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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

IIl-nitride nanowires and heterostructures : growth and optical properties on nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) nanowires promise potential for further improving the electricity-to-light energy conversion efficiencies in light emitting diodes due to strain relaxation, reduced ...

Zhou, Xiang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous silicon nitride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nitride, aluminium oxide, titanium nitride are promising materials for the high... of powder analysis made by the following processes: - Preparation of silicon nitride by...

3

Growth and optical characterization of multilayers of InGaN quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GaN quantum dots Article Type: Research Paper Section/Category: General subjects Keywords: B2. InGaN quantum dots; A1. Photoluminescence; B1. Nitrides; A3. Metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy Corresponding Author: Dr Tongtong Zhu, Ph... , Cambridge, CB2 3QZ, UK Dr Tongtong Zhu Tel: +44 1223 334368 Fax: +44 1223 334437 E-mail: tz234@cam.ac.uk 9 Sep 2011 Dear Editor, Title: Growth and optical characterization of multilayers of InGaN quantum dots Authors: Tongtong Zhu, Haitham A...

Zhu, Tontong; El-Ella, Haitham; Reid, Benjamin; Holmes, Mark; Taylor, Robert; Kappers, Menno; Oliver, Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - aligned carbon nitride Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nitride-coated electroless nickelaluminum masters. The sub- strate material... replica removal through differential contraction in liquid nitrogen. Carbon nitride is a...

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium nitrides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbides and nitrides for the inert matrix fuel by spark plasma sintering Summary: in carbide or nitride matrix to fabricate oxide-dispersed IMF pellets. Further study using...

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive nitride-based coatings Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DELAUSANNE Summary: AND ELECTRONICS PROF. N. GRANDJEAN 33 III-NITRIDE BASED OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES 34 GALLIUM NITRIDE-BASED 2D... FOR DIVERSE APPLICATIONS 84 HOLE ARRAY...

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous carbon nitride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-8984(99)96581-5 Structural and magnetic properties of ammonia-nitrided Y2Fe17 N X Shen, J I Budnick, W A Hines, Y D Zhang, D... and magnetic properties of ammonia-nitrided...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali-resistant silicon nitride Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Science Collection: Engineering ; Materials Science 4 Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 1149-1152 Periodical: Materials...

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide gallium nitride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An advanced diffusion model to identify emergent research issues: the case of optoelectronic devices Summary: instrumentation Absorption coefficients Aluminium Nitrides Aluminium...

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum nitride ceramics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emily Parker, Vanni Lughi, Noel C. MacDonald Summary: , biocompatibility, and high fracture toughness. As a piezoelectric ceramic, aluminum nitride is compatible... Aluminum...

11

Realizing InGaN monolithic solar-photoelectrochemical cells for artificial photosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

InGaN alloys are very promising for solar water splitting because they have direct bandgaps that cover almost the whole solar spectrum. The demonstration of direct solar-to-fuel conversion without external bias with the sunlight being the only energy input would pave the way for realizing photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen by using InGaN. A monolithic solar-PEC cell based on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells capable to directly generate hydrogen gas under zero bias via solar water splitting is reported. Under the irradiation by a simulated sunlight (1-sun with 100 mW/cm{sup 2}), a 1.5% solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency has been achieved under zero bias, setting a fresh benchmark of employing III-nitrides for artificial photosynthesis. Time dependent hydrogen gas production photocurrent measured over a prolonged period (measured for 7 days) revealed an excellent chemical stability of InGaN in aqueous solution of hydrobromic acid. The results provide insights into the architecture design of using InGaN for artificial photosynthesis to provide usable clean fuel (hydrogen gas) with the sunlight being the only energy input.

Dahal, R.; Pantha, B. N.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon nitrides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I?MAYR Sti+ng Institutfur Werkstofiechnik... ,Badgasteiner Str: 3, 2800Bremen 33, Germany Abstract Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a ve interestin ceramic because... the use %of...

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nitrides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

111,Volume 3, novembre 1993 Summary: ,Badgasteiner Str: 3, 2800Bremen 33, Germany Abstract Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a ve interestin ceramic because... the use %of lasma...

14

Boron nitride nanotubes as novel sorbent for solid-phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) is a novel material that shows potential ability in capturing organic pollutants. In this study, BNNTs fixed on a stainless steel fiber by a sol–gel technique were used as sorbent fo...

Meizhen Fu; Hanzhu Xing; Xiangfeng Chen…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Characterization of intra-cavity reflections by Fourier transforming spectral data of optically pumped InGaN lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fourier analysis of laser emission spectra just above threshold is used to evaluate the impact of structural defects on the emission from optically pumped InGaN lasers. By dry etching a 300-nm-deep groove into the surface of a laser bar we have modified the emission spectrum of such a device in a controlled manner. The occurrence of sharp features in the Fourier transformedspectrum allowed the identification of the mode spacing corresponding to the full cavity length as well as to fractions of the full cavity length due to the etched groove. This enables us to identify additional features in the transformspectrum as being due to scattering centers within the waveguide. Identification of the density and strength of such centers is an important capability for the fabrication of blue diode lasers in the gallium–nitride material system.

Daniel Hofstetter; Linda T. Romano; Robert L. Thornton; David P. Bour; N. M. Johnson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Optoelectrical characteristics of green light-emitting diodes containing thick InGaN wells with digitally grown InN/GaN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compared with conventionally grown thin InGaN wells, thick InGaN wells with digitally grown InN/GaN exhibit superior optical properties. The activation energy (48 meV) of thick InGaN...

Yu, Chun-Ta; Lai, Wei-Chih; Yen, Cheng-Hsiung; Hsu, Hsu-Cheng; Chang, Shoou-Jinn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Mg impurity in nitride alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although several magnetic resonance studies address the Mg acceptor in GaN, there are few reports on Mg doping in the alloys, where hole production depends strongly on the Al or In content. Our electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the p-type alloys suggest that the Mg impurity retains the axial symmetry, characteristic of a p-type dopant in both alloys; however, In and Al produce additional, different characteristics of the acceptor. In InGaN, the behavior is consistent with a lowering of the acceptor level and increasing hole density as In concentration increases. For AlGaN, the amount of neutral Mg decreases with increasing Al content, which is attributed to different kinetics of hydrogen diffusion thought to occur in samples with higher Al mole fraction.

Zvanut, M. E.; Willoughby, W. R.; Sunay, U. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham AL (United States); Koleske, D. D.; Allerman, A. A. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque NM (United States); Wang, Ke; Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nanishi, Yasushi [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan and WCU Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to meet 5000 h automotive durability goal at cost < 5kW Year 1 Goals: Single-cell fuel cell test performance for 25 cm 2 stamped and nitrided metallic bipolar plates...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Boron nitride nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Near-infrared InN quantum dots on high-In composition InGaN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the growth of InN quantum dots (QDs) on thick InGaN layers with high In composition (>50%) by molecular beam epitaxy. Optimized growth conditions are identified for the InGaN layers at reduced growth temperature and increased active N flux resulting in minimized phase separation and defect generation. The InN QDs grown on top of the optimized InGaN layer exhibit small size, high density, and photoluminescence up to room temperature. The InN/InGaN QDs reveal excellent potential for intermediate band solar cells with the InGaN and InN QD bandgap energies tuned to the best match of absorption to the solar spectrum.

Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D.; Gomez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Calleja, Enrique; Noetzel, Richard [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia (ISOM), Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

III-nitride core–shell nanowire arrayed solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solar cell based on a hybrid nanowire–film architecture consisting of a vertically aligned array of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well core–shell nanowires which are electrically connected by a coalesced p-InGaN canopy layer is demonstrated. This unique hybrid structure allows for standard planar device processing, solving a key challenge with nanowire device integration, while enabling various advantages by the nanowire absorbing region such as higher indium composition InGaN layers by elastic strain relief, more efficient carrier collection in thinner layers, and enhanced light trapping from nano-scale optical index changes. This hybrid structure is fabricated into working solar cells exhibiting photoresponse out to 2.1 eV and short-circuit current densities of ~1 mA cm?2 under 1 sun AM1.5G. This proof-of-concept nanowire-based device demonstrates a route forward for high-efficiency III-nitride solar cells.

Jonathan J Wierer Jr; Qiming Li; Daniel D Koleske; Stephen R Lee; George T Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Helical nanotubes of hexagonal boron nitride  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Physical: Full-length Papers Helical nanotubes of hexagonal boron nitride Masami Terauchi...Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan Nanotubes of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN...discovered. hexagonal boron nitride,|nanotube,|nanoball,|amorphous boron| C......

Masami Terauchi; Michiyoshi Tanaka; Hirofumi Matsuda; Masatoshi Takeda; Kaoru Kimura

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Superplastic forging nitride ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

Panda, Prakash C. (Ithaca, NY); Seydel, Edgar R. (Ithaca, NY); Raj, Rishi (Ithaca, NY)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Doping of gallium nitride using disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Keywords: disilane, gallium nitride, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, silicon doping

A. E. Wickenden; L. B. Rowland; K. Doverspike; D. K. Gaskill; J. A. Freitas, Jr.; D. S. Simons; P. H. Chi

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cordierite silicon nitride filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. (Acurex Environmental Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States)); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. (Aerotherm Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States)); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. (GTE Products Corp., Towanda, PA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Internal efficiency of InGaN light-emitting diodes: Beyond a quasiequilibrium model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a model to better investigate InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) internal efficiency by extending beyond the usual total carrier density rate equation approach. To illustrate its capability, the model is applied to study intrinsic performance differences between violet and green LEDs. The simulations show performance differences, at different current densities and temperatures, arising from variations in spontaneous emission and heat loss rates. By tracking the momentum-resolved carrier populations, these rate changes are, in turn, traced to differences in bandstructure and plasma heating. The latter leads to carrier distributions that deviate from the quasiequilibrium ones at lattice temperature.

Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kneissl, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nitrides Race Beyond the Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...are far from the limit,” Palacios says. Nitride transistors might also prove essential for a variety of future “smart grid” applications. First, however, they must be able to withstand transmitting large amounts of power, something silicon-based...

Robert F. Service

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Superplastic forging nitride ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Boron Nitride Porous Microbelts for Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron Nitride Porous Microbelts for Hydrogen Storage ... However, the attention paid to their potential applications in gas sorption, especially in case of hydrogen, has obviously been insufficient. ... boron nitride; porous; microbelts; specific surface area; hydrogen storage ...

Qunhong Weng; Xuebin Wang; Chunyi Zhi; Yoshio Bando; Dmitri Golberg

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

Brogan, Michael A. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hughes, Robert W. [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H., E-mail: Duncan.Gregory@glasgow.ac.uk [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Bamberger, C.E.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Direct LED writing of submicron resist patterns: Towards the fabrication of individually-addressable InGaN submicron stripe-shaped LED arrays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Submicron stripe-shaped InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) arrays with individually addressable capabilities are demonstrated ... the emission pattern, are formed by direct LED writing in a mask-free manner. The .....

Zheng Gong; Benoit Guilhabert; Zhitao Chen; Martin D. Dawson

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

P-type gallium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Photopolymerization of Self-Assembled Monolayers of Diacetylenic Alkylphosphonic Acids on Group-III Nitride Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1, 4-7) In addition, the selectivity and sensitivity of a nitrides-based sensor can be tailored by modifying the nitride’s surface with a thin layer that selectively recognizes chemical species of interest. ... However, ODPA SAMs desorbed from GaN substrates upon immersion in aqueous solution, especially in basic solution, probably reflecting the high solubility of deprotonated ODPA in the solution,(18) electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged ODPA and substrate surface,(18) and/or the dissolution of the gallium oxide layer. ... Water contact angles on group-III nitride samples were measured using a PG-1 pocket contact angle goniometer by reading contact angle values of the two sides of a drop (2 ?L) within 30 s after deposition of the drop. ...

Feng Li; Evgeniy Shishkin; Michael A. Mastro; Jennifer K. Hite; Charles R. Eddy, Jr.; J. H. Edgar; Takashi Ito

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

Examination on surface films of plasma nitrided and post-stream oxidised H13 steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different surface structures have been obtained on H13 steel by plasma nitriding under a mix current of ammonia and argon at 520°C, and a simple current of ammonia at 550°C. Post-stream oxidation gives the H13 samples a compact oxide film. The surface films and structures of these samples have been investigated with optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high distinguishability energy diffraction spectrometry. Only a single nitrogen diffusion layer is obtained on the 520°C-nitrided H13 samples, while a white Fe2-3N nitride film and a deeper diffusion layer with needle-like nitride is obtained on the 550°C-nitrided samples. These two type samples are covered by the films of Me3O4 mainly as well as Fe2O3 after post-oxidation. It is also discussed on the application chances of the duplex treatment, which is cleaner and more environment friendly than conventional salt bath or gaseous techniques.

Yongan Min; Xiaochun Wu; Luoping Xu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation...

40

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to ?-rays but poor sensitivity to ?-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after ?-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

Atsumi, Katsuhiro [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki, E-mail: ttnakan@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bamboo-like boron nitride nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Full-length paper Bamboo-like boron nitride nanotubes Renzhi Ma Yoshio Bando Tadao Sato To...305-0044, Japan Bamboo-like boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs), synthesized from melamine...the temperature gradient applied in the nanotube growth process was considered as the......

Renzhi Ma; Yoshio Bando; Tadao Sato

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Synthesis of transition metal nitride by nitridation of metastable oxide precursor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metastable transition metal oxides were used as precursors to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Amorphous MoO{sub 2} was prepared by reduction of (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24} solution with hydrazine. As-synthesized amorphous MoO{sub 2} was transformed into fcc {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N at 400 Degree-Sign C and then into hexagonal {delta}-MoN by further increasing the temperature to 600 Degree-Sign C under a NH{sub 3} flow. The nitridation temperature employed here is much lower than that employed in nitridation of crystalline materials, and the amorphous materials underwent a unique nitridation process. Besides this, the bimetallic nitride Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N was also synthesized by nitridating amorphous bimetallic precursor. These results suggested that the nitridation of amorphous precursor possessed potential to be a general method for synthesizing many interstitial metallic compounds, such as nitrides and carbides at low temperature. - graphical abstract: Amorphous oxide was used as new precursor to prepare nitride at low temperature. Pure {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN were obtained at 400 Degree-Sign C and at 600 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We bring out a new method to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both mono- and bimetallic molybdenum nitrides were synthesized at a mild condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of two different molybdenum nitrides {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN can be controlled from the same metastable precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitridation temperature was much lower than that reported from crystalline precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metastable precursor had different reaction process in comparison with crystalline precursor.

Wang, Huamin; Wu, Zijie; Kong, Jing [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zqwang@mail.nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China) [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Water Environment and Resources, Tianjin Normal University, No. 393 Binshui Road, Xiqing Dist., Tianjin 300387 (China); Zhang, Minghui, E-mail: zhangmh@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (MOE), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cubic boron nitride: a new prospective material for ultracold neutron application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the first time, the neutron optical wall-potential of natural cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultracold neutron (UCN) source of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz using the time-of-flight method (TOF). The samples investigated had a wall-potential of (305 +/- 15) neV. This value is in good agreement with the result extracted from neutron reflectometry data and theoretical expectations. Because of its high critical velocity for UCN and its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride coatings (isotopically enriched) will be useful for a number of applications in UCN experiments.

Sobolev, Yu; Borisov, Yu; Daum, M; Fresne, N du; Goeltl, L; Hampel, G; Heil, W; Knecht, A; Keunecke, M; Kratz, J V; Lang, T; Meister, M; Plonka-Spehr, Ch; Pokotilovski, Yu; Reichert, P; Schmidt, U; Krist, Th; Wiehl, N; Zenner, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Nitrides of Aluminum and Gallium," J. Electrochem.1) 24 (1962). G. Long and L. M. Foster, "Aluminum Nitride, aRefractory for Aluminum to 2000°C," J. Am. Ceram. Soc. ,

Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG); Young, Albert C. (Flushing, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Method of nitriding refractory metal articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic body is disclosed comprising at least about 80 w/o silicon nitride and having a mean tensile strength of at least about 800 MPa. 4 figs.

Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

50

Low temperature route to uranium nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Darien, IL); Yeamans, Charles (Berkeley, CA); Hartmann, Thomas (Idaho Falls, ID); Silva, G. W. Chinthaka (Las Vegas, NV); Cerefice, Gary (Henderson, NV); Czerwinski, Kenneth R. (Henderson, NV)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Catalytic hydrodesulfurization by molybdenum nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High surface area molybdenum nitride (up to 108 m{sup 2}/g) was synthesized, characterized, and tested for thiophene desulfurization activity. The surface area was found to depend on synthesis temperature profile, mass transfer, and passivation procedure. Passivated and sulfided catalysts retained the bulk structure of face-centered-cubic Mo{sub 2}N. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed no evidence for MoO{sub 3} or MoS{sub 2} formation in fresh catalysts or catalysts sulfided at 673 K. Thiophene desulfurization activity was measured over a broad range Mo{sub 2}N surface areas and reactor condition. Small amounts of tetrahydrothiophene were formed during desulfurization and low-conversion data at 673 K indicate that butane is one of the initial products of the thiophene desulfurization reaction, in addition to butadiene and the butenes.

Markel, E.J.; Van Zee, J.W. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

Delnick, Frank M.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Ĺ/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

Yang, Minghui, E-mail: m.yang@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca 14853-1301, NY (United States); Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T. [Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca 14853-1301, NY (United States); Ralston, Walter T. [College of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-1460, CA (United States); MacLeod, Michelle J. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139-4307, MA (United States); DiSalvo, Francis J., E-mail: fjd3@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca 14853-1301, NY (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron-Nitride Nanotubes Show Potential in Cancer Treatment NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 26 - A new study has shown that adding boron-nitride nanotubes to the surface of cancer cells can...

55

Dry patterning of InGaN and InAlN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry etch rates of In x Ga1?x N and In x Al1?x N alloys are found to increase with In mole fraction in CH4/H2microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges and to decrease under the same conditions in Cl2/H2 mixtures. Both plasma chemistries produce smooth anisotropicetching across the entire composition range from InN to either GaN or AlN. Addition of SF6 rather than H2 to a Cl2discharge produces faster etch rates and retains smooth morphologies. This suggests that either atomic hydrogen or fluorine is capable of effective removal of N from the III?V nitride materials. Ar+ ion milling rates for InGaAlN alloys are found to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than for more conventional III?V semiconductors like GaAs.

S. J. Pearton; C. R. Abernathy; F. Ren

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon-nitride ceramic valves can improve the performance of both light- and heavy-duty automotive engines because of the superior material properties of silicon nitrides over current metal alloys. However, ceramics are brittle materials that may introduce uncertainties in the reliability and durability of ceramic valves. As a result, the lifetime of ceramic valves are difficult to predict theoretically due to wide variations in the type and distribution of microstructural flaws in the material. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are therefore required to assess the quality and reliability of these valves. Because ceramic materials are optically translucent and the strength-limiting flaws are normally located near the valve surface, a laser-scatter method can be used for NDE evaluation of ceramic valves. This paper reviews the progress in the development of this NDE method and its application to inspect silicon-nitride ceramic valves at various stages of manufacturing and bench and engine tests.

Sun, J. G.; Zhang, J. M.; Andrews, M. J.; Tretheway, J. S.; Phillips, N. S .L.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas; Caterpillar, Inc.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hands-On Session 6: Monolayer Boron Nitride BerkeleyGW Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hands-On Session 6: Monolayer Boron Nitride Hands-On Session 6: Monolayer Boron Nitride BerkeleyGW Workshop 11/23/2013 Diana Qiu Goals: 1. Demonstrate a GW-BSE calculation for a 2D semiconductor 2. Look at the behavior of ε -1 00 (q) for a system with a truncated Coulomb interaction 3. Learn how to use BerkeleyGW's visualization tools to look at the exciton wave function Instructions: Please copy the example directory into your scratch directory >> cp -rP /project/projectdirs/m1694/BGW-2013/6-boron_nitride $SCRATCH/ 1-MF ● Please go the directory ``6-boron_nitride/1-mf/`` ● Enter each directory in numerical order and follow the instructions in the README files. Some things to note for 2D calculations: ● The system is in a periodic supercell. Though we will not do so in this calculation, you should always converge the k-grid sampling and amount of vacuum between

58

Titanium nitride electrodes for thermoelectric generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a thin film of titanium nitride as an electrode deposited onto solid electrolyte. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); Schmatz, Duane J. (Dearborn Heights, MI); Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heteroepitaxy of group IV-VI nitrides by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heteroepitaxial growth of selected group IV-VI nitrides on various orientations of sapphire (?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is demonstrated using atomic layer deposition. High quality, epitaxial films are produced at significantly lower temperatures than required by conventional deposition methods. Characterization of electrical and superconducting properties of epitaxial films reveals a reduced room temperature resistivity and increased residual resistance ratio for films deposited on sapphire compared to polycrystalline samples deposited concurrently on fused quartz substrates.

Klug, Jeffrey A., E-mail: jklug@anl.gov; Groll, Nickolas R.; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Becker, Nicholas G.; Cao, Chaoyue; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Weimer, Matthew S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

Light-Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project is producing high-efficiency semipolar light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on low-defect bulk gallium nitride (GaN) substrates.

63

16 - Applications of Refractory Carbides and Nitrides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter reviews the applications of refractory carbides and nitrides in each of the following industrial categories: (1) automotive and aerospace, (2) industrial machinery and equipment, (3) cutting and grinding tools, (4) armor, (5) nuclear, (6) semiconductor, and (6) optical. Many of the automotive and aerospace applications of refractory carbides and nitrides are of a structural and chemical nature, especially in applications involving high temperature and/or corrosive environments where most metals are no longer suitable. These applications are usually in the bulk form and are made possible by recent advances in processing technology. Relatively large parts can now be produced to near-net shape with little machining required. Applications of refractory carbides and nitrides are found extensively in machinery and equipment for protection against wear, erosion, and chemical attack. Both bulk materials and coatings are used. The most important bulk material is tungsten carbide sintered with a metallic binder that is usually cobalt. Cutting and grinding tools are a special case of wear and corrosion applications. Cutting tools have a sharp edge for the purpose of shaving and generating a material chip. This edge must remain sharp for the tool to perform properly. Grinding tools are different in that they have an abrasive-coated surface that generates a powder as opposed to the chip of a cutting tool.

Hugh O. Pierson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

Dr. Paul A. Lessing

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Atomic Layer Deposition of Insulating Hafnium and Zirconium Nitrides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

author. E-mail: gordon@chemistry.harvard.edu. (1) Toth, L. E. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides homoleptic tetrakis(dialkylamido)- metal(IV) complexes and ammonia at low substrate temperatures (150-250 °C). The precursor vapors were alternately pulsed into a heated reactor, yielding 1.15-1.20 � of metal nitride film

68

The thermal conductivity of silicon nitride with molybdenum disilicide additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Room-temperature thermal conductivity has been measured for a series of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix composites with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) additions of 2, 5 10, 25 and 50 wt. %. Included in these measurements were a pure MoSi{sub 2} sample and a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample containing only sintering aids. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added as the sintering aids, at approximately 6 and 2 respectively. When the amount of MoSi{sub 2} was increased to greater than 10 wt. %, the amount of the sintering aids necessary to densify the composite was decreased. No sintering aids were added to the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample. Thermal conductivities of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample without MoSi{sub 2} and the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample wee 36 W/m.K and 52 W/m.K respectively, which agree very well with the literature values for similar materials. No statistically significant changes were observed in the thermal conductivity for those samples containing up to 10 wt. % MoSi{sub 2}. However, between 10 and 25 wt. % MoSi{sub 2} there was a dramatic decrease in the thermal conductivity from 37 to 20.9 W/m.K. The thermal conductivity then increased steadily with further additions of MoSi{sub 2} up to 52 W/m.K for the pure MoSi{sub 2} specimen.

Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Abeel, A.M.; Lowden, R.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 40 (2005) 2101 2103 LETTERS Pressureless sintering of silicon nitride/boron nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2044, USA Silicon nitride (Si3N4) and boron nitride (BN) are ma- terials2O3 (Alcoa A- 16SG, 0.4 µm in diameter) and 4 wt% Y2O3 (Alfa Aesar REacton, 10 µm in diameter

Trice, Rodney W.

70

Surface modification by gas nitriding for improving cavitation erosion resistance of CP-Ti  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas nitriding process has been used to increase the surface hardness of titanium, in this study we used this technique to improve the cavitation erosion resistance (Rce) of commercial purity titanium (CP-Ti). We also studied microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and the effect of processing parameters on Rce of the treated samples. The results indicated that the Rce of the treated samples was related to the processing parameters. The sample treated at 850 °C for 4 h has the highest Rce, which was attributed to the compound layer (CL) with a hard, dense and free-defects microstructure. With increasing the nitriding temperature and duration, the Rce of the treated samples decreased due to the excessive oxide and defects formed in the CL. When the CL was removed, the treated sample exhibited an excellent cavitation erosion behavior. It was supposed to be due to the existence of the residual compressive stresses field in the nitrogen diffusion zone, which played an important role in preventing microcracks initiation and propagation to interior for cavitation damage.

Haibin Li; Zhenduo Cui; Zhaoyang Li; Shengli Zhu; Xianjin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth of non-polar group III nitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing high quality, nonpolar Group III nitrides using lateral growth from Group III nitride nanowires. The method of nanowire-templated lateral epitaxial growth (NTLEG) employs crystallographically aligned, substantially vertical Group III nitride nanowire arrays grown by metal-catalyzed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) as templates for the lateral growth and coalescence of virtually crack-free Group III nitride films. This method requires no patterning or separate nitride growth step.

Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM); Li, Qiming (Albuquerque, NM); Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Cordierite silicon nitride filters. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. [Acurex Environmental Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. [Aerotherm Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. [GTE Products Corp., Towanda, PA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Hafnium nitride for hot carrier solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hot carrier solar cells is an attractive technology with the potential of reaching high energy conversion efficiencies approaching the thermodynamic limit of infinitely stacked multi-junction solar cells: 65% under one sun and 86% under maximally concentrated. The hot carrier solar cell is conceptually simple consisting of two key components: absorber and energy selective contacts. High efficiencies are achieved by minimising the energy lost to thermalisaton of hot photo-generated carriers while absorbing majority of the solar spectrum. For this to be achieved, energy selective contacts are required to allow the extraction of carriers fast enough at an energy level above the electronic band edge. It is critical for the absorber to be able to maintain a hot carrier population for a sufficiently long time period for the extraction of carriers while they are ‘hot’. Bulk materials with a large gap between acoustic and optical branches in the phonon dispersion are predicted to exhibit slow hot carrier thermalisation rates. Hafnium nitride is such a material with a large gap in its phonon dispersion and is identified as a potential material to be used as a hot carrier absorber. Hafnium nitride has been deposited using reactive sputtering and characterised to investigate material properties and carrier cooling rates.

Simon Chung; Santosh Shrestha; Xiaoming Wen; Yu Feng; Neeti Gupta; Hongze Xia; Pyng Yu; Jau Tang; Gavin Conibeer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Catalyst-free synthesis of boron nitride single-wall nanotubes with a preferred zig-zag configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized in gram quantities using a continuous CO2 laser ablation reactor without the benefit of a metal catalyst. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses have shown the samples to be composed of single-wall nanotubes organized in long and well-crystallized bundles containing about ten tubes. The samples also contain a small amount of double-wall BNNTs and multiwall boron nitride fullerenelike “cages.” The majority of the BNNTs were identified as having the zig-zag configuration, as attested by the 0.2 nm period array of spots observed along tube walls; the other tubes are either armchair or chiral. The BNNTs seem to be attached at one end to nanoparticles which were shown in electron spectroscopy imaging mode to be composed of pure boron, thus supporting a root-based growth mechanism.

R. S. Lee; J. Gavillet; M. Lamy de la Chapelle; A. Loiseau; J.-L. Cochon; D. Pigache; J. Thibault; F. Willaime

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

Vacancy Hardening and Softening in Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of vacancies on mechanical properties of the transition metal carbides and nitrides are studied using the ab initio pseudopotential approach. Calculated shear elastic stiffness and electronic structures show that the vacancy produces entirely different effects on the mechanical strength of groups IVb nitrides and Vb carbides. It is found that the occupation of shear-unstable metallic dd bonding states changes essentially in an opposite way for the carbides and nitrides in the presence of vacancies, resulting in different responses to shear stress. Our study provides an atomistic understanding of the anomaly in hardness for these substoichiometric materials.

Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Ihm, Jisoon

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Iron-Nitride Alloy Magnets: Transformation Enabled Nitride Magnets Absent Rare Earths (TEN Mare)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: Case Western is developing a highly magnetic iron-nitride alloy to use in the magnets that power electric motors found in EVs and renewable power generators. This would reduce the overall price of the motor by eliminating the expensive imported rare earth minerals typically found in today’s best commercial magnets. The iron-nitride powder is sourced from abundant and inexpensive materials found in the U.S. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new magnet system, which contains no rare earths, in a prototype electric motor. This could significantly reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted in the U.S. each year by encouraging the use of clean alternatives to oil and coal.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A new stepwise-pressing reaction method for synthesizing pure turbostractic boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new stepwise-pressing reaction method is proposed, by which pure and near monodisperse turbostractic boron nitride (tBN) nano-particles with high yield (higher than 92%) are selectively synthesized via reacting BBr{sub 3} and (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}N at 260 {sup o}C in benzene. The obtained sample emits a strong photoluminescence band at 346 nm (under a excitation of 215 nm), making tBN a promising candidate for fabricating UV photoelectronic devices.

Yu, Lili; Wang, Tao; Luan, Chunhong [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Qilong [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China) [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Cui, Deliang, E-mail: cuidl@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [State Key Lab of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Deposition of tungsten nitride on stainless steel substrates using plasma focus device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten nitride (WN) films were deposited on the stainless steel-304 substrate by a 2 kJ Mather-type plasma focus device. The preparation method and characterization data are presented. X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed for the characterization of the samples obtained with different number of focus shots, respectively. The average size of crystallites (from XRD), sub-micro-structures (from SEM) and particles (from AFM images) increase when the number of shots increase from 10 to 20 then 30, then they decrease when the substrate is exposed to 40 shots.

G.R. Etaati; M.T. Hosseinnejad; M. Ghoranneviss; M. Habibi; M. shirazi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Sandia National Laboratories: III-Nitride core-shell nanowire...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sector III-Nitride core-shell nanowire arrayed solar cells On April 27, 2012, in Energy, Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Solid-State Lighting In a new EFRC-supported...

80

Polythiophene-based charge dissipation layer for electron beam lithography of zinc oxide and gallium nitride  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of thin polythiophene layers to dissipate accumulated charge in the electron beam lithography (EBL) of wide bandgap semiconductors such as zinc oxide and gallium nitride is demonstrated. A quick and inexpensive processing method is demonstrated for EBL exposure of dense and high-resolution patterns in a hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) negative-tone resistdeposited on bulk ZnO samples and with GaN/AlN on sapphire substrates. For the former experimental results are given for three different cases: where no charge dissipation layer was used as well as cases where 40-nm-thick Al and 100-nm-thick conductive polymer layers were used on the top of the HSQ resist. For the latter material EBL exposure was investigated for pure HSQ and for HSQ with a thin conductive polymer layer on top. Based on the scanning electron microscope observations of the resulting photonic crystal(PhC) pattern conventional Al and the proposed polymer approach were compared. Good agreement between these results is reported while the new method considerably simplifies sample processing. Spin-coatable conducting polymer may be easily removed due to its solubility in water which makes it a perfect solution for the processing of amphoteric oxide samples i.e. zinc oxide. Gallium nitride processing also benefits from polymer dissipation layer usage due to extended exposure range and the avoidance of dense pattern overexposure in HSQ.

R. Dylewicz; S. Lis; R. M. De La Rue; F. Rahman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

Lowden, R.A.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gallium Nitride Synthesis Using Lithium Metal as a Nitrogen Fixant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This present work centers on the synthesis of white, microcrystalline gallium nitride from gallium and ammonia, using lithium to increase the solubility of nitrogen-containing species in the metal phase. ... After the acid was decanted and the product was rinsed repeatedly with water and then acetone, the resulting white powder was found to exhibit the powder X-ray diffractogram (PXRD) (Figure 2a) of crystalline gallium nitride (1). ...

Seán T. Barry; Stephen A. Ruoff; Arthur L. Ruoff

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

83

Electro-optical properties of UV-emitting InGaN heterostructures considering injection-induced conductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some radiative and electric properties of heterostructures based on semiconductor nitrides emitting in the visible and UV regions are considered. The following anomalous properties of UV-emitting heterostructures are studied: the low-temperature emission quenching, a strong non-ideality of I-V curves, and the increase in the slope of these characteristics upon cooling. The anomalous emission quenching is especially typical for {approx}3-nm thick single-quantum-well structures, but it is absent in a 50-nm thick double heterostructure. It seems that this difference is caused by the fact that the capture of carriers at the levels in quantum wells slows down upon cooling, and a 'through' injection of carriers occurs into the opposite emitter layer. In addition, electrons injected into the p region reduce its resistance. The consideration of the injection-induced conductivity in the passive layer allows us to explain satisfactorily the electric anomalies. (active media)

Eliseev, P G [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee, J; Osinski, M A [Centre for High-Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effect of AlGaN/GaN strained layer superlattice period on InGaN MQW laser diodes[Multiple Quantum Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AlGaN/GaN strained layer superlattices have been employed in the cladding layers of InGaN multi-quantum well laser diodes grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Superlattices have been investigated for strain relief of the cladding layer, as well as an enhanced hole concentration, which is more than ten times the value obtained for bulk AlGaN films. Laser diodes with strained layer superlattices as cladding layers were shown to have superior structural and electrical properties compared to laser diodes with bulk AlGaN cladding layers. As the period of the strained layer superlattices is decreased, the threshold voltage, as well as the threshold current density, is decreased. The resistance to vertical conduction through p-type superlattices with increasing superlattice period is not offset by the increase in hole concentration for increasing superlattice spacing, resulting in higher voltages.

Hansen, M.; Abare, A.C.; Kozodoy, P.; Katona, T.M.; Craven, M.D.; Speck, J.S.; Mishra, U.K.; Coldren, L.A.; DenBaars, S.P.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Strong carrier localization and diminished quantum-confined Stark effect in ultra-thin high-indium-content InGaN quantum wells with violet light emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here, we report on the optical and structural characteristics of violet-light-emitting, ultra-thin, high-Indium-content (UTHI) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), and of conventional low-In-content MQWs, which both emit at similar emission energies though having different well thicknesses and In compositions. The spatial inhomogeneity of In content, and the potential fluctuation in high-efficiency UTHI MQWs were compared to those in the conventional low-In-content MQWs. We conclude that the UTHI InGaN MQWs are a promising structure for achieving better quantum efficiency in the visible and near-ultraviolet spectral range, owing to their strong carrier localization and reduced quantum-confined Stark effect.

Ko, Suk-Min; Kwack, Ho-Sang; Park, Chunghyun; Yoo, Yang-Seok; Cho, Yong-Hoon, E-mail: yhc@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and KI for the NanoCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Yong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jin Kim, Hee; Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Si Dang, Le [Nanophysics and Semiconductors, CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Institut Néel, CNRS Grenoble, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Nanophysics and Semiconductors, CEA-CNRS-UJF Group, Institut Néel, CNRS Grenoble, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

Protective nitride formation on stainless steel alloys for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas nitridation has shown excellent promise to form dense, electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant Cr-nitride surface layers on Ni-Cr base alloys for use as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Due to the high cost of nickel, Fe-base bipolar plate alloys are needed to meet the cost targets for many PEMFC applications. Unfortunately, nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys typically leads to internal Cr-nitride precipitation rather than the desired protective surface nitride layer formation, due to the high permeability of nitrogen in these alloys. This paper reports the finding that it is possible to form a continuous, protective Cr-nitride (CrN and Cr{sub 2}N) surface layer through nitridation of Fe-base stainless steel alloys. The key to form a protective Cr-nitride surface layer was found to be the initial formation of oxide during nitridation, which prevented the internal nitridation typically observed for these alloys, and resulted in external Cr-nitride layer formation. The addition of V to the alloy, which resulted in the initial formation of V{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was found to enhance this effect, by making the initially formed oxide more amenable to subsequent nitridation. The Cr-nitride surface layer formed on model V-modified Fe-27Cr alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and low interfacial contact resistance under simulated PEMFC bipolar plate conditions.

Yang, Bing [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Young, David J [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

Crawford, Samuel Curtis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Surface engineering and chemical characterization in ion-nitrided titanium and titanium alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical and physical characteristics of ion-nitrided surface layers, obtained on ?-? titanium alloys, are examined and correlated both with the working conditions adopted in the ion-nitriding process and wit...

T. Bacci; G. Pradelli; B. Tesi; C. Gianoglio; C. Badini

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effect of strain on low-loss electron energy loss spectra of group-III nitrides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thin films of AlN experiencing different strain states were investigated with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) by low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results conclude that the low-loss properties and in particular, the plasmon peak position is shifted as a direct consequence of the inherent strain of the sample. The results reveal that strain, even minor levels, can be measured by STEM-EELS. These results were further corroborated by full potential calculations and expanded to include the similar III nitrides GaN and InN. It is found that a unit-cell volume change of 1% results in a bulk plasmon peak shift of 0.159, 0.168, and 0.079 eV for AlN, GaN, and InN, respectively, according to simulations. The AlN peak shift was experimentally corroborated with a corresponding peak shift of 0.156 eV. The unit-cell volume is used here since it is found that regardless of in- and out-of-plane lattice augmentation, the low-loss properties appear near identical for constant volume. These results have an impact on the interpretation of the plasmon energy and its applicability for determining and separating stress and composition. It is found that while the bulk plasmon energy can be used as a measure of the composition in a group-III nitride alloy for relaxed structures, the presence of strain significantly affects such a measurement. The strain is found to have a lower impact on the peak shift for Al1-xInxN (?3% compositional error per 1% volume change) and In1-xGaxN alloys compared to significant variations for Al1-xGaxN (16% compositional error for 1% volume change). Hence a key understanding in low-loss studies of III nitrides is that strain and composition are coupled and affect one another.

J. Palisaitis; C.-L. Hsiao; M. Junaid; J. Birch; L. Hultman; P. O. Ĺ. Persson

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Thermodynamic stability of oxide, nitride, and carbide coating materials in liquid Sn25Li  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamic stability of oxide, nitride, and carbide coating materials in liquid Sn­25Li S of various oxides, carbides, and nitrides in Sn­Li is estimated as a function of lithium composition K most of the studied nitrides, carbides, and some oxides were found to be stable (DrG > 0). However

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

92

Trends in elasticity and electronic structure of transition-metal nitrides and carbides from first principles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trends in elasticity and electronic structure of transition-metal nitrides and carbides from first 2005 The elastic properties of selected transition-metal TM nitrides and carbides in B1 structure the transition-metal nitrides and carbides remain unclear and a challenge for engineering hard materials

Wu, Zhigang

93

Extreme nitriding limits in aluminium extrusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extrusion of aluminium is an efficient manufacturing process which allows long continuous production. The heated billet (aluminium material) is squeezed through the opening of a metal die in order to shape the desired aluminium profile. A long continuous production increases aging of the die and hampers its capability to yield homogeneously shaped profiles. Hence the dies are usually removed from production lines before their breaking point and only go back into production after receiving a layer coat for protection of the metal. This paper consists of a preliminary analysis of the extrusion amounts between consecutive maintenance procedures of the dies. A maintenance procedure in its whole encompasses an immersion bath of the die in caustic soda, a polishing operation and possibly a subsequent coat layering process in a nitriding chamber. The main goal here is to find the optimal life cycle for a die, in the sense that we are looking for a risk level (an extrusion amount) above which die-damage occurs with a certain high probability. We shall rely on extreme value statistics to answer the question of how long can we go on at each continuous operation of aluminium extrusion.

Claudia Neves; M. Ivette Gomes; Isabel Fraga Alves

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Low temperature thermal transport in partially perforated silicon nitride membranes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal transport in partially trenched silicon nitride membranes has been studied in the temperature range from 0.3 to 0.6 K, with the transition edge sensor (TES), the sole source of membrane heating. The test configuration consisted of Mo/Au TESs lithographically defined on silicon nitride membranes 1 {micro}m thick and 6 mm{sup 2} in size. Trenches with variable depth were incorporated between the TES and the silicon frame in order to manage the thermal transport. It was shown that sharp features in the membrane surface, such as trenches, significantly impede the modes of phonon transport. A nonlinear dependence of thermal resistance on trench depth was observed. Partial perforation of silicon nitride membranes to control thermal transport could be useful in fabricating mechanically robust detector devices.

Yefremenko, V.; Wang, G.; Novosad, V.; Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Divan, R.; Chang, C. L.; Downes, T. P.; Mcmahon, J. J.; Bleem, L. E.; Crites, A. T.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Univ. of Chicago

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Synthesis of uranium nitride and uranium carbide powder by carbothermic reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium nitride and uranium carbide are being considered as high burnup fuels in next generation nuclear reactors and accelerated driven systems for the transmutation of nuclear waste. The same characteristics that make nitrides and carbides candidates for these applications (i.e. favorable thermal properties, mutual solubility of nitrides, etc.), also make these compositions candidate fuels for space nuclear reactors. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of depleted uranium nitride and carbide for a space nuclear reactor program. Importantly, this project emphasized that to synthesize high quality uranium nitride and carbide, it is necessary to understand the exact stoichiometry of the oxide feedstock. (authors)

Dunwoody, J.T.; Stanek, C.R.; McClellan, K.J.; Voit, S.L.; Volz, H.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Hickman, R.R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

Koc, Rasit (Lakewood, CO); Glatzmaier, Gregory C. (Boulder, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

Morgan, Peter E. D. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Pugar, Eloise A. (Newbury Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

Holt, J. Birch (San Jose, CA); Kingman, deceased, Donald D. (late of Danville, CA); Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Quantitative description of microstructure defects in hexagonal boron nitrides using X-ray diffraction analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A routine for simultaneous quantification of turbostratic disorder, amount of puckering and the dislocation and stacking fault density in hexagonal materials was proposed and tested on boron nitride powder samples that were synthesised using different methods. The routine allows the individual microstructure defects to be recognised according to their effect on the anisotropy of the X-ray diffraction line broadening. For quantification of the microstructure defects, the total line broadening is regarded as a linear combination of the contributions from the particular defects. The total line broadening is obtained from the line profile fitting. As testing material, graphitic boron nitride (h-BN) was employed in the form of hot-isostatically pressed h-BN, pyrolytic h-BN or a h-BN, which was chemically vapour deposited at a low temperature. The kind of the dominant microstructure defects determined from the broadening of the X-ray diffraction lines was verified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their amount was attempted to be verified by alternative methods. - Highlights: • Reliable method for quantification of microstructure defects in BN was suggested. • The method is based on the analysis of anisotropic XRD line broadening. • This XRD line broadening is unique and characteristic of the respective defect. • Thus, the quantification of coexistent microstructure defects is possible. • The method was tested on hexagonal BN, which was produced by different techniques.

Schimpf, C., E-mail: schimpf@iww.tu-freiberg.de; Motylenko, M.; Rafaja, D.

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Formation of Hollow Gallium Nitride Spheres via Silica Sphere Templates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formation of Hollow Gallium Nitride Spheres via Silica Sphere Templates ... To form reasonably uniform gallium oxide shells, the amounts of urea and water added to the reaction mixture were varied. ... Due to the low solubility of urea in 2-propanol, addition of a larger amount of urea than that used in this study is not desirable. ...

Chun-Neng Lin; Michael H. Huang

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Novel compound semiconductor devices based on III-V nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New developments in dry and wet etching, ohmic contacts and epitaxial growth of Ill-V nitrides are reported. These make possible devices such as microdisk laser structures and GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors with improved InN ohmic contacts.

Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Ren, F. [AT & T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nitridation of zirconium using energetic ions from plasma focus device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nitridation of zirconium disks is achieved by irradiating energetic nitrogen ions from 2.3 kJ plasma focus device using multiple focus deposition shots (10, 20, 30 and 40) at different angular positions with respect to the anode axis. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the evolution of ZrN, Zr2N and Zr3N4 phases of zirconium nitride depending upon the ion energy flux and angular positions. The crystallite size of ZrN and Zr2N phases increases by increasing the number of focus deposition shots. The residual stresses estimated for Zr (101), ZrN (111) and ZrN (200) phases are maximum in the nitrided surfaces at lower nitrogen ion dose, decreases as the nitrogen ion dose increases. The field emission scanning electron microscopy results exhibit the uniform and smooth film of zirconium nitride with granular surface morphology at 10° angular position. The energy dispersive X-rays spectroscopy data indicate that nitrogen content in the film is improved for higher nitrogen ion dose while reduced at larger angular positions. The Vickers microhardness of the film is enhanced up to 400%. The microhardness increases by increasing the nitrogen ion dose and decreases rapidly by increasing the angular position.

I.A. Khan; M. Hassan; R. Ahmad; A. Qayyum; G. Murtaza; M. Zakaullah; R.S. Rawat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas July 3, 2013 - 2:04pm Addthis Kim Kisslinger, a researcher at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials seen here with a focused-ion beam instrument, reduced the indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples to a thickness of just 20 nanometers to prepare them for electron microscopy. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Kim Kisslinger, a researcher at Brookhaven Lab's Center for Functional Nanomaterials seen here with a focused-ion beam instrument, reduced the indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples to a thickness of just 20 nanometers to prepare them for electron microscopy. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

110

David Niedzwiecki 3/2/2012 2:37:42 PM Protocol for Ultrathin Nitride Membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

necessary to remove the nitride layer. -Use the CHF3/CF4/Ar oxide removal protocol to remove the oxide. Do 8

Movileanu, Liviu

111

Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Metal clusters with exposed and low-coordinate nitride nitrogen atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis and structural characterization of a prototypic series of iron nitride clusters in which the nitrogen atoms are exposed and of low coordination number, namely four and five are described. The term nitride denotes species in which a nitrogen atom is only within bonding distance of metal atoms. The clusters prepared were (Fe/sub 4/N(CO)/sub 12//sup -/), (Fe/sub 5/N(CO)/sub 14//sup -/). The 62-electron four-iron nitrides should have butterfly structures and the 74-electron five-iron nitrides should have square-pyramidal structures. 1 figure.

Tachikawa, M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Stein, J.; Muetterties, E.L.; Teller, R.G.; Beno, M.A.; Gebert, E.; Williams, J.M.

1980-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced microstructural study Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 15 Light extraction efficiency enhancement of InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes with Summary: microstructures on the light extraction efficiency...

114

Chemical preparation and shock wave compression of carbon nitride precursors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two synthetic routes have been developed to produce high-molecular-weight organic precursors containing a high weight fraction of nitrogen. One of the precursors is a pyrolysis residue of melamine-formaldehyde resin. The second precursor is the byproduct of an unusual low-temperature combustion reaction of tetrazole and its sodium salt. These precursors have been shock compressed under typical conditions for diamond and wurtzite boron nitride synthesis in an attempt to recover a new ultrahard carbon nitride. The recovered material has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and Raman microprobe analysis. Diamond is present in the recovered material. This diamond is well ordered relative to diamond shock synthesized from carbonaceous starting materials.

Wixon, M.R. (KMS Fusion, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Electrically dependent bandgaps in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present first-principles calculations on the bandgap of graphene on a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in three different stacking configurations. Relative stability of the configurations is identified and bandgap tunability is demonstrated through the application of an external, perpendicularly applied electric field. We carefully examine the bandgap's sensitivity to both magnitude of the applied field as well as separation between the graphene and hexagonal boron nitride layers. Features of the band structure are examined and configuration-dependent relationships between the field and bandgap are revealed and elucidated through the atom-projected density of states. These findings suggest the potential for opening and modulating a bandgap in graphene as high as several hundred meV.

Kaplan, D., E-mail: daniel.b.kaplan.civ@mail.mil; Swaminathan, V. [U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC, Fuze Precision Armaments and Technology Directorate, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey 07806 (United States); Recine, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Fordham University, Bronx, New York 10458 (United States)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Study of nitrogen-rich titanium and zirconium nitride films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin titanium nitride (TiN) and zirconium nitride (ZrN) films containing excess nitrogen up to 59 and 63 at. % N, respectively, were deposited on austenitic stainless-steel substrates by reactive triode ion plating at about 823 K. The film structure and surface chemistry were studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning Auger spectroscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). In TiN films only the face-centered-cubic mononitride phase was detected. The lattice parameter of the stoichiometric TiN film was larger than the corresponding bulk value and it increased with increasing nitrogen content. The lattice parameter of overstoichiometric ZrN films showed abnormal behavior when calculated from different diffracting planes. This behavior together with the EELS and other measurements indicate that a dielectric Zr/sub 3/N/sub 4/ phase was formed at overstoichiometric compositions.

Ristolainen, E.O.; Molarius, J.M.; Korhonen, A.S.; Lindroos, V.K.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

15 - Processing of Refractory Carbides and Nitrides (Coatings)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter reviews the coating processes of refractory carbides and nitrides. Coatings of refractory carbides and nitrides have great industrial importance with a wide range of applications in semiconductors and other electronic components, in cutting tools, gas-turbine vanes and blades, precision bearings, punch sets, extruders, prostheses, and many other products. The surface of a material may be exposed to wear, corrosion, radiation, electrical or magnetic fields, and other phenomena and hence, it must have the ability to withstand these environments. This can be accomplished by coating the base material to obtain a composite in which the surface properties may be considerably different from those of the substrate. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) belong to the class of vapor-transfer processes, which are atomistic in nature—that is, the deposition species are atoms or molecules or a combination of these. The coatings are also commonly known as thin-films when their thickness is less than 10 ?m. CVD is a versatile process that is well adapted to the production of all the refractory carbides and nitrides, not only as coatings but also as powders, bulk/monolithic components, and fibers. It may be defined as the deposition of a solid on a heated surface from a chemical reaction in the vapor phase.

Hugh O. Pierson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ion implantation of silicon nitride ball bearings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis for ion implantation effect was that stress concentrations reflected into the bulk due to topography such as polishing imperfections, texture in the race, or transferred material, might be reduced due to surface amorphization. 42 control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. Six ion implanted balls were tested to an extended period of 150 h. Accelerated testing was done in a V groove so that wear was on two narrow wear tracks. Rutherford backscattering, XRPS, profilometry, optical microscopy, nanoindentation hardness, and white light interferometry were used. The balls were implanted with 150-keV C ions at fluence 1.1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The samples had preexisting surface defects (C-cracks), so the failure rate of the control group was unacceptable. None of the ion-implanted samples failed in 150 h of testing. Probability of randomly selecting 6 samples from the control group that would perform this well is about 5%, so there is good probability that ion implantation improved performance. Possible reasons are discussed. Wear tracks, microstructure, and impurity content were studied in possible relation to C-cracks.

Williams, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miner, J.R. [United Technologies, Pratt and Whitney, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Deposition of tungsten nitride thin films by plasma focus device at different axial and angular positions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten nitride thin films were deposited on stainless steel–304 substrates by using a low energy (2 kJ) Mather type plasma focus device. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microhardness are used to study the surface of treated samples. The XRD analysis shows that the degree of crystallinity of deposited thin films strongly depends on axial and angular positions of samples. The SEM micrographs of the deposited films at different angular positions (0°, 10° and 30°) and axial position of 8 cm show that the content of WN sub-micro crystalline structures on the surface of deposited films decreased with increasing the angle with respect to anode axis. From AFM results we observe that for the sample deposited at 8 cm and 0° axial and angular positions, respectively, the most uniform surface and the most homogenous distribution of grains are obtained. Also the hardness results show that the highest mechanical hardness is obtained when the film is deposited at 8 cm and 0° axial and angular positions, respectively.

M.T. Hosseinnejad; M. Ghoranneviss; G.R. Etaati; M. Shirazi; Z. Ghorannevis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Influence of interlayer trapping and detrapping mechanisms on the electrical characterization of hafnium oxide/silicon nitride stacks on silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al/HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors have been studied by electrical characterization. Films of silicon nitride were directly grown on n-type silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance assisted chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride thickness was varied from 3 to 6.6 nm. Afterwards, 12 nm thick hafnium oxide films were deposited by the high-pressure sputtering approach. Interface quality was determined by using current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), conductance transients, and flatband voltage transient techniques. Leakage currents followed the Poole-Frenkel emission model in all cases. According to the simultaneous measurement of the high and low frequency capacitance voltage curves, the interface trap density obtained for all the samples is in the 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range. However, a significant increase in this density of about two orders of magnitude was obtained by DLTS for the thinnest silicon nitride interfacial layers. In this work we probe that this increase is an artifact that must be attributed to traps existing at the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface. These traps are more easily charged or discharged as this interface comes near to the substrate, that is, as thinner the SiN{sub x}:H interface layer is. The trapping/detrapping mechanism increases the capacitance transient and, in consequence, the DLTS measurements have contributions not only from the insulator/substrate interface but also from the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface.

Garcia, H.; Duenas, S.; Castan, H.; Gomez, A.; Bailon, L. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, E.T.S.I. Telecomunicacion, Universidad de Valladolid, Campus 'Miguel Delibes', 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Toledano-Luque, M.; Prado, A. del; Martil, I.; Gonzalez-Diaz, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electronica), Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Excitons in Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Dimensionality Effects Ludger Wirtz,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitons in Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Dimensionality Effects Ludger Wirtz,1,2 Andrea Marini,3; published 30 March 2006) We show that the optical absorption spectra of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes are dominated by strongly bound excitons. Our first-principles calculations indicate that the binding energy

Marini, Andrea

122

Ultra-thin ohmic contacts for p-type nitride light emitting devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor based Light Emitting Device (LED) can include a p-type nitride layer and a metal ohmic contact, on the p-type nitride layer. The metal ohmic contact can have an average thickness of less than about 25 .ANG. and a specific contact resistivity less than about 10.sup.-3 ohm-cm.sup.2.

Raffetto, Mark (Raleigh, NC); Bharathan, Jayesh (Cary, NC); Haberern, Kevin (Cary, NC); Bergmann, Michael (Chapel Hill, NC); Emerson, David (Chapel Hill, NC); Ibbetson, James (Santa Barbara, CA); Li, Ting (Ventura, CA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

123

Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene hexagonal boron nitride graphene junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene ­ hexagonal boron nitride ­ graphene junctions T. Roy1 , L. Liu2 , S. de la Barrera,3 B. Chakrabarti1,4 , Z. R. Hesabi1 , C. A. Joiner1 Abstract: Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate

Feenstra, Randall

124

One step process for producing dense aluminum nitride and composites thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A one step combustion process for the synthesis of dense aluminum nitride compositions is disclosed. The process comprises igniting pure aluminum powder in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of about 1000 atmospheres or higher. The process enables the production of aluminum nitride bodies to be formed directly in a mold of any desired shape.

Holt, J. Birch (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

carbides. The multiphase/polytypic region can be expected to occur also in the nitrides because  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in valence electron concentration where sev- eral phases of the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal carbides have, Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides (Academic Press, New York, 1971). 6. C. Maerky, M.-O. Guillou, J. L is predicted to be substantially enhanced over that of traditional transition metal car- bide/nitride coatings

Shen, Guoyin

126

Single-Crystalline Mesoporous Molybdenum Nitride Nanowires with Improved Electrochemical Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. I. Introduction TRANSITION -metal oxides, carbides, sulfides, and nitrides are extensively, and catalytic properties.1­4 Among the transition-metal com- pounds, transition-metal nitrides are regarded using transition-metal complex materials.16 However, the transi- tion-metal complex materials are lower

Cao, Guozhong

127

Hard superconducting nitrides Xiao-Jia Chen*, Viktor V. Struzhkin*, Zhigang Wu*, Maddury Somayazulu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(4). The refractory characteristics of these transition- metal nitrides and carbides have been, and hardness of selected superconducting transition-metal nitrides reveals inter- esting correlations among transition temperature (Tc) near 4 K when doped with boron (3). However, the transition-metal compounds

Wu, Zhigang

128

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride nanotube films: Low temperature growth and electron field emission Dingyong Zhong, Shuang Liu, Guangyu Zhang, and E. G. Wanga) State Key Laboratory for Surface Received 2 January 2001; accepted for publication 13 March 2001 Large-scale well aligned carbon nitride

Zhang, Guangyu

129

Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

Williams, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Miner, J. [United Technologies Corp., West Palm Beach, FL (United States). Pratt and Whitney Div.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

Yi, Min [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Shen, Zhigang, E-mail: shenzhg@buaa.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Xiaohu [Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liang, Shuaishuai [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Lei [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600?°C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600?°C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39?mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

Song, Yenan [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Ho [Nano Electron-Source Creative Research Center, Creative and Challenging Research Division, ETRI, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Milne, William I. [Electrical Engineering Division, Engineering Department, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Jin Lee, Cheol, E-mail: cjlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Micro/Nano Systems, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Field emission characteristics from graphene on hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attempt has been made to utilize uniquely high electron mobility of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) to electron emitter. The field emission property of graphene/h-BN/Si structure has shown enhanced threshold voltage and emission current, both of which are key to develop novel vacuum nanoelectronics devices. The field emission property was discussed along with the electronic structure of graphene investigated by Fowler-Nordheim plot and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The result suggested that transferring graphene on h-BN modified its work function, which changed field emission mechanism. Our report opens up a possibility of graphene-based vacuum nanoelectronics devices with tuned work function.

Yamada, Takatoshi, E-mail: takatoshi-yamada@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Ebisudani, Taishi; Okano, Ken [International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fast reverse osmosis using boron nitride and carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate reverse osmosis through commonly used polymeric and advanced inorganic nanotube based semipermeable membranes by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations indicate that there is a significantly higher water flux through boron-nitride nanotube (BNNT) and carbon nanotube(CNT) compared to a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) pore and a slightly higher water flux through BNNT as compared to CNT. The calculated permeation coefficient is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical single-file “hopping” model. Potential of mean force analysis indicates that the irregular nature of PMMA pore surface can cause significant localized energy barriers inside the pore thereby reducing the water flux.

M. E. Suk; A. V. Raghunathan; N. R. Aluru

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits operating at ultraviolet wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum nitride (AlN) has recently emerged as a promising material for integrated photonics due to a large bandgap and attractive optical properties. Exploiting the wideband transparency, we demonstrate waveguiding in AlN-on-Insulator circuits from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths using nanophotonic components with dimensions down to 40?nm. By measuring the propagation loss over a wide spectral range, we conclude that both scattering and absorption of AlN-intrinsic defects contribute to strong attenuation at short wavelengths, thus providing guidelines for future improvements in thin-film deposition and circuit fabrication.

Stegmaier, M.; Ebert, J.; Pernice, W. H. P., E-mail: wolfram.pernice@kit.edu [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Meckbach, J. M.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M. [Institute of Micro- und Nanoelectronic Systems, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

136

Local environment of silicon in cubic boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Si-doped cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is synthesized at high pressure and high temperature, and the local environment of Si is investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and first-principles calculations. Si-K XANES indicates that Si in c-BN is surrounded by four nitrogen atoms. According to first-principles calculations, the model for substitutional Si at the B site well reproduces experimental Si-K XANES, and it is energetically more favorable than substitutional Si at the N site. Both the present experimental and theoretical results indicate that Si in c-BN prefers the B site to the N site.

Murata, Hidenobu, E-mail: MURATA.Hidenobu@nims.go.jp; Taniguchi, Takashi [Advanced Key Technologies Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Hishita, Shunichi [Environment and Energy Materials Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305–0044 (Japan); Yamamoto, Tomoyuki [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169–8555 (Japan); Oba, Fumiyasu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606–8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606–8501 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta, Nagoya 456–8587 (Japan)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

137

Nitride and Oxynitride Based Phosphors for Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to advance the technology of the Lightscape Materials Inc. (Lightscape) proprietary nitride and oxynitride phosphors for solid state lighting (SSL) from the current level of maturity of applied research to advanced engineering development. This objective will be accomplished by optimizing the novel nitride and oxynitride phosphors, whose formulations are listed in Table 1, and establishing cost-effective preparation processes for the phosphors. The target performances of the phosphors are: • High luminescence efficiency: Quantum Yield = 90%. • Superior thermal stability of luminescence: Thermal Quenching Loss <10% at 150 °C. • Superior environmental stability: Luminescence Maintenance >90% after 5,000 hours at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity. • Scattering loss <10%. • Cost-effective preparation processes. The resulting phosphor materials and their preparation processes are anticipated to be a drop-in component for product development paths undertaken by LED lamp makers in the SSL industry. Upon program completion, Lightscape will target market insertion that enables high efficacy, high color rendering index (CRI), high thermal stability and long lifetime LED-based lighting products for general illumination that realizes substantial energy savings.

Tian, Yongchi

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radiation tolerance of piezoelectric bulk single-crystal aluminum nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For practical use in harsh radiation environments, we pose selection criteria for piezoelectric materials for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and material characterization. Using these criteria, piezoelectric aluminum nitride is shown to be an excellent candidate. The results of tests on an aluminumnitride-based transducer operating in a nuclear reactor are also presented. We demonstrate the tolerance of single-crystal piezoelectric aluminum nitride after fast and thermal neutron fluences of 1.85 × 1018 neutron/cm2 and 5.8 × 1018 neutron/cm2, respectively, and a gamma dose of 26.8 MGy. The radiation hardness of AlN is most evident from the unaltered piezoelectric coefficient d33, which measured 5.5 pC/N after a fast and thermal neutron exposure in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWh, in agreement with the published literature value. The results offer potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects on materials by enabling structural health monitoring and NDE in spite of the high levels of radiation and high temperatures, which are known to destroy typical commercial ultrasonic transducers.

David A. Parks; Bernhard R. Tittmann

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene symmetric field effect transistors. Gate control of the tunneling characteristics is observed similar to previously reported results for exfoliated graphene–hexagonal boron nitride–graphene devices. Density-of-states features are observed in the tunneling characteristics of the devices, although without large resonant peaks that would arise from lateral momentum conservation. The lack of distinct resonant behavior is attributed to disorder in the devices, and a possible source of the disorder is discussed.

Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Joiner, C. A.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Liu, L.; Gu, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, 1520 Middle Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Barrera, S. de la; Feenstra, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Gain analysis of blue nitride-based lasers by small signal modulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With a small signal frequency-modulation of the driving current the resonance frequency and the damping factor of the optical output power response of blue nitride-based ridge lasers grown on [0001]-plane gallium-nitride substrates were investigated with a network analyzer setup. From the linear dependence of the squared resonance frequency on the driving current the gain coefficients of the logarithmic gain model could be extracted being 7680 ? cm ? 1 for blue nitride-based lasers. For this purpose additional parameters such as the carrier density and the confinement factor were assigned by carrier lifetime and quantum efficiencymeasurements and one dimensional transfer matrix simulations respectively.

J. Müller; M. Scheubeck; M. Sabathil; G. Brüderl; D. Dini; S. Tautz; T. Lermer; A. Breidenassel; S. Lutgen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

X-ray Excited Optical Luminescence from Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Electronic Structures and the Role of Oxygen Impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a study on the optical luminescence properties and the electronic structures of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). BNNTs with natural B (80% {sup 11}B and 20% {sup 10}B) and pure {sup 10}B are investigated in comparison with hexagonal BN crystals using X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL). We find that the BNNT specimen synthesized with natural B contains more oxide impurities than that with pure {sup 10}B, resulting in significantly different behavior in optical luminescence. All BN samples with hexagonal structures are found to emit strong luminescence, but the emission spectra are strongly morphology- and structure-dependent. XEOL and XANES measurements were carried out at the B K-edge, N K-edge, and O K-edge in order to reveal the origin of different luminescence channels and the corresponding electronic structures in these BN materials.

Liu, L.; Han, W.; Sham, T.-K.; Zhi, C.; Bando, Y.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

The influence of prestrained metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial gallium-nitride templates on hydride vapor phase epitaxial growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have varied the strain situation in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial (MOVPE) grown gallium-nitride (GaN) by exchanging the nucleation layer and by inserting a submono-Si x N y -interlayer in the first few hundred nanometers of growth on sapphire substrates. The influence on the MOVPE template and subsequent hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) growth could be shown by in-situ measurements of the sample curvature. Using the results of these investigations we have established a procedure to confine the curvature development in MOVPE and HVPE growth to a minimum. By increasing the layer thickness in HVPE we could create self-separated freestanding GaN layers with small remaining curvature.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Boron-Nitride (BN) Nanotubes (BNNT) at TJNAF| U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Boron-Nitride (BN) Nanotubes (BNNT) at Boron-Nitride (BN) Nanotubes (BNNT) at TJNAF Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Boron-Nitride (BN) Nanotubes (BNNT) at TJNAF Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Boron-Nitride (BN) Nanotubes (BNNT) Developed at: Jefferson Lab Free Electron Facility Developed in: 2008-2011

144

Friction and wear behavior of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specimens of in-situ-reinforced silicon nitride (ISRSH) have been wear tested in lubricated, reciprocating, sliding motion against a silicon nitride counterface. Only mild wear of the ISRSN was observed at contact pressures up to 4.8 GPa at an average sliding velocity of 0.3 m/s. At 0.6 m/s, a wear mode transition was observed in ISRSN at 4.2 - 4.4 GPa. In comparison, the wear mode transition in silicon carbide whisker reinforced silicon nitride at both velocities was evident at about 2.2 - 2.4 GPa. Scanning electron microscopy of the ISRSN wear surfaces revealed the presence of a 40 pm thick debris layer on the mild wear tracks. The ISRSN wear mode transition response indicated a potential for an improved wear resistance in this material as compared to whisker reinforced silicon nitride.

Yust, C.S.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method of nitriding, carburizing, or oxidizing refractory metal articles using microwaves  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of nitriding an article of refractory-nitride-forming metal or metalloids. A consolidated metal or metalloid article is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid to an article of refractory nitride. in addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Lasers Used to Make First Boron-Nitride Nanotube Yarn | Jefferson...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yarn Visualization of helium-4 and beryllium nuclei. A yarn spun of boron-nitride nanotubes suspends a quarter. NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Dec. 2 -Researchers have used lasers to create...

148

High-Temperature Oxidation Resistance of Refractory Silicon Nitride—Silicon Carbide Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon nitride and carbide are promising materials for use as refractories; they are highly resistant to mineral acids and alkalis, have a high melting point, and are thermally very stable [1].

I. N. Godovannaya; O. I. Popova

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optoelectronic Properties in Monolayers of Hybridized Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explain the nature of the electronic energy gap and optical absorption spectrum of carbon–boron-nitride (CBN) monolayers using density functional theory, GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations. The band structure and the ...

Bernardi, Marco

150

Hydrogen adsorption on boron nitride nanotubes: A path to room-temperature hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption of molecular hydrogen on boron nitride nanotubes is studied with the use of the pseudopotential density functional method. The binding energy and distance of adsorbed hydrogen is particularly calculated. It is found that the binding energy of hydrogen on boron nitride nanotubes is increased by as much as 40% compared to that on carbon nanotubes, which is attributed to heteropolar bonding in boron nitride. The effect of substitutional doping and structural defects on hydrogen adsorption is also studied and we find a substantial enhancement of the binding energy from that on perfect boron nitride. The current study demonstrates a pathway to the finding of proper media that can hold hydrogen at ambient conditions through physisorption.

Seung-Hoon Jhi and Young-Kyun Kwon

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fluorination of a depleted uranium-plutonium-nitride fuel with elemental fluorine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A physical and a mathematical model have been developed to describe the physicochemical process of torch fluorination of an uranium-plutonium-nitride fuel. An algorithm for calculating the velocity, temperatur...

V. A. Karelin; V. N. Brendakov; M. V. Popadeikin

152

Method of enhancing the wettability of boron nitride for use as an electrochemical cell separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A felt or other fabric of boron nitride suitable for use as an interelecte separator within an electrochemical cell is wetted with a solution containing a thermally decomposable organic salt of an alkaline earth metal. An aqueous solution of magnesium acetate is the preferred solution for this purpose. After wetting the boron nitride, the solution is dried by heating at a sufficiently low temperature to prevent rapid boiling and the creation of voids within the separator. The dried material is then calcined at an elevated temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. to provide a coating of an oxide of magnesium on the surface of the boron nitride fibers. A fabric or felt of boron nitride treated in this manner is easily wetted by molten electrolytic salts, such as the alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides, that are used in high temperature, secondary electrochemical cells.

McCoy, Lowell R. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method of enhancing the wettability of boron nitride for use as an electrochemical cell separator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A felt or other fabric of boron nitride suitable for use as an interelectrode separator within an electrochemical cell is wetted with a solution containing a thermally decomposable organic salt of an alkaline earth metal. An aqueous solution of magnesium acetate is the preferred solution for this purpose. After wetting the boron nitride, the solution is dried by heating at a sufficiently low temperature to prevent rapid boiling and the creation of voids within the separator. The dried material is then calcined at an elevated temperature in excess of 400/sup 0/C to provide a coating of an oxide of magnesium on the surface of the boron nitride fibers. A fabric or felt of boron nitride treated in this manner is easily wetted by molten electrolytic salts, such as the alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides, that are used in high temperature, secondary electrochemical cells.

McCoy, L.R.

1981-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effect of the nitrogen ion energy on the MBE growth of thin gallium nitride films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of the energy of bombarding nitrogen ions on the growth of thin gallium nitride (GaN) films under molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) conditions has been simulated using the method of balance kinetic eq...

D. V. Kulikov; Yu. V. Trushin; V. S. Kharlamov

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Impurity-induced disorder in III-nitride materials and devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for impurity-induced disordering in III-nitride materials comprises growing a III-nitride heterostructure at a growth temperature and doping the heterostructure layers with a dopant during or after the growth of the heterostructure and post-growth annealing of the heterostructure. The post-growth annealing temperature can be sufficiently high to induce disorder of the heterostructure layer interfaces.

Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J; Allerman, Andrew A

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

Surface hardening of metallic alloys by electrospark deposition followed by plasma nitriding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study concerned with the surface hardening of nonferrous and ferrous alloys, by integrating the electrospark deposition and plasma nitriding processes. Specimens of an aluminium bronze and of a grey cast iron were firstly electrospark coated with AISI-304 stainless steel and, then, ion nitrided in a 25%N2 + 75%H2 dc plasma. It is shown that by using these two treatments, the surface hardness of this two materials can be substantially increased.

M.A. Béjar; W. Schnake; W. Saavedra; J.P. Vildósola

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nitride III-V Activities at Sandia National Labs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lighting: Lighting: Synergisms with Office of Science Materials Programs Jerry A. Simmons Semiconductor Materials and Device Sciences Sandia National Laboratories March 13, 2001 EMaCC Meeting OUTLINE *Brief overview of prospects & promise of SSL *National Initiative *Grand Challenge LDRD at Sandia *BES-supported activities at Sandia provided core capabilities *Other NS applications of nitride materials science Will only discuss inorganic materials and devices here. Major motivation for SSL is energy savings: lighting is large fraction of energy consumption 1 10 100 1000 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Energy Electricity Illumination (assuming 20% of electricity) Projected WORLD Energy Consumption (Quads) Year 400 Quads 130 Quads 25 Quads 1998 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Energy Electricity Illumination

158

Graphene interconnects fully encapsulated in layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate improvements in the electrical performance of graphene interconnects with full encapsulation by lattice-matching layered insulator, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). A novel layer-based transfer method is developed to assemble the top passivating layer of h-BN on the graphene surface to construct the h-BN/graphene/h-BN heterostructures. The encapsulated graphene interconnects (EGIs) are characterized and compared with graphene interconnects on either SiO2 or h-BN substrates with no top passivating h-BN layer. We observe significant improvements in both the maximum current density and breakdown voltage in EGIs. Compared with the uncovered structures, EGIs also show an appreciable increase (~67%) in power density at breakdown. These improvements are achieved without degrading the carrier transport characteristics in graphene wires. In addition, EGIs exhibit a minimal environment impact, showing electrical behavior insensitive to ambient conditions.

Nikhil Jain; Chris A Durcan; Robin Jacobs-Gedrim; Yang Xu; Bin Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sřrensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of thin-film silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured and analyzed the optical characteristics of a series of silicon nitride thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates for photovoltaic applications. Spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were made by using a two-channel spectroscopic polarization modulator ellipsometer that measures N, S, and C data simultaneously. The data were fit to a model consisting of air / roughness / SiN / crystalline silicon. The roughness was modeled using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation, assuming 50% SiN, 50% voids. The optical functions of the SiN film were parameterized using a model by Jellison and Modine. All the {Chi}{sup 2} are near 1, demonstrating that this model works extremely well for all SiN films. The measured dielectric functions were used to make optimized SiN antireflection coatings for crystalline silicon solar cells.

Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Modine, F.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doshi, P.; Rohatgi, A. [Georiga Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Photonic Crystal Light Sources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) is maximizing the efficiency of a white LED by enhancing the external quantum efficiency using photonic crystals to extract light that would normally be confined in a conventional structure. Ultimate efficiency can only be achieved by looking at the internal structure of light. To do this, UCSB is focusing on maximizing the light extraction efficiency and total light output from light engines driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based LEDs. The challenge is to engineer large overlap (interaction) between modes and photonic crystals. The project is focused on achieving high extraction efficiency in LEDs, controlled directionality of emitted light, integrated design of vertical device structure, and nanoscale patterning of lateral structure.

162

Biofuels production from hydrotreating of vegetable oil using supported noble metals, and transition metal carbide and nitride.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The focus of this research is to prepare non-sulfided hydrotreating catalysts, supported noble metal and transition metal carbide/ nitride, and evaluate their hydrocracking activities… (more)

Wang, Huali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Reaction injection molding of silicon nitride ceramics having crystallized grain boundary phases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reaction injection molding process is described for preparing a sintered, silicon nitride-containing ceramic article comprising; (1) injecting into a heated mold a fluid, nondilatant mixture comprising (a) at least 40% by volume of a powder mixture of (i) from about 20 wt.% to about 98 wt.% silicon nitride, (ii) from about 0.5 wt.% to about 20 wt.% of a silicate glass-forming sintering aid, and (iii) from about 0.001 wt.% to about 80 wt.% of a high metal content transition metal silicide or a transition metal or metal compound that forms a high metal content silicide with silicon nitride under the conditions defined in steps (2) or (3), and (b) a curable silicon nitride precursor binder that is a liquid below its curing temperature, to cure the binder and produce a hardened molded article, (2) heating the hardened mol suitable atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the cured binder to a silicon nitride-containing ceramic, and (3) sintering the article by (i) heating at a temperature of 1,300 to 1,800 C until a silicate glass forms, and (ii) further heating at a temperature of 1,300 to 1,800 C under a vacuum until oxygen is removed from the silicate glass and the glass crystallizes.

Lukacs, A. III; Matsumoto, R.L.K.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12 m.sup.2 /g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

Huckabee, Marvin (Marlboro, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA); Neil, Jeffrey T. (Acton, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength is disclosed. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12 m[sup 2]/g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

Huckabee, M.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal oxidation of polycrystalline and single crystalline aluminum nitride wafers (Prop 2003-054)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two types of aluminum nitride (AlN) samples were oxidized in flowing oxygen between 900 C and 1150 C for up to 6 h - highly (0001) textured polycrystalline AlN wafers and low defect density AlN single crystals. The N-face consistently oxidized at a faster rate than the Al-face. At 900 C and 1000 C after 6 h, the oxide was 15% thicker on the N-face than on the Al-face of polycrystalline AlN. At 1100 C and 1150 C, the oxide was only 5% thicker on the N-face, as the rate-limiting step changed from kinetically-controlled to diffusion-controlled with the oxide thickness. A linear parabolic model was established for the thermal oxidation of polycrystalline AlN on both the Al- and N-face. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the formation of a thicker crystalline oxide film on the N-face than on the Al-face, and established the crystallographic relationship between the oxide film and substrate. The oxidation of high-quality AlN single crystals resulted in a more uniform colored oxide layer compared to polycrystalline AlN. The aluminum oxide layer was crystalline with a rough AlN/oxide interface. The orientation relationship between AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was (0001) AlN//(10{bar 1}0) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and (1{bar 1}00) AlN//(01{bar 1}2) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

Speakman, Scott A [ORNL; Gu, Z [Kansas State University; Edgar, J H [Kansas State University; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Perrin, J [Kansas State University; Chaudhuri, J [Kansas State University

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan [Shahid Chamran University, Golestan boulevard, Ahvaz, Khouzestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neek-Amal, M., E-mail: neekamal@srttu.edu [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Lavizan, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Formation of Protective Nitride Surfaces for PEM Fuel Cell Metallic Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective gas nitridation of model Ni-base alloys was used to form dense, electrically-conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride surface layers, including TiN, VN, CrN, Cr2N, as well as a complex NiNbVN phase. Evaluation for use as a protective surface for metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) indicated that CrN/Cr2N base surfaces hold promise to meet Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for automotive applications. The thermally grown CrN/Cr2N surface formed on model Ni-Cr base alloys exhibited good stability and low electrical resistance in single-cell fuel cell testing under simulated drive-cycle conditions. Recent results indicate that similar protective Cr-nitride surfaces can be formed on less expensive Fe-Cr base alloys potentially capable of meeting DOE cost goals.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Yang, Bing [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermodynamic stability and unusual strength of ultra-incompressible rhenium nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a comprehensive study of thermodynamic and mechanical properties as well as a bond-deformation mechanism on ultra-incompressible Re{sub 2} N and Re{sub 3} N. The introduction of nitrogen into the rhenium lattice leads to thermodynamic instability in Re{sub 2} N at ambient conditions and enhanced incompressibility and strength for both rhenium nitrides. Rhenium nitrides, however, show substantially lower ideal shear strength than hard ReB{sub 2} and superhard c -BN, suggesting that they cannot be intrinsically superhard. An intriguing soft “ionic bond mediated plastic deformation” mechanism is revealed to underline the physical origin of their unusual mechanical strength. These results suggest a need to reformulate the design concept of intrinsically superhard transition-metal nitrides, borides, and carbides.

Zhang, R. F.; Lin, Zhijun; Mao, Ho-kwang; Zhao, Yusheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effects of N{sub 2} remote plasma nitridation on the structural and electrical characteristics of the HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics grown using remote plasma atomic layer deposition methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of remote plasma atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on Si, which has a very thin SiO{sub 2} interlayer with and without remote plasma nitridation (RPN), have been investigated. Small amounts of N atoms were successfully incorporated by RPN pretreatment, in which the dominant emission species were excited atomic nitrogen (N{sup *}) and excited molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}{sup *}), into a very thin SiO{sub 2} interlayer for the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film. The thin ({approx}1.5 nm) intermediate layer containing nitrogen, which was prepared by sequential O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} remote plasma treatment of the Si substrate, can effectively suppress growth of the unintentional interface layer. In addition, it enhances the thermal stability and the resistance to oxygen diffusion during rapid thermal annealing. The HfO{sub 2} film containing the remote plasma nitrided SiO{sub 2} interlayer annealed at 800 deg. C showed a lower equivalent oxide thickness of {approx}1.89 nm and a lower leakage current density (3.78x10{sup -7} A cm{sup -2} at |V{sub G}-V{sub FB}|=2 V) compared to a non-nitrided sample of the same physical thickness. Also, we compared the characteristics of HfO{sub 2} films annealed in two different ambient environments, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}.

Choi, Jihoon; Kim, Seokhoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Kang, Hyunseok; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Bae, Choelhwyi [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Alternative Liquid Fuel Effects on Cooled Silicon Nitride Marine Gas Turbine Airfoils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With prior support from the Office of Naval Research, DARPA, and U.S. Department of Energy, United Technologies is developing and engine environment testing what we believe to be the first internally cooled silicon nitride ceramic turbine vane in the United States. The vanes are being developed for the FT8, an aeroderivative stationary/marine gas turbine. The current effort resulted in further manufacturing and development and prototyping by two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers, preliminary development of both alumina, and YTRIA based environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) and testing or ceramic vanes with an EBC coating.

Holowczak, J.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells with chromium nitride nanocrystals as electrocatalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells(PEMFCs) are energy conversion devices that produce electricity from a supply of fuel such as hydrogen. One of the major challenges in achieving efficient energy conversion is the development of cost-effective materials that can act as electrocatalysts for PEMFCs. In this letter we demonstrate that instead of conventional noble metals such as platinum chromium nitride nanocrystals of fcc structure exhibit attractive catalytic activity for PEMFCs. Device testing indicates good stability of nitride nanocrystals in low temperature fuel cell operational environment.

Hexiang Zhong; Xiaobo Chen; Huamin Zhang; Meiri Wang; Samuel S. Mao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Metal Nitride and Metal Carbide Nanoparticles by a Soft Urea Pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It also worth noting that in the presence of the metal precursors, the solubility of urea (or similar compounds) is significantly higher than in pure ethanol (4.877 g/100 g at 18.2 °C), which already indicates the formation of soluble complexes and coordination polymers. ... HRTEM shown well-developed lattice fringes, with d = 2.43 Ĺ as interplanar distance, corresponding to the plane 101 of the hexagonal structures of gallium nitride (dcalcd = 2.43765 Ĺ, ref ICDD-PDF4+ 01?089?7522). ... (Oxy)nitrides as new photocatalysts for water splitting under visible light irradiation ...

Cristina Giordano; Christian Erpen; Weitang Yao; Bettina Milke; Markus Antonietti

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Anisotropic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Nanomaterials - Synthesis and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride (BN) is a synthetic binary compound located between III and V group elements in the Periodic Table. However, its properties, in terms of polymorphism and mechanical characteristics, are rather close to those of carbon compared with other III-V compounds, such as gallium nitride. BN crystallizes into a layered or a tetrahedrally linked structure, like those of graphite and diamond, respectively, depending on the conditions of its preparation, especially the pressure applied. Such correspondence between BN and carbon readily can be understood from their isoelectronic structures [1, 2]. On the other hand, in contrast to graphite, layered BN is transparent and is an insulator. This material has attracted great interest because, similar to carbon, it exists in various polymorphic forms exhibiting very different properties; however, these forms do not correspond strictly to those of carbon. Crystallographically, BN is classified into four polymorphic forms: Hexagonal BN (h-BN) (Figure 1(b)); rhombohedral BN (r-BN); cubic BN (c-BN); and wurtzite BN (w-BN). BN does not occur in nature. In 1842, Balmain [3] obtained BN as a reaction product between molten boric oxide and potassium cyanide under atmospheric pressure. Thereafter, many methods for its synthesis were reported. h-BN and r-BN are formed under ambient pressure. c-BN is synthesized from h-BN under high pressure at high temperature while w-BN is prepared from h-BN under high pressure at room temperature [1]. Each BN layer consists of stacks of hexagonal plate-like units of boron and nitrogen atoms linked by SP{sup 2} hybridized orbits and held together mainly by Van der Waals force (Fig 1(b)). The hexagonal polymorph has two-layered repeating units: AA'AA'... that differ from those in graphite: ABAB... (Figure 1(a)). Within the layers of h-BN there is coincidence between the same phases of the hexagons, although the boron atoms and nitrogen atoms are alternatively located along the c-axis. The rhombohedral system consists of three-layered units: ABCABC..., whose honeycomb layers are arranged in a shifted phase, like as those of graphite. Reflecting its weak interlayer bond, the h-BN can be cleaved easily along its layers, and hence, is widely used as a lubricant material. The material is stable up to a high temperature of 2300 C before decomposition sets in [2] does not fuse a nitrogen atmosphere of 1 atm, and thus, is applicable as a refractory material. Besides having such properties, similar to those of graphite, the material is transparent, and acts as a good electric insulator, especially at high temperatures (10{sup 6} {Omega}m at 1000 C) [1]. c-BN and w-BN are tetrahedrally linked BN. The former has a cubic sphalerite-type structure, and the latter has a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure. c-BN is the second hardest known material (the hardest is diamond), the so-called white diamond. It is used mainly for grinding and cutting industrial ferrous materials because it does not react with molten iron, nickel, and related alloys at high temperatures whereas diamond does [1]. It displays the second highest thermal conductivity (6-9 W/cm.deg) after diamond. This chapter focuses principally upon information about h-BN nanomaterials, mainly BN nanotubes (BNNTs), porous BN, mono- and few-layer-BN sheets. There are good reviews book chapters about c-BN in [1, 4-6].

Han,W.Q.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Anthrax Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

180

Growth Mechanisms of Vertically-aligned Carbon, Boron Nitride, and Zinc Oxide Nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanotubes are one-dimensional nanomaterials with all atoms located near the surface. This article provides a brief review on the possible growth mechanisms of a series of inorganic nanotubes, in particular, vertically-aligned (VA) carbon nanotubes (CNTs), boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), and ZnO nanotubes (ZnO NTs).

Yap, Yoke Khin [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 118 Fisher Hall, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Disordered graphene and boron nitride in a microwave tight-binding analogue S. Barkhofen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disordered graphene and boron nitride in a microwave tight-binding analogue S. Barkhofen,1 M Sophia-Antipolis, 06108 Nice, France (Dated: December 20, 2012) Experiments on hexagonal graphene of the high flexibility of the discs positions, consequences of the disorder introduced in the graphene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

182

Numerical simulation of the heat transfer in amorphous silicon nitride membrane-based microcalorimeters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation of the heat transfer in amorphous silicon nitride membrane July 2003 Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional 2D heat flow in a membrane-based microcalorimeter have been performed. The steady-state isotherms and time-dependent heat flow have been calculated

Hellman, Frances

183

Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method for Improving Mg Doping During Group-III Nitride MOCVD  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for improving Mg doping of Group III-N materials grown by MOCVD preventing condensation in the gas phase or on reactor surfaces of adducts of magnesocene and ammonia by suitably heating reactor surfaces between the location of mixing of the magnesocene and ammonia reactants and the Group III-nitride surface whereon growth is to occur.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, George T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Published April 28, 2010. Metal silicides such as TiSi2 and CoSi2 have been commonly used as the contactsFormation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide NiSi , which is a key material for source, drain

187

Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

Kisielowski, Christian K. (Peidmont, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

Kisielowski, Christian K. (Piedmont, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Graphene field-effect transistors based on boron nitride gate dielectrics Inanc Meric1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene field-effect transistors based on boron nitride gate dielectrics Inanc Meric1 , Cory Dean1, 10027 Tel: (212) 854-2529, Fax: (212) 932-9421, Email: shepard@ee.columbia.edu Abstract Graphene field of graphene, as the gate dielectric. The devices ex- hibit mobility values exceeding 10,000 cm2 /V

Shepard, Kenneth

190

Characterization of the nitrogen split interstitial defect in wurtzite aluminum nitride using density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carried out Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional theory plane wave supercell calculations in wurtzite aluminum nitride in order to characterize the geometry, formation energies, transition levels, and hyperfine tensors of the nitrogen split interstitial defect. The calculated hyperfine tensors may provide useful fingerprint of this defect for electron paramagnetic resonance measurement.

Szállás, A., E-mail: szallas.attila@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szász, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Institute of Physics, Eötvös University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Trinh, X. T.; Son, N. T.; Janzén, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Gali, A., E-mail: gali.adam@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tuning the optical properties of dilute nitride site controlled quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that deterministic control of the properties of pyramidal site-controlled quantum dots (QD) could be achieved by exposing the QD layer to nitrogen precursor unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMHy). The properties that could be tuned include an expected emission reduction in dilute nitride materials, excitonic pattern (biexciton binding energy) and improved carrier confinement potential symmetry (reduced fine-structure splitting)

Juska, G.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Mereni, L. O.; Gocalinska, A.; Pelucchi, E. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electronic structure and pairwise interactions in substoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1001 Electronic structure and pairwise interactions in substoichiometric transition metal carbides observations expéri- mentales. Abstract 2014 In substoichiometric transition metal carbides and nitrides This paper is devoted to the study of the ordering processes in substoichiometric transition metal carbi- des

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

Compressibilities and phonon spectra of high-hardness transition metal-nitride materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report compressibilities measured by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and phonon spectra from Raman scattering at high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) for cubic transition metal nitrides TiN{sub 1-x}, {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and VN{sub x}. The high-hardness metal nitride compounds have large values of the bulk modulus. B1-structured nitrides normally have no allowed first-order Raman spectra. However, they exhibit broad bands that reflect the vibrational density of states g({omega}) associated with breakdown of q=0 selection rules because of the presence of N{sup 3-} vacancies on anion sites. Peaks in g({omega}) at low frequency are identified with the longitudinal and transverse acoustic (TA) branches. The maximum in the TA band is correlated with the superconducting transition temperature in these materials (T{sub c}). In situ Raman scattering measurements in the DAC thus permit predictions of the T{sub c} variation with pressure for cubic nitrides and isostructural carbide materials.

Shebanova, O.; Soignard, E.; Mcmillan, P.F. (ASU); (UCL)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

ORDER AND DISORDER IN CARBIDES AND NITRIDES Ch. H. DE NOVION and V. MAURICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition metals, rare earths and actinides react with carbon and nitrogen to form metallic carbides experimental evidence for short and long-range ordering of point defects in metallic transition metal, rareCOMPOUNDS. ORDER AND DISORDER IN CARBIDES AND NITRIDES Ch. H. DE NOVION and V. MAURICE SESI, C

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Formation of BN and AlBN during nitridation of sapphire using RF plasma sources[Radiofrequency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that nitrogen plasma sources utilizing a pyrolytic boron nitride liner may be a significant source of B contamination during growth and processing. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis performed during nitridation of sapphire indicate the resulting layers contain a significant amount of BN. The formation of Al{sub 1{minus}x}B{sub x}N would explain the observation of a lattice constant several percent smaller than AlN as measured by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The presence of cubic inclusions in layers grown on such a surface may be related to the segregation of BN during the nitridation into its cubic phase.

Ptak, A.J.; Ziemer, K.S.; Holbert, L.J.; Stinespring, C.D.; Myers, T.H.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Chemical vapor deposition of refractory ternary nitrides for advanced diffusion barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refractory ternary nitride films for diffusion barriers in microelectronics have been grown using chemical vapor deposition. Thin films of titanium-silicon-nitride, tungsten-boron-nitride, and tungsten-silicon-nitride of various compositions have been deposited on 150 mm Si wafers. The microstructure of the films are either fully amorphous for the tungsten based films, or nauocrystalline TiN in an amorphous matrix for titanium-silicon-nitride. All films exhibit step coverages suitable for use in future microelectronics generations. Selected films have been tested as diffusion barriers between copper and silicon, and generally perform extremely weH. These fiIms are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barriers for microelectronics applications. The manufacturing of silicon wafers into integrated circuits uses many different process and materials. The manufacturing process is usually divided into two parts: the front end of line (FEOL) and the back end of line (BEOL). In the FEOL the individual transistors that are the heart of an integrated circuit are made on the silicon wafer. The responsibility of the BEOL is to wire all the transistors together to make a complete circuit. The transistors are fabricated in the silicon itself. The wiring is made out of metal, currently aluminum and tungsten, insulated by silicon dioxide, see Figure 1. Unfortunately, silicon will diffuse into aluminum, causing aluminum spiking of junctions, killing transistors. Similarly, during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from ~fj, the reactivity of the fluorine can cause "worn-holes" in the silicon, also destroying transistors. The solution to these problems is a so-called diffusion barrier, which will allow current to pass from the transistors to the wiring, but will prevent reactions between silicon and the metal.

Custer, Jonathan S.; Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth; Smith, Paul Martin

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sampling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); King, Lloyd L. (Benton, WA); Jackson, Peter O. (Richland, WA); Zulich, Alan W. (Bel Air, MD)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to model the quantum harmonic oscillator modes observed in uranium nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently an extended series of equally spaced vibrational modes was observed in uranium nitride (UN) by performing neutron spectroscopy measurements using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of- flight chopper spectrometers [A.A. Aczel et al, Nature Communications 3, 1124 (2012)]. These modes are well described by 3D isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) behavior of the nitrogen atoms, but there are additional contributions to the scattering that complicate the measured response. In an effort to better characterize the observed neutron scattering spectrum of UN, we have performed Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations of the ARCS and SEQUOIA experiments with various sample kernels, accounting for the nitrogen QHO scattering, contributions that arise from the acoustic portion of the partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and multiple scattering. These simulations demonstrate that the U and N motions can be treated independently, and show that multiple scattering contributes an approximate Q-independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. Temperature dependent studies of the lowest few oscillator modes have also been made with SEQUOIA, and our simulations indicate that the T-dependence of the scattering from these modes is strongly influenced by the uranium lattice.

Lin, J. Y. Y. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Aczel, Adam A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL] [ORNL; Buyers, W. J. L. [National Research Council of Canada] [National Research Council of Canada; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous silicon carbide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

50, mai 1989 Summary: revetementdans le substrat. Abstract - Cuttingtools made of A1203+TiC, silicon nitride,carbide, and stabi- lized... with Tic, silicon nitride,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium structures espoo Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

juin 1995 C5-905 Summary: these "nanocrystals" have the wurtzite structure of aluminium nitride. 1. INTRODUCTION Among the many nitride ceramics... of the materials. The...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative lmfbr carbide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

illustrating the rich behavior of carbo-nitride materials. The early transition metal carbides and nitrides... the calculations re- ported here were performed with the...

203

Characterization of Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Nitride Films from Disilane and Ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nitride films a:SiNx were prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) from disilane ( Si2H6) and ammonia ( NH3). Most of the depositions were performed at 600° C with various NH3/Si2H6 gas ratios ranging from 4 to 50. Different deposits with composition (x= N/Si) ranging from silicon-rich to stoichiometric silicon nitride were characterized by means of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ellipsometry, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and their structure analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transmission infrared measurements showed low hydrogen content (x= N/Si) and density of the films were correlated with their refractive index and discussed.

Redhouane Henda; Larbi Laanab; Emmanuel Scheid; Robert Fourmeaux

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ternary silicon germanium nitrides: A class of tunable band gap materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ternary silicon germanium nitrides with compositions of both Si1?xGexN and (Si1?xGex)3N4 are predicted to have a band gap that decreases as the germanium:silicon ratio increases. The band gap is indirect for the silicon-rich compounds but becomes direct as the germanium content increases, due to greater mixing of s and p states in the conduction band. This effect of band gap tunability has recently been reported for (Si1?xGex)3N4 in the spinel structure [Boyko et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 155207 (2010)]. Our results suggest that this is a more general effect and that ternary group-14 nitrides should form a class of semiconducting materials for which the band gap can be tuned by controlling the composition.

Judy N. Hart; Neil L. Allan; Frederik Claeyssens

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d?>?1.4?nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0?eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d???1.4?nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Shen, Yaogen [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K. [Extreme Energy-Density Research Institute, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Materials Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Nondestructive evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves from engine duration test.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated impact and wear damage in silicon-nitride ceramic valves that were subjected to an engine duration test in a natural-gas engine. A high-speed automated laser-scattering system was developed for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of 10 SN235P silicon-nitride valves. The NDE system scans the entire valve surface and generates a two-dimensional scattering image that is used to identify location, size and relative severity of subsurface damage in the valves. NED imaging data were obtained at before and at 100 and 500 hours of the engine duration test. The NDE data were analyzed and compared with surface photomicrographs. Wear damage was found in the impact surface of all valves, expecially for exhaust valves. However, the NDE examination did not detect subsurface damage such as cracks or spalls in these engine-tested valves.

Sun, J. G.; Trethewey, J. S.; Vanderspiegle, N. N.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Caterpillar, Inc.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Effects of plasma-deposited silicon nitride passivation on the radiation hardness of CMOS integrated circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of plasma-deposited silicon nitride as a final passivation over metal-gate CMOS integrated circuits degrades the radiation hardness of these devices. The hardness degradation is manifested by increased radiation-induced threshold voltage shifts caused principally by the charging of new interface states and, to a lesser extent, by the trapping of holes created upon exposure to ionizing radiation. The threshold voltage shifts are a strong function of the deposition temperature, and show very little dependence on thickness for films deposited at 300/sup 0/C. There is some correlation between the threshold voltage shifts and the hydrogen content of the PECVD silicon nitride films used as the final passivation layer as a function of deposition temperature. The mechanism by which the hydrogen contained in these films may react with the Si/SiO/sub 2/ interface is not clear at this point.

Clement, J. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Soliton mechanism of the uranium nitride microdynamics and heat conductivity at high temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microdynamics of soliton waves and localized modes of nonlinear acoustic and optical oscillations in uranium nitride has been investigated. It is shown that, upon heating, the energies of solitons in the gap between the optical and acoustic phonon bands increase, while the energies of local modes decrease. The experimentally observed quasi-resonance features, which are shifted in the gap with a change in temperature, can be manifestations of the revealed soliton waves and local modes. The microdynamics of uranium nitride heat conductivity with the stochastic generation of the observed solitons and local modes at remote energy absorption have been investigated. The temperature dependence of the heat conductivity coefficient has been determined from the temperature gradient and energy flux within the standard approach (which is to be generalized).

Semenov, V. A.; Dubovsky, O. A., E-mail: dubov@ippe.ru; Orlov, A. V. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation Leipunsky Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ab initio study of phase transition of boron nitride between zinc-blende and rhombohedral structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride has polymorphs such as zinc-blende (c-BN), wurtzite (w-BN), rhombohedral (r-BN), and graphite-like (h-BN) forms. We simulate the direct conversion of r-BN to c-BN through electronic excitation. In our calculation, the conversion is made possible by increasing the hole concentration to over 0.06/atom. This conversion should be experimentally possible by hole-doping via an electric double layer transistor (EDLT) or capacitor.

Nishida, S.; Funashima, H.; Sato, K.; Katayama-Yoshida, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Quantifying the Solubility of Boron Nitride Nanotubes and Sheets with Static Light Scattering and Refractometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissolution of nanoparticles, particularly those containing boron, is an important area of interest for polymer nanocomposite formation and material development. In this work, the solubility of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT), functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (FBNNT), and boron nitride sheets (BNZG) is quantified in toluene and THF with static light scattering, refractometry, UV vis spectroscopy, and physical observations. UV vis spectroscopy provides a method to determine the concentration and solubility limits of the solutions tested. Using light scattering, the second virial coefficient, A2, is determined and used to calculate , the solute solvent interaction parameter. The Hildebrand solubility parameter, , is then extracted from this data using the Hildebrand Scatchard Solution Theory. A list of potential good solvents based on the estimated value is provided for each nanoparticle. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and prepolymers (EN4 and EN8) used to synthesize polyurethanes were also tested, because the published and molar attraction constants of these materials provided a selfconsistent check. The dn/dc of SWNTs and boron-containing particles was measured for the first time in this work. A solvent screen for BN-ZG provides additional information that supports the obtained and . Three systems were found to have values below 0.5 and were thermodynamically soluble: BNNT in THF, EN8 in THF, and EN8 in toluene.

Mutz, M [The University of Tennessee; Eastwood, Eric Allen [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

An electrochemical method suitable for preparing nine metal-nitride powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an electrochemical method that is suitable for the preparation of metal-nitride ceramic materials that is both simple and general. We begin with a single-compartment electrochemical cell containing suitable metal (M) anodes and cathodes (M=Al, Mo, Nb, Ni, Ti, V, W, Zn, or Zr) and a NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X (X=Br or Cl) electrolyte solution. Application of a sufficiently high voltage results in oxidation and dissolution of M to M{sup n+} at the anode and reduction of NH{sub 3} to NH{sub 2}- at the cathode. When M=Al, this results in formation of an insoluble inorganic polymer, which can subsequently be calcined above 600{degrees}C to yield phase-pure AlN. For some of the other metals, a simple ammoniated metal ion is formed at the anode, but calcination of this material also leads to the corresponding metal nitride. The phases and morphologies of the powders depends strongly on the calcining conditions. The important point is that this method is general for the preparation of metal-nitride powders even though the pathway that leads to the powders is metal-dependent. This talk will focus primarily on the preparation of AlN, which is an important packaging material for the electronics industry, and NbN, which is a superconductor (T{sub c}{approximately}17 K) with important technological applications.

Wade, T.; Crooks, R.M. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

1991-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

216

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 829-832 Periodical: Materials Science Forum Vols. 264-268  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 829@scientific.net © 1998 by Trans Tech Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related

Steckl, Andrew J.

217

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 1149-1152 Periodical: Materials Science Forum Vols. 264-268  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related Materials', Year: 1998, pp: 1149@scientific.net © 1998 by Trans Tech Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide Publications Ltd., Switzerland, http://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Silicon Carbide, III-Nitrides and Related

Steckl, Andrew J.

218

The Hessian biased force field for silicon nitride ceramics: Predictions of thermodynamic and mechanical properties for CX-and @S&N4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that these calculations provide the first reliable data on such fundamental properties of silicon nitride. This MSXX force in diesel en- gines, industrial heat exchangers, and gas turbines, to name but a few potential applications for engines insulated with silicon nitride, leads to an increased efficiency of these en- gines. However

Goddard III, William A.

219

Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a metal boride, nitride, carbide and/or silicide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a metal boride, carbide, nitride and/or silicide catalyst, such as titanium carbide, vanadium boride, manganese nitride or molybdenum silicide.

McGuiggan, M.F.; Kuch, P.L.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

Corrugated aluminum nitride energy harvesters for high energy conversion effectiveness This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrugated aluminum nitride energy harvesters for high energy conversion effectiveness This article aluminum nitride energy harvesters for high energy conversion effectiveness Ting-Ta Yen1, Taku Hirasawa of micromachining processes with high energy conversion effectiveness. Corrugated cantilever design with a single

Lin, Liwei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wet Chemical Functionalization of III–V Semiconductor Surfaces: Alkylation of Gallium Arsenide and Gallium Nitride by a Grignard Reaction Sequence ... These observations are consistent with the known solubility of oxidized As species in water. ... Remote H plasma exposure was effective for removing halogens and hydrocarbons from the surfaces of both nitrides at 450 °C, but was not efficient for oxide removal. ...

Sabrina L. Peczonczyk; Jhindan Mukherjee; Azhar I. Carim; Stephen Maldonado

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

222

The near-edge structure in energy-loss spectroscopy: many-electron and magnetic effects in transition metal nitrides and carbides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in transition metal nitrides and carbides This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down-loss spectroscopy: many-electron and magnetic effects in transition metal nitrides and carbides A T Paxton, M van energies are systematically overestimated by 4.22 ± 0.44 eV in twelve transition metal carbides

Paxton, Anthony T.

223

Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the SP-100 was designed to use mono-uranium nitride fuel. Although the SP-100 reactor was not commissioned, tens of thousand of nitride fuel pellets were manufactured and lots of them, cladded in Nb-1-Zr had been irradiated in fast test reactors (FFTF and EBR-II) with good irradiation results. The Russian Naval submarines also use nitride fuel with stainless steel cladding (HT-9) in Pb-Bi coolant. Although the operating experience of the Russian submarine is not readily available, such combination of fuel, cladding and coolant has been proposed for a commercial-size liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (BREST-300). Uranium mono-nitride fuel is studied in this LDRD Project due to its favorable properties such as its high actinide density and high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of mono-nitride is 10 times higher than that of oxide (23 W/m-K for UN vs. 2.3 W/m-K for UO{sub 2} at 1000 K) and its melting temperature is much higher than that of metal fuel (2630 C for UN vs. 1132 C for U metal). It also has relatively high actinide density, (13.51 gU/cm{sup 3} in UN vs. 9.66 gU/cm{sup 3} in UO{sub 2}) which is essential for a compact reactor core design. The objective of this LDRD Project is to: (1) Establish a manufacturing capability for uranium-based ceramic nuclear fuel, (2) Develop a computational capability to analyze nuclear fuel performance, (3) Develop a modified UN-based fuel that can support a compact long-life reactor core, and (4) Collaborate with the Nuclear Engineering Department of UC Berkeley on nitride fuel reprocessing and disposal in a geologic repository.

Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Aluminum Nitride Micro-Channels Grown via Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for MEMs Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for a number of applications due to its temperature and chemical stability. Furthermore, AlN maintains its piezoelectric properties at higher temperatures than more commonly used materials, such as Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) [1, 2], making AlN attractive for high temperature micro and nanoelectromechanical (MEMs and NEMs) applications including, but not limited to, high temperature sensors and actuators, micro-channels for fuel cell applications, and micromechanical resonators. This work presents a novel AlN micro-channel fabrication technique using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE). AlN easily nucleates on dielectric surfaces due to the large sticking coefficient and short diffusion length of the aluminum species resulting in a high quality polycrystalline growth on typical mask materials, such as silicon dioxide and silicon nitride [3,4]. The fabrication process introduced involves partially masking a substrate with a silicon dioxide striped pattern and then growing AlN via MOVPE simultaneously on the dielectric mask and exposed substrate. A buffered oxide etch is then used to remove the underlying silicon dioxide and leave a free standing AlN micro-channel. The width of the channel has been varied from 5 ěm to 110 ěm and the height of the air gap from 130 nm to 800 nm indicating the stability of the structure. Furthermore, this versatile process has been performed on (111) silicon, c-plane sapphire, and gallium nitride epilayers on sapphire substrates. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Raman measurements have been taken on channels grown on each substrate and indicate that the substrate is influencing the growth of the AlN micro-channels on the SiO2 sacrificial layer.

Rodak, L.E.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Famouri, P.; Ting, L.; Korakakis, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Very long single- and few-walled boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor/condenser method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are desired for their exceptional mechanical, electronic, thermal, structural, textural, optical, and quantum properties. A new method for producing long, small-diameter, single- and few-walled, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in macroscopic quantities is reported. The pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) method produces, without catalysts, highly crystalline, very long, small-diameter, BNNTs. Palm-sized, cotton-like masses of BNNT raw material were grown by this technique and spun directly into centimeters-long yarn. Nanotube lengths were observed to be 100 times that of those grown by the most closely related method. Self-assembly and growth models for these long BNNTs are discussed.

Michael W. Smith, Kevin Jordan, Cheol Park, Jae-Woo Kim, Peter Lillehei, Roy Crooks, Joycelyn Harrison

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Rf-plasma synthesis of nanosize silicon carbide and nitride. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pulsed rf plasma technique is capable of generating ceramic particles of 10 manometer dimension. Experiments using silane/ammonia and trimethylchlorosilane/hydrogen gas mixtures show that both silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can be synthesized with control of the average particle diameter from 7 to 200 nm. Large size dispersion and much agglomeration appear characteristic of the method, in contrast to results reported by another research group. The as produced powders have a high hydrogen content and are air and moisture sensitive. Post-plasma treatment in a controlled atmosphere at elevated temperature (800{degrees}C) eliminates the hydrogen and stabilizes the powder with respect to oxidation or hydrolysis.

Buss, R.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

High performance vertical tunneling diodes using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride/graphene hetero-structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tunneling rectifier prepared from vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) materials composed of chemically doped graphene electrodes and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunneling barrier was demonstrated. The asymmetric chemical doping to graphene with linear dispersion property induces rectifying behavior effectively, by facilitating Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward biases. It results in excellent diode performances of a hetero-structured graphene/h-BN/graphene tunneling diode, with an asymmetric factor exceeding 1000, a nonlinearity of ?40, and a peak sensitivity of ?12?V{sup ?1}, which are superior to contending metal-insulator-metal diodes, showing great potential for future flexible and transparent electronic devices.

Hwan Lee, Seung; Lee, Jia; Ho Ra, Chang; Liu, Xiaochi; Hwang, Euyheon [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Sup Choi, Min [Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hee Choi, Jun [Frontier Research Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-711 (Korea, Republic of); Zhong, Jianqiang; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Jong Yoo, Won, E-mail: yoowj@skku.edu [Samsung-SKKU Graphene Center (SSGC), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Science and Technology, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano-Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

229

Processing and mechanical properties of silicon nitride formed by robocasting aqueous slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robocasting is a new freeform fabrication technique for dense ceramics. It uses robotics to control deposition of ceramic slurries through an orifice. The optimization of concentrated aqueous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurry properties to achieve high green density robocast bodies and subsequent high sintered densities was investigated. The effects of pH, electrolyte, additives and solids loading on the dispersion and rheological properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurries were determined. The mechanical behavior of sintered robocast bars was determined and compared to conventionally produced silicon nitride ceramics.

HE,GUOPING; HIRSCHFELD,DEIDRE A.; CESARANO III,JOSEPH

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Titanium nitride thin films deposited by reactive pulsed-laser ablation in RF plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titanium nitride thin films were deposited on Si (100) substrates by pulsed laser ablation of a titanium target in a N2 atmosphere (gas pressure approx. 10 Pa) using a doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) also assisted by a 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma. Deposition was carried out at various substrate temperatures ranging from 373 up to 873 K and films were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. A comparison between the ‘normal’ pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and the RF plasma-assisted PLD showed the influence of the plasma on the structural characteristics of the thin films.

A. Giardini; V. Marotta; S. Orlando; G.P. Parisi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mechanical Instability and Ideal Shear Strength of Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ideal shear strength of transition metal carbides and nitrides is calculated with the use of the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. The microscopic mechanism that limits the ideal strength is studied using full atomic and structural relaxation and the results of electronic structure calculations. It is shown that plasticity in perfect crystals can be triggered by electronic instabilities at finite strains. Our study explicitly demonstrates that the ideal strength in these materials is limited by the elastic instability which is in turn initiated by electronic instabilities. The potential application of alloy hardening due to the onset of instabilities at different strains is also discussed.

Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Morris, J. W.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

Multi-scale modelling of III-nitrides: from dislocations to the electronic structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or public lighting nowadays use GaN-based LEDs. Significant effort is being invested in development of efficient and reliable LEDs which emit comfort- able white light, as there is a huge market potential for replacing bulbs and fluorescent tubes currently... of wurtzite forms of the III-nitrides. The range of the visible spectrum is shown on the wavelength axis. GaN and its alloys with aluminium or indium are in their stable form, wurtzite direct band gap semicon- ductors that have become the most important since...

Holec, David

233

Atom probe tomography characterisation of a laser diode structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of a III-nitride laser diode (LD) structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Four APT data sets have been obtained, with fields of view up to 400 nm in depth and 120 nm in diameter. These data sets contain material from the InGaN quantum well (QW) active region, as well as the surrounding p- and n-doped waveguide and cladding layers, enabling comprehensive study of the structure and composition of the LD structure. Two regions of the same sample, with different average indium contents (18% and 16%) in the QW region, were studied. The APT data are shown to provide easy access to the p-type dopant levels, and the composition of a thin AlGaN barrier layer. Next, the distribution of indium within the InGaN QW was analyzed, to assess any possible inhomogeneity of the distribution of indium (''indium clustering''). No evidence for a statistically significant deviation from a random distribution was found, indicating that these MBE-grown InGaN QWs do not require indium clusters for carrier localization. However, the APT data show steps in the QW interfaces, leading to well-width fluctuations, which may act to localize carriers. Additionally, the unexpected presence of a small amount (x = 0.005) of indium in a layer grown intentionally as GaN was revealed. Finally, the same statistical method applied to the QW was used to show that the indium distribution within a thick InGaN waveguide layer in the n-doped region did not show any deviation from randomness.

Bennett, Samantha E.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Smeeton, Tim M.; Hooper, Stewart E.; Heffernan, Jonathan [Sharp Laboratories of Europe Limited, Edmund Halley Road, Oxford Science Park, Oxford, OX4 4GB (United Kingdom); Saxey, David W.; Smith, George D. W. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Ferromagnetism in Doped Thin-Film Oxide and Nitride Semiconductors and Dielectrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal goal in the field of high-Tc ferromagnetic semiconductors is the synthesis, characterization and utilization of semiconductors which exhibit substantial carrier spin polarization at and above room temperature. Such materials are of critical importance in the emerging field of semiconductor spintronics. The interaction leading to carrier spin polarization, exchange coupling between the dopant spins and the valence or conduction band, is known to be sufficiently weak in conventional semiconductors, such as GaAs and Si, that magnetic ordering above cryogenic temperatures is essentially impossible. Since the provocative theoretical predictions of Tc above ambient in p-Mn:ZnO and p-Mn:GaN (T. Dietl et al., Science 287 1019 (2000)), and the observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co:TiO2 anatase (Y. Matsumoto et al., Science 291 854 (2001)), there has been a flurry of work in oxides and nitrides doped with transition metals with unpaired d electrons. It has even been claimed that room-temperature ferromagnetism can be obtained in certain d0 transition metals oxides without a dopant. In this Report, the field of transition metal doped oxides and nitrides is critically reviewed and assessed from a materials science perspective. Since much of the field centers around thin film growth, this Report focuses on films prepared not only by conventional vacuum deposition methods, but also by spin coating colloidal nanoparticles.

Chambers, Scott A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 127 2000 260 265 Characterization of carbon nitride thin films deposited by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-screw adapter and monitored by measuring the back reflection power at the end of a water load. A mixture polycrystalline car- bon nitride films, and the resulting mechanical proper- ties are not as good as predicted a valve between the deposition chamber and the vacuum pumps. The microwave power was adjusted by a four

Gao, Hongjun

236

Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

Huckabee, Marvin L. (Marlboro, MA); Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav (Acton, MA); Neil, Jeffrey T. (Acton, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Theoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II. Collision, storage, and adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a true hydrogen storage capacity, thus it would be also true that some results of rather high storage storage material or not. Our previous study6 showed that the pristine CNT is not an effective hydrogenTheoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II

Goddard III, William A.

238

Coating of Titanium Nitride on Stainless Steel Targets by a 4 kJ Plasma Focus Device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titanium nitride thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS316L) targets by using a 4 kJ plasma focus device. The corresponding energy flux delivered to...13 kev cm?3 ns?1. X-ray diffraction analysis reveal...

M. Omrani; M. Habibi; R. Amrollahi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

First-Principles Study of MetalCarbide/Nitride Adhesion: Al/VC vs. Al/VN Donald J. Siegel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-oxide ce- ramics. Within this class, the transition metal carbides and ni- trides are a particularly knowledge, there have been only three studies of adhesion between metals and transition metal carbidesFirst-Principles Study of Metal­Carbide/Nitride Adhesion: Al/VC vs. Al/VN Donald J. Siegel

Adams, James B

240

Room-temperature high radio-frequency source power effects on silicon nitride films deposited by using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon nitride films were deposited at room temperature using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In this study, the effects of radio frequency (RF) source power ranging from 200 W to ... charact...

Byungwhan Kim; Suyeon Kim

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An Investigation of the Properties of Silicon Nitride (SiNx) Thin Films Prepared by RF Sputtering for Application in Solar Cell Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon nitride films deposited on glass and multicrystalline silicon by RF sputtering with power between 100–350W. The target was hot pressed Si3N4 ceramic. The morphology and optical properties of films are inv...

Negin Manavizadeh; Alireza Khodayari…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Imaging the p-n junction in a gallium nitride nanowire with a scanning microwave microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used a broadband, atomic-force-microscope-based, scanning microwave microscope (SMM) to probe the axial dependence of the charge depletion in a p-n junction within a gallium nitride nanowire (NW). SMM enables the visualization of the p-n junction location without the need to make patterned electrical contacts to the NW. Spatially resolved measurements of S{sub 11}{sup ?}, which is the derivative of the RF reflection coefficient S{sub 11} with respect to voltage, varied strongly when probing axially along the NW and across the p-n junction. The axial variation in S{sub 11}{sup ?}? effectively mapped the asymmetric depletion arising from the doping concentrations on either side of the junction. Furthermore, variation of the probe tip voltage altered the apparent extent of features associated with the p-n junction in S{sub 11}{sup ?} images.

Imtiaz, Atif [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Wallis, Thomas M.; Brubaker, Matt D.; Blanchard, Paul T.; Bertness, Kris A.; Sanford, Norman A.; Kabos, Pavel, E-mail: kabos@boulder.nist.gov [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Weber, Joel C. [Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Coakley, Kevin J. [Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Two-dimensional excitons in three-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recombination processes of excitons in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) have been probed using time-resolved photoluminescence. It was found that the theory for two-dimensional (2D) exciton recombination describes well the exciton dynamics in three-dimensional hBN. The exciton Bohr radius and binding energy deduced from the temperature dependent exciton recombination lifetime is around 8?Ĺ and 740?meV, respectively. The effective masses of electrons and holes in 2D hBN deduced from the generalized relativistic dispersion relation of 2D systems are 0.54m{sub o}, which are remarkably consistent with the exciton reduced mass deduced from the experimental data. Our results illustrate that hBN represents an ideal platform to study the 2D optical properties as well as the relativistic properties of particles in a condensed matter system.

Cao, X. K.; Lin, J. Y., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: jingyu.lin@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Clubine, B.; Edgar, J. H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

244

Plasma-enriched chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on silicon carbide fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near stoichiometric Si:N coatings were deposited by means of PECVD on SCS-6 SiC fibers which contained a carbon-rich coating. Weight loss associated with oxidation of the outer carbon-rich coating of the as-received SiC fibers was greatly reduced for the Si:N coated SiC fibers even after 10 h heat-treatment in oxygen at 800{degrees}C. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to obtain elemental compositions of the as-received and Si:N coated SiC fibers after heat-treatment. Negligible amounts of oxygen were found at the carbon-rich coating of the heat-treated Si:N coated SiC fiber. These results clearly prove the effectiveness of PECVD silicon nitride coating as an oxygen diffusion barrier.

Stinespring, C.D.; Collazos, D.F.; Gupta, R.K. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Interaction and charge transfer in the iron nitride Fe4N  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The linearized augmented-plane-wave method has been used to calculate the electronic bands of the cubic iron nitride Fe4N. Strong interaction between N 2p and Fe 4s orbitals of nearest Fe atoms (FeII has been revealed. This interaction leads to an increase in the N 2p population. The Fe 3d bands remain almost the same as in the pure Fe metal with negligible interaction with neighboring N orbitals. However, the occupation of the FeII 3d bands and the total number of electrons of FeII atoms increases due to less screening. This unified picture clarifies the controversy in the previous explanations of the experimental results obtained from magnetic measurements, electron diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopy.

Wei Zhou, Li-jia Qu, Qi-ming Zhang, and Ding-sheng Wang

1989-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electrical transport properties of Si-doped hexagonal boron nitride epilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of Si as an n-type dopant in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) wide bandgap semiconductor has been investigated. Si doped hBN epilayers were grown via in-situ Si doping by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Hall effect measurements revealed that Si doped hBN epilayers exhibit n-type conduction at high temperatures (T > 800 K) with an in-plane resistivity of ?12 ?·cm, electron mobility of ? ? 48 cm{sup 2}/V·s and concentration of n ? 1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}. Temperature dependent resistivity results yielded a Si energy level in hBN of about 1.2 eV, which is consistent with a previously calculated value for Si substitutionally incorporated into the B sites in hBN. The results therefore indicate that Si is not a suitable dopant for hBN for room temperature device applications.

Majety, S.; Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X., E-mail: hx.jiang@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Molybdenum nitride/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrid material for lithium storage in lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Molybdenum nitride and nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets (MoN/GNS) hybrid materials are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method combined with a heat treatment at 800 °C under an ammonia atmosphere. It is found by scanning and transmission electron microscopy that MoN nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 40 nm in diameter are homogeneously anchored to GNS. The electrochemical performance of MoN/GNS as a possible anode material for Li-ion batteries is investigated. Galvanostatic charge/discharge experiments reveal that the hybrid materials exhibit an enhanced lithium storage capacity and excellent rate capacity as a result of its efficient electronic and ionic mixed conducting network. The electrochemical results demonstrate that the weight ratio of GNS and MoN had significant effect on the electrochemical performance.

Botao Zhang; Guanglei Cui; Kejun Zhang; Lixue Zhang; Pengxian Han; Shanmu Dong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Graphene on boron-nitride: Moiré pattern in the van der Waals energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial dependence of the van der Waals (vdW) energy between graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) is investigated using atomistic simulations. The van der Waals energy between graphene and h-BN shows a hexagonal superlattice structure identical to the observed Moiré pattern in the local density of states, which depends on the lattice mismatch and misorientation angle between graphene and h-BN. Our results provide atomistic features of the weak van der Waals interaction between graphene and BN which are in agreement with experiment and provide an analytical expression for the size of the spatial variation of the weak van der Waals interaction. We also found that the A-B-lattice symmetry of graphene is broken along the armchair direction.

Neek-Amal, M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Department of Physics, Shahid Rajaee University, Lavizan, Tehran 16788 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peeters, F. M. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermal interface conductance across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterojunction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure thermal transport across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) interface by electrically heating the graphene and measuring the temperature difference between the graphene and BN using Raman spectroscopy. Because the temperature of the graphene and BN are measured optically, this approach enables nanometer resolution in the cross-plane direction. A temperature drop of 60?K can be achieved across this junction at high electrical powers (14 mW). Based on the temperature difference and the applied power data, we determine the thermal interface conductance of this junction to be 7.4?×?10{sup 6}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1}, which is below the 10{sup 7}–10{sup 8}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1} values previously reported for graphene/SiO{sub 2} interface.

Chen, Chun-Chung; Li, Zhen; Cronin, Stephen B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

A cohesive law for interfaces in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructure has showed great potential to improve the performance of graphene device. We have established the cohesive law for interfaces between graphene and monolayer or multi-layer h-BN based on the van der Waals force. The cohesive energy and cohesive strength are given in terms of area density of atoms on corresponding layers, number of layers, and parameters in the van der Waals force. It is found that the cohesive law in the graphene/multi-layer h-BN is dominated by the three h-BN layers which are closest to the graphene. The approximate solution is also obtained to simplify the expression of cohesive law. These results are very useful to study the deformation of graphene/h-BN heterostructure, which may have significant impacts on the performance and reliability of the graphene devices especially in the areas of emerging applications such as stretchable electronics.

Zhang, Chenxi [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33146 (United States); Lou, Jun [Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251 (United States); Song, Jizhou, E-mail: jzsong@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics and Soft Matter Research Center, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Femtosecond laser-ultrasonic investigation of plasmonic fields on the metal/gallium nitride interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By using femtosecond laser-ultrasonic we demonstrate an approach to study the surface plasmon field optically excited in the interface between metal and a semiconductor thin film. By femtosecond impulsive excitation on gallium–nitride (GaN) different optical probe signals were observed when the impulse-excited nanoacoustic pulse propagated through the metalfilm and metal nanoslits. By analyzing the shape and temporal response of thus induced acousto-optical signals our femtosecond laser-ultrasonic study not only reveals the plasmonic field distribution optically excited in the metal/substrate interface but also confirms that the penetration depth of surface plasmon field into the substrate agrees well with a simulation result.

Hung-Pin Chen; Yu-Chieh Wen; Yi-Hsin Chen; Cheng-Hua Tsai; Kuang-Li Lee; Pei-Kuen Wei; Jinn-Kong Sheu; Chi-Kuang Sun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nitrogen Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon Nitride Isotope Multilayers Probed by Neutron Reflectometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nitride is a model system for a covalently bound amorphous solid with a low atomic mobility where reasonable values of self-diffusivities are still lacking. We used neutron reflectometry on isotope enriched Si3?N414/Si3?N415 multilayers to determine nitrogen self-diffusivities ranging from 10-24 to 10-21??m2/s between 950 and 1250?°C. Time dependent diffusivities observed at 1150?°C indicate the presence of structural relaxation. For long annealing times (relaxed state) the diffusivities follow an Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (3.6±0.4)??eV. The results are indicative of a direct diffusion mechanism without the involvement of thermal point defects.

H. Schmidt; M. Gupta; M. Bruns

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nitrogen Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon Nitride Isotope Multilayers Probed by Neutron Reflectometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon nitride is a model system for a covalently bound amorphous solid with a low atomic mobility where reasonable values of self-diffusivities are still lacking. We used neutron reflectometry on isotope enriched Si{sub 3} {sup 14}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3} {sup 15}N{sub 4} multilayers to determine nitrogen self-diffusivities ranging from 10{sup -24} to 10{sup -21} m{sup 2}/s between 950 and 1250 deg. C. Time dependent diffusivities observed at 1150 deg. C indicate the presence of structural relaxation. For long annealing times (relaxed state) the diffusivities follow an Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (3.6{+-}0.4) eV. The results are indicative of a direct diffusion mechanism without the involvement of thermal point defects.

Schmidt, H.; Gupta, M.; Bruns, M. [AG Thermochemie und Mikrokinetik, Fakultaet fuer Natur-und Materialwissenschaften, TU Clausthal, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, ETH Zuerich and PSI, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, CH-5232 (Switzerland); Institut fuer Instrumentelle Analytik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300?°C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu){sub 2}]{sub 2} precursors, where M?=?Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200?°C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18?nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities.

Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R., E-mail: abelson@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S., E-mail: girolami@scs.illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermally Nitrided Stainless Steels for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 1 Model Ni-50Cr and Austenitic 349TM alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal nitridation of a model Ni-50Cr alloy at 1100 C for 2 h in pure nitrogen resulted in the formation of a continuous, protective CrN/Cr{sub 2}N surface layer with a low interfacial contact resistance. Application of similar nitridation parameters to an austenitic stainless steel, 349{sup TM}, however, resulted in a discontinuous mixture of discrete CrN, Cr{sub 2}N and (Cr,Fe){sub 2}N{sub 1-x} (x = 0--0.5) phase surface particles overlying an exposed {gamma} austenite-based matrix, rather than a continuous nitride surface layer. The interfacial contact resistance of the 349{sup TM} was reduced significantly by the nitridation treatment. However, in the simulated PEMFC environments (1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 2 ppm F{sup -} solutions at 70 C sparged with either hydrogen or air), very high corrosion currents were observed under both anodic and cathodic conditions. This poor behavior was linked to the lack of continuity of the Cr-rich nitride surface formed on 349{sup TM} Issues regarding achieving continuous, protective Cr-nitride surface layers on stainless steel alloys are discussed.

Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

sediment samples | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment samples sediment samples Leads No leads are available at this time. Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . Abstract: Ferrocene (Fc) and...

258

Water and Sediment Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analytical laboratory limit below which any level present cannot be determined) Note: Sediment sample locations are co-located with off-site surface water sample locations. Surface...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum oxide selectively Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between GaN and AlGaN has been observed up to an aluminum mole fraction... oxides.1-3 For gallium nitride and aluminum gallium nitride this effect has been seldom reported.4... ,...

260

Cryogenic growth of Al nitride on GaAs(110): X-ray-photoemission spectroscopy and inverse-photoemission spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on our recent studies of Al nitride growth on GaAs(110) formed by depositing Al onto a condensed ammonia overlayer on GaAs(110) at T=90 K using x-ray-photoemission spectroscopy and inverse-photoemission spectroscopy. We have also investigated the temperature dependence of the interface thus formed. The results show some limited amount of Al nitride formed at T=90 K even though the reaction is slow, but the overlayer mostly remains metallic until the substrate is heated up. Much of the reaction of Al with ammonia occurs at about T=170 K, above which the overlayer becomes insulating. The combined information from occupied and unoccupied states reveals new features of the interface formation, and is consistent with our previous synchrotron photoemission studies of Al/NH3/GaAs(100).

Ken T. Park and Y. Gao

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

Lima, L. H. de [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin”, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil)] [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin”, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T. [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland)] [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Spin-dependent processes in amorphous silicon-rich silicon-nitride S.-Y. Lee,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diodes9 and a-Si:H solar cells.10 Fol- lowing coherent manipulation of paramagnetic centers, tran- sient-band , TSAMPLE=15 K. Dark and illuminated IV curves of the p-i-n devices were measured at room temperature and T amorphous silicon nitride a-SiNx:H has been used widely as a dielectric for thin-film transistors,1 solar

McCamey, Dane

263

Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Morales, Eugenia T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Leonard, Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lin, Yong

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced technologies directorate Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Director Center for Advanced Nitride Electronics Umesh Mishra... , Director Optoelectronics Technology ... Source: Becker, Luann - Institute for Crustal Studies, University...

265

ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

266

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

267

Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined using optical reflectance and the nucleation density was determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Nomarski microscopy. Dislocation density was measured using X-ray diffraction and AFM after coating the surface with silicon nitride to delineate all dislocation types. The program milestone of producing GaN films with dislocation densities of 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} was met by silicon nitride treatment of annealed sapphire followed by the multiple deposition of a low density of GaN nuclei followed by high temperature GaN growth. Details of this growth process and the underlying science are presented in this final report along with problems encountered in this research and recommendations for future work.

Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Synthesis and characterization of novel group VI metal (Mo, W) nitride and oxide compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations into the preparation of tungsten nitrides have involved the synthesis of molecular precursors, and their conversion to tungsten nitrides at relatively low temperatures. Two interesting molecular precursors, [WNCl{sub 3}{center_dot}NCCH{sub 3}]{sub 4} and WN(N{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}xNCCH{sub 3}, have been prepared and characterized. The molecular structure of the first consists of a W{sub 4}N{sub 4} tetrameric core with multiple and single W-N bonds arranged in an alternating fashion. Three new solid state phases, amorphous W{sub 3}N{sub 5}, cubic WN, and W{sub 2}N{sub 2}(C{sub 2}N{sub 2}), have been discovered by solid state and chemical vapor transport reactions. The structures have been investigated. A systematic study in the Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}-MoO{sub 3}-Mo (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm) system has been explored to better understand LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14}. The study has shown that the sizes of the rare-earth cations affect the formation of these phases. Larger cations (La, Ce, and Pr) aid in the formation of trans-Mo{sub 8} bicapped octahedra, and the smaller cations (Nd, Sm) only stabilize the cis-Mo{sub 8} bicapped octahedra. Magnetic susceptibility measurements have indicated that no effective moment contribution arises from the Mo{sub 8} metal clusters, even though the cis-Mo{sub 8} cluster in LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14}, containing all cis-Mo{sub 8} octahedra, apparently contains an odd number of electrons (23). Electrical resistivity measurements and electronic structure calculations have shown that the LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14} compounds containing cis-Mo{sub 8} clusters are metallic, and the LnMo{sub 8}O{sub 14} compounds containing a 1:1 ratio of cis- to trans-Mo{sub 8} clusters are semiconducting.

Zhang, Z.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

event. Sampling Protocol Wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 were sampled using dedicated bladder pumps. Data from these wells are qualified with an "F" flag in the database indicating the...

271

Processing of Silicon Nitride Ceramics from Concentrated Aqueous Suspensions by Robocasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optimization of concentrated AlliedSignal GS-44 silicon nitride aqueous slurries for robocasting was investigated. The dispersion mechanisms of GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} aqueous suspensions with and without polyacrylate were analyzed. The zero point of charge (ZPC) was at about pH 6. Well-dispersed GS-44 suspensions were obtained in the pH range from 7 to 11 by the addition of Darvan 821A. The influence of pH, amount of Darvan 821A and solids loading on the theological behavior of GS-44 aqueous suspensions was determined. A coagulant, aluminum nitrate, was used to control the yield stress and shear thinning behavior of highly loaded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurries. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of 52 vol% GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were robocast successfully at pH 7.8 to pH 8.5. The sintering process, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of robocast GS-44 bars were determined.

HE,GUOPING; HIRSCHFELD,DEIDRE A.; CESARANO III,JOSEPH; STUECKER,JOHN N.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Antifuse with a single silicon-rich silicon nitride insulating layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An antifuse is disclosed which has an electrically-insulating region sandwiched between two electrodes. The electrically-insulating region has a single layer of a non-hydrogenated silicon-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) silicon nitride SiN.sub.X with a nitrogen content X which is generally in the range of 0

Habermehl, Scott D.; Apodaca, Roger T.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dry etching techniques for active devices based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as a fundamentally and technologically important material system owing to its unique physical properties including layered structure, wide energy bandgap, large optical absorption, and neutron capture cross section. As for any materials under development, it is necessary to establish device processing techniques to realize active devices based on hBN. The authors report on the advancements in dry etching techniques for active devices based on hBN epilayers via inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The effect of ICP radio frequency (RF) power on the etch rate and vertical side wall profile was studied. The etching depth and angle with respect to the surface were measured using atomic force microscopy showing that an etching rate ?1.25 ?m/min and etching angles >80° were obtained. Profilometer data and scanning electron microscope images confirmed these results. This work demonstrates that SF{sub 6} is very suitable for etching hBN epilayers in RF plasma environments and can serve as a guide for future hBN device processing.

Grenadier, Samuel; Li, Jing; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

High Temperature Annealing Studies on the Piezoelectric Properties of Thin Aluminum Nitride Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) system was used to anneal sputtered and MOVPE-grown Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin films at temperatures up to 1000°C in ambient and controlled environments. According to Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX), the films annealed in an ambient environment rapidly oxidize after five minutes at 1000°C. Below 1000°C the films oxidized linearly as a function of annealing temperature which is consistent with what has been reported in literature [1]. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) was used to measure the piezoelectric coefficient, d33, of these films. Films annealed in an ambient environment had a weak piezoelectric response indicating that oxidation on the surface of the film reduces the value of d33. A high temperature furnace has been built that is capable of taking in-situ measurements of the piezoelectric response of AlN films. In-situ d33 measurements are recorded up to 300°C for both sputtered and MOVPE-grown AlN thin films. The measured piezoelectric response appears to increase with temperature up to 300°C possibly due to stress in the film.

Farrell, R.; Pagan, V.R.; Kabulski, A.; Kuchibhatla, S.; Harman, J.; Kasarla, K.R.; Rodak, L.E.; Hensel, J.P.; Famouri, P.; Korakakis, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

More Efficient Power Conversion for EVs: Gallium-Nitride Advanced Power Semiconductor and Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Delphi is developing power converters that are smaller and more energy efficient, reliable, and cost-effective than current power converters. Power converters rely on power transistors which act like a very precisely controlled on-off switch, controlling the electrical energy flowing through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon (Si) semiconductors. However, Delphi is using semiconductors made with a thin layer of gallium-nitride (GaN) applied on top of the more conventional Si material. The GaN layer increases the energy efficiency of the power transistor and also enables the transistor to operate at much higher temperatures, voltages, and power-density levels compared to its Si counterpart. Delphi is packaging these high-performance GaN semiconductors with advanced electrical connections and a cooling system that extracts waste heat from both sides of the device to further increase the device’s efficiency and allow more electrical current to flow through it. When combined with other electronic components on a circuit board, Delphi’s GaN power transistor package will help improve the overall performance and cost-effectiveness of HEVs and EVs.

None

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride for surface passivation in quantum dot solar cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single crystalline, two dimensional (2D) layered insulator hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), is demonstrated as an emerging material candidate for surface passivation on mesoporous TiO{sub 2}. Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dot based bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell employed h-BN passivated TiO{sub 2} as an electron acceptor exhibits photoconversion efficiency ?46% more than BHJ employed unpassivated TiO{sub 2}. Dominant interfacial recombination pathways such as electron capture by TiO{sub 2} surface states and recombination with hole at valence band of CdSe are efficiently controlled by h-BN enabled surface passivation, leading to improved photovoltaic performance. Highly crystalline, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, dangling bond-free 2D layered h-BN with self-terminated atomic planes, achieved by chemical exfoliation, enables efficient passivation on TiO{sub 2}, allowing electronic transport at TiO{sub 2}/h-BN/CdSe interface with much lower recombination rate compared to an unpassivated TiO{sub 2}/CdSe interface.

Shanmugam, Mariyappan; Jain, Nikhil; Jacobs-Gedrim, Robin; Yu, Bin, E-mail: byu@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Xu, Yang [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

278

Interlayer coupling enhancement in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures by intercalated defects or vacancies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), a remarkable material with a two-dimensional atomic crystal structure, has the potential to fabricate heterostructures with unusual properties. We perform first-principles calculations to determine whether intercalated metal atoms and vacancies can mediate interfacial coupling and influence the structural and electronic properties of the graphene/hBN heterostructure. Metal impurity atoms (Li, K, Cr, Mn, Co, and Cu), acting as extrinsic defects between the graphene and hBN sheets, produce n-doped graphene. We also consider intrinsic vacancy defects and find that a boron monovacancy in hBN acts as a magnetic dopant for graphene, whereas a nitrogen monovacancy in hBN serves as a nonmagnetic dopant for graphene. In contrast, the smallest triangular vacancy defects in hBN are unlikely to result in significant changes in the electronic transport of graphene. Our findings reveal that a hBN layer with some vacancies or metal impurities enhances the interlayer coupling in the graphene/hBN heterostructure with respect to charge doping and electron scattering.

Park, Sohee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Changwon [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kim, Gunn, E-mail: gunnkim@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simulation studies on the evolution of gallium nitride on a liquid gallium surface under plasma bombardmenta)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to study the formation of gallium-nitride (GaN) layer on liquid gallium (Ga) sputtering target immersed in nitrogen ( N 2 ) plasma. In the simulation model N ions were assumed to possess energy equal to the bias voltage applied to the sputtering target with respect to the plasma. The results showed the surface morphology of GaN changed from a relatively smooth GaN on Ga surface at 50 eV N ion energy to a rough surface with GaN dendrites on liquid Ga at 500 eV ion energy. Further increase in N ion energy up to 1 keV resulted in smaller density of GaN dendrites on surface. Increasing surface coverage of Ga by GaN substantially reduced the sputtering yield of Ga from the target. These simulation results were correlated with previously reported experimental observations on liquid Ga surface immersed in the nitrogen plasma of a plasma-sputter-type ion source.

M. R. Vasquez Jr.; R. E. Flauta; M. Wada

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

282

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

283

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

284

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

285

Sample Proficiency Test exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

Systematic sampling with errors in sample locations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......truncation points 0 and 2 and standard deviation = 0 05 (middle...distributed with density h. Standard renewal theory yields...systematic sampling: a review of Matheron's transitive...Trans. Inst. Econ. Mining 59, 147. GUAL-ARNAU...methods. J. Statist. Plan. Infer. 77, 263279......

Johanna Ziegel; Adrian Baddeley; Karl-Anton Dorph-Petersen; Eva B. Vedel Jensen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Assessing respondent-driven sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...convenience sampling through the internet versus respondent driven sampling...in Social Networks, Drug Abuse, and HIV Transmission , eds...5) MSM Tallinn, Estonia Internet convenience sampling...convenience sampling through the internet versus respondent driven sampling...

Sharad Goel; Matthew J. Salganik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Application of Self-Propagating High Temperature Synthesis to the Fabrication of Actinide Bearing Nitride and Other Ceramic Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project uses an exothermic combustion synthesis reaction, termed self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), to produce high quality, reproducible nitride fuels and other ceramic type nuclear fuels (cercers and cermets, etc.) in conjunction with the fabrication of transmutation fuels. The major research objective of the project is determining the fundamental SHS processing parameters by first using manganese as a surrogate for americium to produce dense Zr-Mn-N ceramic compounds. These fundamental principles will then be transferred to the production of dense Zr-Am-N ceramic materials. A further research objective in the research program is generating fundamental SHS processing data to the synthesis of (i) Pu-Am-Zr-N and (ii) U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. In this case, Ce will be used as the surrogate for Pu, Mn as the surrogate for Am, and depleted uranium as the surrogate for U. Once sufficient fundamental data has been determined for these surrogate systems, the information will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for synthesis of Zr-Am-N, Pu-Am-Zr-N and U-Pu-Am-N ceramic fuels. The high vapor pressures of americium (Am) and americium nitride (AmN) are cause for concern in producing nitride ceramic nuclear fuel that contains Am. Along with the problem of Am retention during the sintering phases of current processing methods, are additional concerns of producing a consistent product of desirable homogeneity, density and porosity. Similar difficulties have been experienced during the laboratory scale process development stage of producing metal alloys containing Am wherein compact powder sintering methods had to be abandoned. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a low-temperature or low–heat fuel fabrication process for the synthesis of Am-containing ceramic fuels. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS), also called combustion synthesis, offers such an alternative process for the synthesis of Am nitride fuels. Although SHS takes thermodynamic advantage of the high combustion temperatures of these exothermic SHS reactions to synthesize the required compounds, the very fast heating, reaction and cooling rates can kinetically generate extremely fast reaction rates and facilitate the retention of volatile species within the rapidly propagating SHS reaction front. The initial objective of the research program is to use Mn as the surrogate for Am to synthesize a reproducible, dense, high quality Zr-Mn-N ceramic compound. Having determined the fundamental SHS reaction parameters and optimized SHS processing steps using Mn as the surrogate for Am, the technology will be transferred to Idaho National Laboratory to successfully synthesize a high quality Zr-Am-N ceramic fuel.

John J. Moore, Marissa M. Reigel, Collin D. Donohoue

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

290

Sampled data lattice filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subfect...: Electrical Engineering SAMPLED DATA LATTICE FILTERS A Thesis by WILLIAM TERRY THRIFT III Approved as to style and content by: (Chair an of Committee) (Hea f Department) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) December 1979 ABSTRACT Sampled Data...

Thrift, William Terry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-liquid-injection Chemical-vapor-deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smooth, continuous, and highly conformal nickel nitride (NiN{sub x}) films were deposited by direct liquid injection (DLI)-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a solution of bis(N,N{prime}-di-tert-butylacetamidinato)nickel(II) in tetrahydronaphthalene as the nickel (Ni) source and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the coreactant gas. The DLI-CVD NiNx films grown on HF-last (100) silicon and on highly doped polysilicon substrates served as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide (NiSi), which is a key material for source, drain, and gate contacts in microelectronic devices. Rapid thermal annealing in the forming gas of DLI-CVD NiNx films formed continuous NiSi films at temperatures above 400 C. The resistivity of the NiSi films was 15{mu}{Omega} cm, close to the value for bulk crystals. The NiSi films have remarkably smooth and sharp interfaces with underlying Si substrates, thereby producing contacts for transistors with a higher drive current and a lower junction leakage. Resistivity and synchrotron X-ray diffraction in real-time during annealing of NiNx films showed the formation of a NiSi film at about 440 C, which is morphologically stable up to about 650 C. These NiSi films could find applications in future nanoscale complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices or three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor devices such as Fin-type field effect transistors for the 22 nm technology node and beyond.

Li, Z.; Gordon, R; Li, H; Shenai, D; Lavoie, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

sample recovery not within control limits. Organic: Tentatively identified compound (TIC). P > 25% difference in detected pesticide or Aroclor concentrations between 2 columns....

293

EMSL - sediment samples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sediment-samples en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrol...

294

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

conducted in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMSPROS04351, continually updated). Monitoring...

295

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2014 LMSGUPS00414 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

296

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites December 2014 LMSSRWSRES00914 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

297

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

299

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

300

Role of GaAs surface clearing in plasma deposition of silicon nitride films for encapsulated annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of GaAs surface cleaning and plasma reactor cleaning prior to deposition of silicon nitride films for encapsulated annealing has been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to determine the surface characteristics of GaAs treated with HCl, HF, and NH4OH solutions preceded by a degreasing procedure. The HCl clean left the least amount of oxygen on the surface. Fluorine contamination resulting from the CF4 plasma used to clean the reactor was found to be located at the film-substrate interface by Auger electron spectroscopy with argon-ion sputtering. A modified deposition procedure was developed to eliminate the fluorine contamination. Plasma deposition of silicon nitride encapsulating films was found to modify the I-V characteristics of Schottky diodes subsequently formed on GaAs surface. The reverse current of the diodes was slightly reduced. Substrates implanted with Si at 100 keV and a dose of 5 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm showed a peak electron concentration of 1.7 x 10 to the 17th/cu cm at a depth of 0.1-micron with 60 percent activation after encapsulation and annealing at 800 C for 7 min. 9 references.

Valco, G.J.; Kapoor, V.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effect of substrate temperature on crystal orientation and residual stress in radio frequency sputtered gallium–nitride films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal orientation and residual stress in gallium nitride(GaN)filmsdeposited on a single-crystal (0001) sapphire substrate using a sputtering system are examined through x-ray diffraction measurements as part of a study of low-temperaturesputtering techniques for GaN. The rf sputtering system has an isolated deposition chamber to prevent contamination with impurities and is expected to produce high-purity nitride films.GaNfilms are deposited at various substrate temperatures and constant gas pressure and input power. This system is found to produce GaNfilms with good crystal orientation with the c axes of GaN crystals oriented normal to the substrate surface. The crystal size of filmsdeposited at high temperature is larger than that deposited at low T s . All films except that deposited at 973 K exhibit compressive residual stress and this residual stress is found to decrease with increasing temperature. Finally the filmdeposited at 973 K was tinged with white and the surface contained numerous microcracks.

Kazuya Kusaka; Takao Hanabusa; Kikuo Tominaga; Noriyoshi Yamauchi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 833845. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-8984(99)96581-5 Structural and magnetic properties of ammonia-nitrided  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 833­845. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-8984(99)96581-5 Structural and magnetic properties of ammonia-nitrided Y2Fe17 N X Shen, J I Budnick, W A Hines, Y D Zhang, D of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA Department of Physics, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610, USA

Yang, De-Ping

303

[1] P. Schwarzkopf, R. Kieffer, Refractory Hard Metals: Borides, Car-bides, Nitrides and Silicides, MacMillan, New York 1953.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

± [1] P. Schwarzkopf, R. Kieffer, Refractory Hard Metals: Borides, Car- bides, Nitrides and Silicides, MacMillan, New York 1953. [2] E. Fryt, Solid State Ionics 1997, 101±103, 437. [3] N. Durlu, J. Metal catalysts, such as gold[1,4,8] and tin[5,9,10] have been employed in the synthesis to align

Wang, Zhong L.

304

In situ UHV contactless C–V and XPS characterization of surface passivation process for InP using a partially nitrided Si interface control layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A totally in situ surface passivation process of InP consisting of growth of an ultrathin Si interface control layer (Si ICL) and its subsequent partial nitridation is described. The process was characterized and optimized by in situ ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) contactless capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-N2 plasma process and a nitrogen radical process were compared for partial nitridation of Si ICL. In situ XPS measurements provided useful information on the thickness and composition of the nitrided surface layer. UHV C–V measurements showed that the nitridation process using ECR-N2 plasma was more favorable, realizing a full swing of Fermi level almost over the entire bandgap. A metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) capacitor was fabricated by further depositing a thick Si3N4 layer on the ECR plasma processed structure. Conventional MIS C–V measurements confirmed an excellent interface property, proving the effectiveness of the in situ passivation process.

Hiroshi Takahashi; Hideki Hasegawa

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma, Shuang Liu, and E. G. Wanga)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen storage in carbon nitride nanobells X. D. Bai, Dingyong Zhong, G. Y. Zhang, X. C. Ma as hydrogen adsorbent. A hydrogen storage capacity up to 8 wt % was achieved reproducibly under ambient pressure and at temperature of 300 °C. The high hydrogen storage capacity under the moderate conditions

Zhang, Guangyu

306

Lewis Base Adduct Stabilized Organogallium Azides:? Synthesis and Dynamic NMR Spectroscopic Studies of Novel Precursors to Gallium Nitride and Role of Ammonia as Reactive Carrier Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lewis Base Adduct Stabilized Organogallium Azides:? Synthesis and Dynamic NMR Spectroscopic Studies of Novel Precursors to Gallium Nitride and Role of Ammonia as Reactive Carrier Gas ... Solvents were dried under argon according to standard methods; n-pentane and toluene were stored over Na/K alloy, and diethyl ether and thf over potassium benzophenoate (residual water solubility in other solvents than thf. ...

Alexander Miehr; Mike R. Mattner; Roland A. Fischer

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Compact cold stage for micro-computerized tomography imaging of chilled or frozen samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High resolution X-ray microCT (computerized tomography) can be used to image a variety of objects, including temperature-sensitive materials. In cases where the sample must be chilled or frozen to maintain sample integrity, either the microCT machine itself must be placed in a refrigerated chamber, or a relatively expensive commercial cold stage must be purchased. We describe here the design and construction of a low-cost custom cold stage suitable for use in a microCT imaging system. Our device uses a boron nitride sample holder, two-stage Peltier cooler, fan-cooled heat sink, and electronic controller to maintain sample temperatures as low as ?25?°C ± 0.2?°C for the duration of a tomography acquisition. The design does not require modification to the microCT machine, and is easily installed and removed. Our custom cold stage represents a cost-effective solution for refrigerating CT samples for imaging, and is especially useful for shared equipment or machines unsuitable for cold room use.

Hullar, Ted; Anastasio, Cort, E-mail: canastasio@ucdavis.edu [Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)] [Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Paige, David F. [Paige Instruments, Woodland, California 95776 (United States)] [Paige Instruments, Woodland, California 95776 (United States); Rowland, Douglas J. [Center for Molecular and Genomic Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)] [Center for Molecular and Genomic Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hetero-junctions of Boron Nitride and Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hetero-junctions of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are expected to have appealing new properties that are not available from pure BNNTs and CNTs. Theoretical studies indicate that BNNT/CNT junctions could be multifunctional and applicable as memory, spintronic, electronic, and photonics devices with tunable band structures. This will lead to energy and material efficient multifunctional devices that will be beneficial to the society. However, experimental realization of BNNT/CNT junctions was hindered by the absent of a common growth technique for BNNTs and CNTs. In fact, the synthesis of BNNTs was very challenging and may involve high temperatures (up to 3000 degree Celsius by laser ablation) and explosive chemicals. During the award period, we have successfully developed a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique to grow BNNTs at 1100-1200 degree Celsius without using dangerous chemicals. A series of common catalyst have then been identified for the synthesis of BNNTs and CNTs. Both of these breakthroughs have led to our preliminary success in growing two types of BNNT/CNT junctions and two additional new nanostructures: 1) branching BNNT/CNT junctions and 2) co-axial BNNT/CNT junctions, 3) quantum dots functionalized BNNTs (QDs-BNNTs), 4) BNNT/graphene junctions. We have started to understand their structural, compositional, and electronic properties. Latest results indicate that the branching BNNT/CNT junctions and QDs-BNNTs are functional as room-temperature tunneling devices. We have submitted the application of a renewal grant to continue the study of these new energy efficient materials. Finally, this project has also strengthened our collaborations with multiple Department of Energy�s Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), including the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINTs) at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results obtained during the current funding period have led to the publication of twelve peer reviewed articles, three review papers, two book and one encyclopedia chapters, and thirty eight conference/seminar presentation. One US provisional patent and one international patent have also been filed.

Yap, Yoke Khin

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3-Sampling and Analysis Work Orders Attachment 4-Trip Reports DVP-June and September 2013, Durango, Colorado U.S. Department of Energy RIN 13055370 and 13085577 March 2014 Page...

310

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. U.S. Department of Energy DVP-May 2013, Rulison, Colorado October 2013 RIN 13055300 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary...

311

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

analyses were conducted as specified in the 2004 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan, Draft Final and Sampling and Analysis Plan...

312

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2014 Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S....

313

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site August 2014 LMSGRNS00614 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2014, Green River, Utah August 2014 RIN 14066228 Page i Contents Sampling...

314

Climatic data, sample of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The representative sample data given below is derived from Climates of the World (Environmental Data Service, 1972). To facilitate conversion from degrees Fahrenheit, inches of precipitation, and elevation in fee...

John E. Oliver

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Dissolution actuated sample container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effective heat dissipation and geometric optimization in an LED module with aluminum nitride (AlN) insulation plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The heat dissipation performance in a conventional chip on board (COB) LED module is limited by the very low thermal conductivity of the dielectric layer. In this study, an enhanced model is proposed to achieve effective heat dissipation using an aluminum nitride (AlN) insulation plate instead of the dielectric layer. Initially, the geometric configuration of the enhanced model was optimized by using response surface methodology. The effects of each design parameter were also analyzed in terms of the one-dimensional and spreading thermal resistances. In the optimized enhanced model, the junction temperature and total thermal resistance were 24.1% and 55.2% lower, respectively, than the conventional COB module with the copper-based substrate. At the heat input of 15 W, the luminous efficacy of the optimized enhanced model was about 13.9% higher than that of the conventional COB module.

Min Woo Jeong; Seung Won Jeon; Sang Hun Lee; Yongchan Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Impact of the reaction conditions on the photocatalytic reduction of water on mesoporous polymeric carbon nitride under sunlight irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sacrificial hydrogen evolution was studied with sol–gel prepared carbon nitride photocatalysts loaded in-situ with platinum in a photocatalytic setup with defined geometry and a solar simulator as light source. Reaction conditions (e.g. photocatalyst concentration, triethanolamine concentration, amount of Pt precursor, water quality, etc.), and catalyst properties (e.g. BET surface area) were varied to optimize the catalysts for hydrogen evolution. We found that most of the parameters strongly influence the in-situ co-catalyst loading. The optimum platinum loading is between 0.03 and 0.09 wt%, which is less than 5% of the initial amount of platinum. A long term stability test was conducted showing a stable hydrogen evolution rate for more than 10 days indicating a stable catalyst under applied reaction conditions. We found that a change in the BET surface area affects the photocatalytic activity rather than the experimental conditions.

M. Schröder; K. Kailasam; S. Rudi; M. Richter; A. Thomas; R. Schomäcker; M. Schwarze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hydrogen storage capacity of Ti-doped boron-nitride and B?Be-substituted carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the hydrogen absorption capacity of two tubular structures, namely, B?Be-substituted single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Ti covered single-wall boron nitride nanotube (SWBNT) using first-principles plane wave method. The interaction of H2 molecules with the outer surface of bare SWBNT, which is normally very weak, can be significantly enhanced upon functionalization by Ti atoms. Each Ti atom adsorbed on SWBNT can bind up to four H2 molecules with an average binding energy suitable for room temperature storage. While the substitution process of Be atom on SWNT is endothermic, the substituted Be strengthens the interaction between tube surface and H2 to hold one H2 molecule.

E. Durgun; Y.-R. Jang; S. Ciraci

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Effects of boron-nitride substrates on Stone-Wales defect formation in graphene: An ab initio molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effects of a boron nitride (BN) substrate on Stone-Wales (SW) defect formation and recovery in graphene. It is found that SW defects can be created by an off-plane recoil atom that interacts with the BN substrate. A mechanism with complete bond breakage for formation of SW defects in suspended graphene is also revealed for recoils at large displacement angles. In addition, further irradiation can result in recovery of the SW defects through a bond rotation mechanism in both graphene and graphene/BN, and the substrate has little effect on the recovery process. This study indicates that the BN substrate enhances the irradiation resistance of graphene.

Jin, K.; Xiao, H. Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Weber, W. J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic hydrogen density Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 Theoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II. Collision, storage, and adsorption Summary: two hydrogen atoms, but only one of...

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic hydrogen generated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 Theoretical study on interaction of hydrogen with single-walled boron nitride nanotubes. II. Collision, storage, and adsorption Summary: two hydrogen atoms, but only one of...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - area semiconductor laser Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

areas of semiconductor... for conducting research on wide bandgap semiconductor optoelectronics in my research group, within the Center... bandgap III-Nitride semiconductor...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - assistive technology devices Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Computer Engineering (ECE) at Lehigh... bandgap III-Nitride semiconductor optoelectronics materials and devices. The position is available Source: Gilchrist, James F. -...

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony oxides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

growth of the field oxide in the case of a LOCOS... deposition or removing, - oxide and nitride deposition or etching, - ion-implantationof boron, BF,, arsenic... isolation, -...

330

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimony pyrochlore-type oxides Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

growth of the field oxide in the case of a LOCOS... deposition or removing, - oxide and nitride deposition or etching, - ion-implantationof boron, BF,, arsenic... isolation, -...

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium hydroxides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the powder by heating... process was to convert the oxides or hydroxides to carbides and nitrides by carburizing them with methane Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de...

332

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide mixed oxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuels Mikael JOLKKONEN1;;y Summary: . Examples of such substances are molten actinide carbides and the gaseous forms of many metal oxides... , minor actinides, uranium-free nitride...

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing positron annihilation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1995 Summary: Positron Annihilation Characteristics in Perfect and Imperfect Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides M... kova 22, CZ-616 62 Bmo, CzechRepublic **PositronAnnihilatio...

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation lifetime study Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C1, supplkment au Journal de Physique 111,Volume 5,janvier 1995 Summary: for transition metal carbides and nitrides. The quantities studied are the positron affinity and...

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - axillary region positron Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1995 Summary: Positron Annihilation Characteristics in Perfect and Imperfect Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides M... kova 22, CZ-616 62 Bmo, CzechRepublic **PositronAnnihilatio...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - annihilation lifetime technique Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1995 Summary: Positron Annihilation Characteristics in Perfect and Imperfect Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides M... kova 22, CZ-616 62 Bmo, CzechRepublic **PositronAnnihilatio...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - angle magnetron sputtering Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Society. Keywords: scandium nitride; magnetron sputtering; hard coatings; transition metal... Epitaxial ScN,,001... Grown and Analyzed In situ by XPS and UPS. II. ... Source:...

338

Effects of ternary mixed crystal and size on optical phonons in wurtzite nitride core-shell nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the framework of dielectric continuum and Loudon's uniaxial crystal models, existence conditions dependent on components and frequencies for optical phonons in wurtzite nitride core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) are discussed to obtain dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of optical phonons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN CSNWs. The results show that there may be four types of optical phonons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/GaN CSNWs for a given ternary mixed crystal (TMC) component due to the phonon dispersion anisotropy. This property is analogous to wurtzite planar heterojunctions. Among the optical phonons, there are two types of quasi-confined optical (QCO) phonons (named, respectively, as QCO-A and QCO-B), one type of interface (IF) phonons and propagating (PR) phonons existing in certain component and frequency domains while the dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of same type of optical phonons vary with components. Furthermore, the size effect on optical phonons in CSNWs is also discussed. The dispersion relations of IF and QCO-A are independent of the boundary location of CSNWs. Meanwhile, dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of QCO-B and PR phonons vary obviously with size, especially, when the ratio of a core radius to a shell radius is small, and dispersion relation curves of PR phonons appear to be close to each other, whereas, this phenomenon disappears when the ratio becomes large. Based on our conclusions, one can further discuss photoelectric properties in nitride CSNWs consisting of TMCs associated with optical phonons.

Li, J.; Guan, J. Y.; Zhang, S. F.; Ban, S. L.; Qu, Y., E-mail: quyuan@imu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Bandgap Engineering of 1-Dimensional Nitride and Oxynitride Materials for Solar Water Splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1-x O x ) nanotubes were studied using TEM energy dispersivethe band gap energy of GaN:ZnO nanotubes. Samples wereINCA energy dispersive X-ray detector. Different nanotubes

Hahn, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Isotope Effect in Band Spectra, IV: the Spectrum of Silicon Nitride  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon nitride bands.—(1) A system of bands shaded toward the red, lying between 3800 and 5300A was obtained by Jevons in 1913 by the introduction of SiCl4 vapor into active nitrogen. His measurements have been repeated and extended to all possible heads. It is important that no oxygen be present. From a sharp intense head each band decreases rapidly in intensity to zero at the null line, then increases to a maximum at about m=13 in the negative branch, in which the lines get far enough apart to be resolved. With the aid of the quantum theory, Jevons' arrangement was revised, and correct initial (n?) and final (n??) vibrational quantum numbers assigned. The null lines of the Si28N bands correspond to the wave-number equation: ??=24234.2+1016.30 n?-17.77n?2+0.410n?4-0.00487n?-1145.00n??+6.570n??2. Partial analysis of the band structure indicates that the lines of any band are given by the equation: ?=??+B?+2B?m+Cm2 where B?=0.728-0.097n? and C=-0.0121-0.0097n?+0.0053n??; from this the internuclear distance for the vibrationless SiN molecule is 1.56×10-8 cm. Additional weak heads are present whose positions agree very closely with those calculated for the isotopes Si29N and Si30N, isotope 29 being slightly the stronger. This agreement definitely excludes SiO or any other compound than SiN as the emitter of the bands, confirming the chemical evidence. The agreement is also definite, but not conclusive, evidence against the existence of half-quantum numbers for SiN, a result opposite to that for BO. Plate I shows most of the Si28N bands together with some isotope heads. The intensity distribution in each band corresponds to thermal equilibrium at about 80°C. In respect to the initial vibrational quantum number, the distribution is non-thermal and corresponds to a high effective temperature as in other cases such as BO and CN. The intensity distribution with respect to ?n is similar to that of the violet CN bands. The sequence ?n=0 is by far the strongest, other sequences of diminishing intensity being observed as far as -3 and +3 or +4. (2) New system of bands, extensive but weak, probably also due to SiN, is described. They all have double heads (??=27), are shaded toward the red and extend from the ultraviolet through the green. An equation for the heads is given. The intensity distribution is characterized by numerically large values of ?n and by the absence of the band (0?0) and some neighboring bands.

Robert S. Mulliken

1925-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

342

Fluid sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

Yeamans, D.R.

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

Thompson, C.V.

1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

345

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

346

Thermally Nitrided Stainless Steels for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 2: Beneficial Modification of Passive Layer on AISI446  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal nitridation of AISI446 mod-1 superferritic stainless steel for 24 h at 1100 C resulted in an adherent, inward growing surface layer based on (Cr, Fe){sub 2}N{sub 1-x} (x = 0--0.5). The layer was not continuous, and although it resulted in low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) and good corrosion resistance under simulated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodic conditions; poor corrosion resistance was observed under simulated anodic conditions. Nitridation for 2 h at 1100 C resulted in little nitrogen uptake and a tinted surface. Analysis by SEM, XPS, and AES suggested a complex heterogeneous modification of the native passive oxide film by nitrogen rather than the desired microns-thick exclusive Cr-rich nitride layer. Surprisingly, this modification resulted in both good corrosion resistance under simulated cathodic and anodic conditions and low ICR, well over an order of magnitude lower than the untreated alloy. Further, little increase in ICR was observed under passivating polarization conditions. The potential of this phenomenon for PEMFC bipolar plates is discussed.

Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Brady, Michael P [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Dicalcium nitride as a two-dimensional electride with an anionic electron layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Figure 2a schematically depicts the stamping method of measuring the electrical properties of a Ca2N single crystal, which allow reproducible ... crystal sample (0.5?×?0.5?×?0.02?mm3), we adopted the stamp method, which has been used to measure the electrical properties of organic single crystals. ...

Kimoon Lee; Sung Wng Kim; Yoshitake Toda; Satoru Matsuishi; Hideo Hosono

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Professor Mathias Schubert explains his study of indium gallium nitride semiconductor systems, which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation of multiple-junction solar energy conversion devices with improved ease of manufacture, cost within a sample. Conversely, the blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) intended for transferring from energy free charge carrier properties in contact- based electrical measurements, in the extreme case

Farritor, Shane

349

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

350

Stack sampling apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fluid sampling tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ?5?nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265??A–280??A with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 × 10{sup 6}–7.4 × 10{sup 6} for a V{sub DD}?=?0.68?V corresponding to 10?nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

353

High rate (?3 nm/s) deposition of dense silicon nitride films at low substrate temperatures (plasma and substrate biasing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The deposition of amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) films at high deposition rates (?3 nm/s) and at low substrate temperatures (plasma technique operated on an Ar–NH3–SiH4 reactant mixture. To increase the atomic density of the films by ion bombardment, low frequency (lf, 400 kHz) and radio-frequency (rf, 13.6 MHz) substrate biasing has been employed during deposition such that the ions are accelerated towards the substrate up to energies of ?250 eV. From spectroscopic ellipsometry and Rutherford backscattering measurements, it is demonstrated that the film density increases with increasing substrate bias even under these high deposition rate conditions. An increase in film atomic density from 7.6×1022 cm?3 to 8.8×1022 cm?3 has been observed for rf biasing when going from almost zero substrate bias to a bias voltage of ?250 V. It is shown that this increased film density reduces the oxygen content in the a-SiNx:H caused by post-deposition oxygen and/or moisture permeation by more than 50%.

F.J.H. van Assche; W.M.M. Kessels; R. Vangheluwe; W.S. Mischke; M. Evers; M.C.M. van de Sanden

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electrical properties of scandium nitride epitaxial films grown on (100) magnesium oxide substrates by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scandium nitride (ScN) films were grown on (100) MgO single crystals by a molecular beam epitaxy method. The effects of growth conditions, including [Sc]/[N] ratio, growth temperature, and nitrogen radical state, on the electrical properties of the ScN films were studied. The ScN films comprised many small columnar grains. Hall coefficient measurements confirmed that the ScN films were highly degenerate n-type semiconductors and that the carrier concentration of the ScN films was sensitive to the growth temperature and the nitrogen radical states during the film growth. The carrier concentrations of the ScN films ranged from 10{sup 19}–10{sup 21} cm{sup ?3} while the Hall mobilities ranged from 50–130 cm{sup 2}·V{sup ?1}·s{sup ?1} for undoped films. The temperature-dependent Hall coefficient measurements showed that the carrier concentration is nearly independent of temperature, indicating that the change in resistivity with temperature is explained by a change in the Hall mobility. The temperature-dependence of the Hall mobility was strongly affected by the growth conditions.

Ohgaki, Takeshi; Watanabe, Ken; Adachi, Yutaka; Sakaguchi, Isao; Hishita, Shunichi; Ohashi, Naoki; Haneda, Hajime [Environment and Energy Materials Research Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Environment and Energy Materials Research Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Picosecond response of gallium-nitride metal–semiconductor–metal photodetectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodiodes fabricated on GaN were tested in the picosecond regime with an electro-optic sampling system. A device with a feature size of 1 ?m showed a response with 1.4 ps rise time and 3.5 ps full width at half maximum. The derived electron velocity 1.43×10 7 ? cm/s is in good agreement with independent photoexcitation measurements. A slower impulse response was observed in a device with smaller feature size of 0.5?? m .

Jianliang Li; Ying Xu; T. Y. Hsiang; W. R. Donaldson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Quantum Metropolis Sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman who envisaged a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems, a task that is believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a machine would have a wide range of applications in the simulation of many-body quantum physics, including condensed matter physics, chemistry, and high energy physics. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd who showed how to approximately decompose the time-evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer. However, this left open the problem of how to simulate the equilibrium and static properties of quantum systems. This requires the preparation of ground and Gibbs states on a quantum computer. For classical systems, this problem is solved by the ubiquitous Metropolis algorithm, a method that basically acquired a monopoly for the simulation of interacting particles. Here, we demonstrate how to implement a quantum version of the Metropolis algorithm on a quantum computer. This algorithm permits to sample directly from the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian and thus evades the sign problem present in classical simulations. A small scale implementation of this algorithm can already be achieved with today's technology

K. Temme; T. J. Osborne; K. G. Vollbrecht; D. Poulin; F. Verstraete

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

358

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

359

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

360

Synthesis and Structure of Sr3GaN3 and Sr6GaN5:? Strontium Gallium Nitrides with Isolated Planar [GaN3]6- Anions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthesis and Structure of Sr3GaN3 and Sr6GaN5:? Strontium Gallium Nitrides with Isolated Planar [GaN3]6- Anions ... 9-19 In most cases, an alkaline earth metal is introduced into a Na melt to enhance the solubility of nitrogen, and is incorporated in the nitride product. ... The container was sealed by welding its open end in an argon atmosphere with active water-cooling so that NaN3 did not decompose due to heating during the welding. ...

Dong Gon Park; Zoltán A. Gál; Francis J. DiSalvo

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ab initio calculations of the physical properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides and possible routes to high-T{sub c} superconductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report ab initio linear-response calculations of the phonon spectra and the electron-phonon interaction for several transition metal carbides and nitrides in a NaCl-type structure. For NbC, the kinetic, optical, and superconducting properties are calculated in detail at various pressures and the normal-pressure results are found to agree well with the experiment. Factors accounting for the relatively low critical temperatures T{sub c} in transition metal compounds with light elements are considered and the possible ways of increasing T{sub c} are discussed.

Maksimov, E. G., E-mail: maksimov@lpi.ru; Ebert, S. V. [Lebedev Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Magnitskaya, M. V.; Karakozov, A. E. [Vereshchagin Institute for High Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

Backfish, Michael

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers whole years of the three-year program 'Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications'. The research activities were focused on the development of p-type layer that has less/no detrimental thermal annealing effect on as well as excellent structural and electrical properties and the development of green LED active region that has superior luminescence quality for {lambda}{approx}540nm green LEDs. We have also studied (1) the thermal annealing effect on blue and green LED active region during the p-type layer growth; (2) the effect of growth parameters and structural factors for LED active region on electroluminescence properties; (3) the effect of substrates and orientation on electrical and electro-optical properties of green LEDs. As a progress highlight, we obtained green-LED-active-region-friendly In{sub 0.04}Ga{sub 0.96}N:Mg exhibiting low resistivity with higher hole concentration (p=2.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a low resistivity of 0.5 {omega}-cm) and improved optical quality green LED active region emitting at {approx}540nm by electroluminescence. The LEDs with p-InGaN layer can act as a quantum-confined Stark effect mitigation layer by reducing strain in the QW. We also have achieved (projected) peak IQE of {approx}25% at {lambda}{approx}530 nm and of {approx}13% at {lambda}{approx}545 nm. Visible LEDs on a non-polar substrate using (11-20) {alpha}-plane bulk substrates. The absence of quantum-confined Stark effect was confirmed but further improvement in electrical and optical properties is required.

Russell Dupuis

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Low-temperature synthesis of AlN powder with multicomponent additive systems by carbothermal reduction-nitridation method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AlN powders were synthesized at low temperatures (1300 and 1400 {sup o}C) by the carbothermal reduction-nitridation (CRN) method using multicomponent additive systems. The synthesis treatments were conducted in a graphite furnace with flowing nitrogen gas between 1200 and 1500 {sup o}C using powder mixtures with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C molar ratio of 1:3 and 0.5-3 wt% of CaF{sub 2}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and/or SrCO{sub 3} as additives. In relation to the conventional CRN process, the use of multicomponent additive systems reduced the synthesis temperature in 200 {sup o}C (CaF{sub 2}-SrCO{sub 3}), 100 {sup o}C (CaF{sub 2}-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) or <100 {sup o}C (CaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-SrCO{sub 3}). X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the additives reacted with the alumina powder forming aluminate phases, which vaporized with the increase of synthesis temperature. The enhanced AlN conversion rate was discussed in terms of the vaporization of aluminates in the reducing atmosphere.

Molisani, Andre Luiz [Federal University of ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, Santo Andre, SP 09210-170 (Brazil)] [Federal University of ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, Santo Andre, SP 09210-170 (Brazil); Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki, E-mail: humberto.yoshimura@ufabc.edu.br [Federal University of ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, Santo Andre, SP 09210-170 (Brazil)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Sample page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sample page Sample page Jump to: navigation, search This page has been rated 13[1][2] on the scale of awesomness. This page is awesome! The above text is generated by the SampleTemplate. Try editing it and changing the level of awesomeness to see the template react. Hint: It says something different depending on whether or not the page is at least 5 awesome. This page is related to the following topics[3][4]: References Sample pages Help pages Additional Info Name Sample page Awesomeness 13 Topics (raw) References; Sample pages; Help pages; References ↑ Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California. GRC Bulletin. . ↑ EPRI. 12/12/2012. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine

366

Adaptive Sampling for Environmental Robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186, 2003. S. Thrun, “Robotics Mapping: A survey”, Exploringtechnique to environmental robotics applications includingSampling for Environmental Robotics Mohammad Rahimi †,‡‡ ,

Mohammad Rahimi; Richard Pon; Deborah Estrin; William J. Kaiser; Mani Srivastava; Gaurav S. Sukhatme

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Sample Residential Program Term Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

368

Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

370

Wasted Paper in Pharmaceutical Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of pills and packaging in one of each brand of drug samples stored in the clinic. All pills were packaged in either foil blister packs or plastic bottles; these were contained in paper-product boxes and accompanied by paper package inserts. Ninety-two packages contained 665 pills (mean [±SD], 7.2±6... To the Editor: Clinicians give pharmaceutical samples provided to clinics by industry sales representatives to patients who are unable to afford medicines or use them as starter packs for patients initiating a new treatment. These samples are usually ...

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid pentavalent 99m Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

involving a ring with pentavalent Si, whereas nitridation of HY is found to pro- ceed via... cage-like structures 1. Acidic zeolite catalysts have long been the backbone...

372

Category:Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Sampling Technique Subcategories This...

373

Sampling based on local bandwidth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sampling of continuous-time signals based on local bandwidth is considered in this thesis. In an intuitive sense, local bandwidth refers to the rate at which a signal varies locally. One would expect that signals should ...

Wei, Dennis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sample Business Plan Framework 3  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

375

Sample Business Plan Framework 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

376

Sample Business Plan Framework 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

377

Sample Business Plan Framework 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

378

Sample Business Plan Framework 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

379

Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - assurance sampling method Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Design 6.0 Sampling Procedures B2 Sampling Methods Requirements 6.0 Sampling... Procedures B3 Sample Handling and Custody Requirements 7.0 Sample Custody B4 Analytical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Temperature dependence of electrical properties of gallium-nitride bulk single crystals doped with Mg and their evolution with annealing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comprehensive studies of the electrical properties of Mg-doped bulk GaN crystals grown by high-pressure synthesis were performed as a function of temperature up to 750?°C. Annealing of the samples in nitrogen ambient modifies qualitatively their resistivity values ? and the ?(T) variation. It was found that our material is characterized by a high concentration of oxygen-related donors and that the charge transport in the studied samples is determined by two types of states one of shallow character (Mg-related state E A ?0.15? eV ) and the second one much more deep E 2 ?0.95? eV (above the valence band). Depending on the effective concentration of either states different resistivities ? can be observed: lower resistivity (?10 6 ??? cm at ambient temperature) in samples with dominant E 2 states. For the first type of samples annealing at T ann <500?° C leads to a decrease of their resistivity and is associated with an increase of the effective concentration of the shallow Mg acceptors. Annealing of both types of samples at temperatures between 600 and 750?°C leads to an increase of the deep state concentration. The presence of hydrogen ambient during annealing of the low-resistivity samples strongly influences their properties. The increase of the sample resistivity and an appearance of a local vibrational mode of hydrogen at 3125 cm?1 were observed. These effects can be removed by annealing in hydrogen-free ambient.

E. Litwin-Staszewska; T. Suski; R. Piotrzkowski; I. Grzegory; M. Bockowski; J. L. Robert; L. Ko?czewicz; D. Wasik; E. Kami?ska; D. Cote; B. Clerjaud

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

383

Photoluminescence from GaN layers at high temperatures as a candidate for in situ monitoring in MOVPE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Efficient photoluminescence (PL) spectra from GaN and InGaN layers at temperatures up to 1100 K are observed with low noise floor and high dynamic resolution. A number of detailed spectral features in the PL can be directly linked to physical properties of the epitaxial grown layer. The method is suggested as an in situ monitoring tool during epitaxy of nitride LED and laser structures. Layer properties like thickness, band gap or film temperature distribution are feasible.

C. Prall; M. Ruebesam; C. Weber; M. Reufer; D. Rueter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

Dewhurst, K.H.

1987-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

Dewhurst, Katharine H. (13150 Wenonah SE. Apt. 727, Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Inertial impaction air sampling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

Dewhurst, K.H.

1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Properties of silicon nitride.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Theoretische Ab-initio Methoden haben sich in der Materialphysik etabliert, da sie wichtige Erkenntnisse liefern als Bestätigung, Ergänzung und Erweiterung von experimentellen Befunden. Die gegenständliche Studie… (more)

Watts, Thomas Frederic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nitride fuel performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an increase of the cost of enrichment. As a result, a new procedure has been developed based on the pyrochemical reprocessing technique (Suzuki et al. , 1998). The pyrochemical process was originally developed at Argonne National Laboratory...

Reynaud, Sylvie Marie Aurel?ie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program ... Direct Determination of Sulfur Species in Coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Program by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry ... Direct Determination of Sulfur Species in Coals from the Argonne Premium Sample Program by Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry ...

Karl S. Vorres

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Automation of sample mounting for macromolecular crystallography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sample holder standard for use with robotic sample changers is defined. The standard includes a system for sample identification, tracking and management of data flow in a macromolecular structure-determination pipeline. A robotic sample changer designed for use with the sample standard is described.

Cipriani, F.

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

391

Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring the onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. The Hanford Environmental Health Foundation is responsible for monitoring the nonradiological parameters as defined in the National Drinking Water Standards while PNL conducts the radiological monitoring of the onsite drinking water. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize the expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

Bisping, L.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Design of bioaerosol sampling inlets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation involving the design, fabrication, and testing of an ambient sampling inlet and two additional Stokes-scaled inlets is presented here. Testing of each inlet was conducted at wind speeds of 2, 8, and 24 km/h (0.55, 2...

Nene, Rohit Ravindra

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sample Environment Plans and Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 ďż˝ 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group Leader Neutron Scattering Science Division #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy-stage CCR for Reflectometry ďż˝ SNAP-customized CCR rig ďż˝ Vulcan furnace, baby load frame ďż˝ Low-Q air furnace

Pennycook, Steve

394

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - arbitrarily distributed samples Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

distributed samples Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arbitrarily distributed samples Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Robust Statistics...

396

Model-Based Sampling and Inference  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation James R. Knaub, Jr., Energy Information Administration, EI-53.1 James.Knaub@eia.doe.gov Key Words: Survey statistics, Randomization, Conditionality, Random sampling, Cutoff sampling Abstract: Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling within groups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic random sampling), may be familiar to a lot of people. These are design-based samples. Estimates of means and totals for an entire population may be inferred from such a sample, along with estimation of the amount of error that might be expected. However, inference based on a sample and its (modeled) relationship to other data may be less familiar. If there is enough

397

Surface passivation of p-type Ge substrate with high-quality GeN{sub x} layer formed by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation at low temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the effects of the formation temperature and postmetallization annealing (PMA) on the interface properties of GeN{sub x}/p-Ge fabricated by the plasma nitridation of Ge substrates using an electron-cyclotron-resonance-generated nitrogen plasma. The nitridation temperature is found to be a critical parameter in improving the finally obtained GeN{sub x}/Ge interface properties. The GeN{sub x}/Ge formed at room temperature and treated by PMA at 400 deg. C exhibits the best interface properties with an interface trap density of 1 x 10{sup 11 }cm{sup -2 }eV{sup -1}. The GeN{sub x}/Ge interface is unpinned and the Fermi level at the Ge surface can move from the valence band edge to the conduction band edge.

Fukuda, Yukio; Otani, Yohei [Tokyo University of Science, Suwa, 5000-1 Toyohira, Chino, Nagano 391-0292 (Japan); Okamoto, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takuro; Ono, Toshiro [Hirosaki University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

399

Sample Forms | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NMMSS Information, Reports & Forms Sample Forms Sample Forms U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

400

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

402

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

403

Special nuclear material inventory sampling plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents improved procedures for obtaining statistically valid sampling plans for nuclear facilities. The double sampling concept and methods for developing optimal double sampling plans are described. An algorithm is described that is satisfactory for finding optimal double sampling plans and choosing appropriate detection and false alarm probabilities. (ACR)

Vaccaro, H.S.; Goldman, A.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

405

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

406

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

407

Physical sampling for site and waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical sampling plays a basic role in site and waste characterization program effort. The term ``physical sampling`` used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ``physical sampling`` broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measuring of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting.

Bonnough, T.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

TRU waste-sampling program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a TRU waste-sampling program, Los Alamos National Laboratory retrieved and examined 44 drums of /sup 238/Pu- and /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste. The drums ranged in age from 8 months to 9 years. The majority of drums were tested for pressure, and gas samples withdrawn from the drums were analyzed by a mass spectrometer. Real-time radiography and visual examination were used to determine both void volumes and waste content. Drum walls were measured for deterioration, and selected drum contents were reassayed for comparison with original assays and WIPP criteria. Each drum tested at atmospheric pressure. Mass spectrometry revealed no problem with /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste, but three 8-month-old drums of /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste contained a potentially hazardous gas mixture. Void volumes fell within the 81 to 97% range. Measurements of drum walls showed no significant corrosion or deterioration. All reassayed contents were within WIPP waste acceptance criteria. Five of the drums opened and examined (15%) could not be certified as packaged. Three contained free liquids, one had corrosive materials, and one had too much unstabilized particulate. Eleven drums had the wrong (or not the most appropriate) waste code. In many cases, disposal volumes had been inefficiently used. 2 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

Warren, J.L.; Zerwekh, A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

410

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Alper, Naum I. (Monroeville, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Licensing Guide and Sample License  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP Lic:en!iing Guide and Sample Lic:en!ie ·~ ICan.u City Plan I OFermilab ~OAK ~RIDGE Nuioul~.

412

A novel hohlraum with ultrathin depleted-uranium-nitride coating layer for low hard x-ray emission and high radiation temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An ultra-thin layer of uranium nitrides (UN) has been coated on the inner surface of the depleted uranium hohlraum (DUH), which has been proved by our experiment can prevent the oxidization of Uranium (U) effectively. Comparative experiments between the novel depleted uranium hohlraum and pure golden (Au) hohlraum are implemented on Shenguang III prototype laser facility. Under the laser intensity of 6*10^14 W/cm2, we observe that, the hard x-ray (> 1.8 keV) fraction of this uranium hohlraum decreases by 61% and the peak intensity of total x-ray flux (0.1 keV ~ 5 keV) increases by 5%. Two dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED are exploited to interpret the above observations. Our result for the first time indicates the advantage of the UN-coated DUH in generating the uniform x-ray field with a quasi Planckian spectrum and thus has important implications in optimizing the ignition hohlraum design.

Guo, Liang; Xing, Peifeng; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Taimin; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Zhichao; Li, Renguo; Wu, Zheqing; Jing, Longfei; Zhang, Wenhai; Zhan, Xiayu; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Bobi; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Tunnel-injection quantum dot deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping in III-nitride heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient semiconductor optical emitters in the deep-ultraviolet spectral window are encountering some of the most deep rooted problems of semiconductor physics. In III-Nitride heterostructures, obtaining short-wavelength photon emission requires the use of wide bandgap high Al composition AlGaN active regions. High conductivity electron (n-) and hole (p-) injection layers of even higher bandgaps are necessary for electrical carrier injection. This approach requires the activation of very deep dopants in very wide bandgap semiconductors, which is a difficult task. In this work, an approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to counter the challenges. The active region of the heterostructure light emitting diode uses ultrasmall epitaxially grown GaN quantum dots. Remarkably, the optical emission energy from GaN is pushed from 365?nm (3.4?eV, the bulk bandgap) to below 240?nm (>5.2?eV) because of extreme quantum confinement in the dots. This is possible because of the peculiar bandstructure and band alignments in the GaN/AlN system. This active region design crucially enables two further innovations for efficient carrier injection: Tunnel injection of carriers and polarization-induced p-type doping. The combination of these three advances results in major boosts in electroluminescence in deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lays the groundwork for electrically pumped short-wavelength lasers.

Verma, Jai, E-mail: jverma@nd.edu; Islam, S. M.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

414

Structure, electronic and magnetic properties of hexagonal boron nitride sheets doped by 5d transition metal atoms: First-principles calculations and molecular orbital analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A first-principles calculation based on density functional theory is carried out to reveal the geometry, electronic structures and magnetic properties of hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNSs) doped by 5d transitional mental atoms (Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au and Hg) at boron-site (B5d) and nitrogen-site (N5d). Results of pure h-BNS, h-BNS with B vacancy (VB) and N vacancy (VN) are also given for comparison. It is shown that all the h-BNSs doped with 5d atoms possess a \\{C3v\\} local symmetry except for \\{NLu\\} and \\{NHg\\} which have a clear deviation. For the same 5d dopant, the binding energy of \\{B5d\\} is larger than that of N5d, which indicates the substitution of a 5d atom for B is preferred. The total densities of states are presented, where impurity energy levels exist. Besides, the total magnetic moments (TMMs) change regularly with the increment of the 5d atomic number. Theoretical analyses by molecular orbital under \\{C3v\\} symmetry explain the impurity energy levels and TMMs.

Zhaofu Zhang; Zhaohui Geng; Danyun Cai; Tongxi Pan; Yixin Chen; Liyuan Dong; Tiege Zhou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

417

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Sample holder for X-ray diffractometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sample holder for use with X-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

Hesch, Victor L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

An economic approach to acceptance sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tially reducing the cost of inspection. Evolution of Econom1c Sampling Plans The first attempt to develop a consistent approach to aoceptance sampling was conducted by Bell Telephone Labo- ratories during the 1920's. As a result of this research...- tially reducing the cost of inspection. Evolution of Econom1c Sampling Plans The first attempt to develop a consistent approach to aoceptance sampling was conducted by Bell Telephone Labo- ratories during the 1920's. As a result of this research...

Ruth, Robert Justin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution sampling Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sampling Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution sampling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 griculture is in the spotlight as a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Separation principle for a sampled bilinear system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is a continuation of [2] and [1] in which the authors studied the preservation of the observability and observer under sampling. In this paper, by relaxing some hypotheses, we study the observability and stabilization problems for a sampled ... Keywords: 93B07, Sampled bilinear system, observability, observer, stabilization

S. Ammar; M. A. Hammami; H. Jerbi; J. C. Vivalda

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - asynchronous optical sampling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

monitoring method for NRZ-DPSK signals using asynchronous delay tap sampling... the photodiode (PD). The asynchronous sampling processes occur after the optical-electrical...

423

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

424

Sampling procedure for atmospheric geothermal brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic and chemical changes can alter the characteristics of geothermal brine samples significantly. A procedure which minimizes these changes has been developed for sampling atmospheric geothermal brines. The method is fast with minimal cooling and yields representative samples which have been stabilized to preserve their integrity. The procedure provides reliable suspended solids data and both the solid and liquid samples are suitable for elemental analysis. The procedure is also a valuable tool to aid in monitoring a geothermal brine conditioning system. Data are included from a flow test at an MCR Geothermal well in the Imperial Valley area of California to illustrate the utility of the sampling procedure.

Kochelek, J.T.; Zienty, D.F.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Sample sizes for confidence limits for reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We recently performed an evaluation of the implications of a reduced stockpile of nuclear weapons for surveillance to support estimates of reliability. We found that one technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under-estimates the required sample size for systems-level testing. For a large population the discrepancy is not important, but for a small population it is important. We found that another technique used by SNL provides the correct required sample size. For systems-level testing of nuclear weapons, samples are selected without replacement, and the hypergeometric probability distribution applies. Both of the SNL techniques focus on samples without defects from sampling without replacement. We generalized the second SNL technique to cases with defects in the sample. We created a computer program in Mathematica to automate the calculation of confidence for reliability. We also evaluated sampling with replacement where the binomial probability distribution applies.

Darby, John L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C. [Southwest Research Institute (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Iron-Nitride-Based Magnets: Synthesis and Phase Stabilization of Body Center Tetragonal (BCT) Metastable Fe-N Anisotropic Nanocomposite Magnet- A Path to Fabricate Rare Earth Free Magnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: The University of Minnesota will develop an early stage prototype of an iron-nitride permanent magnet material for EVs and renewable power generators. This new material, comprised entirely of low-cost and abundant resources, has the potential to demonstrate the highest energy potential of any magnet to date. This project will provide the basis for an entirely new class of rare-earth-free magnets capable of generating power without costly and scarce rare earth materials. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate a prototype with magnetic properties exceeding state-of-the-art commercial magnets.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Uncertainty and sampling issues in tank characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A defensible characterization strategy must recognize that uncertainties are inherent in any measurement or estimate of interest and must employ statistical methods for quantifying and managing those uncertainties. Estimates of risk and therefore key decisions must incorporate knowledge about uncertainty. This report focuses statistical methods that should be employed to ensure confident decision making and appropriate management of uncertainty. Sampling is a major source of uncertainty that deserves special consideration in the tank characterization strategy. The question of whether sampling will ever provide the reliable information needed to resolve safety issues is explored. The issue of sample representativeness must be resolved before sample information is reliable. Representativeness is a relative term but can be defined in terms of bias and precision. Currently, precision can be quantified and managed through an effective sampling and statistical analysis program. Quantifying bias is more difficult and is not being addressed under the current sampling strategies. Bias could be bounded by (1) employing new sampling methods that can obtain samples from other areas in the tanks, (2) putting in new risers on some worst case tanks and comparing the results from existing risers with new risers, or (3) sampling tanks through risers under which no disturbance or activity has previously occurred. With some bound on bias and estimates of precision, various sampling strategies could be determined and shown to be either cost-effective or infeasible.

Liebetrau, A.M.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Kashporenko, D.M. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

430

Commercialization of New Lattice-Matched Multi-Junction Solar Cells Based on Dilute Nitrides: July 8, 2010 - March 7, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Technical Progress Report for PV Incubator subcontract NAT-0-99013-03. The overall objective of this Incubator subcontract was to complete the work necessary to make commercial ready solar cells using the dilute nitride technology. The specific objectives of this program were aimed at completing the development of a triple-junction solar cell that incorporates a GaInNAs {approx}1eV subcell to the point of commercial readiness, and determining the cell reliability and, if necessary, identifying and eliminating process or material related issues that lead to early-life cell failures. There were three major objectives for Phase 1, each of which focuses on a key element of the solar cell that determines its performance in a commercial CPV system. One objective was to optimize the quality and performance of the key individual components making up the solar cell structure and then to optimize the integration of these components into a complete triple-junction cell. A second objective was to design and test anti-reflective coating that maximizes the light coupled into a 3J cell with a {approx}1 eV bottom cell bandgap. The third objective was to develop Highly Accelerated Life Tests (HALT) protocols and tools for identifying and correcting potential reliability problems. The Phase 2 objectives were a continuation of the work begun in Phase 1 but aimed at optimizing cell performance for commercial requirements. Phase 2 had four primary objectives: (1) develop a glass-matched anti-reflective coating (ARC) and optimize the cell/ARC to give good performance at 60C operating temperature, (2) optimize the cell for good operation at 60C and high concentration, and (3) complete the light biased HALT system and use it to determine what, if any, failures are observed, and (4) determine the reliability limits of the optimized cell.

Herb, J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

SNS Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment Operations Group SNS Sample Environment Operations Group from left to right: (left to right): Bekki Mills, Mark Loguillo, Saad Elorfi, Randy Sexton, Leland Robbins, Matt Rucker, Cory Fletcher, Todd Sherline, Hans-Jochen Lauter, Ken Kroll The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research

432

Sample Environment Equipment Categories - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › Sample Environment Sample Environment: Categories of Equipment All Ancillary Equipment Auto Changer Closed Cycle Refrigerators Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Bottom Loading Closed Cycle Refrigerators - Top Loading Furnaces Gas Handling Gas Panel High Pressure Systems Liquid Helium Cryostats Magnet Systems Other Special Environments Sample Cell Sample Stick Ultra Low Temperature Devices Sample Environment: by Beam Line All BL-11A-POWGEN BL-11B-MANDI BL-12-TOPAZ BL-13-Fundamental Neutron Physics Beam Line BL-14A-BL-14A BL-14B-HYSPEC BL-15-Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) BL-16B-VISION BL-17-SEQUOIA BL-18-ARCS BL-1A-TOF-USANS BL-1B-NOMAD BL-2-BASIS BL-3-SNAP BL-4A-Magnetism Reflectometer BL-4B-Liquids Reflectometer BL-5-Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) BL-6-EQ-SANS

433

Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Sample Desorption/Ionization From Mesoporous Silica Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Supported mesoporous silica was prepared by coating an ethanolic silicate solution having a removable surfactant onto a substrate to produce a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. The surfactant was chosen to provide a desired pore size between about 1 nanometer diameter and 50 nanometers diameter. Removal of the surfactant resulted in a mesoporous silica thin

434

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

435

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

436

100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

437

Techniques for geothermal liquid sampling and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed that is particularly suited to liquid-dominated resources and adaptable to a variety of situations. It is intended to be a base methodology upon which variations can be made to meet specific needs or situations. The approach consists of recording flow conditions at the time of sampling, a specific insertable probe sampling system, a sample stabilization procedure, commercially available laboratory instruments, and data quality check procedures.

Kindle, C.H.; Woodruff, E.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - azido compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

n Use of 4,4 6,6-tetra(azido... )azo-1,3,5-triazine and 3,6-di(azido)-1,2,4,5- tetrazine to prepare carbon nitrides and nano... Cells Capabilities: High-nitrogen compound...

439

Density Measurements of Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Density Measurements of Argonne Premium Coal Samples ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ... Constitution of Illinois No. 6 Argonne Premium Coal: A Review ...

He Huang; Keyu Wang; David M. Bodily; V. J. Hucka

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Sample Template1 PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sample Template1 PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE INSERT TITLE HERE PON-XX-XXX http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts/index ........................................................................................................12 Stage One: Administrative and Completeness Screening

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

PolyChord: nested sampling for cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PolyChord is a novel nested sampling algorithm tailored for high dimensional parameter spaces. In addition, it can fully exploit a hierarchy of parameter speeds such as is found in CosmoMC and CAMB. It utilises slice sampling at each iteration to sample within the hard likelihood constraint of nested sampling. It can identify and evolve separate modes of a posterior semi-independently and is parallelised using openMPI. PolyChord is available for download at: http://ccpforge.cse.rl.ac.uk/gf/project/polychord/

Handley, W J; Lasenby, A N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

Fleischhauer, H.L.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Suppression of Ge-O And Ge-N Bonding at Ge-HfO(2) And Ge-TiO(2) Interfaces By Deposition Onto Plasma-Nitrided Passivated Ge Substrates: Integration Issues Ge Gate Stacks Into Advanced Devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of changes in nano-scale morphology of thin films of nano-crystalline transition metal (TM) elemental oxides, HfO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}, on plasma-nitrided Ge(100) substrates, and Si(100) substrates with ultra-thin (-0.8 nm) plasma-nitrided Si suboxide, SiO{sub x}, x < 2, or SiON interfacial layers is presented. Near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAS) has been used to determine nano-scale morphology of these films by Jahn-Teller distortion removal of band edge d-state degeneracies. These results identify a new and novel application for NEXAS based on the resonant character of the respective O K{sub 1} and N K{sub 1} edge absorptions. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the integration issues for the introduction of this Ge breakthrough into advanced semiconductor circuits and systems. This includes a comparison of nano-crystalline and non-crystalline dielectrics, as well as issues relative to metal gates.

Lee, S.; Long, J.P.; Lucovsky, G.; Whitten, J.; Seo, H.; Luning, J.

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

444

EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1989 data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1989 indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the analytical and sampling techniques that were used to measure them. During 1989, the occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that we measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. The 1989 annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites were lower than those previously reported during the last decade. Possible changes in the atmospheric production of {sup 7}Be, variations in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, as well as modifications to our sampling procedure many all have contributed to this observed trend. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. These short-term fluctuations probably resulted from variations in meteorological factors. The data from our quality control samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable for their intended application.

Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental protection Program,'' and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.'' The sampling methods are described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, DOE/RL-91-50, Rev.2, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland, Washington. This document contains the CY1999 schedules for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes the sampling location, sample type, and analyses to be performed on the sample. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 1999 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. In addition, a map is included for each media showing approximate sampling locations.

LE Bisping

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

447

Surface-Related Mercury in Lunar Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...selenium content of these samples was determined by measurement of neutron induced 81Se. The samples were from the Camp Century area of the Greenland ice sheet (77 10'N and 61 07'W) and from a virgin area 80 km east southeast of this location...

G. W. Reed; J. A. Goleb; S. Jovanovic

1971-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a patent for a disc-type, four-port sampling valve for service with erosive high temperature process streams. Inserts and liners of ..cap alpha..-silicon carbide respectively, in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities, limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation. 1 fig.

Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

1984-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

449

Final Report BW Sample Collection& Preparation Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop the technique needed to prepare a field collected sample for laboratory analysis and build a portable integrated biological detection instrument with new miniaturized and automated sample purification capabilities. The device will prepare bacterial spores, bacterial vegetative cells, and viral particles for PCR amplification.

Koopman, R P; Belgrader, P; Meyer, G; Benett, W J; Richards, J B; Hadley, D R; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms New Sampling Methods for Airborne Microorganisms Speaker(s): Klaus Willeke Date: February 27, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Klaus Willeke and his international team of engineers, physicists, microbiologists, industrial hygienists and environmental scientists have worked for about 15 years on the development of new methods for sampling airborne microorganisms. The following topics will be highlighted: long-term bioaerosol sampling into liquid by swirling air motion ("Biosampler"); personal aerosol sampling with low wind sensitivity and highfilter deposit uniformity ("Button Aerosol Sampler"); collection of microorganisms by electrostatic means; source testing as a predictor for microorganism release from surfaces; particle concentrating from large air

451

Inspection/Sampling Schedule | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inspection/Sampling Schedule Inspection/Sampling Schedule Inspection/Sampling Schedule Site Inspection and Water Sampling Schedules Note: The following schedules are subject to change without prior notice and will be updated periodically. Site Name Inspection Date Sampling Week Ambrosia Lake, NM, Disposal Site August 18, 2014 November 20, 2013 Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site August 18, 2014 November 20, 2013 January 28, 2014 May 12, 2014 Boiling Nuclear Superheater (BONUS), PR, Decommissioned Reactor Site Next event 2017 Burrell, PA, Disposal Site December 9, 2013 November 20, 2013 Canonsburg, PA, Disposal Site December 9, 2013 November 19, 2013 Durango, CO, Disposal Site May 19, 2014 June 2, 2014 Durango, CO, Processing Site N/A June 2, 2014 September 1, 2014 Edgemont, SD, Disposal Site June 23, 2014 N/A

452

Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving radioactive samples will be reviewed by the APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC). The review will be on a graded basis. Hence, the experimenters are strongly advised to send in the experiment proposal in detail at least 2 months before the expected scheduled date of the experiment. Previously approved containment, isotopes and weights can be submitted as late as 2 weeks in advance. If your ESAF was submitted less than seven (7) days in advance of its scheduled start date you may be delayed to allow time for a safety review. The following guidelines are to be followed for all experiments with

453

East Mountain Area 1995 air sampling results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ambient air samples were taken at two locations in the East Mountain Area in conjunction with thermal testing at the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS). The samples were taken to provide measurements of particulate matter with a diameter less than or equal to 10 micrometers (PM{sub 10}) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report summarizes the results of the sampling performed in 1995. The results from small-scale testing performed to determine the potentially produced air pollutants in the thermal tests are included in this report. Analytical results indicate few samples produced measurable concentrations of pollutants believed to be produced by thermal testing. Recommendations for future air sampling in the East Mountain Area are also noted.

Deola, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Air Quality Dept.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Green Button Sample from Texas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

from Texas Green Button Sample from Texas These files contain sample Green Button data from two example households in Texas. Unlike the California sample data, these customers...

455

Category:Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling page? For detailed information on Surface Water Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Surface Water Sampling Add.png Add a new Surface...

456

Analysis of a small sample geometry for concurrent identification and quantification of mixed-nuclide samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An easier way to perform a complete radionuclide analysis was investigated for this thesis. Complex chemical separations are not always possible or practical in preparation for counting a sample, especially a very small sample, on several different...

Krieger, Kenneth Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - ancient geologic samples Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geologic samples Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ancient Life Nebraska Unit Kim Vogt Hastings Middle School, Hastings, Nebraska Summary: at the environments we can look at samples of...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive importance sampling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liu, Fan Wang, Gagan Agrawal Summary: Adaptive Stratified Sampling for Data Mining on the Deep Web Tantan Liu, Fan Wang, Gagan Agrawal... a->Y - Adaptive sampling: more data are...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic microbial samples Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

functional changes of macroinvertebrates and microbial communities in response to resuspension of contaminated sediment Summary: by sampling macroinvertebrates and microbial...

460

Sample Environment at SNAP | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Environment at SNAP Sample Mass Calculator Bulk Modulus (GPa) Density (g/cm3) Volume (mm3) Sample Mass Needed (mg) Custom Values NaCl 24.4 2.17 87.1 171.888 MnO 148.0 5.37 87.1 354.256 V 160.0 6.00 87.1 388.104 CoO 180.0 6.44 87.1 402.766 Bi 31.0 9.78 87.1 767.770 Sample Geometry Click below for illustration of sample shapes for use in the Paris-Edinburgh press Volume (mm3) Double-toroid, encapsulated 16.8 Double-toroid, non-encapsulated 31.1 Single-toroid, encapsulated 55.5 Single-toroid, non-encapsulated 87.1 Graphite furnace 68.1 If you see NaN in the "Sample Mass Needed (mg)" field, then one of your entries probably contains non-numeric data or is not a valid number, for example, entering 3.9.0 (double decimal points)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program: and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The sampling design is described in the Operations Office, Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland DOE/RL-91-50, Rev.2, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland, Washington. This document contains the CY 2000 schedules for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sample types, and analyses to be performed. In some cases, samples are scheduled on a rotating basis and may not be collected in 2000 in which case the anticipated year for collection is provided. In addition, a map showing approximate sampling locations is included for each media scheduled for collection.

LE Bisping

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Vapor and gas sampling of Single-Shell Tank 241-T-111 using the vapor sampling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents sampling data resulting from the January 20, 1995, sampling of SST 241-T-111 using the vapor sampling system.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-BY-112 using the vapor sampling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents sampling data from the November 18, 1994, sampling of SST 241-BY-112 using the vapor sampling system.

Caprio, G.S.

1995-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Soil Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Soil Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Soil Gas Sampling...

466

Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Flux Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Flux Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Flux Sampling...

467

Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole fluid sampling is typically performed to monitor water quality, study recharge and flow in groundwater systems, and evaluate resource potential of geothermal reservoirs. Analysis of both the liquid and gas fractions of the reservoir fluid allows for detailed characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of the subsurface hydrothermal system. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

469

Definition: Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Various methods are applied to obtain samples used for determination of the composition of gases present in soils or hydrothermal discharges. The flux of volatile gases emitted from a hydrothermal system can also be determined by measuring the flow of gases at specific locations and comparing it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can provide an indication of hydrothermal activity at depth that is otherwise not apparent. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

470

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Chemical & Sample Prep  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical & Sample Preparation Chemical & Sample Preparation For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Chemical and Sample Preparation Laboratory responsible: Monika Hartl | hartl@lanl.gov | 505.665.2375 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: Leilani Conradson | leilani@lanl.gov | 505.665.9505 Chemistry Laboratories High-Pressure Laboratory X-ray Laboratory Spectroscopy Laboratory Clean Room Glove box - He atmosphere High-purity water Diamond anvils Rotating anode generators (reflectometry, residual stress, powder diffraction) Zeiss microscope (with fluorescence abilities) Tube and box furnaces Ultrasonic bath ZAP-cell (for in situ diffraction at high P) Infrared spectrometer Brewster angle microscope

471

Fusion of images on affine sampling grids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a method for combining multiple images of a common object assuming two-dimensional (2D) affine transformations between the image sampling grids. Our method is based upon the...

Granrath, Douglas; Lersch, James

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Experimental analysis of municipal solid waste samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the analysis of municipal solid waste consolidation, large-scale devices are usually used to measure the compression and hydraulic conductivity parameters. The use of those devices is justified due to difficulties in probing undisturbed samples...

Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

474

Form:SampleForm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SampleForm Jump to: navigation, search Input the name of a Test Page below. If the resource already exists, you will be able to edit its information. AddEdit a Test Page The text...

475

Sample Plan of Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Sample Plan of DevelopmentLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2001 Legal Citation Not provided DOI...

476

Generalized Sampling-Based Feedback Motion Planners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

states. In the deterministic robotics motion planning community, sampling based algorithms like probabilistic roadmaps (PRM) and rapidly exploring random trees (RRTs) have been successful in solving very high dimensional deterministic problem. However...

Kumar, Sandip

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Microsoft Word - JWS Sample.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 SAMPLE ONLY REV2_02/10/05 SAMPLE ONLY Joint Work Statement For CRADA No. Sample BETWEEN U. S. Department of Energy Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center AND Partner Name Project Name 1. Purpose 2. Scope A. TASKS: B. FINAL REPORT: At the end of the project, in accordance with Article XII of the CRADA, RMOTC and the Participant will jointly prepare a final report. 3. Personnel A. RMOTC will provide the following personnel: B. Partner will provide the following personnel: Page 2 of 7 SAMPLE ONLY REV2_02/10/05 4. Equipment A. RMOTC will provide the following equipment: B. Partner will provide the following equipment: 5. Materials A. RMOTC will provide the following materials: B. Partner will provide the following materials:

478

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Littleton, CO 80127 #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 SAMPLING Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By: Date: Sally Cuffin Project Quality Assurance Manager New Horizons...................................................................................................................................3 2.5 Decision Rules

479

Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehens...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive protein characterization of pathogenic systems. Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive...

480

A study of bioaerosol sampling cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF BIOAEROSOL SAMPLING CYCLONES A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE MONCLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 2004 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A STUDY OF BIOAEROSOL SAMPLING CYCLONES A Thesis by BRANDON WAYNE MONCLA Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Moncla, Brandon Wayne

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitride ingan samples" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling Network Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Mauna Loa, Hawaii Mauna Loa weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Barrow, Alaska American Samoa South Pole Daily average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Kumukahi Christmas Island Baring Head Kermadec Island La Jolla Pier La Jolla Pier weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples PDF Documentation available as Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S, (NDP-001a) For information on calibration and some additional literature, go to

482

On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Analytical instrument with apparatus for sample concentrating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for analysis of trace concentrations of contaminants in air includes a portable liquid chromatograph and a preconcentrator for the contaminants to be analyzed. The preconcentrator includes a sample bag having an inlet valve and an outlet valve for collecting an air sample. When the sample is collected the sample bag is connected in series with a sorbing apparatus in a recirculation loop. The sorbing apparatus has an inner gas-permeable container containing a sorbent material and an outer gas-impermeable container. The sample is circulated through the outer container and around the inner container for trapping and preconcentrating the contaminants in the sorbent material. The sorbent material may be a liquid having the same composition as the mobile phase of the chromatograph for direct injection thereinto. Alternatively, the sorbent material may be a porous, solid body, to which mobile phase liquid is added after preconcentration of the contaminants for dissolving the contaminants, the liquid solution then being withdrawn for injection into the chromatograph.

Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Sample Based Unit Liter Dose Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Waste Characterization Program has taken many core samples, grab samples, and auger samples from the single-shell and double-shell tanks during the past 10 years. Consequently, the amount of sample data available has increased, both in terms of quantity of sample results and the number of tanks characterized. More and better data is available than when the current radiological and toxicological source terms used in the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (FDH 1999) and the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (FDH 1999) were developed. The Nuclear Safety and Licensing (NS&L) organization wants to use the new data to upgrade the radiological and toxicological source terms used in the BIO and FSAR. The NS and L organization requested assistance in developing a statistically based process for developing the source terms. This report describes the statistical techniques used and the assumptions made to support the development of a new radiological source term for liquid and solid wastes stored in single-shell and double-shell tanks.

JENSEN, L.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

POWGEN Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample Environment Sample Environment PAC Helium fill station for cans. PAC PAC stands for Powgen Automatic Changer. This is the second generation sample changer that was developed for POWGEN. The changer has a carousal that holds a maximum of 24 sample-filled vanadium cans and collects data in a temperature range of 10 to 300 K. The cool down temperature from room temperature to 10 K is 45 minutes. However, samples can be changed at 10 K, which takes about 20 minutes. PAC cans The OD (outer diameter) for the V part is 6.3, 7.86 and 9.42 mm The ID (inner diameter) for these to be 5.9, 7.46 and 9.02mm ILL Furnace ILL can ILL can for high temp The traditional ILL furnace built with vanadium heating elements is available for high-temperature measurements from room temperature to 1100°C. Cooling to 200°C takes 3-4 hours from highest temperature, and

486

Template:SampleTemplate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Template Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Template:SampleTemplate Jump to: navigation, search This is the SampleTemplate template. It is designed for use by Sample Pages. To define a test page, please use this form. Parameters Awesomeness - The numeric level of awesomeness that your test page will achieve. Topics - Topics this page discusses. (semicolon delimited) Note: References for the above parameters are generated automatically by the ReferenceForValue template and can be seen using the ShowRefFieldsButton. Dependencies Template:Cite Template:ReferenceForValue Widget:ShowRefFieldsButton Usage It should be invoked using the corresponding form.

487

Sample Project Execution Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sample Project Execution Plan Sample Project Execution Plan Sample Project Execution Plan The project execution plan (PEP) is the governing document that establishes the means to execute, monitor, and control projects. The plan serves as the main communication vehicle to ensure that everyone is aware and knowledgeable of project objectives and how they will be accomplished. The plan is the primary agreement between Headquarters and the federal project director and a preliminary plan should be developed and approved at Critical Decision-1. Project objectives are derived from the mission needs statement, and an integrated project team assists in development of the PEP. The plan is a living document and should be updated to describe current and future processes and procedures, such as integrating safety

488

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.