons! What happens when a balloon full of air is plunged into a container full of liquid nitrogen? Play the video to find out! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a really big balloon! Joanna: Let's see what happens when we place the balloon in the liquid nitrogen! Steve: Okay! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Isn't the balloon going to pop? Joanna: We'll see! Steve: Aw, man... Huh. Okay, so the balloon didn't pop. But, there's

252

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Insulators!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Popping Film Canisters! Popping Film Canisters! Previous Video (Popping Film Canisters!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Show!) Liquid Nitrogen Show! Insulators! Cups full of water are placed into bowls of liquid nitrogen! Which cup will insulate the best? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And these are two plastic cups! Joanna: Let's see which cup is the better insulator! Steve: Okay! So, um, how do we do that? Joanna: Well, we'll pour water into each of the cups and then we'll pour the liquid nitrogen into each of the bowls. If we then place the cup in the bowl, the heat from the water will try to pass through the cup into the

253

Visualizing Individual Nitrogen Dopants in Monolayer Graphene  

SciTech Connect

In monolayer graphene, substitutional doping during growth can be used to alter its electronic properties. We used scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and first principles calculations to characterize individual nitrogen dopants in monolayer graphene grown on a copper substrate. Individual nitrogen atoms were incorporated as graphitic dopants, and a fraction of the extra electron on each nitrogen atom was delocalized into the graphene lattice. The electronic structure of nitrogen-doped graphene was strongly modified only within a few lattice spacings of the site of the nitrogen dopant. These findings show that chemical doping is a promising route to achieving high-quality graphene films with a large carrier concentration.

L Zhao; R He; K Rim; T Schiros; K Kim; H Zhou; C Gutierrez; S Chockalingam; C Arguello; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Very Short Ruthenium(II) - Nitrogen Heterocycle Bond: The Crystal Structures of Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(II) Iodide and Pentaammine(N-methylpyrazinium)ruthenium(III) p-Toluenesulfonate Pentahydrate James F. Wishart, Avi Bino and Henry Taube Inorg. Chem. 25, 3318-3321 (1986) Abstract: The crystal structures of [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] I3 and [(NH3)5Ru(NC4H4NCH3)] (CH3C6H4SO3)4°5H2O have been solved to weighted R factors of 0.053 and 0.083, respectively. For the former structure, the space group is Pmma with a = 10.655(2)Å, b = 7.704(1)Å, c = 21.488(3)Å, and Z = 4. The Ru(II)-N(Mepyz) distance of 1.95(1)Å in this complex is the shortest yet reported for a ruthenium(II) to heteroctclic nitrogen bond. A difference of 0.04(1)Å between the cis (2.122(7)Å and 2.136(8)Å) and

256

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Eligibility Commercial...

257

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

258

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Grant Topic Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes affected by DOE nuclear material shipments. The group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the development of a consolidated funding vehicle for transportation activities, should DOE implement such a program. Some of the major issues under consideration by the Consolidated Grant

259

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Tribal Topic Group was established in January 1998 to address government-to-government consultation between DOE and Indian Tribes affected by its transportation activities. The group focuses on...

260

Engineered Fire Safety Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered Fire Safety Group. Welcome. ... Employment/Research Opportunities. Contact. Jason Averill, Leader. Engineered Fire Safety Group. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Research Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Research Group. Welcome. The newest Group in the CNST develops instruments designed to reveal the nanoscale ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Comminution employing liquid nitrogen pretreatments  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a methodology that will lead to the establishment of an effective, efficient technique for ultrafine grinding of coal. We believe that the key to successful coal grinding is strongly dependent upon the change of the brittleness of coal under a freezing temperature pretreatment. Furthermore, a cryogenic grinding process may provide the basis for the development of advanced technologies involving the separation of the pyritic minerals from coal. Specific objectives of the program are to: determine the effect of low temperature pretreatments on the microfracture development along the coal/pyrite interface and on the fracture resistance (brittleness) of coal. Specifically, we intend to examine the effect of direct contact of coal with liquid nitrogen, dry ice, and dry-iced acetone. Also, we intend to study pyrite liberation as a result of these treatments; determine the fracture resistance of coal under different low temperature pretreatments; determine the relationships between the fracture resistance of coal and the effectiveness of a grinding process; determine the effect of the frozen coal grinding on the pyrite liberation; evaluate factors which might effect process design, scale-up, and economics; and make a first pass economic assessment of the process. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Yen, S.C. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Mechanics); Hippo, E.J. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nitrogen oxide delivery systems for biological media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated levels of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo are associated with a variety of cellular modifications thought to be mutagenic or carcinogenic. These processes are likely mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as ...

Skinn, Brian Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd nitrogen removal/gas treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project field test at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A toolbox for calculating net anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (NANI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''Net Anthropogenic Nitrogen Input'' (NANI) to a region represents an estimate of anthropogenic net nitrogen (N) fluxes across its boundaries, and is thus a measure of the effect of human activity on the regional nitrogen cycle. NANI accounts for ... Keywords: Anthropogenic, Nitrogen, Synthesis, Toolbox, Watershed

Bongghi Hong; Dennis P. Swaney; Robert W. Howarth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter experts concerned with secure transport of spent nuclear...

268

Lighting Group: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New in the Lighting Group For more information on what's new in the Lighting Group, please contact: Francis Rubinstein Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4096...

269

Sustainable Energy Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Systems Group The Sustainable Energy Systems Group studies the impacts of energy generation and use, manufacturing, and other activities on the environment, the...

270

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

synchrotron research in a particular area. View monthly meetings on calendar Groups Catalysis Randall Winans, APS The Catalysis group meets at noon on the second Tuesday of each...

271

Groups defined by automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is Chapter 24 in the "AutoMathA" handbook. Finite automata have been used effectively in recent years to define infinite groups. The two main lines of research have as their most representative objects the class of automatic groups (including word-hyperbolic groups as a particular case) and automata groups (singled out among the more general self-similar groups). The first approach implements in the language of automata some tight constraints on the geometry of the group's Cayley graph, building strange, beautiful bridges between far-off domains. Automata are used to define a normal form for group elements, and to monitor the fundamental group operations. The second approach features groups acting in a finitely constrained manner on a regular rooted tree. Automata define sequential permutations of the tree, and represent the group elements themselves. The choice of particular classes of automata has often provided groups with exotic behaviour which have revolutioned our perception of infinite finitely ge...

Bartholdi, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

Schmidt, G.W.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Bioanalytical Science Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioanalytical Science Group. Welcome. We provide the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Research Group overview what's new publications software facilities people contact us links...

275

Scientific Working Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TWGDAM 1988). SWGDOG, Scientific Working Group on Dogs and Orthogonal Detection Guidelines, 2004. SWGTOX, Scientific ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

QUANTUM GROUPS JOHAN KUSTERMANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM GROUPS JOHAN KUSTERMANS Syllabus: #15; The de#12;nition of a locally compact quantum group: motivational ex- amples and special cases. The classical case, compact and discrete quantum groups. #15 for weights. #15; The general de#12;nition of a locally compact quantum group and its basic consequences

Schürmann, Michael

277

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group | Focus Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content EAG Home About the EAG EAG Members Questions and Answers Suggestions and Questions Focus Group...

278

Simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides from combustion gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the simultaneous removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides from power plant stack gases comprising contacting the stack gases with a supported iron oxide catalyst/absorbent in the presence of sufficient reducing agent selected from the group consisting of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and mixtures thereof, to provide a net reducing atmosphere in the SO.sub.x /NO.sub.x removal zone. The sulfur oxides are removed by absorption substantially as iron sulfide, and nitrogen oxides are removed by catalytic reduction to nitrogen and ammonia. The spent iron oxide catalyst/absorbent is regenerated by oxidation and is recycled to the contacting zone. Sulfur dioxide is also produced during regeneration and can be utilized in the production of sulfuric acid and/or sulfur.

Clay, David T. (Longview, WA); Lynn, Scott (Walnut Creek, CA)

1976-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Research Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Research Group Staff. ... Nikolai Zhitenev, Group Leader Nikolai Zhitenev is the Group Leader of the CNST Energy Research Group. ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thermal transformations of nitrogen and sulfur forms in peat related to coalification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical pathways for nitrogen and sulfur transformations during coalification are elucidated by comparing the chemical forms of unaltered peats, lignites, and coals and pyrolyzed peats using a combination of spectroscopic techniques in unaltered peats, the NMR and XPS spectra are consistent with the presence of amide nitrogen. The spectra indicate that a thermal transformation of amide nitrogen into pyrrolic and pyridinic forms occurs after thermal stress that is roughly equivalent to lignitification. High total nitrogen levels are found in pyrolyzed peats relative to lignites and higher-rank coals, suggesting that some amides initially found in peat are lost via nonthermal pathways during coalification. Lignites contain the highest levels of quaternary nitrogen, and they are associated with protonated pyridinic structures. Most quaternary nitrogen is formed during lignitification as a result of the creation and interaction of basic nitrogen species with acidic functionalities and is lost completely during bitumenization. Sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (S-XANES) of unaltered peats detect the presence of disulfide, mercapto, aliphatic sulfide, and aromatic forms of organically bound sulfur. XPS and S-XANES results show that the relative level of aromatic sulfur increases as the severity of peat pyrolysis increases. The relative level of aromatic sulfur increases through the selective loss of disulfide, aliphatic sulfide, and SO{sub 3} groups and through the transformation of aliphatic sulfur forms. Aliphatic sulfur is present mostly as mercapto and disulfide species in peats and in lignites but not in higher-rank coals. These results indicate that mercapto and disulfide species are lost after lignitification. Organic sulfur in peats exist mainly as aromatic forms, consistent with the level of aromatic sulfur increasing with the increasing degree of coalification. 91 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

S.R. Kelemen; M. Afeworki; M.L. Gorbaty; P.J. Kwiatek; M. Sansone; C.C. Walters; A.D. Cohen [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

282

Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Rational subsets of groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This text, Chapter 23 in the "AutoMathA" handbook, is devoted to the study of rational subsets of groups, with particular emphasis on the automata-theoretic approach to finitely generated subgroups of free groups. Indeed, Stallings' construction, associating a finite inverse automaton with every such subgroup, inaugurated a complete rewriting of free group algorithmics, with connections to other fields such as topology or dynamics. Another important vector in the chapter is the fundamental Benois' Theorem, characterizing rational subsets of free groups. The theorem and its consequences really explain why language theory can be successfully applied to the study of free groups. Rational subsets of (free) groups can play a major role in proving statements (a priori unrelated to the notion of rationality) by induction. The chapter also includes related results for more general classes of groups, such as virtually free groups or graph groups.

Bartholdi, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Theses | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theses Theses 2013 Elizabeth L. Baxter, "Uncovering Allostery in a Uniquely Folded Metalloprotein", University of California San Diego, 2013; Advisor: P. A. Jennings Martja A. Beckwith, "X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of Manganese Complexes Relevant to Photosystem II", Cornell University, 2013; Advisor: S. DeBeer Beate Fulda, "Changes in Copper and Cadmium Solubility and Speciation Induced by Soil Redox Dynamics - Competitive Metal Sulfide Formation and Interactions with Natural Organic Matter", ETH Zurich, 2013; Advisor: R. Kretzschmar Thomas D. Grant, "Understanding the Structure of Eukaryotic Glutaminyl-TRNA Synthetase: Combining X-ray Crystallography with Statistical Evaluations of Small Angle Scattering Data", State University of New York Buffalo, 2013;

285

Robert L. Byer Stanford University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

causing irreparable harm to the DOE's science programs generally and the domestic fusion and plasma research programs more specifically. If the U.S. is to maintain a leadership position in fusion energy

286

Grantee: Stanford University Geophysics Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cohesive substrata: (i) spherical glass beads d50=1.09mm; (ii) angular very coarse sand d that only such flume-based studies, with tight environmental control and measurement colonies of Phormidium over d50=0.3- 0.5 mm sand; Fig. 3: ESEM of biofilm over d

Nur, Amos

287

DOE Solar Decathlon: Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into one centralized "engine" with modular additions to extend the control system to each living space. A modular framework supports future additions. Structural insulated panels...

288

(continued on back) Stanford's Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of estrogen plus progestin faced elevated risks of breast cancer, heart attack, and stroke, rendering. Researchers want to find out if an even more intensive diet (lower fat, more nutrient-dense vegetables than

Ford, James

289

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical engineering, applied physics and materials science. Bill spent the past 40...

290

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farrel W. Lytle Award was established by the SSRL Organization Executive Committee to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based...

291

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific Development Award honors a pioneer at the forefront of accomplishments in NMR, EPR, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy who was dedicated to the pursuit of the...

292

Characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the separation and characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil samples were obtained. Two samples of Paraho shale oil were hydrotreated by Chevron Research Company such that one sample contained about 0.05 wt. percent nitrogen and the other sample contained about 0.10 wt. percent nitrogen. A separation method concentrate specific nitrogen compound types was developed. Characterization of the nitrogen types was accomplished by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, potentiometric titration, and elemental analysis. The distribution of nitrogen compound types in both samples and in the Paraho crude shale oil is compared.

Holmes, S.A.; Latham, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Student Common Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Students interested in the oils and fats industry make valuable networking connections by joining the AOCS Student Common Interest Group. Student Common Interest Group Student Membership achievement aocs application award awards distinguished divi

294

Quantum Chevalley groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to construct quantum analogues of Chevalley groups inside completions of quantum groups or, more precisely, inside completions of Hall algebras of finitary categories.

Berenstein, Arkady

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Microanalysis Research Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Microanalysis Research Group Staff. ... Joseph M. Conny, Research Chemist. Jeff M. Davis, Materials Research Engineer. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Retrieval Group Digital Video  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site is no longer in use and will soon disappear entirely. The Retrieval Group Information Access Division Last updated ...

298

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is now working with the company's Randall Gas Technology Group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group first found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produced about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit was built to bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid was built by ABB. NTE ordered the required compressor and MTR made the membrane modules for a December 2004 delivery. However, the gas supply was not steady enough for field testing, and MTR/ABB have now located other sites for field testing and commercial development.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. Our target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1-MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technologies group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The system has been installed in the field and initial startup activities have been completed. The system has not yet produced the flow rate required for continuous stable operation. NTE, the company hosting this test site/pilot plant, will drill additional wells to increase the inlet flow rate. The system is expected to be in full continuous operation by May 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. The membrane skid is scheduled to be completed by December 29. The target is to have the unit installed and optimized by mid-January.

Andre Da Costa

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPERATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group has found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant. The plant produces about 1 MMscfd of gas containing 24% nitrogen. The membrane unit will bring this gas to 4% nitrogen for delivery to the pipeline. The membrane skid is being built by ABB. NTE has ordered the required compressor and MTR is making the membrane modules. System fabrication was completed in January 2004 and the membrane inserts were loaded. Additional pressure testing and verification will be completed prior to shipment, which is expected in early February 2004.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Modelling nitrogen leaching from overlapping urine patches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urine depositions have been shown to be the main source of N leaching from grazing systems and thus it is important to consider them in simulation models. The inclusion of urine patches considerably increases the complexity of the model and this can ... Keywords: APSIM, Grazing system, Heterogeneity, Leaching, Nitrogen, Simulation modelling, Urine patches

R. Cichota; V. O. Snow; I. Vogeler

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Working Group 7 Summary  

SciTech Connect

The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

309

Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole...

311

Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American...

313

NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath temperature superconductor) power devices, such as HTS transformers, fault current limiters, and terminals of subcooled liquid nitrogen system for an HTS transformer, operating at around 65 K. This system consists

Chang, Ho-Myung

314

NITROGEN EVOLUTION AND SOOT FORMATION DURING SECONDARY COAL PYROLYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor to provide a high temperature, oxygen-free post-flame environment to study secondary reactions yields of the primary tar as a function of reactor temperature in coal [N]tar nitrogen content in tar or soot N nitrogen N2 molecular nitrogen NH3 ammonia NMR Nuclear

Fletcher, Thomas H.

315

Interagency Advanced Power Group, Solar Working Group: Meeting minutes  

SciTech Connect

This report is the minutes of the Solar Working group. The meeting was prompted by the Steering Group`s desire to resolve issues the Solar Working Group.

Not Available

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

Trails Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet and non-motorized alternatives between the Townsite and LANL or between technical areas. The Trails Working Group, established in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA Los

317

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's Engineering group has found a new site for the project at a Duke Energy gas processing plant in Milfay, Oklahoma.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

1451 Group 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... It defines a set of implementaition-independent application programming interface (API) as needed. Website: http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/1451/0/.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to search page 7 - Privacy policy 8 - Terms of use 9 - Go to contactcomment page LBNL Community Advisory Group: HOME CALENDAR FEEDBACK HOME About the Community Advisory...

320

Image Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Group works to support the needs for Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-12 and the Personal Identity Verification (PIV) card for ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Grid Integration Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration Group The Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducts research that advances the near-term adoption of demand response (DR) technologies, policies, programs,...

322

Combustion Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technologies Group Combustion research generates the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge on the interaction between flame and turbulence. Experimental and...

323

Electron Physics Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Group conducts wide ranging, cross-disciplinary research ... phenomenon known as spin transfer torque, a ... energy and generates heat, creating two ...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NERSC Users Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group Teleconferences Annual Meetings NUGEX Elections Charter User Announcements Help Operations...

326

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis High Pressure LiquidSoft-Matter Surface Scattering Powder Diffraction SAXS Surface & Interface Scattering XAS X-ray Micros.Imaging Scientific Interest Groups...

327

Tribal Topic Group Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Email information on Indian 101 course to Tribal Topic Group * Government panel at future TEC on impacts of broader hazmat transportation spectrum * Set up next conference...

328

MEMS Test Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... p2. Top view of cantilevers in in-plane length group. p1. Unconventional anchor design. Same anchor design as in thickness test structures. ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

329

Particle Data Group - Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group HOME: pdgLive Summary Tables Reviews, Tables, Plots Particle Listings Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, Pakistan, Russia and all other countries For copies of: ...

330

Standards Working Groups - Logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... group is to define practices and test methods related to the overall deployment procedures and constraints in place for emergency response. ...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

TMS Group Savings Plus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A money-saving group discount on auto and homeowners policies; Convenient payment plans Including automatic checking account deduction or direct home...

332

Electron Physics Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Physics Group Staff. ... Jabez McClelland, Group Leader Jabez McClelland is the Group Leader of the CNST Electron Physics Group. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

Striking nitrogen isotope anomaly in the Bencubbin and Weatherford meteorites  

SciTech Connect

The stony-iron meteorites Bencubbin and Weatherford contain nitrogen with a ratio of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14 larger than normal by as much as a factor of 2. The excess nitrogen-15 may be due either to a nucleosynthetic origin or to extreme isotopic fractionation. In the former case, it may reflect failure to homogenize nitrogen-15 produced in nova explosions. In the latter case, it may reflect chemical processing at temperatures below 40 K in a presolar molecular cloud. 34 references.

Prombo, C.A.; Clayton, R.N.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NITROGEN -N2 MSDS (Document # 001040) PAGE 1 OF 10 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an emergency? 1. PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION CHEMICAL NAME; CLASS: NITROGEN - N2 LIQUEFIED NITROGEN N2, (CryogenicNITROGEN - N2 MSDS (Document # 001040) PAGE 1 OF 10 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET Prepared to U ppm ppm ppm Nitrogen 7727-37-9 >99 % There are no specific exposure limits for Nitrogen. Nitrogen

Choi, Kyu Yong

335

Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted to investigate the processes that influence the destruction of NO in the fuel rich stage of the reburning process. The objective is to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that control the fate of coal nitrogen in the fuel rich zone of a combustion process. Time resolved profiles of temperature, major (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), nitrogenous (NO, HCN and NH{sub 3}) and hydrocarbon (CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) species were obtained for various reburning tests. A slow continuous source of HCN was observed in the reburn zone for most tests. HCN formation from NO + CH{sub i} reactions would partially explain this trend. It has been proposed in the past that these reactions would be fast (less than 0.1s) and the produced HCN would be short lived. However, evidence was provided in this study indicating that NO + CH{sub i} reactions might contribute to HCN formation at longer residence times in the reburn zone. Reactions of molecular nitrogen with hydrocarbon radicals were determined to be a significant source of HCN formation, especially as NO levels decreased in the reburn zone. The results of several tests would justify the exclusion of continued coal devolatilization in the reburn zone as a major source of HCN.

Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

Schmidt, G.W.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

On A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups. Using homotopy invariance of group homology in one variable, we identify the sections of A^1-fundamental group sheaves of an isotropic reductive group G over an infinite field k with the second homology group of the group G(k). This provides explicit loops representing elements in the A^1-fundamental groups.

Konrad Voelkel; Matthias Wendt

338

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Freeze Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Pennies! Shattering Pennies! Previous Video (Shattering Pennies!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! By removing the hottest molecules, we're able to freeze liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, we're going to freeze liquid nitrogen! Joanna and Steve: Yeah! Joanna: The obvious way to do this is to put the liquid nitrogen into something colder. Something that we have lots of around here! Something like... liquid helium! Steve: Yes! Joanna: Yeah, but we're not going to do that. Instead, we're going to freeze the nitrogen by removing the hottest molecules!

339

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Freeze the Rainbow!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! Freeze the Rainbow! Starburst candy. They're fruity. They're chewy. They're delicious! But, can they survive taking a bath in liquid nitrogen? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A student visiting Jefferson Lab from Huntington Middle School in Newport News, Virginia, asked what happens to a starburst if you put it in liquid nitrogen. Well, we're going to find out! Steve: At room temperature, starburst isn't really all that special. I can kind of squish it if I squeeze it hard enough and, if I drop it, nothing

340

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Giant Koosh Ball!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Previous Video (Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Giant Koosh Ball! Sometimes, you just want to know what's going to happen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! A while ago, I was at the mall and I saw this. And, the first thing that popped into my head was 'I wonder what would happen if we were to put this in liquid nitrogen?' Now, that's one thing I really love about science. If you have a question, you can, sometimes, do an experiment to find out what the answer is! Here at the Lab, we have a lot of liquid nitrogen, so that's

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341

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) are the primary USGCRP vehicles for implementing and coordinating research activities within and across agencies. These groups are critical to Program integration and in assessing the Program's progress. The working groups span a wide range of interconnected issues of climate and global change, and address major components of the Earth's environmental and human systems, as well as cross-disciplinary approaches for addressing these issues. IWGs correspond to program functions and are designed to bring agencies together to plan and develop coordinated activities, implement joint activities, and identify and fill gaps in the Program's plans. They allow public officials to communicate with each other on emerging directions within their agencies, on their stakeholder needs, and on best practices learned from agency activities. Together, these functions allow the agencies to work in a more coordinated and effective manner.

342

Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Steering Group Report Fermilab Director Pier Oddone convened the Fermilab Steering Group in March 2007. Members comprised particle and accelerator scientists from Fermilab and the national community. Fermilab Deputy Director Young-Kee Kim served as chair. The Steering Group subsequently formed subgroups to provide advice on the best physics opportunities that new facilities could offer. These subgroups drew upon university and laboratory scientists largely from outside Fermilab. The Steering Group took a number of steps to obtain as much input as possible from a broad spectrum of the U.S. particle- and accelerator-physics community. The Steering Group chair gave presentations and conducted town-hall-style sessions at meetings of all the major collaborations at Fermilab (CDF, DZero, MINOS, MINERνA,

343

Topic Group Participants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Group Report Topic Group Report Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group April 5, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona Recent 180(c) Topic Group Activities Issue Papers 1. Funding Distribution Method 2. Allowable Activities 3. Definitions 4. Pass-Through Requirements 5. Contingency Plans 6. 180(c) Policy or Rulemaking 7. Timing and Eligibility* 8. Funding for Related Activities* 9. State Fees* 10. Funding Allocation Approach* 180(c) Policy & Procedures * Executive Summary * Draft Policy & Procedures * Draft Grant Application Pckg * Appendix *Papers 7-10 still under discussion Today's Discussion Items * Reviewed Topic Group member comments on a variety of issues * Key issues included: - Funding allocation and timing of grants - Planning grants - State fees/matching requirements - Related non-training activities

344

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group May 17, 2007 January 16, 2007 August 31,...

345

Indoor Environment Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

346

SI Group Scheduling Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Personnel On-Call Page Beamline Validation Schedule Group Organizational Chart Reviews Presentations Group Scheduling Page Project Scheduling Information Ops Scheduling Info Project / Scheduling Info APS fy2005 Annual Schedule ( html ) PSS Validation Schedule APS fy2006 Annual Schedule (html) PSS Validation Teams Latest Machine Studies Schedule (pdf) (html) New Builds Schedule (For SI GROUP Reference Only) Parasitic Beam Operations Schedule Ops Scheduling Page Shutdown Information Work Schedules August/September Shutdown Shutdown Work List Validation Schedule Safety Info Work Request Links ISM Core Functions Enter / Search Work Requests APS Safety Page Modify / Approve Work Requests Radiation Safety Policy APS TMS Training Profiles MSDS Search This page maintained by Joe Budz

347

Group key management  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Chemical Reference Data Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Reference Data Group. Welcome. The Chemical Reference Data Group compiles, evaluates, correlates and measures ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Welcome. The Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group conducts research in ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cyber Infrastructure Group Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Infrastructure Group. Welcome. The Cyber Infrastructure Group (775.04) addresses the integration and interoperability ...

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

NIST Laser Applications Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Applications Group. Welcome. The Laser Applications Group advances laser technology for applications in optical ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Dr. Marc Salit (Group Leader). Autumn ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

Focus Group I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF ATTITUDES IN WILLISTON, NORTH DAKOTA Sheila K. Hanson, Energy & Environmental Research Center Daniel J. Daly, Energy & Environmental Research Center Edward N. Steadman, Energy & Environmental Research Center John A. Harju, Energy & Environmental Research Center June 2005 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In April 2005, representatives of the Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, held two focus groups in Williston, North Dakota. A total of sixteen people participated; seven on April 20 and nine on April 21. The purpose of the focus group research was to gain insight into the public perception of carbon sequestration from

354

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content EAG Home About the EAG EAG Members Questions and Answers Suggestions and Questions Focus Group...

355

File Groups at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with another user "jimi", but does not want other members of bigsci to be able to see the data, the PI for Big Science could create a new group (for example, "ejdata", for elvis...

356

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

page 1 - Go to home page 2 - Go to search page 7 - Privacy policy 8 - Terms of use 9 - Go to contactcomment page LBNL Community Advisory Group: HOME CALENDAR...

357

The Ren Group - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ren Group Home Research Members Publications ContactsLinks NEWS Dec 15, 2012 Host an Electron Tomography Workshop with Peter Ercius at NCEM from Jan. 16-18th, 2013. Nov 20, 2012...

358

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK Top B. Krusche Institute of Physics University of Basel CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland Top Yu. Kuyanov COMPAS Group IHEP Protvino, RU-142284...

359

Security Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Group Security and TEC * Tension exists between open forum concept of TEC and the ability of STG members to discuss security topics. - DOE will maintain the open forum - it will not form a subgroup of cleared members NAS Study * Some members want STG to formally recommend a fully independent review of security issues - DOE is reviewing the NAS study and has not formulated a position Security Topic Group (Continued) Classification Guide & Information Sharing Protocol * Guide is finished and undergoing internal concurrence - Slated for late September release * Protocol will be completed once the guide is issued Security-Related Lessons Learned * Lessons learned document was distributed and comments requested by the end of March Security Topic Group (Continued) SRG/CVSA Survey

360

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not been preceded by the evolution of nitrogen fixation, and if these organisms had not also acquired the ability to fix nitrogen at the beginning of or very early in their history. The evolution of nitrogen fixation also appears to have been a precondition for the evolution of (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosynthesis. Given that some form of chlorophyll is obligatory for true photosynthesis, and its light absorption and chemical properties make it a "universal pigment," it may be predicted that the evolution of nitrogen fixation and photosynthesis are also closely linked on other Earth- like planets.

John W. Grula

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NIST, Theory and Modeling of Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of predicting thermodynamic properties of mixtures containing nitrogen, argon, oxygen, carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and i ...

362

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Topic Group Summary - July 1999...

363

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES Rail Topic Group Inspections Subgroup Planning Subgroup Tracking Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup...

364

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAGIS Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries TRAGIS Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup April 11, 2006 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic...

365

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Draft Work Plan More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic...

366

Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

Grula, J W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. MTR then located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; the units will be delivered in mid-2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we are now negotiating with Atmos Energy for a final test of the project demonstration unit. Several commercial sales have also resulted from the partnership with ABB, and sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units now total $2.3 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, and we continue, but have as yet been unsuccessful in our attempts, to negotiate with Atmos Energy for a final test of the original project demonstration unit. In the meantime, MTR has located an alternative testing opportunity and signed a contract with Towne Exploration for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, CA, to be run through May 2007. Several commercial sales have resulted from the partnership with ABB, and total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units are now approaching $2.6 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

The China Energy Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The China Energy Group A city-owned cogeneration plant, built in 1989 in Weihai, Shandong, received an award from the Chinese government as an advanced energy-efficient enterprise. The Energy Analysis Program's China Energy Group-a core team of four Mandarin-speaking U.S. and Chinese researchers, plus leader Mark Levine and a dozen other staff members-has worked closely with energy policymakers in China for nearly a decade. Their goal is to better understand the dynamics of energy use in China and to develop and enhance the capabilities of institutions that promote energy efficiency in that country. This unique collaboration began as a joint effort with the Energy Research Institute of China's State Planning Commission, but the Group's network has expanded to

372

DOE STGWG Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STGWG Group STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas. The tribal membership is composed of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Isleta Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Navajo Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Santa Clara Pueblo, Pueblo de San Ildefonso, Seneca Nation of Indians, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the

373

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizing Framework Organizing Framework CAG Organizing Framework The Community Advisory Group Organizing Framework is composed of three primary components: CAG Purpose and Charge CAG Member Responsibilities Operating Principles CAG Membership and Participation Download a pdf of the CAG Organizing Framework. Purpose and Charge The purpose of the LBNL Community Advisory Group (CAG) is to provide input into the Lab's physical plans and development projects. The specific charge to this group is to: Advise LBNL staff on issues related to the environmental impacts of proposed planning and development projects; Articulate key community planning and design principles to be considered in the review of individual projects as well as to guide the physical development of LBNL overall; Identify recommended strategies and actions for addressing community

374

Lighting Group: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

375

Specific Group Hardware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores with hyperthreading). The total local disk space is 1.9 TB. It is running Scientific Linux SL release 5.5 (Boron) and is disk booted. It is in rack 17. palicevo2 The Virtual Organization (VO) server testbed. It's a Dell PowerEdge R410 with 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors, each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores

376

Illinois Wind Workers Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

David G. Loomis

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

377

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

378

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

379

Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinocome Group Place Beijing Municipality, China Sector Solar Product A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector References Sinocome Group1 LinkedIn Connections...

380

Program on Technology Innovation: Water Quality Trading Program for Nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic releases of nitrogen have greatly increased environmental fluxes of biologically available nitrogen and contributed to serious ecological problems, such as algal blooms that cause waters to become severely depleted of oxygen. Power plant sources of nitrogen include NOx air emissions, the ammonia required for the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) systems that are used for NOx reduction, and the ammonia used for SOx control and ash pond condition...

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory SC Stanford University 1251981 9302017 9302017 M&O 1981 http:www-group.slac.stanford.edulegalcontract.asp Barbara Jackson 865- 576-0976 Tyndal Lindler...

382

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

Bell, group and tangle  

SciTech Connect

The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u [Open University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Passive measurement of nitrogen oxides to assess traffic-related...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

393-403 Date Published 012004 Keywords Freeways, nitrogen dioxide, Passive sampler, schools Abstract The East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study is examining associations...

386

Numerical Simulation of Carbon and Nitrogen Profiles Produced by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In advance of the nitrogen diffusion zone the carbon concentration is as high as 10 at. pct. ... Discovery of Efficient Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

387

Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen ...  

... methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more ...

388

Why sequence functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

functional metagenomics of methane and nitrogen cycles in freshwater lakes? Methane is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, but it is also a potential source of...

389

Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

391

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with...

392

Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air - Energy ...  

Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and ...

393

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

394

A preliminary report on zinc-induced resistance to nitrogen mustard toxicity in mice  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies with cultured human normal fibroblasts indicated that treatment of cells with zinc before exposure to alkylating agents enhanced cell survival by seven- to nine-fold. To establish whether a similar zinc-induced protective response could be elicited in vivo, a set of preliminary experiments was carried out in which Balb/cJ mice were treated with zinc chloride (2 mg/kg body weight) or saline by intraperitoneal (ip) injection at 48, 36, 24, and 12 h before ip administration of 4 mg/kg of the alkylating agent nitrogen mustard. Of the animals that received saline before nitrogen mustard, 57% were killed compared with only 20% in the group treated with zinc before administration of the alkylating agent. These results (which almost certainly were achieved with less than optimal induction conditions) provide evidence for the existence, in vivo, of a zinc-inducible process that reduces alkylating agent lethality. 12 refs., 4 figs.

Shackelford, M.E.; Tobey, R.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has started to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEPARATE NITROGEN FROM NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During precommissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) continued to negotiate a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR will be working with their Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry.

Dr. Andre Da Costa

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Group Nearest Neighbor Queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given two sets of points P and Q, a group nearest neighbor(GNN) query retrieves the point(s) of P with the smallestsum of distances to all points in Q. Consider, for instance,three users at locations q1, q2 and q3 that want to find a meeting point (e.g., ...

Dimitris Papadias; Qiongmao Shen; Yufei Tao; Kyriakos Mouratidis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

BCDA Group Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dohn Arms 2-0272 - 401B1161 9:00AM - 5:30PM EPICS application development and support, CAT contact Marianne Binetti 2-5023 - 401C1239-C 8:30AM - 5:00PM Group Secretary Jeff...

399

Cell Systems Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Cell Systems Science Group. Dr. John T. Elliott (Group Leader). Dr. Donald H. Atha ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

400

Brunnian subgroups of mapping class groups and braid groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we continue our study of the Delta-group structure on the braid groups and mapping class groups of a surface. We calculate the homotopy groups of these Delta-groups and prove some results about Brunnian braid groups and Brunnian mapping class groups. This is the second of a pair of papers on these structures. 1 Introduction and statement of results In this paper we study the sequences

A. J. Berrick; E. Hanbury; J. Wu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Dworkin, Morris  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Technology Group. Education: Ph.D., Mathematics, Brandeis University. BS, Mathematics, Stanford University. Contact. Phone ...

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Group Vision Care Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision Vision Care Policy Group Name: LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC. RETIREES Group Number: 12284390 Divisions 0005 & 0006 Effective Date: JANUARY 1, 2011 EVIDENCE OF COVERAGE Provided by: VISION SERVICE PLAN INSURANCE COMPANY 3333 Quality Drive, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 (916) 851-5000 (800) 877-7195 EOC NM 03/02 11/25/08 CLD In addition to the information contained in this Benefit Program Summary, the LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees Summary Plan Description contains important information about your LANS health and welfare benefits. For additional information: For Retirees: Customer Care Center (866) 934-1200 www.ybr.com/benefits/lanl LANL Benefits Website for Retirees: http://www.lanl.gov/worklife/benefits/retirees/

403

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Icon Fermilab Icon Photo Home About About the Steering Group Members & Contributors Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Acknowledgement Contents Contents Chapter 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Chapter 2 Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Chapter 3 Fermilab and the ILC Chapter 4 Physics at the Intensity Frontier Chapter 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier Chapter 6 Beyond the ILC and the LHC Chapter 7 A Fermilab Plan for Discovery Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix A Steering Group charge Appendix B Fermilab and the ILC Appendix C The international neutrino program Appendix D Neutrino science with 8 GeV and 800 GeV protons Appendix E Muon-to-electron conversion in nuclei Appendix F Precision physics experiments with kaon beams Appendix G Facilities considered Appendix H Steps toward a muon collider

404

NERSC User Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC User Group Meeting NERSC User Group Meeting Oct 18, 2010 Outline * About OpenMP * Parallel Regions * Worksharing Constructs * Synchronization * Data Scope * Tasks * Using OpenMP at NERSC 2 3 Common Architectures * Shared Memory Architecture - Multiple CPUs share global memory, could have local cache - Uniform Memory Access (UMA) - Typical Shared Memory Programming Model: OpenMP, Pthreads, ... * Distributed Memory Architecture - Each CPU has own memory - Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) - Typical Message Passing Programming Model: MPI, ... * Hybrid Architecture - UMA within one SMP node - NUMA across nodes - Typical Hybrid Programming Model: mixed MPI/OpenMP, ... What is OpenMP * OpenMP is an industry standard API of C/C++ and Fortran for shared memory parallel programming.

405

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP MEA BREAKOUT GROUP TOPICS FOCUSED ON CCMs * IONOMER * CATALYST LAYER * PERFORMANCE * DEGRADATION * FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IONOMER * DEVELOP IMPROVED IONOMERS: PERFLUORINATED IONOMERS (O2 SOLUBILITY) HYDROCARBON IONOMERS * ANODE FLOODING ISSUES, CATHODE DRYOUT ISSUES: - DEVELOP SEPARATE IONOMERS FOR ANODE/CATHODE - IONOMER CHEMISTRY * IONOMER/CATALYST INTERACTION * CL / MEMBRANE INTERACTION * IMPROVED CL/M INTERFACES - IONOMER CROSSLINKING CATALYST LAYER * CATALYST CHALLENGES IN ANODE SIDE * FOCUS ON NON-PGM CATALYSTS * INK FORMULATION * CCM VS. GDE * DELAMINATION PERFORMANCE * BACKUP POWER APPLICATION - STATUS: 60C, 0.5V, 0.2W/CM2 (DEGRADATION ISSUES) - TARGETS: SHOULD BE SET CONSISTENT WITH DOE STATIONARY TARGETS (2015) * AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATION - INCREASE POWER DENSITY TO >0.5W/CM2

406

AEC GROUP SHELTER  

SciTech Connect

As a result of atomic shelter tests and field experiments condueted over the past nine years, it has been conclusively shown that shelters provide the only promising means of civilian protection in the event of a nuclear war. Design details are presented for a group shelter to accommodate 100 persons of all age groups and both sexes. The shelter structure is a multiplate corrugated- steel arch set on a concrete slab with end walls of bridge plate sheathing. The entire structure is covered with a minimum of 3 feet of earth. The shelter combines outstanding protection against radioactive fall-out with good protection against blast and thermal radiation. Drawings are included. General operating procedures are outlined. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

CHA Guidelines Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Community Health Assessment Guidelines have been updated from the original document published in 1997. The revisions reflect various published sources, as well as accumulated experience with community health assessment within the province of Manitoba. Special thanks to the members of the CHA Guidelines Working Group, composed of representatives of regional health authorities from across the province and Manitoba Health and Healthy Living staff. These guidelines are made

Jody Allan; Sonia Busca Owczar; Ingrid Botting; Maggie Campbell; Bunmi Fatoye; Bill Funk; Tannis Erickson; Sue Lockhart; Ales Morga; Deborah Malazdrewicz; Leonie Stranc

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

409

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Meeting Summaries Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington DC TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 15, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Minneapolis TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 21, 2004 Albuquerque TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 22, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Jacksonville TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 20, 1999 Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1998

410

Spectroscopic detection of nitrogen concentrations in sagebrush  

SciTech Connect

The ability to estimate foliar nitrogen (N) in semi-arid landscapes can yield information on nutritional status and improve our limited understanding of controls on canopy photosynthesis. We examined two spectroscopic methods for estimating sagebrush dried leaf and live shrub N content: first derivative reflectance (FDR) and continuum removal. Both methods used partial least squares (PLS) regression to select wavebands most significantly correlated with N concentrations in the samples. Sagebrush dried leaf spectra produced PLS models (R2 = 0.760.86) that could predict N concentrations within the dataset more accurately than PLS models generated from live shrub spectra (R2 = 0.410.63). Inclusion of wavelengths associated with leaf water in the FDR transformations appeared to improve regression results. Findings are encouraging and warrant further exploration into sagebrush reflectance spectra to characterize N concentrations.

J. J. MITCHELL; N. F. GLENN; T.T. SANKEY; D. R. DERRYBERRY; R. C. HRUSKA; M. O. Anderson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics of Temperate and Subarctic Heath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics of Temperate and Subarctic Heath Ecosystems with Emphasis on Cold-season cycling of carbon and nitrogen in temperate and subarctic heath ecosystems. Over the last three years, I spend many hours introducing me to modeling carbon exchange, thank you. Also thanks to Karina Clemmensen

412

Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen modification of highly porous carbon for improved supercapacitor performance Stephanie L for supercapacitor applications. Surface modification increases the amount of nitrogen by four times when compared elements in highly porous carbon used for electric double-layer supercapacitors.1 These elements modify

Cao, Guozhong

413

Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Questions and Answers - Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How cold is liquid nitrogen? How cold is liquid nitrogen? Previous Question (How cold is liquid nitrogen?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen, would your body instantly crystallize?) If you jumped into a pool of liquid oxygen,would your body instantly crystallize? Is there anything colder than liquid nitrogen? Yes, there are things colder than liquid nitrogen, like most of the Universe! I assume, though, that you mean things on the Earth. There actually is an entire branch of science called cryogenics that deals with really cold things. Generally the science of cryogenics is when the temperature goes below that which we can reach with conventional refrigeration equipment, around 250 degrees (Fahrenheit) below zero. Many

415

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Popping Film Canisters!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploding Rubber Stopper! Exploding Rubber Stopper! Previous Video (Exploding Rubber Stopper!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Insulators!) Insulators! Popping Film Canisters! What happens when liquid nitrogen is trapped inside a sealed container? Play the video to find out! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a container of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And these are a bunch of film canisters! Joanna: Let's see what happens when we trap the liquid nitrogen in the film canisters! Steve: Okay! Now the room, and everything in it, is way too hot for the liquid nitrogen to stay as a liquid. As soon as the liquid nitrogen touches anything in the room, it boils and changes into a gas.

416

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) nitrogen trailers propane tanks  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is the evaluation and authorization of the onsite transport of propane tanks that are mounted on the Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Characterization Project`s nitrogen trailers. This SEP authorizes onsite transport of the nitrogen trailers, including the propane tanks, until May 31, 1998. The three nitrogen trailers (HO-64-4966, HO-64-4968, and HO-64-5170) are rated for 1,361 kg (30,000 lb) and are equipped with tandem axles and pintel hitches. Permanently mounted on each trailer is a 5,678 L (1,500 gal) cryogenic dewar that is filled with nitrogen, and a propane fired water bath vaporizer system, and a 454 L (1 20 gal) propane tank. The nitrogen trailer system is operated only when it is disconnected from the tow vehicle and is leveled and stabilized. When the trailers are transported, the propane tanks are isolated via closed supply valves.

Ferrell, P.C.

1998-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Marysville, OH); Qiu, Dongming (Dublin, OH); Dritz, Terence Andrew (Worthington, OH); Neagle, Paul (Westerville, OH); Litt, Robert Dwayne (Westerville, OH); Arora, Ravi (Dublin, OH); Lamont, Michael Jay (Hilliard, OH); Pagnotto, Kristina M. (Cincinnati, OH)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

419

Renormalization group functional equations  

SciTech Connect

Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

Curtright, Thomas L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-8046 (United States); Zachos, Cosmas K. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4815 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Renormalization group functional equations.  

SciTech Connect

Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

Curtright, T. L.; Zachos, C. K. (High Energy Physics); (Univ. of Miami)

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SPPR Group Proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Proposal June 23, 2010 Agenda Purpose of Meeting Presenters Background Information  Three Terminal Plan & Market Access  Business Case  Transmission Infrastructure Program ED5-Palo Verde Project Potential Rate Impacts Discussion / Comments 2 Purpose of Meeting Provide background information Share the SPPR Group's current proposal and how it might affect Parker-Davis Project (P-DP) customers Obtain your feedback on the proposal 3 Presenters Background Information - Todd Rhoades ED5-PV Project Description - Todd Rhoades Project Marketability - John Steward Project Cost & Financing - Jack Murray Potential Rate Impacts - Jack Murray Next Steps - Todd Rhoades 4 Three Terminal Plan November 2009 5 Business Case

422

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Albuquerque TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Presentation - April 21, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Portland TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - February 6, 2001 Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1999

423

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Rail Topic Group Task Plan Final Rail Topic Group Paper Strawman Report Comments Matrix 2002 Summary of the Rail Topic Group Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison...

424

Effects of soil substrate and nitrogen fertilizer on biomass production of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of soil substrate and nitrogen fertilizer on biomass production of Acacia senegal;Effects of soil substrate and nitrogen fertilizer on biomass production of Acacia senegal and Acacia, biomass allocation, fertilizer, growth rate, nitrogen, soil substrate Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet

425

Lighting Group: People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People Lighting Group Staff Phone Mailstop Email Group Leader [area code 510] Rubinstein, Francis 486-4096 90R3111 FMRubinstein@lbl.gov Staff Scientists Berman, Sam 5682 90R3111 Clear, Robert 486-4286 90R3111 RDClear@lbl.gov Research Associates Enscoe, Abby (510) 486 6077 90R3111 AIEnscoe@lbl.gov Fritz, Randolph M. (510) 495 2532 90R3111 RFritz@lbl.gov Ghatikar, Girish 486-6768 90R3111 GGhatikar@lbl.gov Granderson, Jessica 486-7692 90R3111 JGranderson@lbl.gov Howells, Jack 4096 46R0125 MRHowells@lbl.gov Kiliccote, Sila 495-2615 90R3111 SKiliccote@lbl.gov Liu, Gao 7207 70R0108B GLiu@lbl.gov Wen, Yao-Jung 4702 90R3111 YJWen@lbl.gov Yazdanian, Mehry 486-4701 90R3111 MYazdanian@lbl.gov Research Technicians Galvin, James 486-4661 47R0112 JEGalvin@lbl.gov Technical Support DiBartolomeo, Dennis 486-4702 90R3111

426

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup Tracking Subgroup March 27, 2006 March 6, 2006...

427

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training - Medical Training Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries...

428

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Items...

429

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup Planning Subgroup Rail Planning Timeline Benchmarking Project: AREVA Trip...

430

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup April 6, 2006 February 23, 2006 Draft January 24, 2006...

431

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup July 17, 2007 September 19, 2007 December 12, 2007 More...

432

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup Planning Subgroup March 30, 2006 February 15, 2006 Draft...

433

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

434

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup October 11, 2007 More...

435

CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

Deng Xinfa [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Yu Guisheng [Department of Natural Science, Nanchang Teachers College, Jiangxi 330103 (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents ARCHIVED DOCUMENTS Inspections Summary Matrix TEC Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison Regulatory Summary Matrix More...

437

Lighting Group: Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software Software Lighting Software The Lighting Group has developed several computer programs in the course of conducting research on energy efficient lighting. Several of these programs have proven useful outside the research environment. One of the most popular programs for advanced lighting applications is Radiance. For more information on this program and its availability, click on the link below. RADIANCE Radiance is a suite of programs for the analysis and visualization of lighting in design. The primary advantage of Radiance over simpler lighting calculation and rendering tools is that there are no limitations on the geometry or the materials that may be simulated. Radiance is used by architects and engineers to predict illumination, visual quality and appearance of innovative design spaces, and by researchers to evaluate new

438

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier In This Section: Facilities for the Intensity Frontier SuperNuMI (SNuMI) Project X Existing rings Project X and the ILC Project X and longer term facilities Summary Facilities for the Intensity Frontier The Steering Group considered a variety of accelerator facilities and programs using the following criteria: Support for physics research goals, effective use of accelerator assets freed up at the end of Tevatron operations, Alignment with the ILC R&D program, Potential for achievement over the next decade. Twelve facilities received consideration using some or all of these criteria. Appendix G sorts those facilities not described in this chapter based on relevance to proton- or electron-based programs. This chapter describes the facilities that would support neutrino science and precision physics at the intensity frontier. The facilities include an intense proton source and its injection to the existing rings at Fermilab for a variety of programs.

439

# Energy Measuremenfs Group  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ri EECE ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of Energy, was used during November 1976 to conduct an exploratory aerial radiological survey in-the greater Niagara Fails area. The purpose of that survey was to identify locations having concentrations of terrestrial radioactivity not typical of the radiation

440

Particle Data Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About PDG About PDG About the PDG PDG authors Order PDG products PDG citation Encoder tools Job at LBNL Contact Us Downloads Resources Errata Archives Atomic Nuclear Properties Online HEP Info Non-PDG Databases Durham-RAL databases Current experiments Guide to Data Partial-wave analyses Contact Us News The "Reviews, Tables, Plots" section has been updated. The next book edition is due in early summer 2014, and the booklet in late summer 2014. Funded By: US DOE US NSF CERN MEXT (Japan) INFN (Italy) MEC (Spain) IHEP & RFBR (Russia) Mirrors: USA (LBNL) Brazil CERN Indonesia Italy Japan (KEK) Russia (Novosibirsk) Russia (Protvino) UK (Durham) The Review of Particle Physics J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 partial update for the 2014 edition.

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441

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Edition and 2007 Web Update 6 Edition and 2007 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors New authors of 2007 Web Update M. Antonelli, 102 H. Baer, 64 G. Bernardi, 103 M. Carena, 51 M.-C. Chen, 11 B. Dobrescu, 51 J.-F. Grivaz, 104 T. Gutsche, 105 J. Huston, 45 T. Junk, 51 C.-J. Lin, 1 H. Mahlke, 106 P. Mohr, 107 P. Nevski, 75 S. Rolli, 108 A. Romaniouk, 109 B. Seligman, 110 M. Shaevitz, 111 B. Taylor, 107 M. Titov, 56,112 G. Weiglein, 78 A. Wheeler, 69 Authors of the 2006 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006)

442

Working Group Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K. Zorika G. Zhang Focus of Discussion The session convened on March 2, with brief introductions by Bill Clements. The purpose of the session was to discuss the scientific merits of retrofitting TOGA/TAO buoys with shortwave radiometers. Three questions were posed at the outset of the session to focus the discussion.

443

future science group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61 61 ISSN 1759-7269 10.4155/BFS.11.150 © 2012 Future Science Ltd In 1950 Reese et al. proposed a mechanism for cel- lulose hydrolysis, which involved two general com- ponents, C 1 and C x , acting in sequence [1]. According to the model, the C 1 component first disrupted and swelled the crystalline cellulose, possibly releasing soluble oligo saccharides into solution. The C x compo- nent, which was shown to have endoglucanase activity, was then able to effectively hydrolyze the previously inaccessible substrate along with the soluble oligo- saccharides. Furthermore, the activity of the mixture was found to be higher than the activity of each com- ponent acting alone, indicating that the components were acting synergistically. In the following years, a number of groups began to identify and characterize

444

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Aguilar-Benitez, Amsler, Antonelli, Arguin, Armstrong, Artuso, Asner, Babu, Baer, Band, Barberio, Barnett, Battaglia, Bauer, Beringer, Bernardi, Bertl, Besson, Bichsel, Biebel, Bloch, Blucher, Blusk, Bunakov, Burchat, Cahn, Carena, Carone, Casas Serradilla, Casper, Cattai, Ceccucci, Chakraborty, Chen, Chivukula, Copic, Cousins, Cowan, Crawford, Dahl, Dalitz, D'Ambrosio, DeGouvea, DeGrand, Damour, Desler, Dissertori, Dobbs, Dobrescu, Donahue, Doser, Drees, Edwards,A, Edwards, Eidelman, Elvira, Erler, Ezhela, Fasso', Feng, Fetscher, Fields, Filimonov, Foster, Freedman, Froidevaux, Fukugita, Gaisser, Garren, Geer, Gerber, Gerbier, Gherghetta, Gibbons, Gilman, Giudice, Goldhaber, Goodman, Grab, Gritsan, Grivaz, Groom, Grünewald, Gurtu, Gutsche, Haber, Hagiwara, Hagmann, Hanhart, Harper , Hayes, Heltsley, Hernàndez-Rey, Hewett, Hikasa, Hinchliffe, Holder, Höcker, Hogan, Höhler, Holtkamp, Honscheid , Huston , Igo-Kemenes, Jackson, James, Jawahery, Johnson, Junk, Karlen, Kayser, Kirkby, Klein, Kleinknecht, Klempt, Knowles, Kolb, Kolda, Kowalewski, Kreitz, Kreps, Krusche, Kuyanov, Kwon, Lahav, Landua, Langacker , Lepage, Liddle, Ligeti, Lin, Liss, Littenberg, Liu, LoSecco, Lugovsky,K, Lugovsky,S, Lugovsky,V, Lynch, Lys, Mahlke, Mangano, Mankov, Manley, Mannel, Manohar, March-Russell, Marciano, Martin, Masoni, Matthews, Milstead, Miquel, Mönig, Mohr, Morrison, Murayama, Nakada, Nakamura, Narain, Nason, Navas, Nevski, Nicholson, Nir, Olive, Oyanagi, Pape, Patrignani, Peacock, Piepke, Porter, Prell, Punzi, Quadt, Quinn, Raby, Raffelt, Ratcliff, Razuvaev, Renk, Richardson, Roesler, Rolandi, Rolli, Romaniouk , Roos, Rosenberg, Rosner, Sachrajda, Sakai, Salam, Sanda, Sarkar, Sauli, Schaffner, Schindler, Schmitt, Schneider, Scott, Seligman, Shaevitz, Shrock, Silari, Skands, Smith, Sjöstrand, Smoot, Sokolosky, Spanier, Spieler, Spooner, Srednicki, Stahl, Stanev, Stone, Stone,S, Streitmatter, Sumiyoshi, Suzuki, Syphers, Tanabashi, Taylor, Terning, Titov, Tkachenko, Törnqvist, Tovey, Trilling, Trippe, Turner, Valencia, van Bibber, Vincter, Venanzoni, Vogel, Voss, Ward, Watari, Webber, Weiglein, Wells, Whalley, Wheeler, Wohl, Wolfenstein, Womersley, Woody, Workman, Yamamoto, Yao, Youssef, Zenin, Zhang, Zhu, Zyla

445

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab In This Section: Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Guidelines The Steering Group's proposed plan Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOνA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac.

446

Nitrogen-Doped Graphitic Nanoribbons: Synthesis, Characterization and Transport  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen-doped graphitic nanoribbons (Nx-GNRs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using pyrazine as a nitrogen precursor, are reported for the first time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveal that the synthesized materials are formed by multi-layered corrugated graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs) which in most cases exhibit the formation of curved graphene edges (loops). This suggests that during growth, nitrogen atoms promote loop formation; undoped GNRs do not form loops at their edges. Transport measurements on individual pure carbon GNRs exhibit a linear I-V (current-voltage) behavior, whereas Nx-GNRs show reduced current responses following a semiconducting-like behavior, which becomes more prominent for high nitrogen concentrations. To better understand the experimental findings, electron density of states (DOS), quantum conductance for nitrogen doped zigzag and armchair single-layer GNRs are calculated for different N doping concentrations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green functions. These calculations confirm the crucial role of nitrogen atoms in the transport properties, confirming that the nonlinear I-V curves are due to the presence of nitrogen atoms within the Nx-GNRs lattice that act as scattering sites. These characteristic Nx-GNRs transport could be advantageous in the fabrication of electronic devices including sensors in which metal-like undoped GNRs are unsuitable.

Jia, Xiaoting [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Dresselhaus, M [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Cruz Silva, Eduardo [ORNL; Munoz-Sandoval, E [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC); Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Lopez, Florentino [IPICyT

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Swatch Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Swatch Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Swatch Group Place Switzerland Product String representation "The Swatch Grou ... ther industries" is too long. References Swatch...

448

Parabolic subgroups of Garside groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Garside monoid is a cancellative monoid with a finite lattice generating set; a Garside group is the group of fractions of a Garside monoid. The family of Garside groups contains the Artin-Tits groups of spherical type. We generalise the well-known notion of a parabolic subgroup of an Artin-Tits group into that of a parabolic subgroup of a Garside group. We also define the more general notion of a Garside subgroup of a Garside group, which is related to the notion of LCMhomomorphisms between Artin-Tits groups. We prove that most of the properties of parabolic subgroups extend to this subgroups.

Eddy Godelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NSLS Committees | Interlock Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interlock Working Group Charge The NSLS Interlock Working Group shall review all new construction and modification of NSLS and SDL personnel protection interlock systems. It is the...

450

Verdeo Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verdeo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Verdeo Group Place Washington, DC Zip 20006 Sector Carbon Product Washington based integrated carbon solutions company. References...

451

Enovos Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enovos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Enovos Group Place Germany Sector Solar Product Germany-based utility. The utility has interests in solar energy. References Enovos...

452

Copelouzos Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copelouzos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Copelouzos Group Place Athens, Greece Product Fully integrated business development organisation, servicing key industrial and...

453

Samaras Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Samaras Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Samaras Group Place Greece Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Greek consultancy services provider with...

454

Argonne Physics Division - Theory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Theory Group: Postdoctoral Position The Theory Group in the Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory is seeking exceptional candidates for a postdoctoral position...

455

Police Group, Emergency Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Police Group Logo Police Group Mission Statement: To serve and protect the Brookhaven National Laboratory site, its employees, guests, and physical assets from unwanted...

456

Interagency Advanced Power Group -- Steering group meeting minutes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the draft meeting minutes of the Steering Group of the Interagency Advanced Power Group. Included are the discussions resulting from the presentation of working group reports and the results of a discussion of IAPG policies and procedures. In the appendix are the reports of the following working groups: Electrical, Mechanical, Solar, and Systems.

Not Available

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS  

SciTech Connect

We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Grundy, W. M. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Romanishin, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Vilas, F., E-mail: Stephen.Tegler@nau.ed, E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed, E-mail: W.Grundy@lowell.ed, E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed, E-mail: fvilas@mmto.or [MMT Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

458

Surgery groups of the fundamental groups of hyperplane arrangement complements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a recent result of Bartels and Lueck (arXiv:0901.0442) we deduce that the Farrell-Jones Fibered Isomorphism conjecture in L-theory is true for any group which contains a finite index strongly poly-free normal subgroup, in particular, for the Artin full braid groups. As a consequence we explicitly compute the surgery groups of the Artin pure braid groups. This is obtained as a corollary to a computation of the surgery groups of a more general class of groups, namely for the fundamental group of the complement of any fiber-type hyperplane arrangement in the complex n-space.

S. Roushon.; 491-500

459

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation

460

TEC Working Group Topic Groups | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Groups Topic Groups TEC Working Group Topic Groups TEC Topic Groups were formed in 1991 following an evaluation of the TEC program. Interested members, DOE and other federal agency staff meet to examine specific issues related to radioactive materials transportation. TEC Topic Groups enable a small number of participants to focus intensively on key issues at a level of detail that is unattainable during the TEC semiannual meetings due to time and group size constraints. Topic Groups meet individually by phone and email between TEC's semiannual general meetings, participate in conference calls and report back to the Department and TEC members. The Topic Groups are intended to work on significant issues, produce a relevant product and sunset the group when the work is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Effect of Temperature on NOx Reduction by Nitrogen Atom Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical reduction of NO{sub x} can be accomplished by injection of nitrogen atoms into the diesel engine exhaust stream. The nitrogen atoms can be generated from a separate stream of pure N{sub 2} by means of plasma jets or non-thermal plasma reactors. This paper examines the effect of exhaust temperature on the NO{sub x} reduction efficiency that can be achieved by nitrogen atom injection. It is shown that to achieve a high NO{sub x} reduction efficiency at a reasonable power consumption penalty, the exhaust temperature needs to be 100 C or less.

Penetrante, B

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49×10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2×10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

465

Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research reported here is concerned with the application of secondary fuel addition, otherwise known as reburning, as a means of NO{sub x} destruction downstream of the primary flame zone in boilers. This paper consists of two parts: First, results from a statistically correct design of parametric experiments on a laboratory coal combustor are presented. These allow the effects of the most important variables to be isolated and identified. Second, mechanisms governing the inter-conversion and destruction of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburning zone of a laboratory coal combustor were explored, using fundamental kinetic arguments. The objective here was to extract models, which can be used to estimate reburning effectiveness in other, more practical combustion configurations. Emphasis is on the use of natural gas as the reburning fuel for a pulverized coal primary flame. Then, reburning mechanisms occur in two regimes; one in which fast reactions between NO and hydrocarbons are usually limited by mixing; the other in which reactions have slowed and in which known gas phase chemistry controls. For the latter regime, a simplified model based on detailed gas phase chemical kinetic mechanisms and known rate coefficients was able to predict temporal profiles of NO, NH{sub 3} and HCN. Reactions with hydrocarbons played important roles in both regimes and the Fenimore N{sub 2} fixation reactions limited reburning effectiveness at low primary NO values.

Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

1990-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

Gold and Black Group Paws Training Plans Gold Group Black Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gold and Black Group Paws Training Plans Gold Group Black Group Week Day Distance Description Day://www.badgerlandstriders.org/home/Races/TheDeerRun.htm. Black Group The goal of the Black Group is to go from moderate running to 13 miles over a ten week include periodic walking breaks as needed. The Black Group should run four days a week on a Monday

Saldin, Dilano

467

The Brattle Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The opinions and views expressed in this staff report do not necessarily represent those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, its Chairman, or individual Commissioners, and are not binding on the Commission. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The analysis presented in this report was produced by a team of consultants from The Brattle Group (TBG), Freeman, Sullivan & Co. (FSC) and Global Energy Partners (GEP). Each firm led different parts of the project, typically with significant input from the other firms. TBG managed the project and was the lead contractor to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). TBG also had the lead in producing this report. FSC was the lead contractor on model development, and also developed the state and customer-segment level load shapes that were used as starting points for developing demand response impacts. FSC and TBG worked together to develop price impacts that reflect the extensive research that has been done in this area. GEP had the lead on data development with input from both TBG and FSC. Gary Fauth, an independent consultant specializing in advanced metering business case analysis, had the lead role in producing the advanced metering deployment scenario that underlies one of the potential estimates. Senior staff from all three firms worked jointly to develop scenario definitions and to provide defensible input assumptions for key drivers of demand response potential.

Ahmad Faruqui; Ryan Hledik; Stephen S. George; Josh Bode; Paul Mangasarian; Ingrid Rohmund; Greg Wikler; Debyani Ghosh; Sharon Yoshida

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

World Bank Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

purpose of this Good Practice Note is to increase the awareness of the health risks related to occupational asbestos exposure, provide a list of resources on international good practices available to minimize these risks, and present an overview of some of the available product alternatives on the market. The need to address asbestos-containing materials (ACM) as a hazard is no longer under debate but a widely accepted fact. Practices regarding asbestos that are normally considered acceptable by the World Bank Group (WBG) in projects supported through its lending or other instruments are addressed in the WBGs General Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Guidelines. 1 This Good Practice Note provide background and context for the guidance in the WBG EHS Guidelines. Good practice is to minimize the health risks associated with ACM by avoiding their use in new construction and renovation, and, if installed asbestos-containing materials are encountered, by using internationally recognized standards and best practices (such as those presented in Appendix 3) to mitigate their impact. In all cases, the Bank expects borrowers and other clients of World Bank funding to use alternative materials wherever feasible.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security Focus Group [Name of Work Group] Work Group Charter (Date) I. PURPOSE The HSS Focus Group [Name of Work Group] is one of several HSS Work Groups, established to address worker health, safety and security programs improvements across the U.S. Department of Energy Complex. The [Name of Work Group] has been established to (state specific purpose). II. OBJECTIVES (State the desired impact(s) and major outcome(s) for, the Work Group) 1. Establish specific improvement goals, intended outputs and supporting activities that respond to identified worker health and safety improvement needs. 2. Establish measurable indicators when possible to support findings, recommendations and accomplishments.

471

Hypothesis Test: Comparing Two Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hypothesis Test: Comparing Two Groups Hypothesis Test: Two-sample Elements of two-sample test of two paired groups Comparing proportions of two groups Hypothesis test errors GOG 502/PLN 504 Youqin Huang 42 Two-sample Test Hypothesis tests on the difference between two different groups Examples

Huang, Youqin

472

Affine buildings for dihedral groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct rank 2 thick nondiscrete affine buildings associated with an arbitrary finite dihedral group.

Berenstein, Arkady

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Security Outreach and Integration Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Outreach and Integration Group. Welcome. The US economy, citizens, and government rely on information technology. ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

474

The nitrogen cycle and ecohydrology of seasonally dry grasslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the coupling of hydrologic and biogeochemical processes and, specifically, the organization of ecosystem traits with the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles. Observations from a factorial irrigation- ...

Parolari, Anthony Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - The Flying Ring!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Pewter Bells) Pewter Bells The Flying Ring! A copper ring leaps off an electromagnet when it's turned on. What happens when the ring's resistance is lowered using liquid nitrogen? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is an AC powered electromagnet. And this is a copper ring. When I place the copper ring on the electromagnet and turn it on, the magnet's changing magnetic field will induce an electric current in the copper ring. The current in the ring will then create it's own magnetic

476

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Pour Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Flowers! Shattering Flowers! Previous Video (Shattering Flowers!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Giant Koosh Ball!) Giant Koosh Ball! Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Liquid nitrogen?! On the floor?! Who's going to clean that mess up?! See what really happens when one of the world's most beloved cryogenic liquids comes into contact with a room temperature floor. [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: From time to time, we spill a little liquid nitrogen! The reaction we sometimes get is.... Shannon: Did they just pour LIQUID NITROGEN on the FLOOR?!?! Joanna: Yes. Yes we did. Steve: One thing people seem to have a problem with is the mess that liquid

477

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management These regulations apply to stationary sources with the potential to emit 50 tons of nitrogen oxides (NOx) per year from all pollutant-emitting equipment or activities. The regulations describe possibilities for exemptions (i.e., for sources which have the potential to emit 50 tons but do not actually reach that level) and Reasonably Available Control

478

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen trifluoride (NF[subscript 3]) has potential to make a growing contribution to the Earths radiative budget; however, our understanding of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited. Based on a ...

Ivy, Diane J.

479

Effects of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to decadal global forcing for ocean and sea-ice models: Theorganic nitrogen to the oceans, Nature, 376, 243 246.trace species to the world ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,

Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Moore, J. Keith; Zender, Charles S; Luo, Chao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The relationship between iron and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium spp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trichodesmium spp. are considered the dominant nitrogen (N) fixing cyanobacteria in tropical and subtropical oceans, regimes frequently characterized by low iron (Fe). Limited information exists about what levels of Fe ...

Chappell, Phoebe Dreux

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrogen group stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Evolution of Nitrogen Oxide Chemistry in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nocturnal cycle of nitrogen oxides in the atmospheric boundary layer is studied by means of a one-dimensional model. The model solves the conservation equations of momentum, entropy, total water content, and of five chemical species. The ...

S. Galmarini; P. G. Duynkerke; J. Vil-Guerau de Arellano

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Land Use and Reactive Nitrogen Discharge: Effects of Dietary Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern agriculture alters natural biological and geophysical processes, with magnitudes proportional to its spatial extent. Cultivation is also the main cause of artificially enhanced reactive nitrogen (Nr) availability in natural ecosystems. ...

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin; Esther E. Bowen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid (Menlo Park, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Membrane-augmented cryogenic methane/nitrogen separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane separation process is described which is combined with a cryogenic separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane, nitrogen and at least one other component. The membrane separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and the other component and rejecting nitrogen. The process is particularly useful in removing components such as water, carbon dioxide or C{sub +2} hydrocarbons that might otherwise freeze and plug the cryogenic equipment. 10 figs.

Lokhandwala, K.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgement Acknowledgement The Fermilab Steering Group is grateful to many members of the particle physics and accelerator community for their expert advice and contributions to the preparation of this report: Robert Abrams, Nikolai Andreev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Giorgio Apollinari, Jeff Appel, Rick Baartman, Jonathan Bagger, Wander Baldini, Barry Barish, Gerald Blazey, Dixon Bogert, Ed Bonnema, James Brau, Steven Brice, Stanley Brodsky, Daniel Broemmelsiek, Alan Bross, Charles Brown, Douglas Bryman, William Bugg, Alexey Burov, Phillip Burrows, Maksim Bychkov, Robert Cahn, Marcela Carena, Jean-Paul Carneiro, Harry Carter, Robert Carey, Brian Chase, David Christian, Michael Church, Willie Clark, Janet Conrad, John Corlett, Mary Anne Cummings, Dan Dale, Chris Damerell, Paul Debevec, André de Gouvea, Fritz DeJongh, Marcel Demarteau, Paul Derwent, Milind Diwan, Harold Lee Dodds, Gerald Dugan, Craig Dukes, Estia Eichten, Eckhard Elsen, Louis Emery, Peter Fisher, George Flanagan, Tony Favale, Gary Feldman, Buck Field, David Finley, Bonnie Fleming, Brian Foster, Emil Frlez, Kenneth Ganezer, Consolato Gattuso, Stephen Geer, Norman Gelfand, Terry Goldman, Keith Gollwitzer, Maury Goodman, Paul Grannis, Daniel Green, Terry Grimm, Alan Hahn, Reidar Hahn, Michael Harrison, Ayman Hawari, David Hertzog, Robert Hirosky, David Hitlin, Richard Holmes, Maxine Hronek, Patrick Hurh, Jim Hylen, Gerald Jackson, Andreas Jansson, David Johnson, Jeffrey Johnson, Rol Johnson, John Johnstone, Chang Kee Jung, Steven Kahn, Peter Kammel, Yuri Kamyshkov, David Kawall, Kara Keeter, Christina Keller, Robert Kephart, Harold Kirk, David Kirkby, Arkadiy Klebaner, Sergey Korenev, Ioanis Kourbanis, Andreas Kronfeld, Krishna Kumar, James Lackey, Kenneth Lande, Valeri Lebedev, Kevin Lesko, Tony Leveling, Mats Lindroos, Laurence Littenberg, Vladimir Lobashev, Kevin Lynch, William Marciano, Daniel Marlow, John Marriner, Michael Martens, Dongming Mei, Mark Messier, Peter Meyers, Phillip Miller, Shekhar Mishra, Hugh Montgomery, Kevin Munday, Homer Neal, David Neuffer, Andrew Norman, Kenneth Olsen, Peter Ostroumov, Satoshi Ozaki, Robert Palmer, Vaia Papadimitriou, Stephen Parke, Kent Paschke, Ralph Pasquinelli, Todd Pedlar, Stephen Peggs, Susan Pfiffner, Henryk Piekarz, Thomas Phillips, Dinko Pocanic, Milorad Popovic, James Popp, Eric Prebys, Chris Quigg, Regina Rameika, Ronald Ray, Lee Roberts, Tom Roberts, Natalie Roe, Jerome Rosen, Marc Ross, Howard Rubin, Randy Ruchti, Richard Sah, Niki Saoulidou, Kate Scholberg, Alan Schwartz, Yannis Semertzidis, Abraham Seiden, Melvyn Shochet, Marilyn Smith, Henry Sobel, Paul Souder, Giulio Stancari, Michelle Stancari, Raymond Stefanski, James Stone, Sheldon Stone, Michael Syphers, Alex Tarasiewicz, Eddie Tatar, Rex Tayloe, Alvin Tollestrup, Yagmur Torun, Todd Treado, Michael Turner, Fred Ullrich, John Urbin, Alexander Valishev, Leonid Vorobiev, Nick Walker, Robert Webber, Bernard Wehring, Steven Werkema, Christopher White, Herman White, James Whitmore, David Wildman, Kent Alan Williams, William Willis, Phil Winkle, William Snow, Stanley Wojcicki, Hitoshi Yamamoto, Peter Yamin, Katsuya Yonehara, Cary Yoshikawa, Albert Young, Michael Zeller, Michael Zisman, Alexander Zlobin, and Robert Zwaska

487

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Meeting Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation Meeting Attendees

488

DOE STGWG Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries STGWG Meeting - May...

489

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Edition 8 Edition C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) Also see: PDF format. AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

490

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Data Management Group Annual Report 2003 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located ........................................................................................................ 3 Text-based Data Retrieval System `drs

Toronto, University of

491

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2001 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program..............................................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ..........................................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS)..............................................3 Complex Data

Toronto, University of

492

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 1999 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program................................................................. 1 INFORMATION PROCESSING ............................................. 2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ........................ 2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS) ............ 3

Toronto, University of

493

Professional Educators Common Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Promoting teaching excellence for those involved in university education and industrial training in lipids and oils. Professional Educators Common Interest Group Professional Educators Common Interest Group aocs awards Educators fats global info

494

MTorres Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTorres Group Place Murcia, Spain Zip 30320 Sector Wind energy Product Wind turbine manufacturer References MTorres Group1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

495

Daesung Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Daesung Group Place Jongno-Gu Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip 110-300 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Daesung Group, a Korea-based energy provider and electric machinary...

496

Experimental Properties of Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Physical and Chemical Properties Division of the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, NIST.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

497

Computer Integrated Building Processes Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laboratory effective in October 2011, the Computer Integrated Building Processes Group ... Chris Brown) are now in the Systems Integration Division. ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

498

Dimensional Metrology Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... James Bowie, Group Office Manager, Secretary, 301-975-3468. Christopher Blackburn, Physical Science Technician, 301-975-6413. ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

499

Surface and Nanostructure Metrology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Surface and Nanostructure Metrology Group in the Semiconductor & Dimensional Metrology Division of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

500

Security Components and Mechanisms Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Components and Mechanisms Group. Welcome. ... A security checklist is a document that contains instructions for securely configuring ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z