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1

Reactivity of tributyl phosphate degradation products with nitric acid: Relevance to the Tomsk-7 accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of a degraded tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent with nitric acid is thought to have caused the chemical explosion at the Tomsk-7 reprocessing plant at Tomsk, Russia in 1993. The estimated temperature of the organic layer was not high eneough to cause significant reaction of nitric acid with TBP or hydrocarbon diluent compounds. A more reactive organic compound was likely present in the organic layer that reacted with sufficient heat generation to raise the temperature to the point where an autocatalytic oxidation of the organic solvent was initiated. Two of the most likely reactive compounds that are present in degraded TBP solvents are n-butanol and n-butyl nitrate. The reactions of these compounds with nitric acid are the subject of this study. The objective of laboratory-scale tests was to identify chemical reactions that occur when n-butanol and n-butyl nitrate contact heated nitric acid solutions. Reaction products were identified and quantitified, the temperatures at which these reactions occur and heats of reaction were measured, and reaction variables (temperature, nitric acid concentration, organic concentration, and reaction time) were evaluated. Data showed that n-butyl nitrate is less reactive than n-butanol. An essentially complete oxidation reaction of n-butanol at 110-120 C produced four major reaction products. Mass spectrometry identified the major inorganic oxidation products for both n-butanol and n-butyl nitrate as nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. Calculated heats of reaction for n-butanol and n-butyl nitrate to form propionic acid, a major reaction product, are -1860 cal/g n-butanol and -953 cal/g n-butyl nitrate. These heats of reaction are significant and could have raised the temperature of the organic layer in the Tomsk-7 tank to the point where autocatalytic oxidation of other organic compounds present resulted in an explosion.

Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis for Online Monitoring of Dibutyl Phosphate Degradation Product in Tributyl Phosphate/n-Dodecane/Nitric Acid Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In liquid–liquid extraction separation processes, accumulation of organic solvent degradation products is detrimental to the process robustness, and frequent solvent analysis is warranted. Our research explores the feasibility of online monitoring of the organic solvents relevant to used nuclear fuel reprocessing. This paper describes the first phase of developing a system for monitoring the tributyl phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane solvent commonly used to separate used nuclear fuel. In this investigation, the effect of extraction of nitric acid from aqueous solutions of variable concentrations on the quantification of TBP and its major degradation product dibutylphosphoric acid (HDBP) was assessed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to discriminate between HDBP and TBP in the nitric acid-containing TBP/n-dodecane solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitated the development of regression models for HDBP and TBP quantification in real time, enabling online implementation of the monitoring system. The predictive regression models were validated using TBP/n-dodecane solvent samples subjected to high-dose external ?-irradiation. The predictive models were translated to flow conditions using a hollow fiber FTIR probe installed in a centrifugal contactor extraction apparatus, demonstrating the applicability of the FTIR technique coupled with multivariate analysis for the online monitoring of the organic solvent degradation products.

Tatiana G. Levitskaia; James M. Peterson; Emily L. Campbell; Amanda J. Casella; Dean R. Peterman; Samuel A. Bryan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis for Online Monitoring of Dibutyl Phosphate Degradation Product in Tributyl Phosphate /n-Dodecane/Nitric Acid Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In liquid-liquid extraction separation processes, accumulation of organic solvent degradation products is detrimental to the process robustness and frequent solvent analysis is warranted. Our research explores feasibility of online monitoring of the organic solvents relevant to used nuclear fuel reprocessing. This paper describes the first phase of developing a system for monitoring the tributyl phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane solvent commonly used to separate used nuclear fuel. In this investigation, the effect of extraction of nitric acid from aqueous solutions of variable concentrations on the quantification of TBP and its major degradation product dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) was assessed. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to discriminate between HDBP and TBP in the nitric acid-containing TBP/n-dodecane solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitated the development of regression models for HDBP and TBP quantification in real time, enabling online implementation of the monitoring system. The predictive regression models were validated using TBP/n-dodecane solvent samples subjected to the high dose external gamma irradiation. The predictive models were translated to flow conditions using a hollow fiber FTIR probe installed in a centrifugal contactor extraction apparatus demonstrating the applicability of the FTIR technique coupled with multivariate analysis for the online monitoring of the organic solvent degradation products.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Campbell, Emily L.; Casella, Amanda J.; Peterman, Dean; Bryan, Samuel A.

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

4

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Howerton, W.B.; Pruett, D.J.

1982-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying wet scavenging processes in aircraft observations of nitric acid and cloud condensation indicator for quantifying wet scavenging. Specifically, nitric acid (HNO3), produced as a by-product of combustion, is highly soluble and removed efficiently from clouds by rain. Regional carbon monoxide (CO

Palmer, Paul

6

A Pulse Radiolysis Investigation of the Reactions of Tributyl Phosphate with the Radical Products of Aqueous Nitric Acid Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is the most common organic compound used in liquid-liquid separations for the recovery of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium from acidic nuclear fuel dissolutions. The goal of these processes is to extract the actinides while leaving fission products in the acidic, aqueous, phase. However, the radiolytic degradation of TBP has been shown to reduce the separation factors for fission products, and to impede the back-extraction of the actinides during stripping. As most previous investigations of the radiation chemistry of TBP have focused on steady state radiolysis and stable product identification, with dibutylphosphoric acid (HDBP) invariably being the major product, here we have determined room temperature rate constants for the reactions TBP and HDBP with the hydroxyl radical ((5.00 +/- 0.02) x 109, (4.40 +/- 0.10) x 109), hydrogen atom ((1.8 +/- 0.2) x 108, (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 108), nitrate radical ((4.3 +/- 0.7) x 106, (2.9 +/- 0.2) x 106) and nitrite radical (< 2 x 105, < 2 x 105) M-1 s-1 with TBP and HDBP, respectively. These data are used to discuss the mechanism of TBP radical-induced degradation.

Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen R. Mezyk; Leigh R. Martin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Removal of fluoride from aqueous nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods for removing fluoride from aqueous nitric acid were investigated and compared with the frequently used aluminum nitrate-calcium nitrate (Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/) chemical trap-distillation system. Zirconium oxynitrate solutions were found to be superior in preventing volatilization of fluoride during distillation of the nitric acid, producing decontamination factors (DFs) on the order of 2 x 10/sup 3/ (vs approx. 500 for the Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/ system). Several other metal nitrate systems were tested, but they were less effective. Alumina and zirconia columns proved highly effective in removing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ vapors distilled through the columns; fluoride DFs on the order of 10/sup 6/ and 10/sup 4/, respectively, were obtained. A silica gel column was very effective in adsorbing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ solutions, producing a fluoride DF of approx. 10/sup 4/.

Pruett, D.J.; Howerton, W.B.; Mailen, J.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EFFECTS OF NITRIC ACID ON CRITICALITY SAFETY ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As nitric acid molarity is increased, there are two competing phenomena affecting the reactivity of the system. First, there is interaction between each of the 10 wells in the basket-like insert. As the molarity of the nitric acid solution is increased (it moves from 100% water to 100% HNO{sub 3}), the hydrogen atom density decreases by about 80%. However, it remains a relatively efficient moderator. The moderating ratio of nitric acid is about 90% that of water. As the media between the wells is changed from 100% water to 100% nitric acid, the density of the media increases by 50%. A higher density typically leads to a better reflector. However, when the macroscopic scattering cross sections are considered, nitric acid is a much worse reflector than water. The effectiveness of nitric acid as a reflector is about 40% that of water. Since the media between the wells become a worse reflector and still remains an effective moderator, interaction between the wells increases. This phenomenon will cause reactivity to increase as nitric acid molarity increases. The seond phenomenon is due to the moderating ratio changing in the high concentration fissile-nitric acid solution in the 10 wells. Since the wells contain relatively small volumes of high concentration solutions, a small decrease in moderating power has a large effect on reactivity. This is due to the fact that neutrons are more likely to escape the high concentration fissile solution before causing another fission event. The result of this phenomenon is that as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases. Recent studies have shown that the second phenomenon is indeed the dominating force in determining reactivity changes in relation to nitric acid molarity changes. When considering the system as a whole, as nitric acid molarity increases, reactivity decreases.

Williamson, B.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chemistry of tributyl phosphate and nitric acid at constant volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the reaction of tributyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The reaction pressure of TBP/HNO{sub 3} mixtures as a function of time was measured under constant volume. A simplified model, which parametrically includes autocatalysis, was used to plot the total gas production of the reaction as a function of time. Comparison of the functions shows a rough equivalence in the induction time, reaction time, and total gas production. Predictions of the amounts of reaction products as a function of time were made based on assumptions regarding autocatalysis and using rate constants from experimental data. The derived reaction mechanisms and experimental results have several implications. Tests with a large amount of venting and high surface to volume ratio will show very different behavior than tests with increasing confinement and low surface to volume ratios. The amount alkyl nitrate, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen that reacts within the organic phase is limited by their solubilities and volatilities. The overall yield of both heat and gas per mol of nitric acid or TBP will vary significantly depending on the amount of solution, free volume, and vessel vent capacity.

Agnew, S.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Morris, J.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

Spencer, B.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Control of nitric acid plant stack opacity during start-up and shutdown  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an improvement in a process for the production of nitric acid wherein air and ammonia are mixed and combusted in an ammonia burner to produce an effluent containing nitrogen oxides. The effluent is cooled, condensed and separated into a liquid weak acid stream and gas stream. The liquid weak acid and vapor streams are fed into an absorber tower wherein they are countercurrently contacted with water to produce a nitric acid stream and an overhead with a reduced nitrogen oxides content. The overhead is combusted with a fuel in the presence of a catalyst in a catalytic combustor to produce a combustor exhaust, work expanded in an expander to recover energy and vented to the atmosphere as stack exhaust. The improvement involves controlling the opacity of the stack opacity during shutdown of the process.

Adams, J.B.; Gasper, J.A.; Stash, P.J.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mercury-free dissolution of aluminum-clad fuel in nitric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury-free dissolution process for aluminum involves placing the aluminum in a dissolver vessel in contact with nitric acid-fluoboric acid mixture at an elevated temperature. By maintaining a continuous flow of the acid mixture through the dissolver vessel, an effluent containing aluminum nitrate, nitric acid, fluoboric acid and other dissolved components are removed. 5 figs.

Christian, J.D.; Anderson, P.A.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mercury-free dissolution of aluminum-clad fuel in nitric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury-free dissolution process for aluminum involves placing the aluminum in a dissolver vessel in contact with nitric acid-fluoboric acid mixture at an elevated temperature. By maintaining a continuous flow of the acid mixture through the dissolver vessel, an effluent containing aluminum nitrate, nitric acid, fluoboric acid and other dissolved components are removed.

Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Philip A. (Pocatello, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Extraction of antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate. I. Tributyl phosphate-antimony(III)-nitric acid system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data have been reported concerning the extraction of trivalent antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate (TBP). A possible mechanism for the extraction of antimony(III) has been determined and the (pre)concentration constant for the process has been calculated. The effect of temperature on trivalent antimony extraction has also been evaluated. The enthalpy value and standard isobar potential and entropy for this process have been determined.

Lakaev, V.S.; Smelov, V.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Extraction of antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate. II. Tributyl phosphate-antimony(V)-nitric acid system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extraction of pentavalent antimony from nitric acid solutions using tributyl phosphate has been investigated. A possible mechanism for the extraction of antimony(V) has been determined and the (pre)concentration constant for the process has been calculated. The composition of the extracted antimony(V) complex has been deduced. A negative effect of temperature on the distribution coefficient for antimony(V) has also been demonstrated.

Lakaev, V.S.; Smelov, V.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO{sub x} vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180{degrees}C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200{degrees}C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time.

Pierce, R.A.; Smith, J.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

FY13 GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATIONS OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SIMULANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility flowsheet to replace formic acid with glycolic acid in order to improve processing cycle times and decrease by approximately 100x the production of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Processing Cell since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the safety significant gas chromatographs and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, eliminating the use of formic acid is highly desirable. Previous testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with glycolic acid allows the reduction and removal of mercury without significant catalytic hydrogen generation. Five back-to-back Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycles and four back-to-back Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were successful in demonstrating the viability of the nitric/glycolic acid flowsheet. The testing was completed in FY13 to determine the impact of process heels (approximately 25% of the material is left behind after transfers). In addition, back-to-back experiments might identify longer-term processing problems. The testing was designed to be prototypic by including sludge simulant, Actinide Removal Product simulant, nitric acid, glycolic acid, and Strip Effluent simulant containing Next Generation Solvent in the SRAT processing and SRAT product simulant, decontamination frit slurry, and process frit slurry in the SME processing. A heel was produced in the first cycle and each subsequent cycle utilized the remaining heel from the previous cycle. Lower SRAT purges were utilized due to the low hydrogen generation. Design basis addition rates and boilup rates were used so the processing time was shorter than current processing rates.

Lambert, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Best, D.

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of Steam Heating of a Two-Layer TBP/N-Paraffin/Nitric Acid Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of steam heating of a two-layer tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin-nitric acid mixture.The purpose of this study is to determine if the degree of mixing provided by the steam jet or by bubbles generated by the TBP/nitric acid reaction is sufficient to prevent a runaway reaction.

Laurinat, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hassan, N.M.; Rudisill, T.S.; Askew, N.M.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

Green, J.R.

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effect of the TBP and Water on the Complexation of Uranyl Nitrate and the Dissolution of Nitric Acid into Supercritical CO2. A Theoretical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started from "random" mixtures of water, TBP, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate, complexation of uranyl to dissolve nitric acid in the supercritical phase. Indeed, without TBP, nitric acid alone self aggregates via containing the acid and uranyl salts. The simulations show that a high TBP/nitric acid ratio is needed

Boyer, Edmond

23

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. III. IR spectra of scandium extracts from concentrated nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing scandium or scandium-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. Extracted complex contains 3, 4, or 5 nitric acid molecules per Sc atom in the case of extraction from 8.3, 10.9, and 12.2 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively, and corresponds to the formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP. Nitric acid molecules are incorporated into extracted complex via H-bond between oxygen atom of coordinated nitrate ion and acid proton.

Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Features of gadolinium and ytterbium extraction by tributyl phosphate from concentrated nitric acid solutions. I. Compositions of extracted complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distribution of macroquantity (0.3-1.3 M) of Gd and Yb between neat tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and 5-12 M nitric acid solutions has been studied. The species extracted by TBP from 7-12 M nitric acid solutions are rare-earth metal (REM) nitrate trisolvates containing one or several nitric molecules.

Nikitna, G.P.; Seredkina, N.V.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Amino acids, polyamines, and nitric oxide synthesis in the ovine conceptus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to determine concentrations of amino acids and polyamines as well as nitric oxide (NO) and polyamine synthesis in the ovine conceptus (embryo/fetal and associated placental membrane). Ewes were hysterectomized...

Kwon, Hyuk Jung

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned nitric acid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plants... In addition to the natural processes that form small amounts of nitric acid in rainwater, high-temperature air... combustion, such as occurs in car engines and power...

27

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ferraro, J.R.; Katzin, L.I. Temp Data Storage 3: Argonne...

28

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current...

29

Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for TBP/HNO{sub 3} solutions at ambient pressure and temperatures above 100{degrees}C. Carbon and nitrogen balances were performed giving the reaction stoichiometry. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems which included mass lost from the reacting system by evaporation. This mathematical model was fit to the experimental data (including the measured net heat and off-gas rate) gathered over a wide range of conditions. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup -1} at 110{degrees}C for an open {open_quotes}vented{close_quotes} system as compared to >1E-3min{sup -1} in a closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced due to a decrease in dissolved oxidants and an inefficient reduction of HNO{sub 3}. Oxidation in the organic phase was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water.

Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 ± 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 ± 0.20 and averaged 1.18 ± 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

Oji, L.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Third phase formation in nitric acid extraction by n-octyl(phenyl)-n,n-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third phase formation was studied as a function of n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) concentrations and temperature in the extraction of nitric acid. The concentration fractions of CMPO and TBP in the second and the third phases were determined by gas chromatography. Both CMPO and TBP were found to be enriched in the third phase. The concentrations of nitric acid in the second and the third phases relatively agreed with the calculated concentrations based on the extraction equilibrium constants of nitric acid by CMPO and TBP. The extraction of Np with the third phase formation was also discussed. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Nagasaki, S.; Wisnubroto, D.S.; Enokida, Y.; Suzuki, A. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

Nash, C

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

MATERIAL COMPATIBILITY EVALUATION FOR DWPF NITRIC-GLYCOLIC ACID - LITERATURE REVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid. The reported corrosion rates and degradation characteristics have shown the following for the materials of construction. ? For C276 alloy, the primary material of construction for the CPC vessels, corrosion rates of either 2 or 20 mpy were reported up to a temperature of 93 ?C. ? For the austenitic stainless steels, 304L and 316L, variable rates were reported over a range of temperatures, varying from 2 mpy up to 200 mpy (at 100 ?C). ? For 690, G30, Allcorr, Ultimet and Stellite alloys no data were available. ? For relevant polymers where data are available, the data suggests that exposure to glycolic acid is not detrimental. The literature data had limited application to the DWPF process since only the storage and feed vessels, pumps and piping used to handle the glycolic acid are directly covered by the available data. These components are either 304L or 316L alloys for which the literature data is inconsistent (See Bullet 2 above). Corrosion rates in pure glycolic acid solutions also are not representative of the DWPF process streams. This stream is complex and contains aggressive species, i.e. chlorides, sulfates, mercury, as well as antifoaming agents which cumulatively have an unknown effect on the corrosion rates of the materials of construction. Therefore, testing is recommended to investigate any synergistic effects of the aggressive species and to verify the performance of materials in the key process vessels as well as downstream vessels and processes such as the evaporator where heating is occurring. The following testing would provide data for establishing the viability of these components. ? Electrochemical testing - evaluate the corrosion rate and susceptibility to localized corrosion within the SRAT, SME, OGCT, Quencher and Evaporator. Testing would be conducted at operational temperatures in simulants with ranges of glycolic acid, iron, chloride, sulfate, mercury, and antifoaming agents. ? Hot-wall testing – evaluate the corrosion under heat transfer conditions to simulate those for heating coils and evaporator coil surfaces. Testing would be at nominal chemistries with concentration of glycolic acid, chloride, sulfate and mercury at high expected concentrations. Some tests would be performed with antifoaming agents. ? Melter coupon testing – evaluate the performance of alloy 690 in melter feeds containing glycolic acid. This testing would be conducted as part of the melter flammability testing. ? Polymer testing – evaluate changes in polymer properties in immersion testing with DWPF simulants to provide product-specific data for service life evaluation and analyze the Hansen solubility parameters for relevant polymers in glycolic vs. formic acid. During this literature review process, the difficulties associated with measuring the liquid level in formic acid tanks were revealed. A test is recommended to resolve this issue prior to the introduction of glycolic acid into the DWPF. This testing would evaluate the feasibility of using ultrasonic inspection techniques to determine liquid level and other desirable attributes of glycolic acid in DWPF storage tanks and related equipment.

Mickalonis, J.; Skidmore, E.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

Oleic AcidDependent Modulation of NITRIC OXIDE ASSOCIATED1 Protein Levels Regulates Nitric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Agriculture­Agricultural Research Service, Washington State University, Prosser, Washington 99350 acid, which induces anti-inflammatory effects (Denys et al., 2001). FAs also serve as alarm molecules also regulate salt, drought, and heavy metal tolerance as well as wounding-induced responses

Kachroo, Pradeep

37

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO[sub 2]. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement. 2 figs.

Balazs, G.B.; Chiba, Z.; Lewis, P.R.; Nelson, N.; Steward, G.A.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO.sub.2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement.

Balazs, G. Bryan (Livermore, CA); Chiba, Zoher (Moraga, CA); Lewis, Patricia R. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Norvell (Palo Alto, CA); Steward, G. Anthony (Los Altos Hills, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A thermodynamic model of nitric acid extraction by tri-n-butyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model is presented for nitric acid extraction by tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). This model is based on the formation of the organic phase species: TBP.HNO/sub 3/ and (TBP)/sub 2/.HNO/sub 3/. The model works successfully at TBP concentrations of 5 to 100 vol% and was found to be effective at predicting the extraction of HNO/sub 3/ from HNO/sub 3//NaNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3//LiNO/sub 3/ solutions. Within the TBP concentration range of 5 to 30%, a single set of extraction constants was sufficient to fit extraction data. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of nitric acid in HNO/sub 3//NaNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3//LiNO/sub 3/ mixtures were calculated using a model developed by Bromley.

Chaiko, D.J.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. I. Scandium extraction isotherms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of scandium distribution between neat tributyl phosphate (TBP) and 0.2-1.2 M scandium solutions in 2.7-12.3 M nitric acid. Scandium extracts in equilibrium with 0.2-1 M Sc in 6-12 M HNO{sub 3} contain from 2 to 5 HNO{sub 3} molecules per scandium atom in extracted Sc complex.

Listopadov, A.A.; Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Influence of uranium on corrosion of stainless steel in solutions of fluoride in nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steels corrode rapidly in solutions of fluoride in nitric acid; the higher the fluoride ion content, the more intense is the corrosion. The activating effect of the fluoride ions mainly reduces to dissolution of the oxide films. Small amounts somewhat retard the cathodic reduction of HNO/sub 3/. In this report the authors provide the results of an investigation of the influence of uranium ions on the corrosion-electrochemical behavior of stainless steel 12Kh18N10T in solutions of up to 10 moles/liter of HNO/sub 3/, with fluoride ions up to 0.1 mole/liter. The authors conclude that the retardation of corrosion of stainless steel by uranium, zirconium and aluminum ions in solutions of fluorides in nitric acid is mainly due to the formation of strong complexes of these metals with fluorine ions, leading to a reduction of the number of free HF molecules in the solution. The stronger the complex of metal with fluorine, the higher the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a solution of fluoride in nitric acid.

Kurtenov, M.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a review of the H-Canyon authorization basis, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) staff members questioned the margin of safety associated with a postulated tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid runaway reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a canyon tank containing greater than 3000 lbs (1362 kg) of TBP. The margin of safety was partially based on experiments and calculations performed by the Actinide Technology Section (ATS) to support deletion of indication of tank agitation as a Safety Class System. In the technical basis for deletion of this system, ATS personnel conservatively calculated the equilibrium temperature distribution of a canyon tank containing TBP and nitric acid layers which were inadvertently heated by a steam jet left on following a transfer. The maximum calculated temperature (128 degrees C) was compared to the minimum initiation temperature for a runaway reaction (greater than 130 degrees C) documented by experimental work in the mid 195 0s. In this work, the initiation temperature as a function of nitric acid concentration was measured for 0 and 20 wt percent dissolved solids. The DNFSB staff members were concerned that data for 0 wt percent dissolved solids were not conservative given the facts that data for 20 wt percent dissolved solids show initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees C and H-Canyon solutions normally contained a small amount of dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL WITH MATRIX SIMULANTS AND SUPERNATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current DWPF flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the CPC since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT and QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

How Nitric Acid Overcame Its Fear of Water | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPA addresses EMF BNitric Acid

46

Sorption of uranium from nitric acid solution using TBP-impregnated activated carbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of extraction chromatography has been used to study the sorption of uranium from nitric acid solutions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) impregnated activated carbons. Batch equilibrium data and kinetic and breakthrough column behavior of uranium are reported. Wood based activated carbon has shown better capacity and breakthrough characteristics than shell based activated carbon. Sorption rate on impregnated carbons was relatively slow indicating that diffusion is the rate controlling step within the pore structure of the activated carbon. Uranium distribution on impregnated activated carbons is compared with equivalent bulk liquid extraction and a mechanism of uranium sorption is discussed.

Abbasi, W.A. [Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Islamabad (Pakistan). Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology; Streat, M. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nitric Oxide Production from Surface Recombination of Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hypersonic reentry vehicles. In the Earth's atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen atoms are generated in the shock1 Nitric Oxide Production from Surface Recombination of Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms Dusan A. Pejakovi from the recombination of oxygen and nitrogen atoms on quartz. The experiments employ two-photon laser

Martín, Pino

48

Effect of temperature on the extraction of nitric acid and plutonium(IV) nitrate with 30 vol% tributyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author's own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model equations and examples of the dependence in the absence and presence of uranium(VI) are given. Taking infinite dilution of all solutes of the system as a standard state, the enthalpy change of the extraction reaction could be estimated as -17 kJ/mol for nitric acid, but no numerical estimate was possible for plutonium(IV).

Kolarik, Z.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Features of gadolinium and ytterbium extraction by tributyl phosphate from concentrated nitric acid solutions. II. IR spectra of lanthanide extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1.8 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing Gd or Yb or lanthanide-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. It was shown that under these conditions lanthanides are extracted as complex trisolvates Ln(NO{sub 3})9{sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP with m = 3-6. Nitric acid molecules are H-bonded to oxygen atoms of coordinated nitrate ions and do not substitute TBP molecules in coordination sphere of the metal ion.

Nikitina, G.P.; Seredkina, N.V.; Kistopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Separation of uranium from nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions with extractant-coated magnetic microparticles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D{sub 2}EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions. The results suggest that a synergistic interaction between the particle surface and solvent coating may explain why the particles display, in some cases, orders of magnitude of higher partitioning coefficients than are estimated from solvent-extraction measurements. Particles coated with TBP and those coated with a combination of TOPO and D{sub 2}EHPA displayed the most desirable characteristics for removing uranium from dilute acid environments typical of contaminated groundwater. Uranium separation from moderate to highly acidic waste streams typical of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear wastes is best accomplished using particles coated with a combination of CMPO and TBP.

Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.; Chemical Engineering

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

Hyder, M.L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nitric Acid Deposition following an Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Event is below Critical Loads for Terrestrial and Freshwater Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitric acid rainout is one of the effects of an astrophysical ionizing radiation event. The predicted values of nitrate rainout from previous work for a typical gamma ray burst (GRB) within our galaxy serve as an extreme example and are shown to be below critical loads of eutrophication and acidification for ecoregions in Europe and the US.

Melott, Ben Neuenswander Adrian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a review of the safety basis for solvent extraction processes at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a question was raised concerning the safety margin associated with a postulated accident involving a runaway tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a tank. The safety margin was based on studies which showed the maximum temperature would not exceed 128 degrees Celsius compared to 130 degrees Celsius, the minimum initiation temperature for runaway reaction established in the 1950's following damaging incidents at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The reviewers were concerned the minimum temperature was not conservative since data for solutions containing 20 wt percent dissolved solids showed initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees Celsius and process solutions normally contain some dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurement of Nitric Oxide Production from Lymphatic Entothelial Cells Under Mechanical Stimuli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT OF NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION FROM LYMPHATIC ENDOTHELIAL CELLS UNDER MECHANICAL STIMULI A Thesis by MOHAMMAD JAFARNEJAD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Engineering Copyright 2012 Mohammad Jafarnejad ii ABSTRACT The lymphatic system plays an important role in fluid and protein balance within the interstitial spaces. Its dysfunction could result in a number of debilitating diseases, namely...

Jafarnejad, Mohammad 1987-

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

Extraction equilibria between organic CMPO-n-dodecane and aqueous nitric acid phases for selected tank waste components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of the transuranium elements from tank-stored wastes is an important step in the cost effective treatment and preparation of these wastes for permanent disposal. One promising method of treatment involves dissolving the tank sludges in acid, followed by extraction of the transuranium species. The TRUEX process, which uses an extracting medium composed of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in an organic solvent such as n-dodecane, is being tested for this purpose. Although CMPO is a powerful extractant for all the actinides, concern arises that certain process chemicals present in the waste will compete for the CMPO. Data will be presented on the pure component equilibrium characteristics of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate and bismuth nitrate partitioned between a nitric acid aqueous phase and a CMPO-n-dodecane organic phase.

Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Counce, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

60

Amides as phase modifiers for N,N{prime}-tetraalkylmalonamide extraction of actinides and lanthanides from nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The N,N{prime}-tetraalkylmalonamides are a class of compounds under development for transuranic (TRU) separations under high nitric acid conditions. There are several issues that challenge the further development of these ligands. One is the development of improved synthetic procedures that lend themselves to commercial scale-up. Another major issue is the third-phase formation that occurs when the N,N{prime}-tetraalkylmalonamides are contacted with medium-to-high nitric acid concentrations in hydrocarbon solvents. To address the synthesis issue, the authors have developed a new synthetic approach for preparing these materials. Third-phase formation can be eliminated by addition of diluent modifiers such as tributylphosphate (TBP). TBP is inappropriate if a nonphosphate-containing process stream is required. Amides have been proposed as alternatives for TBP in a variety of applications because of their ease of synthesis and the variety of substituents that can be generated. The authors have been able to develop an amide phase-modified system that extends the working process range of alkylinalonamides (0.5 M) in dodecane: from 3.5 M to 7.5 M nitric acid and in Isopar H (branched hydrocarbon) from 4.0 M to 10.0 M nitric acid using 1.0 M di-2-ethylhexylacetamide/0.5 M alkylmalonamide. The Kd values were comparable to extraction with alkylinalonamide in Isopar H or hydrogenated tetrapropylene (TPH) solvents. The overall extraction system was more robust than the phase-uninodified system allowing for greater temperature and acid concentration fluctuations without third-phase formation.

Smith, B.F.; Wilson, K.V.; Gibson, R.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Mineral Dust Particles with Nitric Acid. A Combined CCSEM/EDX, ESEM AND ICP-MS Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The heterogeneous chemistry of individual dust particles from four authentic dust samples with gas-phase nitric acid was investigated in this study. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic behavior of mineral dust particles reacted with nitric acid. Differences in the reactivity of mineral dust particles from these four different dust source regions with nitric acid were observed. Mineral dust from source regions containing high levels of calcium, namely China loess dust and Saudi coastal dust, were found to react to the greatest extent.

Laskin, Alexander; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

62

Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately} 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The effect of fluoride and aluminum on the anion exchange of plutonium from nitric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anion exchange in nitric acid is a prominent aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure nuclear materials. This process is sensitive to fluoride ion, which complexes plutonium in competition with the anionic nitrato complex that is strongly sorbed on the anion exchange column. Fluoride interference traditionally has been counteracted by adding a masking agent, such as aluminum, that forms competing complexes with fluoride. The interfering effect of fluoride is known to be a function not only of the fluoride-to-aluminum ratio but also of the fluoride-to-plutonium ratio. This report summarizes a Los Alamos study of the effect of 25 fluoride-aluminum-plutonium conmbinations on the anion exchange sorption of plutonium. Five aluminum-to-plutonium ratios ranging from 0.10 to 10 were each evaluated at five fluoride-to-aluminum ratios that ranged from 0 to 6. The fluoride-to-plutonium ratio has a greater influence on plutonium sorption than does the fluoride-to-aluminum ratio. Aluminum was less effective as a masking agent than had been assumed, because measurable fluoride interference occurred at all levels of added aluminum.

Marsh, S.F.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dissolution of plutonium oxide in nitric acid at high hydrofluoric acid concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissolution of plutonium dioxide in nitirc acid (HNO/sub 3/) at high hydrofluoric acid (HF) concentrations has been investigated. Dissolution rate curves were obtained using 12M HNO/sub 3/ and HF at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 1.0 molar. The dissolution rate increased with HF concentration up to 0.2M and then decreased at higher concentrations. There was very little plutonium dissolved at 0.7 and 1.0M HF because of the formation of insoluble PuF/sub 4/. Various oxidizing agents were added to 12M HNO/sub 3/-1M HF dissolvent to oxidize Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) and prevent the formation of PuF/sub 4/. Ceric (Ce(IV)) and silver (Ag(II)) ions were the most effective in dissolving PuO/sub 2/. Although these two oxidants greatly increased the dissolution rate, the rates were not as rapid as those obtained with 12M HNO/sub 3/-0.2M HF.

Kazanjian, A.R.; Stevens, J.R.

1984-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mercury extraction by the TRUEX process solvent: I. Kinetics, extractable species, dependence on nitric acid concentration and stoichiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury extraction from acidic aqueous solutions by the TRUEX process solvent (0.2 M CMPO, 1.4 M TBP in n-dodecane) has not extensively been examined. Research at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant is currently in progress to evaluate the TRUEX process for actinide removal from several acidic waste streams, including liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW), which contains significant quantities of mercury. Preliminary experiments were performed involving the extraction of Hg{sup 203}, added as HgCl{sub 2}, from 0.01 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solutions. Mercury distribution coefficients (D{sub Hg}) range between 3 and 60 from 0.01 M to 2 M HNO{sub 3}. At higher nitric acid concentrations, i.e. 5 M HNO{sub 3} or greater, D{sub Hg} significantly decreases to values less than 1. These results indicate mercury is extracted from acidic solutions {<=}{approximately}2 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with nitric acid solutions {>=}{approximately}5 M HNO{sub 3}. Experimental results indicate the extractable species is HgCl{sub 2} from nitrate media, i.e., chloride must be present in the nitrate feed to extract mercury. Extractions from Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solutions indicated substantially reduced distribution ratios, typically D{sub Hg}< 1, for the range of nitric acid concentrations examined (0.01 to 8 M HNO{sub 3}). Extraction of mercury, as HgCl{sub 2}, by the individual components of the TRUEX solvent was also examined from 2 M HNO{sub 3}. The diluent, n-dodecane, does not measurably extract mercury. With a 1.4 M TBP/n-dodecane solvent, D{sub Hg} {approximately}3.4 compared with D{sub Hg} {approximately}7 for the TRUEX solvent. Classical slope analysis techniques were utilized to evaluate the stoichiometric coefficients of Hg extraction independently for both CMPO and TBP.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effect of temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI) from nitric acid by tri-n-amyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been carried out on the effect of temperature on the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium by tri-n-amyl phosphate/n-dodecane, measured as a function of the extractant concentration and aqueous phase acidity. The results indicate that the extraction is exothermic as in the case of tri-n-butyl phosphate. From the data available an effort has been made to calculate the equilibrium constant, the Gibbs energy change and the entropy changes of the extraction reaction. 21 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Sood, D.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)]|[BARC, Mumbai (India)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Extraction and recovery of plutonium and americium from nitric acid waste solutions by the TRUEX process - continuing development studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done to date on the application of the TRUEX solvent extraction process for removing and separately recovering plutonium and americium from a nitric acid waste solution containing these elements, uranium, and a complement of inert metal ions. This simulated waste stream is typical of a raffinate from a tributyl phosphate (TBP)-based solvent extraction process for removing uranium and plutonium from dissolved plutonium-containing metallurgical scrap. The TRUEX process solvent in these experiments was a solution of TBP and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in carbon tetrachloride. A flowsheet was designed on the basis of measured batch distribution ratios to reduce the TRU content of the solidified raffinate to less than or equal to 10 nCi/g and was tested in a countercurrent experiment performed in a 14-stage Argonne-model centrifugal contractor. The process solvent was recycled without cleanup. An unexpectedly high evaporative loss of CCl/sub 4/ resulted in concentration of the active extractant, CMPO, to nearly 0.30M in the solvent. Results are consistent with this higher CMPO concentration. The raffinate contained only 2 nCi/g of TRU, but the higher CMPO concentration resulted in reduced effectiveness in the stripping of americium from the solvent. Conditions can be easily adjusted to give high yields and good separation of americium and plutonium. Experimental studies of the hydrolytic and gamma-radiolytic degradation of the TRUEX-CCl/sub 4/ showed that solvent degradation would be (1) minimal for a year of processing this typical feed, which contained no fission products, and (2) could be explained almost entirely by hydrolytic and radiolytic damage to TBP. Even for gross amounts of solvent damage, scrubbing with aqueous sodium carbonate solution restored the original americium extraction and stripping capability of the solvent. 43 refs., 5 figs., 36 tabs.

Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kalina, D.G.; Fischer, D.F.; Bane, R.W.; Burris, L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarisia, R.; Diamond, H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Succinic acid production by Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, succinic acid has been produced commercially by chemical processes. Recently, however, fermentative of bacteria produce succinic acid as a fermentation end product,4 7 few species can produce it as the major 10 Previous studies showed that A. succiniciproducens produces succinic acid and acetic acid

69

Nitric oxide donors prevent while the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME increases arachidonic acid plus CYP2E1-dependent toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) play an important role in alcohol-induced liver injury. AA promotes toxicity in rat hepatocytes with high levels of cytochrome P4502E1 and in HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1. Nitric oxide (NO) participates in the regulation of various cell activities as well as in cytotoxic events. NO may act as a protectant against cytotoxic stress or may enhance cytotoxicity when produced at elevated concentrations. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effect of endogenously or exogenously produced NO on AA toxicity in liver cells with high expression of CYP2E1 and assess possible mechanisms for its actions. Pyrazole-induced rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells expressing CYP2E1 were treated with AA in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase L-N {sup G}-Nitroarginine Methylester (L-NAME) or the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), and (Z)-1-[-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-aminoethyl)]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NONO). AA decreased cell viability from 100% to 48 {+-} 6% after treatment for 48 h. In the presence of L-NAME, viability was further lowered to 23 {+-} 5%, while, SNAP or DETA-NONO increased viability to 66 {+-} 8 or 71 {+-} 6%. The L-NAME potentiated toxicity was primarily necrotic in nature. L-NAME did not affect CYP2E1 activity or CYP2E1 content. SNAP significantly lowered CYP2E1 activity but not protein. AA treatment increased lipid peroxidation and lowered GSH levels. L-NAME potentiated while SNAP prevented these changes. Thus, L-NAME increased, while NO donors decreased AA-induced oxidative stress. Antioxidants prevented the L-NAME potentiation of AA toxicity. Damage to mitochondria by AA was shown by a decline in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). L-NAME potentiated this decline in MMP in association with its increase in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. NO donors decreased this decline in MMP in association with their decrease in AA-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. These results indicate that NO can be hepatoprotective against CYP2E1-dependent toxicity, preventing AA-induced oxidative stress.

Wu Defeng [Department of Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Box 1603, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Cederbaum, Arthur [Department of Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Box 1603, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)]. E-mail: arthur.cederbaum@mssm.edu

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Solvent Extraction Behavior of Neptunium (IV) Ions between Nitric Acid and Diluted 30% Tri-butyl Phosphate in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping tetravalent actinide ions such as Np(IV) and Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Np(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have now been accumulated and trends established. Stability constants for aceto-hydroxamate complexes of Np(IV) and Np(V) ions have also been determined in a perchlorate medium, and these reaffirm the affinity of hydroxamate ligands for actinide (IV) ions over actinyl (V,VI) ions.

Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.; May, Iain

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

Suppression of manganese-dependent production of nitric oxide in astrocytes: implications for therapeutic modulation of glial-derived inflammatory mediators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary cultured astrocytes were treated with Mn in the absence and presence of proinflammatory cytokines to determine their effect upon stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) production. Treatments of manganese and cytokines raised NO production...

Wright, Tyler T.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. II. Interaction of Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP with nitric acid in organic solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scandium nitrate solvates Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}qTBP (TBP is tributyl phosphate, q = 3.15, 2.57, and 1.58) were synthesized, and their IR spectra were measured. Model solutions of Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP in CCl{sub 4} containing nitric acid with Sc:HNO{sub 3} molar ratios 1:1 to 1:3 and 1:7 were prepared, and their IR spectra were also measured. The spectra indicate formation of complexes with formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP (m = 1-7) through H-bonding of medium strength. In complexes with m = 1-2, nitric acid molecules are presumably bonded to oxygen atoms of nitrate groups coordinated to scandium. The R{sub O{hor_ellipsis}O} distance in these complexes was estimated for the H-bond as 2.68 {angstrom}.

Nikitina, G.P.; Papkov, K.B.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Synergistic selective extraction of actinides(III) over lanthanides from nitric acid using new aromatic diorganyldithiophosphinic acids and neutral organophosphorus compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New aromatic dithiophosphinic acids (R{sub 2}PSSH) with R = C{sub 6}H{sub 5{sup {minus}}}, ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}}, FC{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}} and CH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}} were synthesized, characterized and tested as potential separating agents for trivalent actinides over lanthanides. The extraction of Am(III), Eu(III) and other lanthanides was carried out from nitric acid medium with mixtures of R{sub 2}PSSHs and neutral organophosphorus compounds. There was no detectable extraction when R{sub 2}PSSHs were used alone as extractants for either Am(III) or Eu(III) (D{sub Am,Eu} < 10{sup {minus}3}) under the experimental conditions used in this study. High separation factors (D{sub Am}/D{sub Eu} > 20) with D{sub Am} > 1 were achieved in the nitric acid range 0.1--1 mol/L by means of a synergistic mixture of bis(chlorophenyl)dithiophosphinic acid + tributylphosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or tributylphosphine oxide (TBPO). The high radiation resistance (up to 10{sup 6} Gy absorbed {gamma}-doses) of the extractants was also demonstrated.

Modolo, G.; Odoj, R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Comparative evaluation of DHDECMP (dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-methylphosphonate) and CMPO (octylphenyl-N,N,-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide) as extractants for recovering actinides from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain neutral, bifunctional organophosphorous compounds are of special value to the nuclear industry. Dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbomoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and octylphenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) are highly selective extractants for removing actinide and lanthanide elements from nitric acid. We obtained these two extractants from newly available commercial sources and evaluated them for recovering Am(III), Pu(IV), and U(VI) from nitric acid waste streams of plutonium processing operations. Variables included the extractant (DHSECMP or CMPO), extractant/tributylphosphate ratio, diluent, nitrate concentration, nitrate salt/nitric acid ratio, fluoride concentration, and contact time. Based on these experimental data, we selected DHDECMP as the perferred extractant for this application. 18 refs., 30 figs.

Marsh, S.F.; Yarbro, S.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Visualization of nitric oxide production in the mouse main olfactory bulb by a cell-trappable copper(II) fluorescent probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the visualization of NO production using fluorescence in tissue slices of the mouse main olfactory bulb. This discovery was possible through the use of a novel, cell-trappable probe for intracellular nitric oxide ...

McQuade, Lindsey E.

77

Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Exposed To Nitric Acid -Chloride Environments D.G. Kolman, D.K. Ford, D.P. Butt, and T.O. Nelson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of 304 Stainless Steel Exposed To Nitric Acid - Chloride Environments D.G. Kolman, D.K. Ford, D.P. Butt, and T.O. Nelson Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory Los AlamosCl, and temperature on the general corrosion behavior of 304 stainless steel (SS), electrochemical studies were

78

Safety of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and nitric acid solutions in two-phase systems at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the prevention of self-accelerating oxidation of nitric acid and tributyl phosphate (TBP). An accident of this type, which occurred at Tomsk-7, Russia, in 1993, resulted from a slow chemical reaction occurring initially at sub-boiling temperatures. The accumulating heat and vapors overpressurized and burst a process tank. Two safety issues are addressed in this summary of experimental data: circumstances under which convection or radiation cooling of vessels will exceed reaction heat, and measures which can prevent or mitigate such reactions. Heat generations rates have been found to range widely. Thermodynamic calculations confirm that heat generation is reduced by a large factor when nitrogen oxides are able to escape from the reaction mixure. Scoping calculations show that the evaporation of water is potentially the most effective mechanism for heat removal in a large vessel, and experiments have demonstrated that water evaporation is effective for preventing runaway reactions in a vented, two-phase system operated below about 120 C. These data indicate that venting is the key to controlling runaway reactions. However, other experiments have indicated that the self-heating reaction did not present a danger, even if reaction heating led to an accelerating reaction, in a sufficiently vented system. To determine how much venting was required, experiments were performed with pure organic phase and two-phase TBP-nitric acid mixtures. Data show a critical ratio of organic mass to vent area, above which the reacting system can reach potentially dangerous pressures. Experiments show runaway reactions occurring in vented systems only as the temperature approaches 130 C. These results clearly indicate that adequate venting of vessels containing heated TBP and nitrate is the key to controlling their reaction.

Hyder, M.L.; Paddleford, D.F.; Thompson, M.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Studies on reaction runaways for Urex/Purex solvent-nitric acid and red-oil synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In PUREX/UREX processes for recycling of spent nuclear fuels, 30% TBP solvent is used, This solvent has a small solubility in the aqueous phase. During concentration of the process solutions by an evaporation route, a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid is initiated at above 130 deg. C, leading to rapid pressurization and finally containment failure if proper venting is not provided. Red oil was synthesized for the first time in India, and its physical properties as well as thermodynamic parameters for the reaction were determined. It was experimentally established that the presence of metallic nitrates was not essential for red-oil formation as thought earlier. Various experiments have been completed for single-phase as well as two-phase runs. The most important finding of this work was lowering of the limiting acid concentration from the conventional values. In fact, in these experiments, red oil could be formed even at 2 N aqueous acidity. Thus, safety guidelines based on the classical literature are obsolete. New guidelines for the red-oil-safety are required. (authors)

Kumar, Shekhar; Kumar, Rajnish; Koganti, S.B. [Reprocessing R and D Division, Reprocessing Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

THERMODYNAMICS OF EXTRACTION OF NITRIC ACID BY TRI-n-BUTYL PHOSPHATE--HYDROCARBON DILUENT SOLUTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mean act ivi ty coefficient T of TBP and TBP.H20 i n the acid-free, water-saturated organic phase

Wallace Davis

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

K Basin Sludge Conditioning Testing Nitric Acid Dissolution Testing of K East Area Sludge Composite, Small- and Large-Scale Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to support the development of the K Basin Sludge Treatment System. For this work, testing was performed to examine the dissolution behavior of a K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite, referred to as K East area sludge composite, in nitric acid at the following concentrations: 2 M, 4 M, 6 M and 7.8 M. With the exception of one high solids loading test the nitric acid was added at 4X the stoichiometric requirement (assuming 100% of the sludge was uranium metal). The dissolution tests were conducted at boiling temperatures for 24 hours. Most of the tests were conducted with {approximately}2.5 g of sludge (dry basis). The high solids loading test was conducted with {approximately}7 g of sludge. A large-scale dissolution test was conducted with 26.5 g of sludge and 620 mL of 6 M nitric acid. The objectives of this test were to (1) generate a sufficient quantity of acid-insoluble residual solids for use in leaching studies, and (2) examine the dissolution behavior of the sludge composite at a larger scale.

Carlson, C.D.; Delegard, C.H.; Burgeson, I.E.; Schmidt, A.J.; Silvers, K.L.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark, E-mail: mark.deridder@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Metabolic Flux Analysis for Succinic Acid Production by Recombinant Escherichia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Samuelov et al., 1991). Escherichia coli produces several metabolic products by fermentation: acetic acid the final succinic acid concentration obtained was 9.5 g/L and the ratio of succinic acid to acetic acid being expended on the production of succinic acid by microbial fermentation using renewable feedstocks

87

acid inhibits production: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Animals excrete three main nitrogen products, ammonia, urea and uric acid (Fig. 1), as well as some and amino acids. The term ammonia...

88

Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the Fermentation; accepted 13 July 2000 Abstract: Succinic acid was produced by fermentation of Anaerobiospirillum-product acetic acid. The gram ratio of suc- cinic acid to acetic acid was 25.8:1, which is 6.5 times higher than

89

{open_quotes}Open vessel{close_quotes} heat balance for TBP-nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat balances were performed for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} solutions at temperatures above 100{degrees}C. The balance included the heat produced from oxidation minus losses from evaporation and butylnitrate formation by esterification. Net heat measurements were performed using an isothermal calorimeter. Losses from evaporation were determined from the volume of condensate produced (ice bath trap) and the component concentrate Carbon and nitrogen balances were performed to determine the stoichiometry of the reaction. The heat from oxidation was then calculated using the heats of formation of the reactants and products. Balances were obtained assuming that the heat from esterification was near zero (negligibly small). For two layered reaction systems the net heat was maintained endothermic, and constant with time, due to the transport of water to the organic phase by bubble mixing at the interface. This transported was replaced the water lost in the organic phase by evaporation.

Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.; Laurinat, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

Ohlrogge, John B. (Okemos, MI); Cahoon, Edgar B. (Lansing, MI); Shanklin, John (Upton, NY); Somerville, Christopher R. (Okemos, MI)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Naphthenic acid corrosion in synthetic fuels production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serious corrosion damage to carbon steel piping in a fractionation unit associated with synthetic fuels production has been ascribed to the presence of naphthenic acids. Investigation of the problem revealed total acids numbers (TAN) ranging from 8--12mg KOH/g in the feed to the unit. Damage typically occurred in the temperature range 180--240 C and manifested as localized pitting, preferential weld corrosion, general wall thinning and end-grain attack. Filming amine corrosion inhibitors designed for refinery overhead systems have been proven ineffective and high temperature phosphate-based inhibitors could not be used due to potential catalyst poisoning in downstream refinery units. Coupon exposures indicated corrosion rates in the order of 2 mm/y on carbon steel in a reboiler line as well as pitting to austenitic stainless steel type UNS S30403. Line replacement in austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 has been proven effective. The performance of this alloy is mainly ascribed to its molybdenum content. The absence of sulfur in the feed to the unit is also contributing to the alloy performance despite the extremely high total acid numbers.

Bruyn, H.I. de [Mossgas Ltd., Mossel Bay (South Africa)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Salt Effect Model for Aqueous Solubility of TBP in a 5 to 100% TBP/n-Dodecane-Nitric Acid-Water Biphasic System at 298.2 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubilities of nonelectrolytes in aqueous electrolyte solutions have traditionally been modeled by using the Setschenow equation for salt effect. The aqueous solubility of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) during operating conditions of the Purex process is an important parameter for safety considerations. Use of the Setschenow equation for aqueous solubility of TBP under limited conditions has been reported in the literature. However, there is no general model available to account for the presence of the diluent and for the case of multicomponent electrolyte solutions in which only some electrolytes are solvated and extracted by TBP. An extended salt effect model is proposed for predicting the aqueous solubility of TBP in a 5 to 100% TBP/n-dodecane-nitric acid-water biphasic system at 298.2 K. The literature data on TBP solubility were correlated to aqueous acid concentration, diluent concentration in the solvents, and an interaction parameter for electrolytic solutes (extracted or not extracted by TBP)

Kumar, Shekhar; Koganti, Sudhir Babu [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (India)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

acid production plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . - ,, ,,, , -,, . 12;Volatile fatty acids (VIA), produced mainly from fermentation of carbohydrates in the ration of carbohydrates and the production of VFA have not...

95

amino acid production: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of energy requirements for milk production. The protein deficiency was alleviated by infusion Bequette, Brian J. 2 METHODS TO DETERMINE AMINO ACID DIGESTIBILITY IN CiteSeer...

96

Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80 lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002

97

Modeling of the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with tri-n-butyl phosphate. Application to extraction operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model developed for the equilibrium HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-diluent is the basis of the computation of distribution isotherms. The isotherms are used to study the influence of TBP concentration on two chosen operation parameters, distribution coefficients and number of theoretical stages, for the selected flow sheets. It is established that an increase in TBP concentration leads to a decrease in the number of theoretical stages for the extraction flow sheets but to their increase for the striping flow sheets. Given diagrams can be used to determine the efficiency of extraction processes. Agreement with available literature calculations on the number of theoretical stages supports the use of the model in the computation of distribution isotherms, of the system quoted above, in a wide range of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and TBP concentrations.

Comor, J.J.; Tolic, A.S.; Kopecni, M.M.; Petkovic, D.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.] [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced phagocytosis of cultured microglia via nitric oxide production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is a central nervous system complication with a high mortality rate, which is increased significantly by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (DCF). In the present study, we investigated the effects of DCF on brain immune cells (i.e. microglia) stimulated with three proinflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-1?, and interferon-?. Similar to previous findings in astrocytes, all three cytokines induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), as well as NO production, in microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system augmented iNOS expression and NO production. Immunocytochemical analysis and the phagocytosis assay revealed that cytokine treatment induced morphological changes to and phagocytosis by the microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system enhanced microglial activation, as well as the phagocytic activity of cytokine-stimulated microglia. Inhibitors of nuclear factor (NF)-?B inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated microglia with or without DCF, suggesting that the NF-?B pathway is one of the main signaling pathways involved. The iNOS inhibitor N{sup G}-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) reduced both cytokine-induced phagocytosis and phagocytosis induced by the combination of cytokines plus DCF. Furthermore, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside induced phagocytosis, indicating that NO production is a key regulator of microglial phagocytosis. In conclusion, DCF acts synergistically with proinflammatory cytokines to increase the production of NO in microglia, leading to phagocytic activity of the activated microglia. These findings, together with previous observations regarding astrocytes, may explain the significant increase in mortality of IAE patients treated with DCF. - Highlights: ? Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is associated with a high mortality rate. ? Hyperimmunization in the brain is believed to be responsible for IAE. ? The use of diclofenac sodium (DCF) increases the mortality of IAE. ? DCF enhances the cytokine-induced phagocytosis of microglia, brain immune cells. ? DCF-enhanced activation of microglia may explain the greater mortality rate of IAE.

Kakita, Hiroki [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Aoyama, Mineyoshi, E-mail: ao.mine@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Asai, Hayato [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Hussein, Mohamed Hamed [Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo 11559 (Egypt); Maternal and Child Health Department, VACSERA, 51 Wizaret El-Zeraa-Agouza, Giza 22311 (Egypt); Suzuki, Mieko [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Kato, Shin [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Saitoh, Shinji [Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Improvement of D-glucaric acid production in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D-glucaric acid is a naturally occurring compound which has been explored for a plethora of potential uses, including biopolymer production, cancer and diabetes treatment, cholesterol reduction, and as a replacement for ...

Shiue, Eric Chun-Jen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Materials and methods for efficient lactic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides derivatives of Escherichia coli constructed for the production of lactic acid. The transformed E. coli of the invention are prepared by deleting the genes that encode competing pathways followed by a growth-based selection for mutants with improved performance. These transformed E. coli are useful for providing an increased supply of lactic acid for use in food and industrial applications.

Zhou, Shengde; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Yomano, Lorraine; Grabar, Tammy B; Moore, Jonathan C

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Materials and methods for efficient lactic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides derivatives of ethanologenic Escherichia coli K011 constructed for the production of lactic acid. The transformed E. coli of the invention are prepared by deleting the genes that encode competing pathways followed by a growth-based selection for mutants with improved performance. These transformed E. coli are useful for providing an increased supply of lactic acid for use in food and industrial applications.

Zhou, Shengde (Sycamore, IL); Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Shanmugam, Keelnatham T. (Gainesville, FL); Yomano, Lorraine (Gainesville, FL); Grabar, Tammy B. (Gainesville, FL); Moore, Jonathan C. (Gainesville, FL)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient nitric oxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxides (NOx)." Other nitrogen oxides include nitrous acid and nitric acid. While... . Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of a group of highly reactive gasses known...

103

Mechanism of Nitric Oxide Reactivity and Fluorescence Enhancement of the NO-Specific Probe CuFL1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanism of the reaction of CuFL1 (FL1 = 2-{2-chloro-6-hydroxy-5-[(2-methylquinolin-8-ylamino)methyl]-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl}benzoic acid) with nitric oxide (NO) to form the N-nitrosated product FL1-NO in buffered ...

McQuade, Lindsey E.

104

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention related to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rat of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 ..mu..moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 ..mu..moles m1/sup /-/1/ hr/sup /-/1/. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of the strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.; Quinby, H.L.

1987-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rate of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 .mu.moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 .mu.moles ml.sup.-1 hr.sup.-1. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland (Wading River, NY); Chendrayan, Krishnachetty (Coimbatore Tamil Nadu, IN); Quinby, Helen L. (Cambridge, MD)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microbial reverse-electrodialysis chemical-production cell for acid and alkali production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial reverse-electrodialysis chemical-production cell for acid and alkali production Xiuping Accepted 7 March 2013 Available online 15 March 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Reverse electrodialysis Bioenergy A new type of bioelectrochemical system, called a microbial reverse-electrodialysis chemical

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetic acid production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in methyl chloride production is reported. Acetic acid was produced from... of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) 11. Nowadays more than 60% of the industrial production of...

108

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

Greenhalgh, W.O.

1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

MAGNESIUM ABSORPTION IN THE CCUM OF RATS RELATED TO VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNESIUM ABSORPTION IN THE C�CUM OF RATS RELATED TO VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS PRODUCTION Y. RAYSSIGUIER RELATIONS ENTRE L'ABSORPTION C,4ECALE DE MAGNESIUM CHEZ LE RAT ET LA PRODUCTION D'ACIDES GRAS VOLATILS du caecum, pH, acides gras volatils, activité microbienne. Introduction The mode of magnesium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it would be about $20,000/lb removed.

Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Conclusion ·Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production. ·MgSO4 .7H2O is a required nutrient, but hydrogen production work should focus on minimizing the lag time in biological hydrogen production, by varying nutrient

Barthelat, Francois

113

Nonphosphate Degradation Products of Tributyl Phosphate and Their Reactivities in Purex Media Under Extreme Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical degradation of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in liquid systems, where TBP was in contact with aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and/or uranyl nitrate, was studied experimentally to clarify the mechanisms of the formation and successive reactions of nonphosphate products under atmospheric pressure. Butyl nitrate, propionic acid, acetic acid, butric acid, and butyl alcohol were formed as the nonphosphate butyl products derived from the butyl-groups of TBP in an open system. The total amount of these products almost equals the amount of the major intermediate phosphate products reduced, i.e., di- and monobutyl phosphates and phosphoric acid. Butyl alcohol was found to be the precursor of the other nonphosphate products.Even when the extremely degraded solvent was further contacted with 10 M nitric acid at 90 deg. C, no significant heat evolution was observed at atmospheric pressure. Only butyl alcohol changed into carboxylic acids by exothermic oxidative reactions.

Tashiro, Yoshikazu [Sumitomo Metal Mining Company, Ltd. (Japan); Kodama, Ryuji [Sumitomo Metal Mining Company, Ltd. (Japan); Sugai, Hiroshi [Sumitomo Metal Mining Company, Ltd. (Japan); Suzuki, Katsuhiko [Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (Japan); Matsuoka, Shingo [Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (Japan)

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Non-phosphate degradation products of tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tributyl phosphate(TBP) was compulsively degraded with nitric acid and/or uranium nitrate at elevated temperature around 105{degrees}C. Experimental results indicates major non-phosphate degradation products are butyl nitrate (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NO{sub 3}), propionic acid (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}COOH), acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH), butyric acid (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}COOH) and butyl alcohol (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH) in ascending order of quantity. Degrading rate in uranium free system is less than that in uranium coexisting system. Carboxylic acids were not produced in uranium free system, and only acetic acid was identified in case of without supplying nitric acid from aqueous phase. Moreover, from the experimental study on the reactivity of each non-phosphate product with nitric acid, carboxylic acids were identified as byproducts of butyl alcohol and butyl nitrate, and each carboxylic acid was stable in these degrading conditions. Finally, butyl alcohol is considered as one of intermediate products to butyl nitrate and carboxylic acids. From this study, the non-phosphate degradation products of TBP is identified and the degrading reaction pass is proposed. Extraction behavior of each non-phosphate product and reactivity of degraded TBP are also elucidated.

Tashiro, Y.; Kodama, R.; Sugai, H. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Aomori (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid fermentative production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUPPLY Summary: , (12) PC for process monitoring. 2.4 Shake flask fermentations acid Biogas Step 1 Wet oxidation Step 2... ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING...

116

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and...

117

Distribution of 1-butanol between organic solvent and acidic solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1-butanol, a major TBP-degraded product, is known to react explosively with concentrated nitric acid under non-heated conditions. However, no quantitative data is available on the distribution behavior in the Purex solution. The distribution of 1-butanol between tributyl phosphate(TBP) diluted with n-dodecane and aqueous solution of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate was investigated under various conditions, by changing the concentration of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, the composition of the organic mixture, the organic to aqueous phase volume ratio, and temperature. 1-butanol was found to distribute more in solvent phase, but the distribution ratio is not large, less than four under typical Purex solution conditions. The ratio was found to be correlated with the molar concentration of free TBP and 1-butanol. Effects of these characteristics on safety in radiochemical plants will be discussed from the local accumulation of 1-butanol.

Asakura, T.; Nemoto, H.; Uchiyama, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Weston, AU); Boddupalli, Sekhar S. (Manchester, MI)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sulfur Dioxide Crossover during the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sulfur Dioxide Crossover during the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer in the thermochemical conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid for the large-scale production of hydrogen, 2009. Published May 19, 2009. The hybrid sulfur process is being investigated as an efficient way

Weidner, John W.

120

Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Inc has shown that BUTANOL REPLACES GASOLINE - 100 pct and has no pollution problems, and further proved it is possible to produce 2.5 gallons of butanol per bushel corn at a production cost of less than $1.00 per gallon. There are 25 pct more Btu-s available and an additional 17 pct more from hydrogen given off, from the same corn when making butanol instead of ethanol that is 42 pct more Btu-s more energy out than it takes to make - that is the plow to tire equation is positive for butanol. Butanol is far safer to handle than gasoline or ethanol. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as attested to in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as a fuel alcohol in U.S. legislation as ethanol. There are many benefits to this technology in that Butanol replaces gasoline gallon for gallon as demonstrated in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States July-August 2005. No modifications at all were made to a 1992 Buick Park Avenue; essentially your family car can go down the road on Butanol today with no modifications, Butanol replaces gasoline. It is that simple. Since Butanol replaces gasoline more Butanol needs to be made. There are many small farms across America which can grow energy crops and they can easily apply this technology. There is also an abundance of plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry with 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that pose significant environmental problems. Whey lactose presents another waste management problem, 123,000 metric tons US, which can now be turned into automobile fuel. The fibrous bed bioreactor - FBB - with cells immobilized in the fibrous matrix packed in the reactor has been successfully used for several organic acid fermentations, including butyric and propionic acids with greatly increased reactor productivity, final product concentration, and product yield. Other advantages of the FBB include efficient and continuous operation without requiring repeated inoculation, elimination of cell lag phase, good long-term stability, self cleaning and easier downstream processing. The excellent reactor performance of the FBB can be attributed to the high viable cell density maintained in the bioreactor as a result of the unique cell immobilization mechanism within the porous fibrous matrix Since Butanol replaces gasoline in any car today - right now, its manufacturing from biomass is the focus of EEI and in the long term production of our transportation fuel from biomass will stabilize the cost of our fuel - the underpinning of all commerce. As a Strategic Chemical Butanol has a ready market as an industrial solvent used primarily as paint thinner which sells for twice the price of gasoline and is one entry point for the Company into an established market. However, butanol has demonstrated it is an excellent replacement for gasoline-gallon for gallon. The EEI process has made the economics of producing butanol from biomass for both uses very compelling. With the current costs for gasoline at $3.00 per gallon various size farmstead turn-key Butanol BioRefineries are proposed for 50-1,000 acre farms, to produce butanol as a fuel locally and sold locally. All butanol supplies worldwide are currently being produced from petroleum for $1.50 per gallon and selling for $3.80 wholesale. With the increasing price of gasoline it becomes feasible to manufacture and sell Butanol as a clean-safe replacement for gasoline. Grown locally - sold locally at gas prices. A 500 acre farm at 120 bushels corn per acre would make $150,000 at $2.50 per bushel for its corn, when turned into 150,000 gallons Butanol per year at 2.5 gallons per bushel the gross income would be $430,000. Butanol-s advantage is the fact that no other agricultural product made can be put directly into your gas tank without modifying your car. The farmer making and selling locally has no overhead for shippi

David E. Ramey; Shang-Tian Yang

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

Yi, Jian (East Lansing, MI); Kleff, Susanne (East Lansing, MI); Guettler, Michael V. (Holt, MI)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

acid degradation products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFRICAN DWARF SHEEP CiteSeer Summary: This study describes the effect of intraruminal infusion of different proportions of palmitic (saturated fatty acid) and linolenic...

124

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Remedial Investigation Report on the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Program; Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid pipeline (ANAP). This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately}4800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. During the mid-1980s, sections of the pipeline were removed during various construction projects. A total of 19 locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The 19 samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant`s laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. Uranium activities in the soil samples ranged from 0.53 to 13.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U, from 0.075 to 0.75 pCi/g for {sup 235}U, and from 0.71 to 5.0 pCi/g for {sup 238}U. Maximum total values for lead, chromium, and nickel were 75.1 mg/kg, 56.3 mg/kg, and 53.0 mg/kg, respectively. The maximum nitrate/nitrite value detected was 32.0 mg-N/kg. One sample obtained adjacent to a sewer line contained various organic compounds, at least some of which were tentatively identified as fragrance chemicals commonly associated with soaps and cleaning solutions. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the ANAP contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Production of amino acids using auxotrophic mutants of methylotrophic bacillus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of producing amino acids by culturing an amino acid auxotroph of a biologically pure strain of a type I methylotrophic bacterium of the genus Bacillus which exhibits sustained growth at 50.degree. C. using methanol as a carbon and energy source and requiring vitamin B.sub.12 and biotin is provided.

Hanson, Richard S. (Wayzata, MN); Flickinger, Michael C. (St. Paul, MN); Schendel, Frederick J. (Falcon Heights, MN); Guettler, Michael V. (Waconia, MN)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

Donnelly, Mark I. (Warrenville, IL); Sanville-Millard, Cynthia (Plainfield, IL); Chatterjee, Ranjini (Park Ridge, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fermentation and recovery process for lactic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for converting starch to glucose and fermenting glucose to lactic acid, including simultaneous saccharification and fermentation through use of a novel consortium of bacterial strains. 2 figs.

Tsai, S.P.; Moon, S.H.; Coleman, R.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

acid production induced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pot Experiments... Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach) 1909-01-01 275 Stabilization of Water-in-Oil Emulsions by Naphthenic Acids and Their Salts: Model Compounds, Role of pH, and...

132

acid production units: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A guide to selected non-timber forest products of the Hayfork Adaptive Management for non-timber forest products (NTFPs) is increasing, and growing numbers of people are enhancing...

133

A study of the manufacturing and product possibilities of a cork/polylactic acid compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of the manufacturing and product capabilities of a cork/polylactic acid compound was conducted. Fine granulated cork, 1mm in diameter, was compounded with Natureworks' IngeoTM3051D PLA and extruded into pellets. ...

Reed, Sarah BR

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscisic acid production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acid, CEPA) is a commercial product used as an abscission agent for vari- ous plants. After... 20: 1635-1642 Apte PV, Laloraya MM (1982) Inhibitory action of phenolic...

135

Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

Jessen, Holly Jean (Chanhassen, MN); Liao, Hans H. (Eden Prairie, MN); Gort, Steven John (Apple Valley, MN); Selifonova, Olga V. (Plymouth, MN)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

136

Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

Donnelly, Mark (Warrenville, IL); Millard, Cynthia S. (Plainfield, IL); Stols, Lucy (Woodridge, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for 240Am II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285-114  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nitric acid solutions are selectively extracted by organophosphorus extrac- tants such as tributyl phosphate (TBP) [

Ellison, Paul Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

acid natural products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Escherichia coli with Amplified 23 Measurements of Methane Emissions at Natural Gas Production Sites Engineering Websites Summary: Measurements of Methane Emissions at...

142

Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia acetic acid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fluminic acid, or hydrogen. NITRIC ACID with: acetic... with: water, carbon dioxide, carbon tetrachloride, and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. ACETIC ACID with......

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid alkyl esters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitric Acid 34. Sulfuric acid... .5 will not be accepted through this program. Heavy metal, toxic, acidic (without solvents) and basic wastes should... . Mercaptans 4. ......

145

Prebiotic Metabolism: Production by Mineral Photoelectrochemistry of a-Ketocarboxylic Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acid (rTCA) cycle could have fixed carbon dioxide as biochemically useful energy- storage molecules- tions in the past (Fig. 3). Ultraviolet light penetrates into the water, interacting with carbon dioxide energies of formation that disfavor their production. We report herein the production of pyruvate from

146

Title: Using acidic electrolyzed water to reduce objectionable gas emissions from poultry production facilities in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Using acidic electrolyzed water to reduce objectionable gas emissions from poultry Summary: There are increasing numbers of poultry production buildings, with large, densely housed flocks to allow producers to meet the increasing demand for poultry products and, yet, reduce the environmental

Mukhtar, Saqib

147

Continuous Isosorbide Production From Sorbitol Using Solid Acid Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a final report for a project funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board was the principal contracting entity for the grant. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with General Electric, Pacific Northwest National Lab and New Jersey Institute of Technology to conduct research in this project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board and General Electric provided cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate both the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project has led to additional collaborations among other polymer companies. The goals of the project were to develop a renewable route to isosorbide for commercialization that is economically competitive with all existing production technologies and to develop new applications for isosorbide in various products such as polymers and materials. Under this program a novel process for the production of isosorbide was developed and evaluated. The novel process converts corn based sorbitol into isosorbide using a solid catalyst with integrated water removal and product recovery. In addition the work under this program has identified several novel products based on isosorbide chemistries. These market applications include: epoxy resins, UV stabilizers, plasticizers and polyesters. These market applications have commercial interest within the current polymer industry. This report contains an overview summary of the accomplishments. Six inventions and four patent applications have been written as a result of this project. Additional data will be published in the patent applications. The data developed at New Jersey Institute of Technology was presented at two technical conferences held in June of 2006. Several companies have made inquiries about using this material in their products.

Williamson, R.; Holladay,J.; Jaffe, M.; Brunelle, D.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

148

Production of furfural from cottonseed hulls by acid hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'. a offsets of various salts on the hfdrol-ei af xyloae uain; ?hydrochloric cc!. d. ':he ciction of acids on f", rfi". ral resclts in this for, ". ion of huaina an', huaic aci '. lf furf'. ral ia ref la@cd for tao hours in 99 1P. . Q pez cant h... fielded Q&gd per erat furfural. r 1 QjP lTHH AQ 0P, 00 L DXfPJ q 'mM AQ'X3. ', 'R E i IFr F, -g i =, : -I- ?', - ? --4 r WLI ? + -t 1 r r T 1 r ?1 Ij a T ? ~F L 4P E1 L- 1 ' I r t, E ' r & So. ja '0 ? 80-' 10 I=I I ah...

Lee, D. Ralph

1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

acid docosahexaenoic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 38 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

150

acid aspartic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 20 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

151

acid caffeic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

152

acid benzoic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 24 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

153

acid propanoic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 9 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

154

acid oleic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 31 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

155

The Essential Amino Acid Content of Cottonseed, Peanut and Soybean Products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATlON R. D. LEWIS, Director College Station, Texaa BULLETIN NO. 692 SEPTEMBER 1947 The Essential Amino Acid Content of Cottonseed, Peanut and Soybean Products CARL M. LYMAN, KENNETH KUIKEN and FRED HALE... With the technical assistance of Shirley Dieterich, Marjory Bradford and Mary Trant AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President - [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Preface . - - -- - . meals seed, Ili5tid hmino acids...

Hale, Fred; Kuiken, Kenneth A. (Kenneth Alfred); Lyman, Carl M. (Carl Morris)

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The effects of glutathione on the production of free fatty acids in Cheddar cheese slurries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF GLUTATHIONE ON THE PRUDUCTIUN OF FREE FATTY ACIDS IN CHEDDAR CHEESE SLURRIFS A Thesis by JANE MARGUERITE BROUSSARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subuect: Food Science and Technology THE EFFECTS UF GLUTATHIONE ON THE PRODUCTION OF FREE FATTY ACIDS IN CHEDDAR CHEESE SLURRIES A Thesis by JANE MARGUERITE HROUSSARD Approved as to style and content...

Broussard, Jane Marguerite

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Enrichment of By-Product Materials from Steel Pickling Acid Regeneration Plants (TRP 9942)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new process for manufacturing an enriched, iron-based product (strontium hexaferrite) in existing steel pickling acid regeneration facilities was evaluated. Process enhancements and equipment additions were made to an existing acid regeneration plant to develop and demonstrate (via pilot scale testing and partial-capacity production trials) the viability of a patented method to produce strontium-based compounds that, when mixed with steel pickling acid and roasted, would result in a strontium hexaferrite powder precursor which could then be subjected to further heat treatment in an atmosphere that promotes rapid, relatively low-temperature formation of discrete strontium hexaferrite magnetic domains yielding an enriched iron-based product, strontium hexaferrite, that can be used in manufacturing hard ferrite magnets.

Lu Swan, Delta Ferrites LLC

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Production and mitigation of acid chlorides in geothermal steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the equilibrium distribution of relatively nonvolatile solutes between aqueous liquid and vapor phases have been made at temperatures to 350{degrees}C for HCl(aq) and chloride salts. These data are directly applicable to problems of corrosive-steam production in geothermal steam systems. Compositions of high-temperature brines which could produce steam having given concentrations of chlorides may be estimated at various boiling temperatures. Effects of mitigation methods (e.g., desuperheating) can be calculated based on liquid-vapor equilibrium constants and solute mass balances under vapor-saturation conditions.

Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Microbial engineering for the production of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Some aspects of this invention relate to methods useful for the conversion of a carbon source to a biofuel or biofuel precursor using engineered microbes. Some aspects of this invention relate to the discovery of a key regulator of lipid metabolism in microbes. Some aspects of this invention relate to engineered microbes for biofuel or biofuel precursor production.

Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Abidi, Syed Hussain Imam

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 5 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Biological production of acetic acid from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nitric oxide emissions from the high-temperature viscous boundary layers of hypersonic aircraft within the stratosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors study the nitric oxide emission characteristics of supersonic aircraft resulting from heating of viscous boundary layers along the skin of the aircraft. Previous study has concentrated on nitric oxide emissions coming from combustion products from the scramjet engines. This work shows that above mach 8, emissions from viscous heating become a significant factor in total emission of nitric oxide. Above mach 16 it becomes the dominant source of emission.

Brooks, S.B.; Lewis, M.J.; Dickerson, R.R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

acidization: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

166

Spectrophotometric determination of vanadium in metallurgical products with carminic acid and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the authors, there is an increasing demand for sensitive, selective, and rapid methods of determining low levels of vanadium in metallurgical products, and solvent-extraction methods do not meet the requirements. The authors used an anthraquinone dye carminic acid (CA) as a chromophoric organic reagent: 1, 3, 4, 6-tetrahydroxy-2-R-5carboxy-8-methylanthra-9, 10-quinone. The CSA was cetyltrimethylammonium chloride CTA. The three-component system was examined in order to devise a reasonably sensitive and rapid method of determining vanadium in metallurgical products. A study is made of the complexing in the system formed by vanadium (IV) with CA and the CSA. The optimum conditions for the formation of the complex have been established together with the spectrophotometric characteristics. A spectrophotometric method has been devised for determining from 0.05 to 5% of vanadium in metallurgical products with a relative standard deviation of not more than 0.04.

Babenko, N.L.; Blokh, M. Sh.; Guseva, T.D.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

acid-dependent ribonucleic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 40 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

168

Controlling acid rain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn the northeastern USA are caused by the large scale combustion of fossil fuels within this region. Average precipitation acidity is pH 4.2, but spatial and temporal ...

Fay, James A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Constructing and engineering fatty acid metabolic pathways for the production of fuels and chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 fatty acids in transgenic canola by overexpression of Ch0 fatty acids in transgenic canola by overexpression of Ch

Steen, Eric James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Investigation of Solid Acid Catalyst Functionalization for the Production of Biodiesel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid Catalyst Functionalization for the Production of Biodiesel Elliot James Nash University of British Functionalization for the Production of Biodiesel By Elliot James Nash Thesis CHBE 493/494 4 April 2013 The Faculty;ii Abstract The adoption of biodiesel as an alternative fuel is gaining momentum despite its large

171

Omega-3 fatty acid oxidation products prevent vascular endothelial cell activation by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may facilitate development of atherosclerosis by stimulating pro-inflammatory pathways in the vascular endothelium. Nutrition, including fish oil-derived long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6{omega}-3), can reduce inflammation and thus the risk of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that cyclopentenone metabolites produced by oxidation of DHA can protect against PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. Oxidized DHA (oxDHA) was prepared by incubation of the fatty acid with the free radical generator 2,2-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Cellular pretreatment with oxDHA prevented production of superoxide induced by PCB77, and subsequent activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). A{sub 4}/J{sub 4}-neuroprostanes (NPs) were identified and quantitated using HPLC ESI tandem mass spectrometry. Levels of these NPs were markedly increased after DHA oxidation with AAPH. The protective actions of oxDHA were reversed by treatment with sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), which concurrently abrogated A{sub 4}/J{sub 4}-NP formation. Up-regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by PCB77 was markedly reduced by oxDHA, but not by un-oxidized DHA. These protective effects were proportional to the abundance of A{sub 4}/J{sub 4} NPs in the oxidized DHA sample. Treatment of cells with oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5{omega}-3) also reduced MCP-1 expression, but less than oxDHA. Treatment with DHA-derived cyclopentenones also increased DNA binding of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and downstream expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), similarly to the Nrf-2 activator sulforaphane. Furthermore, sulforaphane prevented PCB77-induced MCP-1 expression, suggesting that activation of Nrf-2 mediates the observed protection against PCB77 toxicity. Our data implicate A{sub 4}/J{sub 4}-NPs as mediators of omega-3 fatty acid-mediated protection against the endothelial toxicity of coplanar PCBs.

Majkova, Zuzana [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Layne, Joseph [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J. [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Gill Heart Institute, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0509 (United States); Toborek, Michal [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Hennig, Bernhard, E-mail: bhennig@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 14 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

173

aminoadipic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

174

aminocaproic acid eaca: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

175

acid hydrazone dpktch: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

176

aminolevulinic acid dehydratase: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 18 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

177

aminobutyric acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 36 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

178

acid controls expression: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

179

aminolevulinic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

180

acid riboside salvage: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 30 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

anf 4-hydroxyhomocitric acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

182

acid dioxygenase hpd: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 37 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

183

acid ascorbyl palmitate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 27 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

184

acid dehydratase alad: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

185

acetoacetic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

186

acid lna taqman: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 46 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

187

amygdalic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

188

acid phosphoribosyltransferase 1-deficient: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 19 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

189

adipic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

190

acid dmsa renography: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 8 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

191

anthranilic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 10 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

192

aminocaproic acids: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 7 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

193

acid glycosaminoglycan mucopolysaccharide: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 34 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

194

acidic oligosaccharides paos: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 40 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

195

aminobutyric acids: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 36 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

196

asparaginic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 17 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

197

arsonic acids: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 10 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

198

anthraquinonic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

199

aristolochic acid nephropathy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 28 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

200

acetylsalicylic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 11 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

acid decarboxylase hgad65: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 32 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

202

Chemistry of natural fuel: Use of wastes of synthetic fatty acid production for obtaining water-bitumen emulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of producing water-emulsion waterproofing mastic and waterproofing coating based on bitumen, rubber crumb, and bottoms from production of synthetic fatty acids was studied. The physicochemical properties (softening point, ductility, sorptive properties, and friability) of the waterproofing coating based on a water-emulsion mastic were measured.

Syroezhko, A.M.; Antipova, E.I.; Paukku, A.N. [St. Petersburg Technological Inst. (Russian Federation)

1995-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

THE EFFECT OF ANOLYTE PRODUCT ACID CONCENTRATION ON HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle (Fig. 1) is one of the simplest, all-fluids thermochemical cycles that has been devised for splitting water with a high-temperature nuclear or solar heat source. It was originally patented by Brecher and Wu in 1975 and extensively developed by Westinghouse in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As its name suggests, the only element used besides hydrogen and oxygen is sulfur, which is cycled between the +4 and +6 oxidation states. HyS comprises two steps. One is the thermochemical (>800 C) decomposition of sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and water. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} = SO{sub 2} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O. The other is the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis of water to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and hydrogen (H{sub 2}), SO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O = H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, E{sup o} = -0.156 V, explaining the 'hybrid' designation. These two steps taken together split water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} using heat and electricity. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the University of South Carolina (USC) have successfully demonstrated the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers (Fig. 2) for the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis (sulfur oxidation) step, while Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully demonstrated the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition (sulfur reduction) step using a bayonet-type reactor (Fig. 3). This latter work was performed as part of the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration at General Atomics (GA). The combination of these two operations results in a simple process that will be more efficient and cost-effective for the massive production of hydrogen than alkaline electrolysis. Recent developments suggest that the use of PEMs other than Nafion will allow sulfuric acid to be produced at higher concentrations (>60 wt%), offering the possibility of net thermal efficiencies around 50% (HHV basis). The effect of operation at higher anolyte concentrations on the flowsheet, and on the net thermal efficiency for a nuclear-heated HyS process, is examined and quantified.

Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Functional screening and in vitro analysis reveals thioesterases with enhanced substrate specificity profiles that improve short-chain fatty acid production in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-chain fatty acid (SCFAs) biosynthesis is pertinent to production of biofuels, industrial compounds, and pharmaceuticals from renewable resources. To expand on Escherichia coli SCFA products, we previously implemented ...

Prather, Kristala L. Jones

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects acid production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 67 Stabilization of Water-in-Oil Emulsions by Naphthenic Acids and Their Salts: Model Compounds, Role of pH, and Soap : Acid Ratio Summary:...

206

Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

208

Production of volatile fatty acids as a result of bacterial interactions in the cecum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the C. butyricum strain fermented lactose and D-lactic acid to butyric and acetic acids, whereas L-lactic acid was not fermented. The V. alcalescens strain did not ferment lactose and fermented L better than D of lactose (up to 20 %) to the diet increases bacterial fermentation in the large intestine and cecum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

PRODUCTION D'ACIDES GRAS A COURTE CHAINE AU COURS DE LA DIGESTION CHEZ LE PORC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fermentation) ; this #12;is also the case for acetic acid in the caecum and colon 3 hours after the meal, when jusqu'à 9 h après la consommation (pH et microflore favorables à ce type de fermentation) ; il en va de acids) ; acetic acid, present in great quantities overall in the digestive tract, becomes predominating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Solvent extraction of inorganic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the solution by a sim?. le process that is economically =ttrsctlve is of con- sider. ble interest~ Dilute "olution; of hydrochloric, nitric and sul- furic acid d; occur in many processes either alone or toga- th: r . 'he use of li. , uid-li~uid extraction...~~ram for hexyl c~rbitol- water-nitric acid 17 ~ Distribution die, r m for hoxl'' ca:-bitol- watcr-sulfur'c acid Table 1. . 'xperimental d ta of amyl alcohol-water-!!Cl Pa, e 33 2. Experimental data of isoamyl alcohol-water- HC1 34 3 ~ Cxperimental data...

Ysrael, Miguel Curie

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Monitoring of Total Type II Pyrethroid Pesticides in Citrus Oils and Water by Converting to a Common Product 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring of Total Type II Pyrethroid Pesticides in Citrus Oils and Water by Converting to a Common Product 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid Mark R. McCoy, Zheng Yang, Xun Fu,§ Ki Chang Ahn, Shirley J. Gee an alternative method that converts the type II pyrethroids to a common chemical product, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid

Hammock, Bruce D.

212

Raman Scattering Sensor for Control of the Acid Alkylation Process in Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline refineries utilize a process called acid alkylation to increase the octane rating of blended gasoline, and this is the single most expensive process in the refinery. For process efficiency and safety reasons, the sulfuric acid can only be used while it is in the concentration range of 98 to 86 %. The conventional technique to monitor the acid concentration is time consuming and is typically conducted only a few times per day. This results in running higher acid concentrations than they would like to ensure that the process proceeds uninterrupted. Maintaining an excessively high acid concentration costs the refineries millions of dollars each year. Using SBIR funding, Process Instruments Inc. has developed an inline sensor for real time monitoring of acid concentrations in gasoline refinery alkylation units. Real time data was then collected over time from the instrument and its responses were matched up with the laboratory analysis. A model was then developed to correlate the laboratory acid values to the Raman signal that is transmitted back to the instrument from the process stream. The instrument was then used to demonstrate that it could create real-time predictions of the acid concentrations. The results from this test showed that the instrument could accurately predict the acid concentrations to within ~0.15% acid strength, and this level of prediction proved to be similar or better then the laboratory analysis. By utilizing a sensor for process monitoring the most economic acid concentrations can be maintained. A single smaller refinery (50,000 barrels/day) estimates that they should save over $120,000/year, with larger refineries saving considerably more.

Uibel, Rory, H.; Smith, Lee M.; Benner, Robert, E.

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

MONITORING AND MODELLING OF RADIOLYTIC DEGRADATION PRODUCTS OF TBP/n-DODECANE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) solvent system was developed for the separation of plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel. Since the implementation of this process, the degradation chemistry associated with the irradiated solvent system, tributyl phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane/nitric acid has been extensively studied as the integrity of the organic solvent is paramount for reproducible performance of the separation flowsheet (extraction/scrub/strip) during multiple cycles. In PUREX-like processes, the extent of decomposition is dependent not only upon the solvent, but also upon the presence of constituents, such as nitric acid, that interact with TBP and increase its susceptibility to radiolytic degradation. The build-up of degradation products in the organic phase alters process flowsheet performance via modification of the metal ions speciation, loss of solvent components, and enhanced water transport into the organic phase. On-line identification and quantification of the solvent degradation products would provide the necessary information for more detailed process control as well as providing the basis for timing solvent washing or replacement. In our research, we are exploring the potential of on-line monitoring for the PUREX solvent radiolytic degradation products. To identify degradation products, TBP/n-dodecane solvent, contacted with aqueous nitric acid solutions of variable concentrations are subjected to various gamma radiation external doses then analyzed by electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). In addition, vibrational spectroscopy is utilized to monitor and quantify major degradation products including dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) and monobutyl phosphoric acid (H2MBP) in TBP/n-dodecane solvent. The compiled spectroscopic databases serve for developing interpretive and predictive chemometric models for the quantification of the PUREX solvent degradation products.

Peterson, James M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Bryan, Samuel A.

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

214

Impact of Herbicides on Winter Canola (Brassica napus L.) Production and Fatty Acid Composition in South Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the herbicides evaluated. Fatty acid composition, specifically stearic acid, oleic acid, linolenic acid, and oleic to linolenic acid ratio, was affected by herbicide treatments. This research found that protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPG oxidase) inhibitor...

Cogdill, Todd Joseph

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

Boll, Rose A [Knoxville, TN

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Kinetic modeling of nitric oxide removal from exhaust gases by Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for increased pressure predict a wider temperature range at which significant nitric oxide can be removed and also in the case of RAPRENOx process the levels of N20 (a by-product in the case of the RAPRENOx process) are significantly lower. The accounting...

Chenanda, Cariappa Mudappa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells Jingjing Jiang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells Jingjing Jiang a , Steven C- dated our model with experimental results of gas phase NO release and intracellular L enzyme on NO production. Our model predicts intracellular L-arginine and gas phase NO release over a wide

George, Steven C.

218

Constructing and engineering fatty acid metabolic pathways for the production of fuels and chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production. The products were detected in both the pellet andproduction, 1 mL of culture was centrifuged, 30 s, 20,000 x g and the supernatant was separated from the pellet.

Steen, Eric James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

acidic pathogenesis-related pr-1: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 23 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

220

alpha-amino-isobutyric acid aib: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

acid o-methyltransferase activity1: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 39 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

222

alpha-oxo acid decarboxylase: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 32 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

223

anti-psoriatic fumaric acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 15 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

224

alpha2-6-linked sialic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 33 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

225

anti-proliferative acidic meglcua: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 12 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

226

abscisic acid receptor1oa: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by USDA and U of I researchers Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of 44 Controlling acid rain MIT - DSpace Summary: High concentrations of sulfuric and nitric acid in raTn fn...

227

Guiding optimal biofuels : a comparative analysis of the biochemical production of ethanol and fatty acid ethyl esters from switchgrass.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the current study, processes to produce either ethanol or a representative fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) via the fermentation of sugars liberated from lignocellulosic materials pretreated in acid or alkaline environments are analyzed in terms of economic and environmental metrics. Simplified process models are introduced and employed to estimate process performance, and Monte Carlo analyses were carried out to identify key sources of uncertainty and variability. We find that the near-term performance of processes to produce FAEE is significantly worse than that of ethanol production processes for all metrics considered, primarily due to poor fermentation yields and higher electricity demands for aerobic fermentation. In the longer term, the reduced cost and energy requirements of FAEE separation processes will be at least partially offset by inherent limitations in the relevant metabolic pathways that constrain the maximum yield potential of FAEE from biomass-derived sugars.

Paap, Scott M.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Dibble, Dean C.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Steen, Eric J. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA; Beller, Harry R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Keasling, Jay D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Chang, Shiyan [Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ovarian nitric oxide synthase gene expression during peripubertal development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitric oxide (NO) is generated from L-arginine by different isoforms of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase. (NOS) and is known to be involved in mediating several biological functions, some of which are associated with reproduction. Much attention...

Jones, Benjamin James

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid oxidation products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of oxidized, S-rich mafic magmas for giant Cu mineralization: Evidence from Pinatubo, Bingham Canyon and El Teniente Summary: eruption products show that mafic magma was...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid products adsorbed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biodiesel@uidaho.edu 208-885-7626 Using Adsorbents to Lower... part of the biodiesel production process. Lower- cost feedstocks, such as animal fat or used...

231

Photochemistry of Matrix-Isolated and Thin Film Acid Chlorides: Quantum Yields and Product Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the differences between gas- and condensed-phase photochemistry strengthens our understanding of many, and well-known gas-phase reaction mechanisms are often modified in the condensed phase or completely the photoreaction of condensed acid chloride samples by comparison of reaction quantum yields for acetyl (CH3COCl

Ellison, Barney

232

Analysis of acidity production during enhanced reductive dechlorination using a simplified reactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: crobinson@eng.uwo.ca, jgerhard@eng.uwo.ca Accepted for Publication in Advances in Water Resources 7 April acidification in a contaminated site were examined, and the extent to which the remediation efficiency and subsequent microbial inhibition. The accumulation of organic acids produced from the fermentation

233

Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

234

Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lactic acid production in exercising horses fed N,N-dimethylglycine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly [P&. 05) lower than period 1 at 20 minutes of exercise and at 2, 5, 10, 20, and 60 minutes of recovery. At 30 minutes of exercise period 2 was lower (P&. 06) showing a 32$ decrease from period 1 to period 2. Period 3 mean lactic acid levels... minutes of exercise, and at 2, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 minutes of recovery. Heart rates were obtained for the entire 90 minutes of the SET using an electronic digital heart rate monitor attached to the horse. The electrodes were placed on the anterior...

Moffitt, Patricia Ghagan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Novel Cyclotron-Based Radiometal Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments: (1) Construction of prototype solution target for radiometal production; (2) Testing of prototype target for production of following isotopes: a. Zr-89. Investigation of Zr-89 production from Y-89 nitrate solution. i. Defined problems of gas evolution and salt precipitation. ii. Solved problem of precipitation by addition of nitric acid. iii. Solved gas evolution problem with addition of backpressure regulator and constant degassing of target during irradiations. iv. Investigated effects of Y-89 nitrate concentration and beam current. v. Published abstracts at SNM and ISRS meetings; (3) Design of 2nd generation radiometal solution target. a. Included reflux chamber and smaller target volume to conserve precious target materials. b. Included aluminum for prototype and tantalum for working model. c. Included greater varicosities for improved heat transfer; and, (4) Construction of 2nd generation radiometal solution target started.

DeGrado, Timothy R. [Mayo Clinic] [Mayo Clinic (United States)

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Atomistic Oxidation of a Carbon Nanotube in Nitric Acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRL 104, 066401 (2010) PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS week endingAmerican Physical Society PRL 104, 066401 (2010) PHYSICALthese conditions, the en- PRL 104, 066401 (2010) PHYSICAL

Collins, Philip G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effect of Water Transport on the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be developed that provides efficient production of clean hydrogen. The methods existing today for large-scale produc- tion of hydrogen typically involve hydrocarbon reforming of natural gas or coal gasification% , the overall efficiency is 40%.7 Two issues remain, however, that make the future of this technology un

Weidner, John W.

239

Nitric Oxide in Astrocyte-Neuron Signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Astrocytes, a subtype of glial cell, have recently been shown to exhibit Ca{sup 2+} elevations in response to neurotransmitters. A Ca{sup 2+} elevation can propagate to adjacent astrocytes as a Ca{sup 2+} wave, which allows an astrocyte to communicate with its neighbors. Additionally, glutamate can be released from astrocytes via a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanism, thus modulating neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. In this dissertation, the author investigated the roles of another endogenous signal, nitric oxide (NO), in astrocyte-neuron signaling. First the author tested if NO is generated during astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling by imaging NO in purified murine cortical astrocyte cultures. Physiological concentrations of a natural messenger, ATP, caused a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent NO production. To test the roles of NO in astrocytic Ca{sup 2+} signaling, the author applied NO to astrocyte cultures via addition of a NO donor, S-nitrosol-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). NO induced an influx of external Ca{sup 2+}, possibly through store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. The NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling is cGMP-independent since 8-Br-cGMP, an agonistic analog of cGMP, did not induce a detectable Ca{sup 2+} change. The consequence of this NO-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx was assessed by simultaneously monitoring of cytosolic and internal store Ca{sup 2+} using fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators x-rhod-1 and mag-fluo-4. Blockage of NO signaling with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly reduced the refilling percentage of internal stores following ATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release, suggesting that NO modulates internal store refilling. Furthermore, locally photo-release of NO to a single astrocyte led to a Ca{sup 2+} elevation in the stimulated astrocyte and a subsequent Ca{sup 2+} wave to neighbors. Finally, the author tested the role of NO inglutamate-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling by recording the astrocyte-evoked glutamate-dependent neuronal slow inward current (SIC). Although NO is not required for the SIC,PTIO reduced SIC amplitude, suggesting that NO modulates glutamate release from astrocytes or glutamate receptor sensitivity of neurons.

Nianzhen Li

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Production of hydrobromic acid from bromine, methane and steam for hydrogen production. 1997 annual report, December 15, 1996--January 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar-driven reaction between bromine and steam was studied. The goal was to make hydrobromic acid for hydrogen production and energy storage use via a reversible, high efficiency hydrogen/bromine fuel cell. While the reaction was technically successful and was demonstrated at NREL, it was determined to be uneconomical in today`s economy due to present high capital costs of the solar hardware. In an effort to provide for an interim process that can be utilized to produce hydrogen and store energy until the cost of solar hardware decreases, SRT`s process was modified to include the addition of methane. The new concept entails (i) reaction of bromine with methane and steam to produce hydrogen bromide and carbon dioxide and (ii) electrolysis of the stored hydrogen bromide for production of H{sub 2(g)} and recovery of Br{sub 2(1)}. Electrolyzers are available today for the electrolysis of HBr. In addition, a vendor for a reversible H{sub 2}-Br{sub 2} fuel has been identified. Most components of the envisioned system are commercially available. At present, the reactor needs the most development. In the SRT process, the electrical power required to split water is reduced effectively in half by the production of hydrogen bromide. The SRT concept is very attractive from an economic viewpoint as well. A reversible electrolytic fuel cell employed in the SRT process is capitalized via its use in load leveling by the utility. Thus, the price of SRT-produced hydrogen reflects only the cost of methane, reactor system capital costs and off-peak electrical power.

NONE

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Final technical report: Commercialization of the Biofine technology for levulinic acid production from paper sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved a three-year program managed by BioMetics, Inc. (Waltham, MA) to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of Biofine thermochemical process technology for conversion of cellulose-containing wastes or renewable materials into levulinic acid, a versatile platform chemical. The program, commencing in October 1995, involved the design, procurement, construction and operation of a plant utilizing the Biofine process to convert 1 dry ton per day of paper sludge waste. The plant was successfully designed, constructed, and commissioned in 1997. It was operated for a period of one year on paper sludge from a variety of source paper mills to collect data to verify the design for a commercial scale plant. Operational results were obtained for four different feedstock varieties. Stable, continuous operation was achieved for two of the feedstocks. Continuous operation of the plant at demonstration scale provided the opportunity for process optimization, development of operational protocols, operator training and identification of suitable materials of construction for scale up to commercial operation . Separated fiber from municipal waster was also successfully processed. The project team consisted of BioMetics Inc., Great Lakes Chemical Corporation (West Lafayette, IN), and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Albany, NY).

Fitzpatrick, Stephen W.

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

THE USE OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994 a demonstration project was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of using CCBs for the in situ treatment of acidic mine water. Actual injection of alkaline material was performed in 1997 with initial positive results; however, the amount of alkalinity added to the system was limited and resulted in short duration treatment. In 1999, a CBRC grant was awarded to further investigate the effectiveness of alkaline injection technology (AIT). Funds were released in fall 2001. In December 2001, 2500 tons of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash were injected into the wells used in the 1997 injection project. Post injection monitoring continued for 24 months. During this period the mine chemistry had gone through a series of chemical changes that manifested as stages or ''treatment phases.'' The mine system appeared to be in the midst of reestablishing equilibrium with the partial pressure of mine headspace. Alkalinity and pH appeared to be gradually increasing during this transition. As of December 2003, the pH and alkalinity were roughly 7.3 and 65 ppm, respectively. Metal concentrations were significantly lower than pre-injection levels, but iron and manganese concentrations appeared to be gradually increasing (roughly 30 ppm and 1.25 ppm, respectively). Aluminum, nickel, and zinc were less than pre-injection concentrations and did not appear to be increasing (roughly

Geoffrey A. Canty; Jess W. Everett

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Active Phosphoric Acid and Its Relation to the Needs of the Soil for Phosphoric Acid in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. K/5 nitric acid, measured with a flask. Place in ter bath previously heated to 40" C. Digest five hours, shak- ?very half hour. Filter on a large'double folded filter. When cola, take 1800 c.c. for the estimation of phosphoric acid and potael... and silica. The filtrate was measured ancl its vol- ume recorded. The soil on the filter paper was washed back into the bottle with 2000 c.c. N,'5 nitric acid, and again digested. Fonr treatments in all were made with the acid, The quantity of phosphorjc...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1909-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

acute nitric oxide: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a genetic polymorphisms in nitric oxide synthase genes (NOS), a higher nicotine exposure was associated with lower FeNO levels. Finally, although more studies are needed...

246

Nitric oxide reactions of bio-Inspired zinc and cobalt complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Bioinorganic Chemistry of Nitric Oxide and of Some of Its Targets The redox-active nature of nitric oxide (NO) regulates the chemistry and roles of NO in biology. The interactions of NO with nitric oxide synthases, ...

Kozhukh, Julia, 1985-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Relation of the Water-Soluble Potash, the Replaceable and Acid-Soluble Potash to the Potash Removed by Crops in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ammonia. This acid is 3.33 N. Digest 10 grams soil for 24 hours with 100 c.c. of the above hydrochloric acid at room temperature, shaking occasionally. Filter and wash with hot water. Add 1 c.c. nitric acid. Evaporate to dryness and heat on steam bath... of the soil with nitric acid become greater as the potash taken up by crops increases. Correlation coefficients for the factors studied show close relations between them. Correction of the 0.2N nitric acid for neutralization by the bases of the soil...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Response of shoot growth and gas exchange of Picea abies clones to rain acidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response of shoot growth and gas exchange of Picea abies clones to rain acidity and the addition, particularly the effect of acidity and the addition of a realistic ionic mixture to simulated acidic.0 with a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids (S02-/NO-weight ratio = 2.4). Ionic concentrations m mg/1were: 4.50 S

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual nitric oxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

combustion are nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen... of the nitric oxide is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide, so the environmental effects of emissions of both... O emissions at coal...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects nitric oxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

combustion are nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen... of the nitric oxide is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide, so the environmental effects of emissions of both... O emissions at coal...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - amperometric nitric oxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavioral... Ref. Neurotransmitters and related compounds Nitric oxide (nitrite) Carbon fiber End-channelInt 8... been studied by microchip CEEC is nitric oxide (NO). NO...

252

Fluorescence-based detection methodologies for nitric oxide using transition metal scaffolds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Fluorescence-Based Detection Methodologies for Nitric Oxide: A Review. Chapter 2. Cobalt Chemistry with Mixed Aminotroponimine Salicylaldimine Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization, and Nitric Oxide Reactivity. ...

Hilderbrand, Scott A. (Scott Alan), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous Separation of Strontium and Cesium from Acidic Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synergistic extraction solvent for the simultaneous removal of cesium and strontium from acidic solutions has been investigated. The extraction solvent consists of, 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), and 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB modifier) in a branched aliphatic kerosene (Isopar® L). Extraction synergy for strontium was observed when DtBuCH18C6 was combined with the BOBCalixC6 cesium extractant solvent and Cs-7SB modifier or if the Cs-7SB modifier was substituted into the SREX (Strontium Extraction) solvent in place of TBP. The novel process extracted both cesium and strontium simultaneously from 1 M nitric acid solutions with distribution ratios of 8.8 and 7.7 for strontium and cesium, respectively, at ambient temperature. Distribution coefficients for cesium and strontium as a function of nitric acid concentration and temperature were also obtained with 0.5 M<[HNO3]<2.5 M giving favorable distribution ratios. This new process utilizing the combined solvent has been named the Fission Product Extraction Process (FPEX).

Catherine L. Riddle; John D. Baker; Jack D. Law; Christopher A. McGrath; David H. Meikrantz; Bruce J. Mincher; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was very low throughout all SRAT cycles. (2) The mercury concentration of the SRAT product was below the 0.8 wt% limit in all runs. (3) Nitrite in the SRAT product was <100 mg/kg for all runs. (4) Foaminess was not an issue using the nominal antifoam addition strategy in these tests. (5) The high aluminum sludges (LoFe, HM type sludges) were much more viscous than the Hi Fe sludges. At 100% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very viscous but at 150% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very thin. This makes the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet an improvement for processing more viscous sludges. (6) The pH of the SRAT products was from 2.7-3.1 for the 150% acid stoichiometry runs and 5.1-6.1 for the 100% acid stoichiometry runs, significantly lower than is typical of the baseline nitric acid/formic acid flowsheet.

Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid molecules interacting Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the TBP and Water on the Complexation of Uranyl Nitrate and the Dissolution of Nitric Acid into Supercritical CO2. A Theoretical Study Summary: molecules are involved in...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid resistance test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 32 (1997) 1711--1715 Carbon blackhigh density polyethylene conducting Summary: treated with nitric acid for reaction times of 3, 12 and 24 h....

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid based black Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 32 (1997) 1711--1715 Carbon blackhigh density polyethylene conducting Summary: surface. 2.2. Nitric acid treatment 200 g of the high structure...

258

Influence de l'quilibre en acides amins de trois protines infuses dans l'intestin grle, sur la production laitire de la vache  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Gilles, 35590L'Hermitage, France. Summary. The affect of postruminal infusion of urea, gelatin, isolated soy increased with the amount of essential amino acids infused. Chez des vaches laitières d'un bon niveau de production, la sécrétion des protéines du lait est accrue par l'infusion post-ruminale de caséinates (Clark

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

259

Fission product solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Reduction of pertechnetate by acetohydroxamic acid: Formation of [TcNO(AHA)2(H2O)]+ and implications for the UREX process.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reductive nitrosylation and complexation of ammonium pertechnetate by acetohydroxamic acid has been achieved in aqueous nitric and perchloric acid solutions. The kinetics of the reaction depend on the relative concentrations of the reaction components and are accelerated at higher temperatures. The reaction does not occur unless conditions are acidic. Analysis of the x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic data is consistent with a pseudo-octahedral geometry with the linear Tc-N-O bond typical of technetium nitrosyl compounds, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy is consistent with a the d{sup 5} Tc(II) nitrosyl complex. The nitrosyl source is generally AHA, but may be augmented by products of reaction with nitric acid. The resulting low-valency trans-aquonitrosyl(diacetohydroxamic)-technetium(II) complex (1) is highly soluble in water, extremely hydrophilic, and is not extracted by tri-n-butylphosphate in a dodecane diluent. Its extraction properties are not pH-dependent; titration studies indicate a single species from pH 4.5 down to -0.6 (calculated). This molecule is resistant to oxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, even at high pH, and can undergo substitution to form other technetium nitrosyl complexes. The formation of 1 may strongly impact the fate of technetium in the nuclear fuel cycle.

1Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Nuclear Science and Technology Division, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-4006; Gong, Cynthia-May S; Poineau, Frederic; Lukens, Wayne W; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

262

Hydrogen peroxide differentially modulates cardiac myocyte nitric oxide synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(subscript 2)O(subscript 2)) are synthesized within cardiac myocytes and play key roles in modulating cardiovascular signaling. Cardiac myocytes contain both the endothelial (eNOS) ...

Sartoretto, Juliano

263

Microorganisms for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

The selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia in the presence of oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supporting the authors conclusions. Kato, et al. (1981 a) studied the catalytic activity of' iron oxide-titanium oxide catalysts with Fe/Ti atonuc ratios of 1/9 for the NO ? NHs ? Oz reaction. No NqO ivas detected in the reaction products, regardless... of the fact that an excess of oxygen ivas present in each reaction stuay. Nitric oxide and ammonia reacted stoichiometrically, regardless of the oxygen concentration, the space velocity, the temperature or the presence of SOz and HqO. The rate...

Gruber, Karen Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

266

A high frequency titration of indium with benzenephosphinic acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with ordinary oxidizing agents as hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid. (31) Michaells and Ananoff first reported the preparation and properties of benzenepbosphinic acid in 1874 (25). Kichaells prepared the potassium, barium, calcium, and iron salts... in approximately 25 milliliters of the acid These solutions were heated on a hot plate until dry. The salt was dissolved in dis- tilled water, and diluted to one liter in a volumetric flask. These solutions were standardised volumetrically with EDTA (13...

Keilt, Francis Xavier

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Engineered ketol-acid reductoisomerase and alcohol dehydrogenase enable anaerobic 2-methylpropan-1-ol production at theoretical yield in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-acid reductoisomerase Biofuels a b s t r a c t 2-methylpropan-1-ol (isobutanol) is a leading candidate biofuel a critical obstacle to next- generation biofuel commercialization. & 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Recent advances in biotechnology have made it possible to convert sugars into a wide

Snow, Christopher

268

Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site has led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives, [Ni(PCy2NAmino acid2)2]2+ (CyAA), of [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ complexes. It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation, a feature reminiscent of enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions, 0.25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested up to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentration. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions than the other two derivatives (~300 s-1 H2 production and 20 s-1 H2 oxidation; pH=1, 348 K). The significantly slower rates for CyArgOMe (35 s-1 production and 7 s-1 oxidation) compared to CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s-1 production and 4 s-1 oxidation under the same conditions) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that appended, outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an equally important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts as the protein scaffold does for redox active enzymes. This work was funded by the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (AD, WJS), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, BES (DLD, JASR). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ball-milling, a novel extraction process for production of W from WO{sub 3} using Mg as a reductant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of tungsten (W) metal by the chemical reduction of tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}), using magnesium (Mg) as a reductant, has been investigated by the mechanical alloying process. Complete transformation to W was observed after 60 sec of milling. W metal was recovered from the reaction products of W and magnesium oxide (MgO) by dilute nitric acid leaching. The powders were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques. Electron microscopic studies indicated that nano-meter sized grains were present in the W powder after leaching.

Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Suryanarayana, C.; Fores, F.H.; Prisbrey, K.A. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Purification of uranium alloys by differential solubility of oxides and production of purified fuel precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for purifying metallic alloys of uranium for use as nuclear reactor fuels in which the metal alloy is first converted to an oxide and then dissolved in nitric acid. Initial removal of metal oxide impurities not soluble in nitric acid is accomplished by filtration or other physical means. Further purification can be accomplished by carbonate leaching of uranyl ions from the partially purified solution or using traditional methods such as solvent extraction. 3 figs.

McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Purification of uranium alloys by differential solubility of oxides and production of purified fuel precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for purifying metallic alloys of uranium for use as nuclear reactor fuels in which the metal alloy is first converted to an oxide and then dissolved in nitric acid. Initial removal of metal oxide impurities not soluble in nitric acid is accomplished by filtration or other physical means. Further purification can be accomplished by carbonate leaching of uranyl ions from the partially purified solution or using traditional methods such as solvent extraction.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Miller, Philip E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production of citric acid by fermentation, recovery of theof Citric Acid from Aqueous Fermentation Solutions byof citric acid was 1.1.1 Lactic Acid Currently, fermentation

Poole, L.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Metal-based turn-on fluorescent probes for nitric oxide sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Metal-Based Turn-On Fluorescent Probes for Sensing Nitric Oxide. Nitric oxide, a reactive free radical, regulates a variety of biological processes. The absence of tools to detect NO directly, rapidly, specifically ...

Lim, Mi Hee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Process for the production of aqueous hydrochloric acid having a concentration of at least 35. 5% by weight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for continuously producing aqueous hydrochloric acid having a concentration of at least 3.5% by weight comprising: continuously introducing water to the top of an absorption unit, continuously introducing a gas stream containing anhydrous hydrogen chloride to the bottom of said absorption unit, removing an overhead gaseous stream from said unit, said gaseous stream containing no more than 3% by weight, and preferably no more than 1% by weight hydrogen chloride, and removing a bottom liquid stream from said unit, said bottom stream containing at least 35.5% by weight hydrogen chloride, and returning a portion of said bottom stream to said unit.

Parigi, J.V.

1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Development of Acetic Acid Removal Technology for the UREX+Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is imperative that acetic acid is removed from a waste stream in the UREX+process so that nitric acid can be recycled and possible interference with downstreatm steps can be avoidec. Acetic acid arises from acetohydrozamic acid (AHA), and is used to suppress plutonium in the first step of the UREX+process. Later, it is hydrolyzed into hydroxyl amine nitrate and acetic acid. Many common separation technologies were examined, and solvent extraction was determined to be the best choice under process conditions. Solvents already used in the UREX+ process were then tested to determine if they would be sufficient for the removal of acetic acid. The tributyl phosphage (TBP)-dodecane diluent, used in both UREX and NPEX, was determined to be a solvent system that gave sufficient distribution coefficients for acetic acid in addition to a high separation factor from nitric acid.

Robert M. Counce; Jack S. Watson

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chemical behavior of degradation products of tributylphosphate in purex reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical behavior of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol, degradation products from dealkylation of tri-n-butylphosphate(TBP) in PUREX reprocessing, which has not so far been reported, was investigated. No accumulation of those compounds in the organic phase of TBP(30%)-dodecane was observed in any separation cycle of PUREX despite the fact that the apparent distribution of the compounds lies to the organic phase at their high concentrations. The distribution of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol between organic/aqueous phases is found to be dependent on their concentrations and on nitric acid concentration, which could explain the above phenomena. Only butyl nitrate of the above two compounds was slightly detected in the organic streams. It is probable from this investigation that butyl nitrate is removed into aqueous waste stream primarily through alkali scrubber.

Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Masui, J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Studies on the production of ultra-clean coal by alkali-acid leaching of low-grade coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of low-grade coal in thermal power stations is leading to environmental pollution due to the generation of large amounts of fly ash, bottom ash, and CO{sub 2} besides other pollutants. It is therefore important to clean the coal before using it in thermal power stations, steel plants, or cement industries etc. Physical beneficiation of coal results in only limited cleaning of coal. The increasing environmental pollution problems from the use of coal have led to the development of clean coal technologies. In fact, the clean use of coal requires the cleaning of coal to ultra low ash contents, keeping environmental norms and problems in view and the ever-growing need to increase the efficiency of coal-based power generation. Therefore this requires the adaptation of chemical cleaning techniques for cleaning the coal to obtain ultra clean coal having ultra low ash contents. Presently the reaction conditions for chemical demineralization of low-grade coal using 20% aq NaOH treatment followed by 10% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching under reflux conditions have been optimized. In order to reduce the concentration of alkali and acid used in this process of chemical demineralization of low-grade coals, stepwise, i.e., three step process of chemical demineralization of coal using 1% or 5% aq NaOH treatment followed by 1% or 5% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} leaching has been developed, which has shown good results in demineralization of low-grade coals. In order to conserve energy, the alkali-acid leaching of coal was also carried out at room temperature, which gave good results.

Nabeel, A.; Khan, T.A.; Sharma, D.K. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Chemistry

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Measurement of nitric oxide with an antimonide diode laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lasers while retaining the practical advantages of room- temperature or thermoelectrically cooled the selective detection of NO under reduced pressure conditions was identified. With wavelength- modulation cooling is not required. © 1997 Optical Society of America Key words: Diode laser, antimonide, nitric

279

Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

None

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nitric oxide inhibition of soot oxidation by oxygen atoms at 298K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitric oxide is observed to inhibit the rate of soot oxidation by oxygen atoms at 298K. Small amounts of added NO reduce the rates of production of CO/sub 2/ and CO by up to 35%. The authors show experimentally that NO is not reducing the gas phase O atom concentration. Thermal desorption mass spectrometry shows a small adsorption of NO on the soot; this NO adsorption corresponds to 1.5% of the carbon atoms on the surface of the individual soot spheres. This inhibition is interpreted in terms of a relatively small number of reactive sites on the soot at which soot gasification occurs and which are effectively blocked by NO.

Wicke, B.G.; Grady, K.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nitric oxide inhibition of soot oxidation by oxygen atoms at 298/sup 0/Ktiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitric oxide is observed to inhibit the rate of soot oxidation by oxygen atoms at 298 K. Small amounts of added NO reduce the rates of production of CO/sub 2/ and CO by up to 35%. The authors show experimentally that NO is not reducing the gas phase O atom concentration. Thermal description mass spectrometry is used to measure the small adsorption of NO on the soot; this NO adsorption corresponds to 1.5% of the carbon atoms on the surface of the individual soot spheres. This inhibition is interpreted in terms of a relatively small number of reactive sites on the soot at which soot gasification occurs and which are effectively blocked by NO. When considered together with our previously reported work on oxidation of soot by oxygen atoms at 298 K, these results allow a partial mechanism to be formulated for this soot oxidation process.

Wicke, B.G.; Grady, K.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fatty acid-producing hosts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Asthmatic responses to airborne acid aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlled exposure studies suggest that asthmatics may be more sensitive to the respiratory effects of acidic aerosols than individuals without asthma. This study investigates whether acidic aerosols and other air pollutants are associated with respiratory symptoms in free-living asthmatics. Daily concentrations of hydrogen ion (H+), nitric acid, fine particulates, sulfates and nitrates were obtained during an intensive air monitoring effort in Denver, Colorado, in the winter of 1987-88. A panel of 207 asthmatics recorded respiratory symptoms, frequency of medication use, and related information in daily diaries. We used a multiple regression time-series model to analyze which air pollutants, if any, were associated with health outcomes reported by study participants. Airborne H+ was found to be significantly associated with several indicators of asthma status, including moderate or severe cough and shortness of breath. Cough was also associated with fine particulates, and shortness of breath with sulfates. Incorporating the participants' time spent outside and exercise intensity into the daily measure of exposure strengthened the association between these pollutants and asthmatic symptoms. Nitric acid and nitrates were not significantly associated with any respiratory symptom analyzed. In this population of asthmatics, several outdoor air pollutants, particularly airborne acidity, were associated with daily respiratory symptoms.

Ostro, B.D.; Lipsett, M.J.; Wiener, M.B.; Selner, J.C. (California Department of Health Services, Berkeley (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Oxidation of trace amounts of transplutonium elements to the tetravalent state in solutions of mineral acids and their stabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of trace amounts of americium(IV) in sulfuric and nitric acid solutions as a function of the mineral acid, potassium phosphotungstate, and ammonium persulfate concentrations was investigated. The stability of americium(IV) was studied. The optimal conditions and time of oxidation of trace amounts of americium to the tetravalent state were found on the basis of the experimental data obtained.

Milyukova, M.S.; Varezhkina, N.S.; Kuzovkina, E.V.; Malikov, D.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Digestibility of amino acids and energy in three soybean products measured at the end of the small intestine and over the entire track of growing-finishing swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and feces by the method of Kimura and Miller (1957) and lanthanides by the method of Conner (1977). Amino acids were measured by ion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis using a modified Beckman 120C amino acid auto- analyzer (Spackman st al...

Rudolph, Bryan Charles

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

[Ni(PPh2NBn2)2(CH3CN)]2+ as an Electrocatalyst for H2 Production: Dependence on Acid Strength and Isomer Distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

[Ni(PPh2NBz2)2(CH3CN)](BF4)2, Ni(PPh2NBz2)22+ (where PPh2NBz2 is 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) has been studied as an electrocatalyst for the production of hydrogen in acetonitrile. Using strong acids, such as p cyanoanilinium, Ni(PPh2NBz2)22+ has been shown to be protonated under catalytic conditions prior to reduction, with an effective pKa of 6.7±0.4. Through multinuclear NMR spectroscopy studies, the nickel(II) complex was found to be doubly protonated without any observed singly protonated species. In the doubly protonated complex, both protons are positioned exo with respect to the metal center and are stabilized by an N-H-N hydrogen bond. The formation of exo protonated isomers is proposed to limit the rate of hydrogen production because the protons are unable to gain suitable proximity to the reduced metal center to generate dihydrogen. Pre-protonation of Ni(PPh2NBz2)22+ has been found to shift the catalytic operating potential to more positive potentials by up to 440 mV, depending upon the conditions. The catalytic rate was found to increase by an order of magnitude by increasing the solution pH or through the addition of water. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Appel, Aaron M.; Pool, Douglas H.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Yang, Jenny Y.; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Personal and Ambient Air Pollution is Associated with Increased Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Children with Asthma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1994. Nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide: Method 6014. In:Molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide induced epithelialEC, OC), and 24-hr nitrogen dioxide. Ambient exposures

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Product Identification and Kinetics of Reactions of HCl with HNO3/H2SO4/H2O Solutions Christopher D. Cappa, Sarah E. Kuipers, Jeanine M. Roberts, Abigail S. Gilbert, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as nitric acid trihydrate or water ice) under winter Antarctic conditions,3 an increasing preponderance the catalysts and to produce high yields. A more direct method to produce Cl2 and ClNO directly from a reaction

Elrod, Matthew J.

292

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Effect of Rock Phosphate Upon the Corn Possibility of Phosphoric Acid of the Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Veterinary Medicine, A. and M. College of Texas. **In cooperation with United Statee Department of Agriculture. THE EFFECT OF ROCK PHOSPHATE UPON THE CORN POS- SIBILITY OF PHOSPHORIC ACID OF THE SOIL. In connection vith oil-fertilit~ stuclies..., it is important to lcnow the relation between the effect of the phosphoric acid of the rock phosphate on crops and the phosphoric acid that can be withdrawn from the soil by crops. The phosphoric acid of rock phosphate is readily soluble in K/5 nitric acid...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 2, Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of two appendices: public comments and DOE responses, and public comments not requiring responses.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

FT-IR spectroscopy of nitric acid in TBP/octane solution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared studies for the HNO{sub 3}/0.73 M TBP n-octane system are reported. Two extracted species, TBP {center_dot} HNO{sub 3} and TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3}, were identified in the organic phase. The concentration of the individual species was determined by the analysis of the vibrational band at {approx}1650 cm{sup -1}. The band at 1648 cm{sup -1} was assigned to the monosolvate TBP {center_dot} HNO{sub 3} and the band at 1672 cm{sup -1} to the hemisolvate TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3}. The infrared spectra revealed that with respect to the P{double_bond}O bond, as well to each other, the HNO{sub 3} molecules in the hemisolvate are spectrally non-equivalent. The predominant structure of TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3} involves the chain HNO{sub 3} dimer. Some ionic NO{sub 3}{sup -} and hydronium ions were identified in this system but only during formation of the monosolvate. The analyses performed in this system can serve for the characterization of HNO{sub 3} in related systems in the presence of metal species.

Ferraro, J. R.; Borkowski, M.; Chiarizia, R.; McAlister, D. R.; Chemistry; Loyola Univ. Chicago

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitric acid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hall, Sharon J. - School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 Standard Operating Procedures Standard Operating Procedures...

297

Solvent Extraction Behavior of Plutonium (IV) Ions in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formo-and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Pu(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have been obtained and trends established. The affinity of aceto-hydroxamic acid for Pu(IV) ions and its selectivity over U(VI) ions is demonstrated by the values of the stability constants in HCIO4. These data support the applications of simple hydroxamic acids in advanced Purex-type solvent extraction systems.

Carrott, M. J.; Fox, O. D.; Maher, C. J.; Mason, C.; Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thermal Stability Of Formohydroxamic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal stability of formohydroxamic acid (FHA) was evaluated to address the potential for exothermic decomposition during storage and its use in the uranium extraction process. Accelerating rate calorimetry showed rapid decomposition at a temperature above 65 {degree}?C; although, the rate of pressure rise was greater than two orders of magnitude less than the lower bound for materials which have no explosive properties with respect to transportation. FHA solutions in water and nitric acid did not reach runaway conditions until 150 {degree}?C. Analysis by differential scanning calorimetry showed that FHA melted at 67 {degree}?C and thermally decomposed at 90 {degree}?C with an enthalpy of -1924 J/g. The energics of the FHA thermal decomposition are comparable to those measured for aqueous solutions of hydroxylamine nitrate. Solid FHA should be stored in a location where the temperature does not exceed 20-25 {degree}?C. As a best practice, the solid material should be stored in a climate-controlled environment such as a refrigerator or freezer. FHA solutions in water are not susceptible to degradation by acid hydrolysis and are the preferred way to handle FHA prior to use.

Fondeur, F. F.; Rudisill, T. S.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

299

Turn-on fluorescent probes for detecting nitric oxide in biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Investigating the Biological Roles of Nitric Oxide and Other Reactive Nitrogen Species Using Fluorescent Probes: This chapter presents an overview of recent progress in the field of reactive nitrogen species ...

McQuade, Lindsey Elizabeth, 1981-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The detection of nitric oxide and its reactivity with transition metal thiolate complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule that is essential for life and regulates both beneficial and harmful processes. Because this gaseous radical influences many aspects of health and disease, we wish to explore the relationship ...

Tennyson, Andrew Gregory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pathophysiology of endotoxin: microvascular dysfunction, and the roles of VEGF and nitric oxide (NO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF ENDOTOXIN: MICROVASCULAR DYSFUNCTION, AND THE ROLFS OF VEGF AND NITRIC OXIDE (NO) A Senior Honors Thesis bt MARK ANDREW NAFTANFL Submitted to the Olfice of Honors Programs A. Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University ln...

Naftanel, Mark Andrew

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Seminaphthofluorescein-Based Fluorescent Probes for Imaging Nitric Oxide in Live Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorescent turn-on probes for nitric oxide based on seminaphthofluorescein scaffolds were prepared and spectroscopically characterized. The Cu(II) complexes of these fluorescent probes react with NO under anaerobic ...

Pluth, Michael D.

303

Biochemistry of mobile zinc and nitric oxide revealed by fluorescent sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological mobile zinc and nitric oxide (NO) are two prominent examples of inorganic compounds involved in numerous signaling pathways in living systems. In the past decade, a synergy of regulation, signaling, and translocation ...

Pluth, Michael D.

304

Products and Mechanisms of the Reaction of Oleic Acid with Ozone and Nitrate Radical Hui-Ming Hung, Yasmine Katrib, and Scot T. Martin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the addition of ozone to the double bond of oleic acid, which yields a primary ozonide (molozonide).21 The high-energy chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) are used, and -NO2 are observed in the infrared spectra, and high molecular weight molecules are formed

305

The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over tetraamminecopper (II) complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primary goal has been to develop catalysts that will promote selective reduction of nitric oxide to nitrogen with various reducing agents. The use of metals and mixed metal oxide catalysts with reducing agents such as hydrogen, car- bon monoxide... the energy of the v* orbital of NO in relationship to tne energies 11, 12 of the d orbitals of the metal. ' Although nitric oxide is thermo- dynamically unstable, with respect to decomposition to nitrogen and The citations of the following cages follow...

Oates, Margaret Deron

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in As induced VaD.

Sharma, Bhupesh, E-mail: drbhupeshresearch@gmail.com; Sharma, P.M.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

Wheeler, M. Clayton; van Walsum, G. Peter; Schwartz, Thomas J.; van Heiningen, Adriaan

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts continued towards the synthesis of new pillared clay catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia. The possibility of utilizing hydrocarbons was also investigated.

Li, W.B.; Yang, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and acetic acid concen- trations on the rate of fermentationacetic acid production (data not shown). all fermentationand fermentation) rate and increasing the production of neutral products at the expense of acetic and other acids.

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Endothelial-constitutive nitric oxide synthase exists in airways and diesel exhaust particles inhibit the effect of nitric oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are an important cause of air pollution and are thought to be responsible for some respiratory ailments, but the exact mechanism is not known. We evaluated whether DEP inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in bronchi as No is present in the exhaled air and has a physiological role in the respiratory tract. Aortic rings were also examined for comparison. We observed that acetylcholine (ACh) induced contraction of the bronchi was partially attenuated by the simultaneous release of NO. When bronchial rings were incubated either with N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA): an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) or with DEP, the contraction to ACh was abolished. The source of the NOS was the bronchial epithelium and this endothelial-constitutive NOS was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. DEP like L-NMA inhibited the ACh induced endothelium dependent relaxation in the aortic rings. The inhibition of NO release by DEP and L-NMA from bronchial and aortic rings was also confirmed by a selective NO electrode. We conclude that inhibition of NO availability by DEP may in part be responsible for the adverse respiratory effects seen by inhalation of these particles in polluted air. 27 refs., 6 figs.

Muto, Emiko; Hayashi, Toshio; Yamada, Kazuyoshi [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others] [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

CRADA Final Report For CRADA NO. CR-12-006 [Operation and Testing of an SO{sub 2}-depolarized Electrolyzer (SDE) for the Purpose of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past several years, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has led a team of collaborators under the Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear hydrogen production program to develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process. HyS is a 2-step water-splitting process consisting of high temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid to generate SO{sub 2}, followed by the electrolysis of aqueous SO{sub 2} to generate hydrogen and sulfuric acid. The latter is fed back into the high temperature reactor. SRNL designed and built an SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) and a test facility. Over 40 SDE’s were tested using different catalysts, membranes and other components. SRNL demonstrated that an SDE could be operated continuously for approximately 200 hours under certain conditions without buildup of sulfur at the SDE’s cathode, thus solving a key technical problem with SDE technology. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) is a major supplier of hydrogen production systems, and they have proprietary technology that could benefit from the SDE developed by SRNS, or some improved version thereof. However, to demonstrate that SRNL’s SDE is a truly viable approach to the electrolyzer design, continuous operation for far greater periods of time than 200 hours must be demonstrated, and the electrolyzer must be scaled up to greater hydrogen production capacities. SRNL and Air Products entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the objective of demonstrating the effectiveness of the SDE for hydrogen and sulfuric acid production and to demonstrate long-term continuous operation so as to dramatically increase the confidence in the SDE design for commercial operation. SRNL prepared a detailed technical report documenting previous SDE development, including the current SDE design and operating conditions that led to the 200-hour sulfurfree testing. SRNL refurbished its single cell SDE test facility and qualified the equipment for continuous operation. A new membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was fabricated and installed in the single cell electrolyzer (60 cm{sup 2} active cell area). Shakedown testing was conducted, and several modifications were made to the test facility equipment. Seven different MEAs were used during testing. Beginning on May 20, 2013, SRNL was able to test the SDE continuously for 1200 hours, including 1000 hours under power to generate hydrogen at an average rate of 10.8 liters per hour. The SDE was not removed or repaired during the 50-day test and was successfully restarted after each shutdown. The test was intentionally stopped after 1200 hours (1000 hours of hydrogen production) due to funding constraints. Post-test examination of the MEA using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDAX) showed no elemental sulfur deposits or sulfur layer inside the cell, thus successfully achieving the test goals. The results demonstrated that the SDE could be operated for extended periods without major performance degradation or the buildup of sulfur inside the MEA. Air Products conducted an assessment of the economic viability of the SDE based on the “as tested” design. The results indicated that the SDE faces significant economic obstacles in its current state. Further development and scale-up are necessary before the SDE is ready for commercialization.

Summers, W. A.; Colon-Mercado, H. R.; Steimke, J. L.; Zahn, Steffen

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser-saturated fluorescence of nitric oxide and chemiluminescence measurements in premixed ethanol flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, nitric oxide laser-saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements were acquired from premixed ethanol flames at atmospheric pressure in a burner. NO-LSF experimental profiles for fuel-rich premixed ethanol flames ({phi} = 1.34 and {phi} = 1.66) were determined through the excitation/detection scheme of the Q{sub 2}(26.5) rotational line in the A{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{pi} (0,0) vibronic band and {gamma}(0,1) emission band. A calibration procedure by NO doping into the flame was applied to establish the NO concentration profiles in these flames. Chemiluminescent emission measurements in the (0, 0) vibronic emission bands of the OH{sup *} (A{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} - X{sup 2}{pi}) and CH{sup *}(A{sup 2}{delta} - X{sup 2}{pi}) radicals were also obtained with high spatial and spectral resolution for fuel-rich premixed ethanol flames to correlate them with NO concentrations. Experimental chemiluminescence profiles and the ratios of the integrated areas under emission spectra (A{sub CH*}/A{sub CH*}(max.) and A{sub CH*}/A{sub OH*}) were determined. The relationships between chemiluminescence and NO concentrations were established along the premixed ethanol flames. There was a strong connection between CH{sup *} radical chemiluminescence and NO formation and the prompt-NO was identified as the governing mechanism for NO production. The results suggest the optimum ratio of the chemiluminescence of two radicals (A{sub CH*}/A{sub OH*}) for NO diagnostic purposes. (author)

Marques, Carla S.T.; Barreta, Luiz G.; Sbampato, Maria E.; dos Santos, Alberto M. [Aerothermodynamic and Hypersonic Division, Institute of Advanced Studies - General Command of Aerospatial Technology, Rodovia dos Tamoios, km 5.5, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos - SP (Brazil)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Acidic dissolution behavior of U containing ZrO2–MgO ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study explores the possibility of dissolving zirconia-magnesia inert matrix fuel containing uranium oxide as a fissile material and plutonium homolog and erbium oxide as a burnable poison with nitric and sulfuric acid as a potential first step in a reprocessing scheme. The progress of the dissolution is followed by monitoring the amount of material in solution by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, assessing the speciation of the material by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy, and determining and quantifying the crystalline phases present in the remaining residue by X-ray diffraction. This study has shown a linear incongruent dissolution of the cubic zirconia phase in concentrated nitric acid under certain chemical compositions, while the magnesium oxide phase is completely soluble. In sulfuric acid uranium, erbium, and magnesium are soluble to different extents while zirconium forms a colloidal suspension that conglomerates and settles out of solution. The feasibility of the dissolution of zirconia-magnesia inert matrix fuel with nitric and sulfuric acid for reprocessing is discussed.

Kiel Holliday; Nicholas Smith; Thomas Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Ken Czerwinski

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. A study has been conducted to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. A select few of the top candidate eluants from the screening tests were subjected to actual sorption (loading) and elution tests to confirm their elution ability. The actual sorption (loading) and elution tests mimicked the typical sRF-cesium ion exchange process (i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution) via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. The eluants tested included ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, and nitric acid. Calcium acetate and magnesium acetate were substitutes for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively due to corrosion concerns. Nitric acid was selected for benchmarking since it is the baseline cesium eluant for sRF resin. The cesium elution performance of ammonium carbonate and ammonium acetate was approximately the same as the benchmark eluant, nitric acid. Ninety-seven (97), 94, and 100% percent of the cesium sorbed or loaded were eluted by ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, and nitric acid was respectively. The performance of calcium acetate and magnesium acetate, on the other hand, was mediocre. Percent elution was 16 and 8 respectively.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

315

Bridging the Gap: Studying Sequence to Product Correlation among Fungal Polyketide Synthases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Citric and gluconic acid production from fig by Aspergillus niger using solid-state fermentation."industrial fermentation for the production of citric acid,

Zabala, Angelica Obusan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hien, Tran Thi [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)] [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Myung Ho [Heart Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)] [Heart Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hyperbaric oxygen and hypoxia alter production of nitric oxide by J774 murine macrophages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(no HBO), within each experiment. Control cells, incubated in P02 20mmHg or 40mmHg, produced significantly (P < 0.0001) less NO, ([] respectively), than did cells exposed to 95% room air (RA), 5% C02-Cells incubated in P02 = 20mmHg or 40mm...

Burden, Kyland Irle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylic acid synthesized Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

peracetic acid in an overnight... % trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) solution in methylene chloride, allowing for high conversion to the final vinyl product Source: Harth, Eva M. -...

320

Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3 all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. In the presence of a small concentration of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

Melissa E. Freiderich; Dean R. Peterman; John R. Klaehn; Philippe Marc; Laetitia H. Delmau

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contains nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and nitrous oxide,nitric oxide, while nitrogen dioxide is rapidly formedreadily oxidized to nitrogen dioxide, a pulmonary irritant.

World Health Organization

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An Improved Model for Sandstone Acidizing and Study of the Effect of Mineralogy and Temperature on Sandstone Acidizing Treatments and Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sandstone acidizing is a complex operation because the acidizing fluid reacts with a variety of minerals present in the formation that results in a wide range of reaction products. The hydrofluoric acid (HF) reaction rate differs widely from mineral...

Agarwal, Amit Kumar

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kudzu (Pueraria montana) invasion doubles emissions of nitric oxide and increases ozone pollution) The nitrogen-fixing legume kudzu (Pueraria montana) is a wide- spread invasive plant in the southeastern United the effects of kudzu invasions on soils and trace N gas emissions at three sites in Madison County, Georgia

Mickley, Loretta J.

324

Joule heating and nitric oxide in the thermosphere, 2 Charles A. Barth1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joule heating and nitric oxide in the thermosphere, 2 Charles A. Barth1 Received 14 April 2010, gravity waves propagate from the polar regions toward the equator heating the thermosphere at 140 km and higher. These gravity waves are produced by Joule heating that occurs at latitudes of 60° and higher

Bailey, Scott

325

[Ni(PPh2NC6H4X2)2]2+ Complexes as Electrocatalysts for H2 Production: Effect of Substituents, Acids, and Water on Catalytic Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of mononuclear nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) complexes [Ni(PPh2NPhX2)2](BF4)2 (PPh2NPhX2 = 1,5-di(para¬-X-phenyl)-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; X = OMe, Me, CH2P(O)(OEt)2, Br, and CF3) have been synthesized and characterized. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that [Ni(PPh2NPhMe2)2](BF4)2 and [Ni(PPh2NPhOMe2)2](BF4)2 are tetracoordinate with distorted square planar geometries. The Ni(II/I) and Ni(I/0) redox couples of each complex are electrochemically reversible in acetonitrile (0.2 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate) with potentials that are increasingly cathodic as the electron-donating character of X is increased. All of these complexes are efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen production, with rates generally increasing as the electron-donating character of X is decreased. Catalytic studies using 2,6-dichloroanilinium triflate (2,6-Cl2AnH+OTf , pKaMeCN = 5.0) 4-cyanoanilinium tetrafluoroborate (4-CNAnH+OTf , pKaMeCN = 7.0) and protonated dimethylformamide ([(DMF)H]+OTf , pKaMeCN = 6.1) reveal that turnover frequencies do not correlate with substrate acid pKa values, but are highly dependent on the acid structure, with this effect being related to substrate size. Addition of water is shown to dramatically increase catalytic rates for all catalysts. With [Ni(PPh2NPhCH2P(O)(OEt)22)2](BF4)2 using [(DMF)H]+OTf as acid and with added water, a turnover frequency of 1850 s-1 was obtained. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kilgore, Uriah J.; Roberts, John A.; Pool, Douglas H.; Appel, Aaron M.; Stewart, Michael P.; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Bullock, R. Morris; DuBois, Daniel L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development and testing of an advanced acid fracture conductivity apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wells. Acid fracturing is a standard practice to increase the production rate and to improve ultimate recovery in carbonate reservoirs. There have been successful cases in most carbonate reservoirs around the world. However acid fracture performance...

Zou, ChunLei

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture...

Keys, Ryan S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

ALKALI – CATALYSED PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL FUEL FROM NIGERIAN CITRUS SEEDS OIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiesel production was investigated. Fatty acid alkyl esters were produced from orange seed oil, grape

unknown authors

329

Reaction of Calcite and Dolomite with In-Situ Gelled Acids, Organic Acids, and Environmentally Friendly Chelating Agent (GLDA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Well stimulation is the treatment remedy when oil/gas productivity decreases to unacceptable economical limits. Well stimulation can be carried out through either "Matrix Acidizing" or fracturing with both "Hydraulic Fracturing" and "Acid Fracturing...

Rabie, Ahmed 1978-

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ab-initio simulations of chemical stability indicators of the bis-DGA-type molecule and its radiation degradation products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For hydrometallurgical treatment of the high level liquid waste (HLLW) in the DIAMEX and SANEX processes, organic compounds of the bis-DGA family are used as cation extractants in apolar solvents. For the compound of m-xylylene-bis-diglycolamide high distribution coefficients for Eu and Am were found. Since the environment of the process is highly radioactive and acidic (nitric acid), it is necessary to ensure the stability of the extractants. In order to analyse the process theoretically, the molecule of m-xylylene-bis- diglycolamide and two of its degradation products were simulated by the DFT computational methods (PBE, RPBE, BLYP, B3LYP) available within the simulation environment DMol{sup 3} 6.1 and Gaussian 09 software. The local chemical stability of some locations of the molecule was assessed from the calculated stability indicators (electrostatic potential, Fukui function, HOMO localization). In connection with the chemical treatment, especially the stability against an electrophilic attack was tested. The results of calculated bond orders and spatial distribution of electrostatic potential and HOMO were are successfully correlated with the local and general stability determined by the experiment. These results should be helpful for the further development of the separation process. (authors)

Koubsky, T.; Kalvoda, L.; Drab, M. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Dept. of Solid State Engineering, Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The role of nitric oxide in testosterone-induced vasodilation in pig coronary arteries and rat thoracic aorta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several studies have provided evidence that the administration of testosterone to vascular tissue causes vasodilation (Costarella, Yue). This study examines the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a potential mechanism of testosterone-induced vasodilation...

Piefer, Jason William

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Specific Visualization of Nitric Oxide in the Vasculature with Two-Photon Microscopy Using a Copper Based Fluorescent Probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To study the role and (sub) cellular nitric oxide (NO) constitution in various disease processes, its direct and specific detection in living cells and tissues is a major requirement. Several methods are available to measure ...

Ghosh, Mitrajit

333

Investigation on Nitric Oxide and Soot of Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel using a Medium Duty Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel has been suggested as an alternative fuel to the petroleum diesel fuel. It beneficially reduces regulated emission gases, but increases NOx (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide) Thus, the increase in NOx is the barrier for potential growth...

Song, Hoseok

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Radioiodinated fatty acid analogs for myocardial imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fatty acids are the preferred substrate for the normoxic heart. About sixty percent of the energy required by the myocardium is provided by fatty acid [beta]-oxidation. Many scientists have focused on the alterations in fatty acid metabolism in the ischemic heart for the development of radiolabelled fatty acids for functional imaging of the heart. Three main categories of compounds were synthesized: tetrazoles (1 and 2), glycidic and [alpha]-methylene acids (3-5), and analogs of oleic acid (6,7 and 7A). The tetrazole group has a similar pKa and size to that of a carboxyl group; however, such fatty acid analogs cannot undergo normal fatty acid metabolism. Glycidic and [alpha]-methylene analogs are potential irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. Oleic acid analogs were investigated to assess the affect of stereochemical consequences on biodistribution. The key intermediates in the synthesis of the target compounds were [omega]-nitrophenyl alkylcarboxylic acids and alcohols, which were made using a variety of cross-coupling reactions. The Wittig reaction, which was used in the synthesis of tetrazole 1 and glycidic acid 3, gave low yields of the cross-coupled products. The remaining target compounds were synthesized by condensation of appropriate RCu (CN) ZnI and substituted benzyl bromides or by Pd[sup II] catalyzed cross-coupling of substituted arylhalides with suitable alkynes. The latter two reactions produced much higher yields of the desired products. All of the target compounds were radiolabeled with [sup 125]I by various Cu(I) catalyzed radioiodine exchange procedures and were then subjected to tissue biodistribution (TD) studies in rats. Except for the 15-(4-iodophenyl)-2-methylene-pentadecanoic acid (5), all of the fatty acid analogs failed to surpass clinically-used 15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) in their ability to be taken up and retained by the rat myocardium.

Ruyan, M.K.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Lactic acid fermentation of crude sorghum extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude extract from sweet sorghum supplemented with vetch juice was utilized as the carbohydrate source for fermentative production of lactic acid. Fermentation of media containing 7% (w/v) total sugar was completed in 60-80 hours by Lactobacillus plantarum, product yield averaging 85%. Maximum acid production rates were dependent on pH, initial substrate distribution, and concentration, the rates varying from 2 to 5 g/liter per hour. Under limited medium supplementation the lactic acid yield was lowered to 67%. The fermented ammoniated product contained over eight times as much equivalent crude protein (N x 6.25) as the original medium. Unstructured kinetic models were developed for cell growth, lactic acid formation, and substrate consumption in batch fermentation. With the provision of experimentally determined kinetic parameters, the proposed models accurately described the fermentation process. 15 references.

Samuel, W.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Anthony, W.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

amino acid limitation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of energy requirements for milk production. The protein deficiency was alleviated by infusion Bequette, Brian J. 3 Enantiomeric separation of amino acids and nonprotein amino...

337

acidic soil isolates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil pH indicates its alkalinity or acidity. This property influences soil chemistry and crop production. A low maintenance ROSS Ultra Triodeguarantees accurate measurement of...

338

Investigating fatty acid biosynthesis within the algal chloroplast using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offering a continuous algal production-secretion system thatalgal lipids [124]. As such, there are many research groups interested in engineering fatty acid production and secretion

Blatti, Jillian L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid tar sludges Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of diethylphosphorodithioic acid in the production of phorate. K040 Wastewater treatment sludge from the production of phorate... of facilities within the iron and steel...

340

Complexation of lanthanides and actinides by acetohydroxamic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a suitable reagent for the complexant-based, as opposed to reductive, stripping of plutonium and neptunium ions from the tributylphosphate solvent phase in advanced PUREX or UREX processes designed for future nuclear-fuel reprocessing. Stripping is achieved by the formation of strong hydrophilic complexes with the tetravalent actinides in nitric acid solutions. To underpin such applications, knowledge of the complexation constants of AHA with all relevant actinide (5f) and lanthanide (4f) ions is therefore important. This paper reports the determination of stability constants of AHA with the heavier lanthanide ions (Dy-Yb) and also U(IV) and Th(IV) ions. Comparisons with our previously published AHA stability-constant data for 4f and 5f ions are made. (authors)

Taylor, R.J. [British Technology Centre, Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Sinkov, S.I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Production of levulinic acid in urban biorefineries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy security of the United States depends, most experts agree, on the development of substitute sources of energy for the transportation sector, which accounts for over 93% of the nation's petroleum consumption. ...

Sheldon-Coulson, Garth Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fermentation) rate and increasing the production of neutral products at the expense of acetic andand acetic acid concen- trations on the rate of fermentationacetic acid production (data not shown). all fermentation

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ethanol production in non-recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Non-recombinant bacteria that produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product, associated nucleic acids and polypeptides, methods for producing ethanol using the bacteria, and kits are disclosed.

Kim, Youngnyun; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA); Niemeyer, Christof M. (Bremen, DE); Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Sano, Takeshi (Boston, MA); Hnatowich, Donald J. (Brookline, MA); Rusckowski, Mary (Southborough, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Conservation in Fertilizer Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to NFDC to promote acceptance of this technology by the fertilizer production industry. The PCR uses the heat of reaction of ammonia with phosphoric acid and sulfuric acid to replace fossil fuel heat used...

Mings, W. J.; Sonnett, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Interaction of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in microglia by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the interaction between proinflammatory and inflammatory responses caused by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in primary cultured microglial cells and BV-2 microglia. LTA induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels increase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, LTA also increased nitric oxide (NO) and PGE{sub 2} production in microglia. Administration of TLR2 antagonist effectively inhibited LTA-induced NO, iNOS, and COX-2 expression. Moreover, treatment of cells with LTA caused a time-dependent activation of ERK, p38, JNK, as well as AKT. We also found that LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 up-regulation were attenuated by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. On the other hand, LTA-enhanced HO-1 expression was attenuated by p38 and PI3-kinase inhibitors. Treatment of cells with NF-?B and AP-1 inhibitors antagonized LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression. However, only NF-?B inhibitors reduced LTA-induced HO-1 expression in microglia. Furthermore, stimulation of cells with LTA also activated I?B? phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation at Ser{sup 536}, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, LTA-induced increases of ?B-DNA and AP-1-DNA binding activity were inhibited by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. HO-1 activator CoPP IX dramatically reversed LTA-induced iNOS expression. Our results provided mechanisms linking LTA and inflammation/anti-inflammation, and indicated that LTA plays a regulatory role in microglia activation. - Highlights: • LTA causes an increase in iNOS, COX-2, and HO-1 expression in microglia. • LTA induces iNOS and COX-2 expression through TLR-2/NF-?B and AP-1 pathways. • HO-1 expression is regulated through p38, JNK, PI3K/AKT and AP-1 pathways. • Induced HO-1 reduces LTA-induced iNOS expression. • LTA plays a regulatory role on inflammatory/anti-inflammatory responses.

Huang, Bor-Ren [Department of Neurosurgery, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taichung Branch, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Cheng-Fang [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hsiao-Yun [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shiang-Suo [Department of Pharmacology and Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chi-Rei [Graduate Institute of Chinese Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chingju [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Wei-Lan [Cancer Research Center, Department of Medical Research, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lu, Dah-Yuu, E-mail: dahyuu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Neural and Cognitive Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Selective reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over vanadia on pillared titanium phosphate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the catalyst. Shikada et al. (1981) compared AlzOz, SiOz, and SiO, ? TiOz (equimolar) supports for VzOs using a simulated flue gas containing 100 ppni SOz. The silica- titanium dioxide supported catalyst showed the highest NO conversions followed by those...SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE YVITH AMMONIA OVER VANADIA ON PILLARED TITANIUM PHOSPHATE A Thesis LAWRENCE JOSEPH CZARNECKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

Czarnecki, Lawrence Joseph

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Stabilization of Water-in-Oil Emulsions by Naphthenic Acids and Their Salts: Model Compounds, Role of pH, and Soap : Acid Ratio#  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stabilization of Water-in-Oil Emulsions by Naphthenic Acids and Their Salts: Model Compounds, Role of high acidity are observed in production of petroleum reserves. Naphthenic acids, which are generally experimental results on naphthenic acid/ naphthenate stabilized emulsions utilizing several model compounds

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

352

Plasma Production via Field Ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Kreutzer, Cory (Brighton, CO); Wilson, Carolina (Arvada, CO); Meiser, Manfred (Aurora, CO)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

The application of N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DOGA) in the PUREX process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new salt-free complexant, DOGA for separating trace Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) nitric acid solution was studied. DOGA has stronger complexing abilities to Pu(IV) and Np(IV), but complexing ability of DOGA to U(VI) was weaker. The DOGA can be used in the PUREX process to separate Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) nitric solution. On one hand, U(IV) in the nitric acid solution containing trace Pu(IV) and Np(IV) was extracted by 30%TBP - kerosene(v/v) in the presence of DOGA, but Pu(IV) and Np(IV) were kept in the aqueous phase. On the other hand, Pu(IV) and Np(IV) loading in 30% TBP - kerosene were effectively stripped by DOGA into the aqueous phase, but U(VI) loading in 30% TBP - kerosene was remained in 30% TBP - kerosene. DOGA is a promising complexant to separate Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) solution in the U-cycle of the PUREX process. (authors)

Jianchen, Wang; Jing, Chen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology - INET, Tsinghua University, P.O. Box 1021, Beijing 102201 (China)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Some Suggested Pest Control Products Appropriate for an IPM Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some Suggested Pest Control Products Appropriate for an IPM Program I P M (professional use products) Cockroaches Product Formulation Active Ingredient Maxforce bait stations Hydramethylnon Station (IGR) Hydroprene Dusts Silica aerogel or boric acid Compressed air flushing agent air Carpenter

Virginia Tech

356

Inhibition of Biohydrogen Production by Undissociated Acetic and Butyric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhibition of Biohydrogen Production by Undissociated Acetic and Butyric Acids S T E V E N V A N G Sackett Building, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16801 Glucose fermentation to hydrogen results in the production of acetic and butyric acids. The inhibitory effect of these acids

357

Abstract A novel succinic acid-producing bacterium was isolated from bovine rumen. The bacterium is a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

succinic acid, acetic acid and formic acid at a constant ratio of 2:1:1. When M. succiniciproducens MBEL55E of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and also as one of the fermentation products of anaerobic metabo- lism (Gottschalk 1986; Zeikus 1980). Fermentative pro- duction of succinic acid from renewable biomass has re

358

Production of levulinic acid, furfural, and gamma valerolactone from C.sub.5 and C.sub.6 carbohydrates in mono- and biphasic systems using gamma-valerolactone as a solvent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to make levulinic acid (LA), furfural, or gamma-valerolactone (GVL). React cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates) or xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates) or combinations thereof in a monophasic reaction medium comprising GVL and an acid; or (ii) a biphasic reaction system comprising an organic layer comprising GVL, and a substantially immiscible aqueous layer. At least a portion of the cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates), if present, is converted to LA and at least a portion of the xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates), if present, is converted into furfural.

Dumesic, James A.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif I.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effect of potassium permanganate as an oxidizing agent in the production of lignite-based fertilizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to observe the effect of potassium permanganate oxidation of lignites from Elbistan for end use as fertilizers, after being ammoniated. The experiments at each stage were designed by a 1/2 x full factorial design. The oxidation was carried out by three different methods. In the first two methods potassium permanganate in neutral or basic medium was used. In the other method two stages of oxidation were used: nitric acid followed by potassium permanganate in acidic medium. The latter proved to be more successful.

Baris, S.; Dincer, S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Processes to remove acid forming gases from exhaust gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for reducing the concentration of NO in a gas, which process comprises: (A) contacting a gas sample containing NO with a gaseous oxidizing agent to oxidize the NO to NO[sub 2]; (B) contacting the gas sample of step (A) comprising NO[sub 2] with an aqueous reagent of bisulfite/sulfite and a compound selected from urea, sulfamic acid, hydrazinium ion, hydrazoic acid, nitroaniline, sulfanilamide, sulfanilic acid, mercaptopropanoic acid, mercaptosuccinic acid, cysteine or combinations thereof at between about 0 and 100 C at a pH of between about 1 and 7 for between about 0.01 and 60 sec; and (C) optionally contacting the reaction product of step (A) with conventional chemical reagents to reduce the concentrations of the organic products of the reaction in step (B) to environmentally acceptable levels. Urea or sulfamic acid are preferred, especially sulfamic acid, and step (C) is not necessary or performed. 16 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Metabolism of Aluminum Citrate and Biosynthesis of Oxalic Acid in Pseudomonas fluorescens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bioavailability of aluminum triggered by in- dustrialization and acid rain [20]. The presence of organic acidsThe Metabolism of Aluminum Citrate and Biosynthesis of Oxalic Acid in Pseudomonas fluorescens Vasu-citrate) was metabolized intracellularly and that oxalic acid was an important product in the Al-stressed cells

Appanna, Vasu

362

APPLICATION OF FORMOHYDROXAMIC ACID IN NUCLEAR PROCESSING: SYNTHESIS AND COMPLEXATION WITH TECHNETIUM-99  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) is an organic ligand planned for use in the Uranium Extraction (UREX) process. It reduces neptunium and plutonium, and the resultant hydrophilic complexes are separated from uranium by extraction with tributyl phosphate (TBP) in a hydrocarbon diluent. AHA undergoes hydrolysis to acetic acid which will impede the recycling of nitric acid. During recent discussions of the UREX process, it has been proposed to replace AHA by formohydroxamic acid (FHA). FHA will undergo hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. The reported reduction potentials of AHA and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) indicated that it may be possible for AHA to reduce technetium, altering its fate in the fuel cycle. At UNLV, it has been demonstrated that TcO{sub 4}{sup -} undergoes reductive nitrosylation by AHA under a variety of conditions. The resulting divalent technetium is complexed by AHA to form the pseudo-octahedral trans-aquonitrosyl (diacetohydroxamic)-technetium(II) complex ([Tc{sup II}(NO)(AHA){sub 2}H{sub 2}O]{sup +}). In this paper, we are reporting the synthesis of FHA and its complex formation with technetium along with the characterization of FHA crystals achieved by NMR and IR spectroscopy. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the complexation of FHA with Tc and the results were compared with previous data on AHA. The first experiment involved the elution of Tc from a Reillex HP anion exchange resin, and the second one monitored the complexation of technetium with FHA by UV-visible spectrophotometry.

Amber Wright; Edward Mausolf; Keri Campbell; Frederic Poineau; P. Paviet-Hartmann

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reaction of nitric oxide with heme proteins and model compounds of hemoglobin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rates for the reaction of nitric oxide with several ferric heme proteins and model compounds have been measured. The NO combination rates are markedly affected by the presence or absence of distal histidine. Elephant myoglobin in which the E7 distal histidine has been replaced by glutamine reacts with NO 500-1000 times faster than do the native hemoglobins or myoglobins. By contrast, there is not difference in the CO combination rate constants of sperm whale and elephant myoglobins. Studies on ferric model compounds for the R and T states of hemoglobin indicate that their NO combination rate constants are similar to those observed for the combination of CO with the corresponding ferro derivatives. The last observation suggests that the presence of an axial water molecule at the ligand binding site of ferric hemoglobin A prevents it from exhibiting significant cooperativity in its reactions with NO.

Sharma, V.S.; Traylor, T.G.; Gardiner, R.; Mizukami, H.

1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Structure of a Loose Dimer: an Intermediate in Nitric Oxide Synthase Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperativity among ligand binding, subunit association, and protein folding has implications for enzyme regulation as well as protein aggregation events associated with disease. The binding of substrate l-arginine or cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin converts nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) from a 'loose dimer', with an exposed active center and higher sensitivity to proteolysis, to a 'tight dimer' competent for catalysis. The crystallographic structure of the Bacillus subtilis NOS loose dimer shows an altered association state with severely destabilized subdomains. Ligand binding or heme reduction converts loose dimers to tight dimers in solution and crystals. Mutations at key positions in the dimer interface that distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic NOSs affect the propensity to form loose dimers. The loose dimer structure indicates that non-native interactions can mediate subunit association in NOS.

Pant,K.; Crane, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

acid reduce post-coronary: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has been effective in removing the ammonia and the resulting product can be used for fertilizer. However, sulfuric acid costs moreTitle: Using acidic electrolyzed water to reduce...

366

In vivo unnatural amino acid expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides orthogonal translation systems for the production of polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris. Methods for producing polypeptides comprising unnatural amino acids in methyltrophic yeast such as Pichia pastoris are also provided.

Young, Travis [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Comparative Study of Dolomite Dissolution in Simple Organic Acids and Chelating Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid treatments have predominantly been conducted using HCl for its availability, high rock dissolving power and soluble reaction products. At high temperatures, rapid spending of the acid with carbonates prevents deeper penetration distance...

Adenuga, Olusegun O

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

Three-dimensional Modeling of Acid Transport and Etching in a Fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid fracture stimulation generates higher well production but requires engineering design for treatment optimization. To quantify the cost and benefit of a particular acid fracture treatment an engineer must predict the resulting fracture...

Oeth, Cassandra V

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effect of Bioreactor Mode of Operation on Mixed-Acid Fermentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facultative anaerobic community existing in a biofilm. Compared to countercurrent trains, propagated fixed-bed fermentations have similar selectivity and acid distribution, but lower yield, conversion, productivity, and acid concentration. One- to six...

Golub, Kristina

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

Docosahexaenoic acid and butyrate synergistically modulate intracellular calcium compartmentalization to induce colonocyte apoptosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) from fish oil, and butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid fiber-fermentation product, protect against colon tumorigenesis in part by coordinately inducing apoptosis. We have demonstrated that the combination...

Kolar, Satya Sree N.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential Equilibrium and Dynamics) method.

Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

Integrated production/use of ultra low-ash coal, premium liquids and clean char. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to invert the conventional scale of values for products of coal utilization processes by making coal chars (carbons) that, because of their unique properties, are the most valuable materials in the product slate. A unique type of coal-derived carbon studied in this project is oxidized activated coal char having both adsorptive and catalyst properties. Major program elements were (a) preparation and characterization of materials (b) characterization of carbons and catalyst testing (c) completion of diesel engine testing of low-ash coal and (d) initiation of a two-year adsorption study. Materials prepared were (a) two low-ash coal samples one via ChemCoal processing of IBC-109 and the other by acid dissolution of IBC-109`s mineral matter, (b) coal char (MG char), (c) activated low-ash carbon (AC), (d) oxidized activated carbon (OAC). Amoco continued its support with state-of-the art analytical capabilities and development of catalyst testing procedures. Diesel engine tests were made with low ash coal dispersed in diesel fuel at solid loadings of 20% and 35%. The slurry was successfully burned in cylinder 2 of a two-cylinder diesel engine, after modifications of the engine`s fuel injection system. The higher speed proved to be more favorable but the slurry burned with a slightly improved thermal and combustion efficiency at both speeds with respect to diesel fuel alone. Adsorption studies included preparation of seven base-line carbon samples and their characterization, including their N{sub 2} BET surface areas and apparent densities. Paranitrophenol (PNP) adsorption isotherms were determined for the six controls. Oxidation of carbon with nitric acid decreases activated carbon`s PNP adsorption capacity while air oxidation increases adsorption capacity.

Kruse, C.W.; Carlson, S.L. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Snoeyink, V.L.; Feizoulof, C.; Assanis; Syrimis, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana (United States); Fatemi, S.M. [Amoco, Naperville, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Uniform nano-ripples on the sidewall of silicon carbide micro-hole fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation and acid etching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uniform nano-ripples were observed on the sidewall of micro-holes in silicon carbide fabricated by 800-nm femtosecond laser and chemical selective etching. The morphology of the ripple was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy. The formation mechanism of the micro-holes was attributed to the chemical reaction of the laser affected zone with mixed solution of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid. The formation of nano-ripples on the sidewall of the holes could be attributed to the standing wave generated in z direction due to the interference between the incident wave and the reflected wave.

Khuat, Vanthanh [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049 (China); Le Quy Don Technical University, No. 100, Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Hanoi 7EN-248 (Viet Nam); Chen, Tao; Gao, Bo; Si, Jinhai, E-mail: jinhaisi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ma, Yuncan; Hou, Xun [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Plant fatty acid hydroxylases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A ACID RAIN Audrey Gibson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- SO2 Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) react in the atmosphere with water;Gas Natural Sources Concentration Carbon dioxide CO2 Decomposition 355 ppm Nitric oxide NO Electric discharge 0.01 ppm Sulfur dioxide SO2 Volcanic gases 0-0.01 ppm Table 1 Carbon dioxide, produced

Toohey, Darin W.

378

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Acid/Base Recovery From Sodium Sulfate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

escalating In price due to the Imbalance In market demand. Chlorine and caustic are produced together by the electrolysis 01 sodium chloride brine solutions. Every ECU (electrochemical unit) 01 chlorine resu~s In the production 01 one ECU 01 caustic soda... cell also produces an acid product that is contaminated with unreacted sullate. The voltage 01 a three compartment is higher, however, and the process system Is more complex. Process System Current density and efficiency determines the amount 01...

Niksa, M. J.

380

Cleavage of nucleic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cleavage of nucleic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nucleic acid detection compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James L. (Madison, WI)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

ACID EVAPORATION OF ULTIMA GOLD TM AB LIQUID SCINTILLATION COCKTAIL RESIDUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior analyses of samples from the F/H Lab solutions showed the presence of diisopropylnapthalene (DIN), a major component of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB liquid scintillation cocktail (LSC). These solutions are processed through H-Canyon Tank 10.5 and ultimately through the 17.8E evaporator. Similar solutions originated in SRNL streams sent to the same H Canyon tanks. This study examined whether the presence of these organics poses a process-significant hazard for the evaporator. Evaporation and calorimetry testing of surrogate samples containing 2000 ppm of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB LSC in 8 M nitric acid have been completed. These experiments showed that although reactions between nitric acid and the organic components do occur, they do not appear to pose a significant hazard for runaway reactions or generation of energetic compounds in canyon evaporators. The amount of off-gas generated was relatively modest and appeared to be well within the venting capacity of the H-Canyon evaporators. A significant fraction of the organic components likely survives the evaporation process primarily as non-volatile components that are not expected to represent any new process concerns during downstream operations such as neutralization. Laboratory Waste solutions containing minor amounts of DIN can be safely received, stored, transferred, and processed through the canyon waste evaporator.

Kyser, E.; Fondeur, F.; Crump, S.

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of Composite K East Canister Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were performed to examine mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KECDVSR24H-2) produced during a 20- to 24-hr dissolution of a composite K East (KE) Basin canister sludge in 95 C 6 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KECDVSR24H-2, contains radionuclides at concentrations which exceed the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for TRU by about a factor of 70, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 200, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 50. The solids also exceed the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 2 and uranium by a factor of 5. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (both components of TRU) and then uranium and {sup 137}Cs.

Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

Up-regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2}{alpha} expression by N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate in PC12 cells; involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disulfiram (an alcohol-aversive drug) and related compounds are known to provoke several side effects involving behavioral and neurological complications. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is considered as one of the main toxic species of disulfiram and acts as an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase. Since arachidonic acid (AA) formation is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related to toxicity in neuronal cells, we investigated the effects of DDC on AA release and expression of the {alpha} type of cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}{alpha}) in PC12 cells. Treatment with 80-120 {mu}M DDC that causes a moderate increase in ROS levels without cell toxicity stimulated cPLA{sub 2}{alpha} mRNA and its protein expression. The expression was mediated by extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), one of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Treatment with N {sup G} nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 1 mM) and oxy-hemoglobin (a scavenger of nitric oxide, 2 mg/mL) abolished the DDC-induced responses (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cPLA{sub 2}{alpha} expression). We also showed DDC-induced up-regulation of the mRNA expression of lipocortin 1, an inhibitor of PLA{sub 2}. Furthermore, DDC treatment of the cells enhanced Ca{sup 2+}-ionophore-induced AA release in 30 min, although the effect was limited. Changes in AA metabolism in DDC-treated cells may have a potential role in mediating neurotoxic actions of disulfiram. In this study, we show the first to demonstrate the up-regulation of cPLA{sub 2}{alpha} expression by DDC treatment in neuronal cells.

Akiyama, Nobuteru [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Nabemoto, Maiko [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Hatori, Yoshio [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroyuki [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Hirabayashi, Tetsuya [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Fujino, Hiromichi [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Saito, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Murayama, Toshihiko [Laboratory of Chemical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)]. E-mail: murayama@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

Photoenhanced anaerobic digestion of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for rapid conversion of organic acids and alcohols anaerobic digesters into hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the optimal precursor substrates for production of methane. The process includes addition of photosynthetic bacteria to the digester and exposure of the bacteria to radiant energy (e.g., solar energy). The process also increases the pH stability of the digester to prevent failure of the digester. Preferred substrates for photosynthetic bacteria are the organic acid and alcohol waste products of fermentative bacteria. In mixed culture with methanogenic bacteria or in defined co-culture with non-aceticlastic methanogenic bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria are capable of facilitating the conversion or organic acids and alcohols into methane with low levels of light energy input.

Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE ACIDS CONTAINING PHOSPHOROUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12.1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for ACIDS CONTAINING PHOSPHOROUS Location(s): ___________________________________________________ Chemical(s): Hypophosphorous acid, methylphosphonic acid, phosphonic acid, phosphoric acid, phosphorous

Pawlowski, Wojtek

390

Iron porphyrin polymer films: Materials for the modification of electrode surfaces and the detection of nitric oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are currently investigating a new method for the detection and quantification of nitric oxide (NO) based on a carbon electrode chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. Commercially available vinyl-substituted iron porphyrin monomers can be polymerized directly onto electrode surfaces through a published electrochemical polymerization process. We are also developing a synthesis for a new vinyl-substituted monomer, iron 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-vinyl porphyrin chloride, in hopes of improving polymer film stability. The electrochemistry of NO is also being investigated at electrodes chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. We are studying the catalytic oxidation of iron porphyrin bound NO to nitrate by molecular oxygen. The reaction with molecular oxygen is preceded by a one electron reduction of the iron porphyrin-NO complex. If currents proportional to nitric oxide concentration can be measured, a new NO electrochemical sensor will be designed.

McGuire, M.; Drew, S.M. [Carleton College, Northfield, MN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Design, set up, and testing of a matrix acidizing apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Well stimulation techniques are applied on a regular basis to enhance productivity and maximize recovery in oil and gas wells. Among these techniques, matrix acidizing is probably the most widely performed job because of its relative low cost...

Nevito Gomez, Javier

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded Magnetic Nanoparticles for Spent Nuclear Fuel. Separation Nanotechnology of Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Bonded...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - adenosine triphosphoric acid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

34559. 7... a series of breakdown products to, ultimately, uric acid. The degradation of ATP and adenosine is extremely... receptors for extracellular ... Source: Burnstock,...

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o Summary: production of antioxidants. In plants, antioxidants a-tocopherol (vitamin E) and ascorbic acid...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic oligotrophic fen Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

beyond the nutrient-productivity paradigm. For example, acid precipitation, heavy metal and toxic... of their trophic status. Lakes with low nutrients and low organic...

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylsalicylic acid supplementation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 84 Fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in wastewater treatment plants -Conception of a database and first results Summary: acid (detected...

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic wastes synthesis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food waste: Current status, problems and an alternative product Summary: alternative to biogas generation. The volatile fatty acids (VFA) produced from food waste in a...

399

Evaluation of Acid Fracturing Using the Method of Distributed Volumetric Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acid volume versus cumulative production with optimum fracture half length............................................................................................40 4.1 For Well SA-2, IPR and VLP curves shows production rates... at the beginning of production....................................................................................47 4.2 For Well SA-2, IPR & VLP curves shows production rates at the end of production history; the absolute open flow (AOF) of IPR is much less...

Lee, Jaehun

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Preparation and recovery of methacrylic acid and its esters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the vapor phase catalytic oxydehydrogenation of isobutyric acid or its esters to form methacrylic acid or its esters wherein the gaseous product is condensed and purified. The improvement described here consists of adding to the gaseous product at or about the point of its condensation from 1 to 6000 ppm of a surfactant material selected from the group consisting of an anionic a cationic and non-ionic surfactant.

Frank, P.J.; Hite, J.R.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

403

Well Productivity Enhancement of High Temperature Heterogeneous Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acidizing is one of the most popular techniques for well productivity enhancement during oil and gas production. However, the treatment method is not very effective when the wellbore penetrates through multiple layers of heterogeneous reservoirs...

Wang, Guanqun

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

Preston, III, James F. (Micanopy, FL); Chow, Virginia (Gainesville, FL); Nong, Guang (Gainesville, FL); Rice, John D. (Gainesville, FL); St. John, Franz J. (Baltimore, MD)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

Roles of Glutamates and Metal ions in a Rationally Designed Nitric Oxide Reductase Based on Myoglobin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A structural and functional model of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) has been designed by introducing two glutamates (Glu) and three histidines (His) in sperm whale myoglobin. X-ray structural data indicate that the three His and one Glu (V68E) residues bind iron, mimicking the putative FeB site in NOR, while the second Glu (I107E) interacts with a water molecule and forms a hydrogen bonding network in the designed protein. Unlike the first Glu (V68E), which lowered the heme reduction potential by {approx}110 mV, the second Glu has little effect on the heme potential, suggesting that the negatively charged Glu has a different role in redox tuning. More importantly, introducing the second Glu resulted in a {approx}100% increase in NOR activity, suggesting the importance of a hydrogen bonding network in facilitating proton delivery during NOR reactivity. In addition, EPR and X-ray structural studies indicate that the designed protein binds iron, copper, or zinc in the FeB site, each with different effects on the structures and NOR activities, suggesting that both redox activity and an intermediate five-coordinate heme-NO species are important for high NOR activity. The designed protein offers an excellent model for NOR and demonstrates the power of using designed proteins as a simpler and more well-defined system to address important chemical and biological issues.

Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; S Tian; H Robinson; Y Lu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reversible Acid Gas Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

Dave Heldebrant

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

EMSL - Nuclei acid structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet...

409

Nuclei acid structure | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet...

410

Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sustainable and efficient biohydrogen production via electrohydrogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/mol (50­99% of the theoretical maxi- mum) at applied voltages of 0.2 to 0.8 V using acetic acid, a typical dead-end product of glucose or cellulose fermentation. At an applied voltage of 0.6 V, the overall of combustion of acetic acid was included in the energy balance, at a gas production rate of 1.1 m3 of H2 per

412

Phosphate bonded structural products from high volume wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method to produce structural products from benign waste is provided comprising mixing pretreated oxide with phosphoric acid to produce an acid solution, mixing the acid solution with waste particles to produce a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a structural material comprising waste particles enveloped by an inorganic binder. 1 fig.

Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Naphthenic acids as antiwear additives for jet fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the ways in which the antiwear properties of jet fuels can be improved is the use of lubricity agents, otherwise known as antiwear additives. Among the various compounds that have antiwear properties in these fuels, naphthenic, acids merit special attention. These are alicyclic carboxylic acids, in most cases monobasic, with five- and six-membered carbon rings; they have the general formula R(CH{sub 2}){sub n}COOH, where R is a naphthene radical. Natural naphthenic acids consist mainly of acids of the cyclopentane series, beginning with the simplest, in particular cyclopentylacetic acid. The lower naphthenic acids are monocyclic; the higher acids, beginning with C{sub 13}, are bicyclic and polycyclic. Naphthenic acids of the cyclohexane series are encountered less frequently; they may be found, for example, in Baku, California, and Sakhalin crudes. The most widely used method for obtaining naphthenic acids is the treatment of light distillates, lube distillates, and diesel fuels. The standard GOST 13302-77 establishes several grades of naphthenic acids, depending on the raw material and the production technology. This work was aimed at the utilization of wastes containing naphthenic acids, with subsequent use as jet fuel additives.

Deineko, P.S.; Vasil`eva, E.N.; Popova, O.V.; Bashkatova, S.T.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ECOS Inquiries Series -University of Montana Effect of Acid Rain on the Ability of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ECOS Inquiries Series - University of Montana Effect of Acid Rain on the Ability of Soil Microbes OF ACID RAIN ON THE ABILITY OF SOIL MICROBES TO DECOMPOSE ORGANIC NITROGEN 3. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES: a ecosystems. One well known example of this is the production of acid rain due to certain air pollutants

Brewer, Carol

415

QUALIT DES ENSILAGES DE MAS GRAIN HUMIDE PRSERVS PAR L'ACIDE PROPIONIQUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

product) and acetic (0,1-0,3 per cent) acids are produced by carbohydrate fermentation. The silage p maïs grain humide, la fermentation des glucides entraîne une pro- duction notable d'acides lactique (0 degradative change is practically inhi- bited after 3 to 8 months : in our assays, lactic and acetic acids

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

416

Firmness and cell wall characteristics of pasteurized jalapeno pepper rings affected by acetic acid, calcium chloride and preheating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pasteurization and storage, especially when high acid brines are used. Development of treatments to retard softening may result in a higher quality product. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of calcium chloride (CaCI2), acetic acid...

Burma, Prashanthi V

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids syn-anti-1-amino-3-2-iodoethenyl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(entry 1... production of unnatural -substituted R-amino acids using R-phthalylglycyl chloride (77% yield, 98:2 syn... Development of a New Lewis Acid-Catalyzed Claisen...

418

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL ELUANTS FOR NON-ACID ELUTION OF CESIUM FROM RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions are among the waste treatment plans in the DOE-complex. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (sRF) is the ion exchange resin selected for use in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). It is also the primary ion exchange material under consideration for SCIX at the Hanford site. The elution step of the multi-step ion exchange process is typically done with 0.5 M nitric acid. An acid eluant is a potential hazard in the event of a spill, leak, etc. because the high-level waste tanks are made of carbon steel. Corrosion and associated structural damage may ensue. Studies are ongoing to explore non-acid elution as an alternative. Batch contact sorption equilibrium screening tests have been conducted with 36 potential non-acid eluants. The sorption tests involve equilibrating each cesium-containing eluant solution with the sRF resin for 48 hours at 25 C in a shaker oven. In the sorption tests, an eluant is deemed to have a high cesium elution potential if it minimizes cesium sorption onto the sRF resin. The top candidates (based on lowest cesium sorption distribution coefficients) include ammonium carbonate, ammonium carbonate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate, rubidium carbonate, ammonium acetate, ammonium acetate/ammonium hydroxide, ammonium bicarbonate/ammonium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride. The next phase of testing for this work will focus on the following down selected eluants: Ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, nitric acid, and ammonium hydroxide. The next testing phase is a confirmation of the elution ability of the selected eluants. It will mimic a typical sRF cesium ion exchange process i.e., sorption or loading, caustic wash, water rinse, and elution via batch contact sorption and quasi column caustic wash/water rinse/elution. Due to corrosion concerns, calcium acetate and magnesium acetate will be tested instead of calcium chloride and magnesium chloride respectively. Nitric acid is for benchmarking since it is the baseline sRF eluant. The information at hand indicates ammonium hydroxide, while a weak base, may hold promise as an effective eluant. Hence, its inclusion among the eluants to be studied despite the fact that it was not tested as a stand-alone eluant earlier.

Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Crystal Structures of the Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Complexes of Horse Heart Myoglobin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrite is an important species in the global nitrogen cycle, and the nitrite reductase enzymes convert nitrite to nitric oxide (NO). Recently, it has been shown that hemoglobin and myoglobin catalyze the reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions. We have determined the 1.20 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the nitrite adduct of ferric horse heart myoglobin (hh Mb). The ligand is bound to iron in the nitrito form, and the complex is formulated as Mb{sup III}(ONO{sup -}). The Fe-ONO bond length is 1.94 Angstroms, and the O-N-O angle is 113 degrees. In addition, the nitrite ligand is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with the distal His64 residue. We have also determined the 1.30 Angstroms resolution crystal structures of hh Mb{sup II}NO. When hh Mb{sup II}NO is prepared from the reaction of metMb{sup III} with nitrite/dithionite, the FeNO angle is 144 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 1.87 Angstroms. However, when prepared from the reaction of NO with reduced Mb{sup II}, the FeNO angle is 120 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 2.13 Angstroms. This difference in FeNO conformations as a function of preparative method is reproducible, and suggests a role of the distal pocket in hh Mb{sup II}NO in stabilizing local FeNO conformational minima.

Copeland,D.; Soares, A.; West, A.; Richter-Addo, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a wood pulp processing system of the type producing both pulp and a stream of lactic acid-containing black liquor solution, the processor for production of peracid bleaching agents from hydroxy acid contained in the black liquor solution, comprising: adjusting the pH of the black liquor solution to the range of about 8-9 by exposing the solution to CO/sub 2/ carbon dioxide to form an alkaline precipitate; separating solids from the black liquor solution to produce a residual solution containing lower aliphatic hydroxy acids selected from the group consisting of lactic acid, glycolic acid, 2-hydroxybutanoic acid, xyloisosaccharinic acid, and glucoisosaccharinic acid; decarboxylating the lower aliphatic hydroxy acids to corresponding gaseous aliphatic aldehydes by admixing a powdered semiconductor with the residual solution to form a slurry; removing the gaseous aldehydes from the residual solution by sweeping gas flow as soon as they are generated to prevent further oxidation to carboxylic acids; reacting the gaseous aldehydes with oxygen to form corresponding peracids; and applying the peracids as bleaching agents to the pulp produced in the pulp processing system.

Chum, H.L.; Ratcliff, M.A.; Palasz, P.D.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pilot-Scale Fermentation and Laboratory Nutrient Studies on Mixed-Acid Fermentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contacting method (all nutrients fed to F1), the near- optimal feeding strategies improved exit yield, culture yield, process yield, exit acetate- equivalent yield, conversion, and total acid productivity by approximately 31%, 39%, 46%, 31%, 100%, and 19... NOMENCLATURE A mass of carboxylic acid, g [A] total carboxylic acid concentration, g/Lliq. aceq acetic acid equivalents concentration, g/Lliq. ATP adenosine triphosphate Bi Fermentor i bottle plus centrifuge cake, g C conversion, g NAVS consumed/g NAVS...

Smith, Aaron Douglas

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

422

(Acid rain workshop)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

Turner, R.S.

1990-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fatty Acid Carcass Mapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FATTY ACID CARCASS MAPPING A Thesis by STACEY NICOLE TURK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2008... Major Subject: Animal Science FATTY ACID CARCASS MAPPING A Thesis by STACEY NICOLE TURK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Turk, Stacey N.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

424

The utilization of tricarboxylic acid cycle acids and the uptake of succinic acid by Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UTILIZATION OF TRICARBOXYLIC ACID CYCLE ACIDS AND THE UPTAKE OF SUCCINIC ACID BY NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by PATTI LYNN GILLILAND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Ma) or Subject: Microbiology THE UTILIZATION OF TRICARBOXYLIC ACID CYCLE ACIDS AND THE UPTAKE OF SUCCINIC ACID BY NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by PATTI LYNN GILLILAND Approved as to style and content by...

Gilliland, Patti Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid Hydrofluoric acid (HF characterized by weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, and general ill health. Safe use If possible, avoid working to exposures. #12;Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Programs Office

Wilcock, William

426

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Product Demonstrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Consortium will pursue a number of demonstrations following the general procedure used by DOE's GATEWAY demonstration program. Specific products to be featured in a demonstration may be...

428

Effects of humic acid on forage digestibility in ruminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Minson, 1988; Okine- Mathison, 1991; Luginbuhl et al. , 1994). The clearance of these residues through the reticulo-omasal orifice is generally considered dependent upon physical reduction in particle size by mastication and rumination. However, Lllyatt et... by increasing microbial enzymatic activity, and (2) boosting intake by increasing particle breakdown and passage rate from the reticulo-rumen. Humic Acid Humic acid is the amorphic end product of microbial degradation of organic matter. Humic substances...

Faulkenbery, James Marcus

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Introduction "The cycle of N is unique in that it consists of a massive, well-mixed, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Lavery et al., 2002]. If these trends continue, HNO3 may become a more important contributor to acid rain uncertain due to the very limited number and variety of measurements to date. Nitric acid (HNO3), the oxidation product of NO2, is second only to sulfuric acid as a source of acid precipitation over much

431

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

non-premixed methane/air flame John B. Bell, Marcus S. Day, Joseph F. Grcar Computing Sciences-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame Abstract In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded

Bell, John B.

432

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Method for the continuous production of hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for the continuous production of hydrogen. The present method comprises reacting a metal catalyst with a degassed aqueous organic acid solution within a reaction vessel under anaerobic conditions at a constant temperature of .ltoreq.80.degree. C. and at a pH ranging from about 4 to about 9. The reaction forms a metal oxide when the metal catalyst reacts with the water component of the organic acid solution while generating hydrogen, then the organic acid solution reduces the metal oxide thereby regenerating the metal catalyst and producing water, thus permitting the oxidation and reduction to reoccur in a continual reaction cycle. The present method also allows the continuous production of hydrogen to be sustained by feeding the reaction with a continuous supply of degassed aqueous organic acid solution.

Getty, John Paul (Knoxville, TN); Orr, Mark T. (Kingsport, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Deposition of Nitric Acid and Reactive Nitrogen at Harvard Forest The hourly gas-phase HNO3 concentration was measured at the Harvard Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactive nitrogen trace gas species play an important role in tropospheric photochemistry by stimulating gas-phase HNO3 concentration was measured at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site during radicals may be regenerated. Thus conversion of NOx radicals to HNO3 and subsequent deposition

435

Interphase transfer kinetics of thorium between nitric acid and tributyl phosphate solutions using the single drop and the Lewis cell techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetic rate constants for the interphase transfer of thorium between an aqueous phase and an organic phase of tributyl phosphate-n-paraffin hydrocarbon have been measured using the single drop and the Lewis cell techniques. Results from individual tests performed with the two techniques agree within experimental error. As with uranium, the data are consistent with a model in which the rate-controlling step is the rate of reaction of the components at the phase interface. An organic-soluble complex, represented by Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/.2TBP, forms in the organic phase. The composition of this complex is confirmed by equilibrium, as well as by kinetic, data. The kinetic data include results from tests showing the effects of TBP concentration and nitrate concentration on the values of the forward and the reverse kinetic constants. Other tests show the effect of temperature on the kinetic constant in both the forward and the reverse transfer directions, and the activation energies and enthalpy for the extraction reactions were estimated from these data. Unlike uranium, thorium extraction was shown to have a Marangoni effect under certain conditions. 10 figures, 1 table.

Horner, D.E.; Mailen, J.C.; Coggins, J.R. Jr.; Thiel, S.W.; Scott, T.C.; Pih, N.; Yates, R.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combusion Exhaust Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. The nitric oxide sensor has been used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based sensor measurements showed good agreement with the results from physical probe sampling of the combustion exhaust. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. Future planned modifications will lead to even faster response times at sensitivity levels at or below 1 ppm.

Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

Plant fatty acid hydroxylase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Acidizing of Sandstone Reservoirs Using HF and Organic Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mud acid, which is composed of HCl and HF, is commonly used to remove the formation damage in sandstone reservoirs. However, many problems are associated with HCl, especially at high temperatures. Formic-HF acids have served as an alternative...

Yang, Fei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

acid succinic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulated the laser heating of the succinic acid (this data is still simulation is that infrared heating generates about 10-15 more succinic acid molecules bound to the analyte...

440

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Studies of Fundamental Properties of Rutherfordium (element 104) using Organic Complexing Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the studies of TBP hydrolysis used nitric acid systems. The12 M. This is due to TBP extraction of nitric acid. At this1 M TBP in benzene and the concentration of nitric acid in

Czerwinski, K.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Thermodynamic Investigations of Aqueous Ternary Complexes for Am/Cm Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not extractable by TBP at high nitric acid concentrations.that TBP is also more stable against attack by nitric acid.TBP in kerosene to extract Pu(IV) and U(VI) from nitric acid

Leggett, Christina Joy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Acid Placement in Acid Jetting Treatments in Long Horizontal Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Middle East, extended reach horizontal wells (on the order of 25,000 feet of horizontal displacement) are commonly acid stimulated by jetting acid out of drill pipe. The acid is jetted onto the face of the openhole wellbore as the drill pipe...

Sasongko, Hari

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

Acid placement and coverage in the acid jetting process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many open-hole acid treatments are being conducted by pumping acid through jetting ports placed at the end of coiled tubing or drill pipe. The filter-cake on the bore-hole is broken by the jet; the acid-soluble material is dissolved, creating...

Mikhailov, Miroslav I.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

446

Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, {sup 203}Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste simulant and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl{sub 2} from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. An experimental flowsheet was designed from the batch contact tests and tested counter-currently using 5.5 cm centrifugal contactors. Results from the counter-current test show that mercury can be removed from the acidic mixed SBW simulant and recovered separately from the actinides.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method of solubilizing lead, in the form of lead oxide, found in industrial wastes, before these wastes are dumped into the environment. The lead is solubilized by dissolving the lead oxide in the wastes through contact with an anaerobic bacterial culture containing the bacterium ATCC No. 53464. The solubilized lead can then be removed from the wastes by chemical separation. It could also be removed by extending the contact period with the bacterial culture. As the culture grows, the solubilized lead is removed from the wastes by bioaccumulation by the microorganism or by immobilization by a polymer-like material produced by the microorganism. At this point, the lead is then removed from the wastes when the waste material is separated from the bacterial culture. If desired, the bacterial culture could be digested at this point to yield relatively pure lead for further industrial use.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Production Of Hydroxylated Fatty Acids In Genetically Modified Plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An annular wire harness for use in drill pipe comprising two rings interconnected by one or more insulated conductors. The rings are positioned within annular grooves located within the tool joints and the conductors are fixed within grooves along the bore wall of the pipe. The rings may be recessed within annular grooves in order to permit refacing of the tool joint. The rings are provided with means for coupling a power and data signal from an adjacent pipe to the conductors in such a fashion that the signal may be transmitted along the drill pipe and along an entire drill string.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Provo, UT)

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

Novel Biosynthetic Pathway for Production of Fatty Acid Derived Molecules -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddyof H-2 andNot519hep-ph/0511180-Energy

450

Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmerging FuelsRelated4Roguebuttons

451

Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid, as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired co-solvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon, are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid, as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired co-solvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon, are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

453

Total Acid Value Titration of Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Determination of Carboxylic Acids and Phenolics with Multiple End-Point Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total acid value titration has long been used to estimate corrosive potential of petroleum crude oil and fuel oil products. The method commonly used for this measurement, ASTM D664, utilizes KOH in isopropanol as the titrant with potentiometric end point determination by pH sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode with LiCl electrolyte. A natural application of the D664 method is titration of pyrolysis-derived bio-oil, which is a candidate for refinery upgrading to produce drop in fuels. Determining the total acid value of pyrolysis derived bio-oil has proven challenging and not necessarily amenable to the methodology employed for petroleum products due to the different nature of acids present. We presented an acid value titration for bio-oil products in our previous publication which also utilizes potentiometry using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in place of KOH as the titrant and tetraethylammonium bromide in place of LiCl as the reference electrolyte to improve the detection of these types of acids. This method was shown to detect numerous end points in samples of bio-oil that were not detected by D664. These end points were attributed to carboxylic acids and phenolics based on the results of HPLC and GC-MS studies. Additional work has led to refinement of the method and it has been established that both carboxylic acids and phenolics can be determined accurately. Use of pH buffer calibration to determine half-neutralization potentials of acids in conjunction with the analysis of model compounds has allowed us to conclude that this titration method is suitable for the determination of total acid value of pyrolysis oil and can be used to differentiate and quantify weak acid species. The measurement of phenolics in bio-oil is subject to a relatively high limit of detection, which may limit the utility of titrimetric methodology for characterizing the acidic potential of pyrolysis oil and products.

Christensen, E.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Investigating acid rain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report is given of an address by Kathleen Bennett, Assistant Administrator of Air, Noise and Radiation, Environmental Protection Agency which was presented to the US Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works. Bennet explained that in view of the many unknowns about acid rain, and the possible substantial cost burden of additional controls, EPA is proceeding with its program to investigate this environmental malady over a 10-year period. The three major areas of the research program are (1) transport, transformation, and deposition processes, (2) effects of acid deposition, and (3) assessments and policy studies. Other issues discussed were global transboundary air pollution and Senate amendments addressing long-range transport. (JMT)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Fluid Hyphenated Techniques for Dissolution and Separation of Lanthanides, Actinides, and Fission Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is investigating techniques involving ionic liquids (IL) and supercritical (SC) fluids for dissolution and separation of lanthanides, actinides, and fission products. The research project consists of the following tasks: Study direct dissolution of lanthanide oxides, uranium dioxide and other actinide oxides in [bmin][Tf{sub 2}N] with TBP(HNO{sub 3}){sub 1.8}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.6} and similar types of Lewis acid-Lewis base complexing agents; Measure distributions of dissolved metal species between the IL and the sc-CO{sub 2} phases under various temperature and pressure conditions; Investigate the chemistry of the dissolved metal species in both IL and sc-CO{sub 2} phases using spectroscopic and chemical methods; Evaluate potential applications of the new extraction techniques for nuclear waste management and for other projects. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO{sub 2}) and ionic liquids are considered green solvents for chemical reactions and separations. Above the critical point, CO{sub 2} has both gas- and liquid-like properties, making it capable of penetrating small pores of solids and dissolving organic compounds in the solid matrix. One application of sc-CO{sub 2} extraction technology is nuclear waste management. Ionic liquids are low-melting salts composed of an organic cation and an anion of various forms, with unique properties making them attractive replacements for the volatile organic solvents traditionally used in liquid-liquid extraction processes. One type of room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) based on the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [bmin] with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion [Tf{sub 2}N] is of particular interest for extraction of metal ions due to its water stability, relative low viscosity, high conductivity, and good electrochemical and thermal stability. Recent studies indicate that a coupled IL sc-CO{sub 2} extraction system can effectively transfer trivalent lanthanide and uranyl ions from nitric acid solutions. Advantages of this technique include operation at ambient temperature and pressure, selective extraction due to tunable sc-CO{sub 2} solvation strength, no IL loss during back-extraction, and no organic solvent introduced into the IL phase.

Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Bruce Mincher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nucleic acid isolation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduces the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without effect on the protocol.

Longmire, J.L.; Lewis, A.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nucleic acid isolation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for isolating DNA from eukaryotic cell and flow sorted chromosomes. When DNA is removed from chromosome and cell structure, detergent and proteolytic digestion products remain with the DNA. These products can be removed with organic extraction, but the process steps associated with organic extraction reduce the size of DNA fragments available for experimental use. The present process removes the waste products by dialyzing a solution containing the DNA against a solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). The waste products dialyze into the PEG leaving isolated DNA. The remaining DNA has been prepared with fragments containing more than 160 kb. The isolated DNA has been used in conventional protocols without affect on the protocol.

Longmire, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Annette K. (La Jolla, CA); Hildebrand, Carl E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Engineering metabolic systems for production of advanced fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

keto acid pathways for bio- fuel production. The productionmaking bio- gasoline, bio-jet fuel, and biodiesel, as welldevelopment of bio-ethanol as an alternative fuel have led

Yan, Yajun; Liao, James C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitric acid production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Impact of mineralogy on potassium dynamics and retention behavior in Bangladesh soils used in rice cropping systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................28 viii CHAPTER Page Nitric Acid Extractable K ..................................................................................28... ...............................................................32 Clay Mineralogy of the Study Soils...................................................................34 Total K by HF Digestion....................................................................................36 Nitric Acid Extractable K...

Biswas, Sumitra Bose

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrous li uranyl Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the dissolution of nitric acid... started from "random" mixtures of water, TBP, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate, complexation of uranyl Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

463

Metabolic evolution of Escherichia coli strains that produce organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to the metabolic evolution of a microbial organism previously optimized for producing an organic acid in commercially significant quantities under fermentative conditions using a hexose sugar as sole source of carbon in a minimal mineral medium. As a result of this metabolic evolution, the microbial organism acquires the ability to use pentose sugars derived from cellulosic materials for its growth while retaining the original growth kinetics, the rate of organic acid production and the ability to use hexose sugars as a source of carbon. This invention also discloses the genetic change in the microorganism that confers the ability to use both the hexose and pentose sugars simultaneously in the production of commercially significant quantities of organic acids.

Grabar, Tammy; Gong, Wei; Yocum, R Rogers

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric [R.sup.1R.sup.2B--NR.sup.3R.sup.4].sub.n product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate H.sub.2 for portable power sources.

Stephens, Frances Helen (Santa Fe, NM); Baker, Ralph Thomas (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

465

Communication no. 14 Fatty acid metabolism in liver slices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in perchloric acid soluble products, ASP), and of oleate secretion as part of lipids in VLDL particles (purified by the hepatocytes in both species. After 7 h of labelling, rats secreted 7.22 ± 2.35 nmol of oleate into the lipids calves receive a milk replacer rich in lipids which are largely utilised as energy substrates for growth

Boyer, Edmond

466

Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

467

Acid-Catalyzed Dehydrogenation of Amine-Boranes  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate hydrogen for power generation sources such as fuel cells....

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid lack sustained Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

me to "Sustainability", guiding me at every step and helping me... on the hard hat and boots and move around the Mosaic facility for acids and fertilizers production complex. I...

469

The Influence of Equilibrium Reactions on the Kinetics of Calcite Dissolution in Lactic Acid Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acid and calcite will allow for optimized treatment design. The kinetic model was also used to isolate the contributions of the transport of reactants, the surface reaction, and the transport of products to the overall resistance of the reaction...

Shedd, Daniel C

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal fatty acid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2C involved... that include Ca2+ uxes, the production of free fatty acids from membrane lipids, as well as the activation... of the MAPK pathway by wound-induced Ca2+ and fatty...

471

Tracer Fluid Flow through Porous Media: Theory Applied to Acid Stimulation Treatments in Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most carbonate rocks are heterogeneous at multiple length scales. These heterogeneities strongly influence the outcome of the acid stimulation treatments which are routinely performed to improve well productivity. At the pore scale, carbonate rocks...

Zakaria Mohamed Reda, Ahmed

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

472

Evaluation of various sulphur amino acid compounds in the diet of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement of diet formulations to enhance the efficiency of red drum production continues to be pursued. Based on previous studies, the sulfur amino acid (SAA) requirement of red drum for methionine plus cystine appears to be most limiting, which...

Goff, Jonathan B

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Direct conversion of carboxylate salts to carboxylic acids via reactive extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fermentation conversion. In this case, fermentation broth contains ammonium salts (e.g., ammonium acetate, propionate, butyrate, pentanoate). Therefore, the downstream processing steps (including extraction, purification, esterification, and product... separation) must be compatible with the ammonium carboxylate salts formed in the fermentation. This research focuses on converting fermentation broth carboxylate salts into their corresponding acids via “acid springing.” Reactive extraction and thermal...

Xu, Xin

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

474

Acetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commercially important materials like vinyl acetate monomer (VAM), cellulose acetate, and acetate esters. MoreAcetic Acid from the Carbonylation of Chloride Methane Over Rhodium Based Catalysts Yafang Fan Ã? that makes use of the latest advance in methyl chloride production is reported. Acetic acid was produced from

Bao, Xinhe

475

Modeling of Water-rock interaction in the Mackenzie Basin: competition between sulfuric and carbonic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sulfuric and carbonic acids E. Beaulieu, Y. Godd´eris, D. Labat, C. Roelandt, D. Calmels, J. Gail- lardet of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process in the Mackenzie Basin: competition between sulfuric and carbonic acids. E. Beaulieu1 , Y. Goddéris1 , D. Labat1

476

Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration-based distribution ratios increase from 0.11 to 0.46 as the aqueous phase pH increases from 7.18 to 8.15. Regeneration of the organic extractant solution was carried out by stripping at elevated temperatures to remove the ammonia, with 99% recovery of the ammonia being obtained at 125 C.

Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Biphasic kinetics of growth and bacteriocin production with Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as organic acids (lactate, acetate), ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins (De Vuyst & Vandamme, 1994. For example, during sausage fermentations, bacteria are stressed by the lactic acid produced by the starter the production of lactic and acetic acid. During food processing, microbial survival depends on sensing

Gent, Universiteit

478

Electrocatalytic reduction of nitric oxide at electrodes modified with electropolymerized films of [Cr(v-tpy){sub 2}]{sup 3+} and their application to cellular NO determinations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitric oxide can be electrocatalytically reduced at electrodes modified with electropolymerized films of [Cr(v-tpy){sub 2}]{sup 3+}. Upon further modification with a thin film of Nafion (to prevent interferences from anions, especially nitrite), these electrodes can be employed as NO sensors in solution with submicromolar detection limits and fast response. We have carried out preliminary studies of cellular NO release from Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacterial cells with excellent results. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Maskus, M.; Wu, Q.; Shapleigh, J.P.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Pariente, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)] [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain); Toffanin, A. [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain)] [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

acid acetic acid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of asphaltene deposition that occurs during acid treatments of oil reservoirs. Asphaltenes are present to some degree in most hydrocarbons. Due to the molecular weight of the...

480

Formic Acid Mechanical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). What's Food and Bioprocess Engineering (FBE)? It's the application of engineering principles to biological materials to make useful products. FBE is a specialization within the Agricultural Engineering. An FBE will understand the biological material and bioprocessing used to make ethanol. By 2008, we

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

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481

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Acidic gas capture by diamines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

483

Nitric oxide control of steroidogenesis: Endocrine effects of N sup G -nitro-L-arginine and comparisons to alcohol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) may regulate hormone biosynthesis and secretion. This was tested by treating male rats with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (NAME), a NO synthase inhibitor, and measuring serum and testicular interstitial fluid testosterone and serum corticosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL). The effect of N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (NA), a less-soluble form of the same NO synthase inhibitor, on the reproductive suppressant actions of alcohol was also examined. NAME increased testosterone and corticosterone secretion dose-dependently without affecting LH and PRL secretion. The alcohol-induced suppression of testosterone or LH secretion was not altered by treatment with NA. Although effects of NAME and NA on other systems may be involved, these results indicate that testicular and adrenal steroidogenesis are negatively regulated by endogenous NO and that NO does not regulate LH and PRL secretion or inhibit the testicular steroidogenic pathway in the same way as alcohol.

Adams, M.L.; Nock, B.; Truong, R.; Cicero, T.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

RMOTC - Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality AssuranceProduction RMOTC

485

Clostridium strain which produces acetic acid from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration. 4 figs.

Gaddy, J.L.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

Clostridium stain which produces acetic acid from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various organic acids or alcohols by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified. In an exemplary recovery process, the bioreactor raffinate is passed through an extraction chamber into which one or more non-inhibitory solvents are simultaneously introduced to extract the product. Then, the product is separated from the solvent by distillation. Gas conversion rates can be maximized by use of centrifuges, hollow fiber membranes, or other means of ultrafiltration to return entrained anaerobic bacteria from the bioreactor raffinate to the bioreactor itself, thus insuring the highest possible cell concentration.

Gaddy, James L. (2207 Tall Oaks Dr., Fayetteville, AR 72703)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Experimental Study of Mechanistic Acid Deconstruction of Lignin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a major component of biomass, which remains highly underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in studying the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. Model dimers, imitating H, S, and G lignins, were synthesized with the most abundant {beta} - O - 4 linkage in lignin. These compounds were then depolymerized using various acids and at different operating conditions. The deconstruction products were analyzed to complement the QM studies and investigate proposed mechanisms.

Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Katahira, R.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 ���± 0.7% and 8.8 ���± 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 ���± 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 ���± 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 ���± 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Nulljob product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on the authors' Central VAX Cluster led them to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

NULLJOB product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on our Central VAX Cluster led us to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

An integrated computational and experimental study for overproducing fatty acids in Escherichia coli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the catalytic production of industrial chemicals and diesel- like biofuels. However, bio-production of fatty., 2010) as gasoline bio-alternatives and fatty acids as promising intermediates for diesel bio, such as bio- ethanol (Fortman et al., 2008) produced from corn has relatively low energy density and water

Maranas, Costas