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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

2

Nitrate accumulation in soils and in plant parts of sorghum and oats as influenced by sources and rates of nitrogen fertilizers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Accumulation in the Soil Profile Residual soil NO atter removal by the first crop Residual soil NO after removal by the second crop Residual soil NO after. 15 years in Coastal bermudagrass plo s 21 2 J. 21 41 41 46 50 DI, CUSSION Nitrate... in hydroxylamine reductase. Wright and Trautman (65) and Nightingale (39) have indicated that deficiencies or imbalance of other nutrients such as K, S, and Fe may cause NO build-up. 3 According to Benne (4), injury of the pl. ant tissues resulted in a drastic...

Costa, Cassimiro Vaz

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Soil temperature is an important regulatory control on dissolved organic carbon supply and uptake of soil solution nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of abiotic processes on dissolved organic matter (DOM) production is often underappreciated. However, abiotic processes appear to be especially important in subsoils where, with increasing depth, microbial activity declines and soil organic matter (SOM) becomes a progressively more important contributor to DOM. Within three soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm) in a temperate forest, soil temperature was positively associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.23–0.77) and the DOM humification index (R2 = 0.35–0.72) for soil solutions in slow and fast flowpaths. With increasing soil temperature from 5 to 24 °C, average DOC concentrations increased by 86% at 20 cm, 12% at 40 cm and 12% at 60 cm soil depths. Our data suggest that DOM supply, especially in subsoils, is temperature dependent. We attribute this to the influence of temperature on DOM replenishment through direct processes such as SOM dissolution, diffusion and exchange reactions as well as indirect processes such as rhizodeposition and exoenzyme activity. In contrast, negative relationships (R2 = 0.71–0.88) between temperature and nitrate concentrations in subsoil suggested that the temperature-dependent supply of DOM drives microbial processes such as dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate consumption.

Ehsan R. Toosi; John P. Schmidt; Michael J. Castellano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nitrate movement in soils and nitrogen uptake efficiency as affected by nitrogen source, time of application, and a nitrification inhibitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NITRATE MOVEMENT IN SOILS AND NITROGEN UPTAKE EFFICIENCY AS AFFECTED BY NITROGEN SOURCEs TINE OF APPLICATIONs AIJD A NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR A Thesis by KENNETH PHAIJON BANKS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University..., Norwood silt loam (Typic Udifluvent) and Houston Black clay (Udic Pellustert) to determine the amount of N03-N leaching from various N fertilizer sources. Nitrate N movement, as affected by time of application, was determined for (NHq)2 Sop, urea...

Banks, Kenneth Phanon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

6

Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Potential for Improved Fertilizer Recommendations and Decreased Nitrate Contamination of Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine optimum conditions for estimating soil microbial biomass (SMB) from previously dried soils and to identify a quick, reliable biochemical predictor of soil N mineralization potential. Initial evaluations were conducted on a Weswood silty clay loam...

Franzluebbers, Alan; Haney, Richard; Hons, Frank

7

Accumulation and replacement of exchangeable sodium in soils of Southeast Texas under turfgrass and its effect on soil infiltration rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in soils of this area. This study assessed the degree of Na accumulation on cation exchange sites as affected by gypsum treatments in soils that support turfgrass (bermudagrass) and the response of soil infiltration rate to different rates of gypsum...

Aydemir, Salih

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... .................................................................... Effect of Fertilizers on Shedding 17 ...................... Earliness .......... 18 . Summary and Conclusions 19 BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 EFFECT OF TIME AND RATE OF APPLICATION IJITRATE OF SODA ON THE YIELD OF COTTON The main object...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effect of nitrogen source, rate and time of application on soil nitrogen status and on the characteristics of the plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. They attributed this partly to the rapid hydrolysis of urea to ammoni- um which was then exchangeably sorbed by the soil. Studies by Black (5) indicated more rapid loss of nitrate from coarse than fine textured soils. Research by Greaves et al. (15) indicated... source on the subsoil ammoni- um content on May 16, The influence of nitrogen source, rate and time of application on cotton plant growth. The dry weight of the entire plant on May 30 and the dry weight of the entire plant together...

Sadik, Mohamed Kamal

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Remediation of brine-contaminated soil using calcium nitrate, gypsum, and straw.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Salt-affected soils from point source brine contamination are common in the active oil field in SE Saskatchewan. A remediation process that included dewatering by sub-surface… (more)

Nielsen, Jennifer I.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Beta Particle Dose Rates to Micro-Organisms in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Copyright 1977 Japan Radiation Research Society May 1977 research-article Articles Beta Particle...soil are constantly exposed to betaradiations arising from the naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields......

M. Kabir; F.W. Spiers; T.A Iinuma

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nitrate reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Penetrometer resistance, root penetration resistance and root elongation rate in two sandy loam soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Root penetration resistance and elongation of maize seedling roots ... of two sandy loam soils. Root elongation rate was negatively correlated with root penetration resistance, and was reduced to about 50 ... 7.5...

A. G. Bengough; C. E. Mullins

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The effect of water application rate on the formation of a soil crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF WATER APPLICATION RATE ON THE FOR11ATION OF A SOIL CRUST A Thesis by FAUSTO DANIEL BOGRAN CARCA1'10 Subni tted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillnent of the requlrenents for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE EFFECT OF WATER APPLICATION RATE ON THE FORMATION OF A SOIl. CRUST A Thesi s by FAUSTO DANIEL BOGRAN CARCAMO Approved as to style and content by: ars a . McFar an (Chairman...

Bogran Carcamo, Fausto Daniel

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The effect of sulfur, magnesium, and various rates of potassium on forage production in some sandy soils of East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF SULFUR, MAGNESIUM, AND VARIOUS RATES OF POTASSIUM ON FORAGE PRODUCTION IN SOME SANDy SOILS OF EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DENNIS PAUL LANDUA Submitted to the Graduate Collccje of Texas AFM Unive, sity in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Ma 1969 Major Subject Soil Chemistr THE EFFECT OF SULFUR, MAGNESIUM, AND VARIOUS RATES OF POTASSIUM ON FORAGE PRODUCTION IN SOME SANDY SOILS OF EAST TEXAS A Thesis by DENNIS PAUL LANDUA Approved...

Landua, Dennis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...incineration, storage, or soil washing (12). PAHs are often found in oil spills and in soil at old gasworks sites...H. Frimmel. 1997. Surfactant-enhanced mobilization...manufactured gas. Plant Soil Environ. Sci. Technol...

Mikael Eriksson; Erik Sodersten; Zhongtang Yu; Gunnel Dalhammar; William W. Mohn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The effect of organic soil amendments and nitrogen rate on field establishment of rabbiteye blueberries (Vaccinium ashei Reade.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is usually a result of inadequate nitrogen (46). In the case of blueberries any increase in soil acidity is usually beneficial (2). Several studies have been conducted on the use of aged or composted sawdust as a soil amendment to compensate for the nitro...THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC SOIL AMENDMENTS AND NITROGEN RATE ON FIELD ESTABLISHMENT OF RABBITEYE BLUEBERRIES (VACCINIUM ASHEI READE. ) A Thesis by ELIZABETH CAROL WELLBORN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

Wellborn, Elizabeth Carol

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A study of the effects of rate and frequency of loading on the stress-strain characteristics of granular soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF RATE AND FREQUENCY OF LOADING ON THE STRESS-STRAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF GRANULAR SOILS A Thesis By James Clyde Armstrong Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1962 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF RATE AND FREQUENCY OF LOADING ON THE STRESS-STRAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF GRANULAR SOILS A Thesis By James Clyde...

Armstrong, James Clyde

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Soil and litter respiration rates in different microhabitats of a mixed oak-conifer forest and their control by edaphic conditions and substrate quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil and litter respiration rates were measured under canopies ofQuercus floribunda, Q. leucotrichophora, Cedrus deodara, Cupressus torulosa and mixed tree species by alkali absorption. The soil and litter sample...

C. K. Tewary; Uma Pandey; J. S. Singh

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The influence of nitrogen rate and source on plant and soil properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, P h .D . in Soil Chem istry A&M C o lleg e o f Texas D ire c ted by : D r s . A . G. Caldwell and J. B . Page A f ie ld study on the ro le o f rate o f application and s ou r ce o f f e r ? t i l ize r n itrogen on the production... and quality o f fo ra g e by C oasta l B e r - mudagrass was initiated in 1954 and continued through 1958. Vegetative production (1956-58) was in c rea sed and highly s ign i? f icantly c o r r e la ted with leve l of nitrogen applied to the so i...

Fisher, Flake Leroy

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mine waste contamination limits soil respiration rates: a case study using quantile regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the toxicity of heavy metals depends on soil acidity and organic matter because these factors strongly an environmental gradient. We quantified in situ soil respiration, pH, and heavy metal concentrations across a mine was limited with respect to both heavy metals and pH, and that both increased metals and increased acidity

Rilli, Matthias C.

23

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon Sequestration Rates in Organic Layers of Soils Under the Grey Poplar (Populus x canescens) Stands Impacted by Heavy Metal Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To describe carbon sequestration processes in organic layers of forest soils ... limit-value method was used to estimate C sequestration rate in poplar litters. A two-year ... using the ignition method. Input of ...

Agnieszka Medy?ska-Juraszek; Leszek Kuchar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California  

SciTech Connect

In order to explore the reasons for the apparent discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates and to determine the extent to which weathering rates are controlled by the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium, secondary mineral precipitation and flow rates, a multicomponent reactive transport model (CrunchFlow) was used to interpret soil profile development and mineral precipitation and dissolution rates at the 226 ka marine terrace chronosequence near Santa Cruz, CA. Aqueous compositions, fluid chemistry, transport, and mineral abundances are well characterized (White et al., 2008, GCA) and were used to constrain the reaction rates for the weathering and precipitating minerals in the reactive transport modeling. When primary mineral weathering rates are calculated with either of two experimentally determined rate constants, the nonlinear, parallel rate law formulation of Hellmann and Tisser and [2006] or the aluminum inhibition model proposed by Oelkers et al. [1994], modeling results are consistent with field-scale observations when independently constrained clay precipitation rates are accounted for. Experimental and field rates, therefore, can be reconciled at the Santa Cruz site. Observed maximum clay abundances in the argillic horizons occur at the depth and time where the reaction fronts of the primary minerals overlap. The modeling indicates that the argillic horizon at Santa Cruz can be explained almost entirely by weathering of primary minerals and in situ clay precipitation accompanied by undersaturation of kaolinite at the top of the profile. The rate constant for kaolinite precipitation was also determined based on model simulations of mineral abundances and dissolved Al, SiO{sub 2}(aq) and pH in pore waters. Changes in the rate of kaolinite precipitation or the flow rate do not affect the gradient of the primary mineral weathering profiles, but instead control the rate of propagation of the primary mineral weathering fronts and thus total mass removed from the weathering profile. Our analysis suggests that secondary clay precipitation is as important as aqueous transport in governing the amount of dissolution that occurs within a profile because clay minerals exert a strong control over the reaction affinity of the dissolving primary minerals. The modeling also indicates that the weathering advance rate and the total mass of mineral dissolved is controlled by the thermodynamic saturation of the primary dissolving phases plagioclase and K-feldspar, as is evident from the difference in propagation rates of the reaction fronts for the two minerals despite their very similar kinetic rate laws.

Maher, K.; Steefel, C. I.; White, A.F.; Stonestrom, D.A.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effects of soil treatments supplemented with two rates of magnesium sulfate on the availability of soil nutrients and on the yield and chemical composition of coastal Bermuda grass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wean PPM of P in Soil Samples Collected in 1949 from Coast, al Bermuda Grass Plots Receiving Qifferent Rates and Combinations of N, F205, and MgS04. 7H20 g Treatments P N0 P0 1 Mean P0 1 Pl Mean N2 p$ Mean M80 1. 3 (8) jZ' 3. 4 2. 3 (16...) Nagnesium (Y&g) N xP N xNg PxNg Nxpxlig Replications 95 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 4& 857. 64. ="-" 9, 702. 2 5'-'? 13. 02 10. 67 14 & 113. 50?' " 319. 44 1, 435. 03 3. 38 964. 72 103. 68 8 00 17. 78 . 02 , 02 25, 87 . 58 2. 63 . 01 1. 77...

Evatt, Nathan S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

A study of the rate of gain of strength in lime stabilized soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 37 ~ o ~ 4'7 APPEEDIX C. Electron Nicrographs . . . . . . . . . . . 75 LIST OF TABLES Table Page i. Cation-Exchange Capacity of Clay Minerals 15 2. Results of pH Test on Lime Treate Clay a o o o o o 3. X-Ray Diffraction Data 4.... Fractionation of Clay Soil. 5. Exchangeable Catians of College S t at i on Clay . 6. Electron Micrographs. 7. Comparison of Atterberg Limits. 22 38 8. Compaction Data . 9. Sample Calculations for Method of 10. Triaxial Compression T'est Results 11o...

Nichols, Sterling Ramsdell, Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

A nitrate sink in estuaries?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

and d15N and d18O of nitrate along the salinity gradient in the estuary of the river Elbe, one of the largest German rivers discharging into the North Sea. Nitrate ...

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

30

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

31

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

32

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

Geotechnical characterization of mixed sandy and silty soils using piezocone tests: Analysis of partial drainage phenomena and rate effects on the experimental soil response.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The cone penetration test (CPT), together with its recent variation (CPTU), has become the most widely used in-situ testing technique for soil profiling and geotechnical… (more)

Garcia Martinez, Maria Fernanda and#60;1986and#62

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed by Dr. Warren B. Anderson Two, 4, snd 6 tons/ acre of calcitic and dolomitic limestone in three particle size ranges were disked into a Katy fine sandy loam prior to planting corn. Identical treatments were broadcast on a Boy loamy fine sand... neutralized soil acidity faster than did the dolomitic source. All calcitic limestone treatments significantly increased Ca in the surface 6 inches of soil. The 4- and 6-ton/acre rates of fine, and the 6-ton/acre rate of medium calcitic limestone...

Haby, Vincent A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Detonation of Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detonation of Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer ... charge of the fertilizer enclosed in ¼-inch Shelby seamless tubing, 3 inches in diameter and 20 inches in length, detonated with extreme violence. ...

1947-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Calcite dissolution and Ca/Na ion-exchange reactions in columns with different flow rates through high ESR soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The leaching of a Na?-affected calcareous soil with water results in two concurrent recesses: (i) CaCO? dissolution, and (ii) replacement of Na? on the cation-exchange complex by Ca²?. In the current study, Woodward soil (coarse-silty, mixed...

Navarre, Audrey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Effect of additional vibration exciter and coupled vibro-percussion units on penetration rate of pipe in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aimed to improve capacity of vibro-percussion driving of steel pipes in soil, the authors describe experimental modeling of the process with additional vibration exciters of axial and transverse vibrations ser...

I. V. Tishchenko; V. V. Chervov; A. I. Gorelov

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Soil radioactivity and radiation absorbed dose rates at roadsides in high-traffic density areas in Ibadan metropolis, southwestern Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......under the spectrum of the radionuclide in the standard reference sample. The standard reference soil sample prepared from Rocketdyne Laboratories (CA) is traceable to a mixed standard gamma source (Ref. No. 48722-356) by Analytic Inc. (Atlanta......

N. N. Jibiri; O. S. Bankole

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Methane Consumption in Temperate and Subarctic Forest Soils: Rates, Vertical Zonation, and Responses to Water and Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diffusive gas transport...sphere and the water content of...29). Soil nitrogen content and...Influence of nitrogen fertilization...in mineral waters with resorcinol...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

A. P. S. Adamsen; G. M. King

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

In-situ remediation of nitrate-contaminated ground water by electrokinetics/iron wall processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of using electrokinetics coupled with a zero valent iron (Fe0) treatment wall to abiotically remediate nitrate-contaminated soils was investigated. Upon completion of each test run, the contaminated soil specimen was sliced into five parts and analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen. Nitrogen mass balance was used to determine the major transformation products. In control experiments where only electrokinetics was used at various constant voltages, 25 to 37% of the nitrate-nitrogen was transformed. The amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed improved when a Fe0 wall (20 g or about 8–10% by weight) was placed near the anode. For test runs at various constant voltages, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed ranged from 54 to 87%. By switching to constant currents, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen — transformed was about 84 to 88%. The major transformation products were ammonia-nitrogen and nitrogen gases. Nitrite-nitrogen was less than 1% in all experimental runs. Two localized pH conditions exist in the system, a low pH region near the anode and a high pH region near the cathode. Placing of an iron wall near the anode increases the pH in that area as time increases. Movement of the acid front did not flush across the cathode. This research has demonstrated that the electrokinetics/iron wall process can be used to remediate nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

Chin F. Chew; Tian C. Zhang

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Occurrence of Nitrites in Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity for producing nitrates may form large amounts of nitrites. Nitrites may persist in the soil or in soil extracts for several weeks. Magnesium carbonate and calcium car- bonate may favor the formation of nitrites. Water equivaIent to 50 per cent... ............................................. Method of work 5 Nitrites in soils without additions of nitrogenous materials ........ 6 Nitrification capacity as measured by nitric nitrogen alone. and by nitric and nitrous nitrogen combined ....................... 6...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Sterges, A. J.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Irrigation and Management of Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is available, soil micro- organisms will change ammonium nitrogen in- to nitrate nitrogen and then be taken up by plants. Nitrate nitrogen (NO,-) is not at- tached to clay particles ; it is water-soluble and it moves with soil moisture. On coarse... is unevenly distributed. If nitrogen is applied in irrigation water as the ammonium form to alkaline soils, there is a possibility of 25 to 30 percent loss of the nitrogen as a gas. Phosphorus applied in irrigation water will not move into the soil too...

Box, John; Bennett, William F.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process  

SciTech Connect

Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Application of municipal sludge (biosolids) for agricultural purposes and groundwater nitrate concentrations  

SciTech Connect

One of the more popular means of handling sewage sludge from municipalities is its application to agricultural lands. A variety of crops are grown with the expectation that plants will utilize the nitrogen. However, a complex scenario allows some of the nitrate to move below root depth and eventually to the water table at depths of up to 30 ft. The City of Raleigh, NC injects sewage sludge ( residuals'', biosolids'') into soils derived largely from the Rolesville Granite in an area of typical rolling Piedmont topography. A 1975 background study of part of the site demonstrated differences in groundwater quality between areas farmed over a period of years and areas dominated by second-growth pine and harwood forests. Groundwater quality data collected semiannually between 1982 and 1988 show gradual buildup of nitrate in some fields; in others groundwater quality apparently remains unaffected by nitrate from the sludge. Monitoring well placement may play a role in these differences. Minimum time from the sludge application to an increase in groundwater nitrate is from 9 to 12 months. An ongoing study of a 12-acre field which lay fallow for a number of years prior to sludge application in 1990 demonstrates that some nitrate does move downward fairly rapidly, its movement being recorded in both the saprolite and groundwater. Comparison of nitrate content of groundwater from monitoring wells at a nearby dairy farm shows that normal agricultural practices may also increase the nitrate content of the shallow groundwater.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effect of blow frequency and additional static force on the vibro-percussion pipe penetration rate in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors describe and discuss experimental investigation of the effect exerted by blow frequency and additional static force on penetration rate of a pipe under vibration-percussion by ... Siberian Branch, Rus...

V. V. Chervov; I. V. Tishchenko; B. N. Smolyanitsky

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Relation of Soil Nitrogen, Nitrification and Ammonification to Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................ 6 Relation of the Crops to the Total Nitrogen of the Soil ........... 7 Relation of the Different Crops ................................. 8 Relation of Surface Soil to Subsoil ............................. 13 Acid Soils Compared with Non-Acid... of Production of Nitrates to the Results of the Pot Ex- periments ................................................ 21 Extensive Work ............................................ 24 Relation of Nitric Nitrogen to Nitrogen Removed by First Crop .... 24...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1921-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Agricultural Chemical Movement through a Field-Size Watershed in Iowa:? Surface Hydrology and Nitrate Losses in Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agricultural Chemical Movement through a Field-Size Watershed in Iowa:? Surface Hydrology and Nitrate Losses in Discharge ... In this paper, we illustrate another aspect of the “water quality profile” conceptual model (4) for assessing impacts of farming systems using an analysis of the surface hydrology and nitrate distribution in surface runoff, headcut seepage, and basin drainage from a high relief landscape. ... Surface runoff resulting from snowmelt occurs whenever solar-radiated heat penetrates the snow and heats the soil surface beneath it. ...

Thomas R. Steinheimer; Kenwood D. Scoggin; Larry A. Kramer

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Extended contact between heated mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Most solvent extraction operations are conducted at ambient conditions without heating TBP and have been performed safely for decades, but several explosions involving TBP have occurred in the US, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. This investigation was undertaken to characterize the products of thermal decomposition of both single- and two-phase mixtures of TBP, nitric acid, and water under a variety of conditions. The data indicate that the extent of reaction and the rate of gaseous product formation are affected by the presence of Zr{sup 4+}, distillation compared with reflux conditions, temperature, water/HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 3}/TBP ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs under constant pressure or constant volume conditions. Higher reaction temperatures accelerate the rate of decomposition, but the extent of decomposition, as measured by the quantity of gaseous products, was greater at lower temperatures when the decomposition was performed under distillation conditions. Higher gas production occurs under reflux conditions, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and when a separate water-HNO{sub 3} phase is initially present. The major gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O. Measurable amounts of NO{sub 2} were not present in the final product mixture, although an orange color suggesting the presence of NO{sub 2} was observed in the early stages of decomposition. The major liquid products were dibutyl phosphoric acid, butyl nitrate, and water. Small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} carboxylic acids were also present. Because of the small sample sizes that were employed and the isothermal conditions of the decomposition, runaway reactions were not observed. Some possible reaction pathways are considered.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

[Task 1.] Biodenitrification of low nitrate solar pond waters using sequencing batch reactors. [Task 2.] Solidification/stabilization of high strength and biodenitrified heavy metal sludges with a Portland cement/flyash system  

SciTech Connect

Process wastewater and sludges were accumulated on site in solar evaporation ponds during operations at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant (DOE/RF). Because of the extensive use of nitric acid in the processing of actinide metals, the process wastewater has high concentrations of nitrate. Solar pond waters at DOE/RF contain 300-60,000 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L. Additionally, the pond waters contain varying concentrations of many other aqueous constituents, including heavy metals, alkali salts, carbonates, and low level radioactivity. Solids, both from chemical precipitation and soil material deposition, are also present. Options for ultimate disposal of the pond waters are currently being evaluated and include stabilization and solidification (S/S) by cementation. Removal of nitrates can enhance a wastes amenability to S/S, or can be a unit operation in another treatment scheme. Nitrate removal is also a concern for other sources of pollution at DOE/RF, including contaminated groundwater collected by interceptor trench systems. Finally, nitrate pollution is a problem at many other DOE facilities where actinide metals were processed. The primary objective of this investigation was to optimize biological denitrification of solar pond waters with nitrate concentrations of 300--2,100 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L to below the drinking water standard of 45 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/L (10 mg N/L). The effect of pH upon process stability and denitrification rate was determined. In addition, the effect Cr(VI) on denitrification and fate of Cr(VI) in the presence of denitrifying bacteria was evaluated.

Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mosher, J.; Terry, S.; Canonico, S.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review  

SciTech Connect

Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...

53

Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water report http://Clark Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking waternitrate contamination of drinking water in high-risk areas

Editors, By

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nitrate Losses from Disturbed Ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...or large masses of nutrient-poor...com-petition between plants and decompo-sers...levels prior to treatment. Any or all...nitrifiers and plant roots for ammonium...Purchase, Plant Soil 41, 541...in Municipal Wastewater and Disturbed...to assure the balance of the na-tional...

Peter M. Vitousek; James R. Gosz; Charles C. Grier; Jerry M. Melillo; William A. Reiners; Robert L. Todd

1979-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact or flowing water. They seal the soil surface, reduce the rate of water infiltration, and can into individual particles that clog soil pores, seal the surface, and form a layer that is dense when dry of physical crust with many small, unconnected air pockets or spaces similar to those in a sponge

56

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water mixtures are subject to thermal decomposition. The gaseous and liquid decomposition product yields are highly path dependent. Higher temperatures accelerate decomposition rates, but may result in lower extent of reaction than comparable low temperature cases. Actual extent of reaction, and gaseous by-products generation, are affected by the presence of Zr(IV), condensate reflux back into the reaction vessel, the water/HNO{sub 3} and the HNO{sub 3}/TBP molar ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs at isobaric or constant volume conditions. Higher gaseous production results from condensate reflux, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and with excess HNO{sub 3} and water present as a second liquid phase. Principal gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO and N{sub 2}O. Measurable concentrations of NO{sub 2} were not observed, although gas coloration indicative of NO{sub 2} were obsessed during the beginning of decomposition measurements. Principal liquid products are dibutyl phosphoric acid and butyl nitrate. Air sparging of TBP solutions (e.g., thru transfers using air lift pumps) may increase the hazards of TBP decomposition reactions by lowering the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} molar ratios. Runaway reactions were not observed under the conditions of this study. Possible reaction mechanisms and pathways are discussed.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester  

SciTech Connect

Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Review of municipal sludge use as a soil amendment on disturbed lands  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is examining options of improving soil conditions at Hanford reclamation sites. One promising technology is the incorporation of municipal sewage sludge into the soil profile. This report reviews the potential benefits and adverse consequences of sludge use in land reclamation. Land reclamation comprises those activities instigated to return a mechanically disturbed site to some later successional state. Besides the introduction of suitable plant species to disturbed lands, reclamation generally requires measures to enhance long-term soil nutrient content, moisture retention or drainage, and mitigation of toxic effects from metals and pH. One of the more effective means of remediating adverse soil characteristics is the application of complex organic manures such as municipal sewage sludge. Sewage sludges contain complete macro- and micronutrients necessary to sustain plant growth. The application of sewage sludge may reestablish microbial activity in sterile soils. Physical properties, such as water-holding capacity and percentage water-stable aggregates, also improve with the addition of sewage sludge. Sludge applications may also increase the rate of degradation of some hydrocarbon pollutants in soils. Potential adverse impacts associated with the application of sewage sludge to land include negative public perception of human waste products; concerns regarding pathogen buildup and spread in the soils, plants, and water; entrance and accumulation of heavy metals in the food chain; salt accumulation in the soil and ground water; leaching of nitrates into ground water; and accumulation of other potentially toxic substances, such as boron and synthetic hydrocarbons, in the soil, plants, and food chain. 56 refs., 10 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Quantifying uncertainty in nitrate pollution from land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty associated with nitrate-nitrogen pollution of ground water from sludge applications was investigated. Three alternative planning models were proposed. The models estimate annual loads and concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in percolation. Published data from four field studies that included aerobic and anaerobic sludge and surface- and soil-incorporated applications were used for model testing. Point and stochastic validation procedures were used. The models were generally conservative. For three data sets average relative errors were approximately +/- 25% for all three models. The fourth data set had average relative errors of 100-500%. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test results (at ..cap alpha.. = 5%) suggested point-model predictions and observations were drawn from similar distributions. Stochastic validation tests also suggested that observations were samples from distributions of predictions. The models were tested as uncalibrated approximations of nitrate percolation. All three appear sufficiently accurate for planning application systems. A planning procedure was developed which utilizes analytically approximated probability distributions of nitrate loads and concentrations. Distributions are specified with analytical moment expressions and a normal distribution function limited to be non-negative.

Mummert, M.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water  

SciTech Connect

Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract of Utrecht, Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, PO Box 80005, 3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands 2, The Netherlands 3 Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 LE Petten, The Netherlands 4 Joint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO  

SciTech Connect

DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

Spencer, B.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Corrosion of Iron Stainless Steels in Molten Nitrate Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) is a major area of research that seeks to lower the levelized cost of electricity within the aggressive SunShot goals of 6¢/kW-hrth[1–3]. One viable approach is sensible thermal energy storage (TES), which currently utilizes molten nitrate binary salt, stored at 575 °C in the hot tank of a two tank system [4,5]. Increasing the temperature limit within the hot tank requires a detailed understanding of materials corrosion behavior, in addition to salt thermal stability properties. High temperature nickel based alloys are the logical choice for strength and corrosion resistance as elevated temperatures will increase corrosion kinetics, however, the cost of nickel based alloys are nearly four times more expensive than iron based steels [6]. For this reason iron based stainless steels, specifically 321SS and 347SS (nominally Fe-17Cr-9Ni), were chosen for investigation at several temperatures in nitrate salt. 316SS, an elementally similar alloy, was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking while tested at Solar Two [4]. It was suggested that alloys with stabilizing additions of niobium (347SS) or titanium (321SS) would mitigate this deleterious behavior. Flat coupon samples were immersed in binary nitrate salts at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 680 °C, with air sparging on all tests. Samples were nominally removed at intervals of 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours to acquire data on time varying weight gain information while simultaneously employing metallography to identify corrosion mechanisms occurring within the melt. Corrosion rates varied dramatically with temperature according to an Arrhenius-type behavior. 347SS and 321SS had very little oxidation for 400 and 500 °C, indicative of a protective corrosion scale and low corrosion kinetics. Data at 600 °C showed that 321SS tended toward linear oxidation behavior based on oxide spallation which was observed on the samples upon removal. Corrosion products at 500 °C had phases of iron oxide, with obvious chromium depletion as observed in energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) scans. 600 °C corrosion layers were primarily iron oxide with obvious phases of sodium ferrite on the outer surface. 680 °C marked an excessive rate of corrosion with metal loss in both alloys.

Alan Kruizenga; David Gill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The effects of varied rates and ratios of fertilizer on forage yields and tillering of Austin wheat on Lufkin fine sandy loam and Miller clay soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

163 V9 136 5S 143 1Q ~ LQ Mf f erenee required for signifioanoe betveen sean treatments on c Iuaber of plots ( 27 ) 05 legal 31 31 ~ 01 level 41 + 57 e Treatseatt pounds pez' acre of Ht P205s azd X20c Rg e Oi 81 = 30' H2 60j I3 90$ Pp a Op Pl e... 4 92 3 13 tj 92 3. 13 4 92 2, 23 3 OV 2. 23 3. 07 2. 50 3. 60 1, 89 2~ e R - 30 pounds of nitrogen per sore R s 60 pounds, E3 90 pounds. Table 3. ? Lverage XiaM of ~ Porage in Pounds Per kore from Lufldn Soil Reoeiving Different Combinations...

Coffey, Lee Clayton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Bioaugmentation of TNT-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) in phics. contaminated soil was investigated in this research. A Bacillus sp., isolated from soil obtained from an army ammunition facility, was used to enhance the rate of TNT removal over a 360 day...

Bokelmann, Annamarie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

71

Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

72

Estimation of dose contribution from 226Ra, 232Th and 40K radon exhalation rates in soil samples from Shivalik foot hills in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......than the limit (370 Bq kg1) set in the 1979 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development report. The calculated values...of radon exhalation rate and estimation of radiation doses in coal and fly ash samples. Appl. Radiat. Isot. (2008) 66:401-406......

R. P. Chauhan; Pooja Chauhan; Anil Pundir; Sunil Kamboj; Vakul Bansal; R. S. Saini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect

A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Microstructural Characterization of Colloid-Derived Bimetallic Pd-Cu Nanocatalysts Supported on -Al2O3 for Nitrate Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Center of Advanced Materials for the Purification of Water with Systems, University of Illinois at Urbana of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water with Systems, University of Illinois at Urbana to develop heterogeneous catalysts as a viable water purification method. The rates of nitrate and nitrite

Frenkel, Anatoly

75

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

76

Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem...are linked to changes in the chlorophyll biomass. The model can be treated analytically...Mathematical bounds are found for the autotrophic biomass and the residual nitrate in terms of the...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

CU(II): catalyzed hydrazine reduction of ferric nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing ferrous nitrate solutions by the cupric ion-catalyzed reduction of ferric nitrate with hydrazine. The reaction is complete in about 1.5 hours at 40/sup 0/C. Hydrazoic acid is also produced in substantial quantities as a reaction byproduct.

Karraker, D.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of nitrate and nitrite destruction/separation technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and evaluates four types of nitrate and nitrite destruction and separation technologies that could be used to treat the aqueous, alkaline, nitrate-bearing mixed waste that is generated by the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The technologies considered in this report include thermal, hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical technologies.

Hobbs, D.T.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

80

Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Weapon Systems Using Samine, Melanj and Isopropyl Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the uses and properties of three chemicals stored in Azerbaijan: melanj, samine, and isopropyl nitrate. These three chemicals have historically been used in the manufacturing of liquid bal...

Vugar Gafarov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Project Profile: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator.

84

NITRATE REMOVAL BY CALCINED HYDROTALCITE-TYPE COMPOUNDS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminant in drinking water (which is primarily...levels in contaminated waters. Reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis are considered the best...nitrate-contaminated water (Canter, 1997; Haugen...solid interface. Treatment processes, such as...

María M. Socías-Viciana; María D. Ureña-Amate; Emilio González-Pradas; María J. García-Cortés; Cristina López-Teruel

85

detonation rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

detonation rate, detonation velocity, velocity of detonation, V.O.D., detonating velocity, rate of detonation, detonating rate ? Detonationsgeschwindigkeit f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Herbicide and nitrate distribution in central Iowa rainfall  

SciTech Connect

Herbicides are detected in rainfall; however, these are a small fraction of the total applied. This study was designed to evaluate monthly and annual variation in atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N{prime}-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide), metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide), and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in rainfall over Walnut Creek watershed south of Ames, IA. The study began in 1991 and continued through 1994. Within the watershed, two wet/dry precipitation samplers were positioned 4 km apart. Detections varied during the year with >90% of the herbicide detections occurring in April through early July. Concentrations varied among events from nondetectable amounts to concentrations of 154 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, which occurred when atrazine was applied during an extremely humid day immediately followed by rainfall of <10 mm that washed spray drift from the atmosphere. This was a local scale phenomenon, because the other collector had a more typical concentration of 1.7 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} with an 8-mm rainfall. VAriation between the two collectors suggests that local scale meteorological processes affect herbicide movement. Yearly atrazine deposition totals were >100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} representing <0.1% of the amount applied. Nitrate-N concentrations in precipitation were uniformly distributed throughout the year and without annual variation in the concentrations. Deposition rates of NO{sub 3}-N were about 1.2 g m{sup {minus}2}. Annual loading onto the watershed was about 25% of the amount applied from all forms of N fertilizers. Movement and rates of deposition provide an understanding of the processes and magnitude of the impact of agriculture on the environment. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.L. [National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Wesley, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The moisture retention characteristic of four soils from Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of air at the surface is relatively facile. Hydraulic Conductivity Redistribution of soil water affects plant growth, and the rate and duration of internal moisture flow determines 19 effective soil water storage. This is important to remember when... in sorption (wetting). This characteristic of wetting versus drying for a soil is known as the hysteresis effect (Lal 1979a). Hillel (1980) notes that hysteresis is important for coarse-textured soils in the process of redistribution of soil water...

Landeck, Jonathon Keith

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The effect of various cropping systems upon the stability of aggregates: the rate of water infiltration, and the organic matter content of three soil conditions in the Texas Blacklands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 50 years had more than 75 percent oi' its mass made up of soil granules tbs siss of grains of sand and bits of clay" ~ These small soil granules ars not resistant to the impact of rainfall and vhsn they break dovn? both vater and air lanes... the averages are baseg Tabes 2, Analysis of mricnncs of stable a~tea 0, 20 ssc snd larger in the ccnrfoee her of soil, Rsanirsd ~ of Saene of ccsriatien frasdon Sea of ~s Haan ayah toeni, 01, 05 6 090 35 124e0$085 5o6cc. 3a33 Corot sorn lsgnss ~i oem...

Quintero, Angel H

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays  

SciTech Connect

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE-BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER EROSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTIFYING ACCELERATED SOIL EROSION THROUGH ECOLOGICAL SITE- BASED ASSESSMENTS OF WIND AND WATER change and intensification have resulted in accelerated rates of soil erosion in many areas of the world quantification of accelerated soil erosion. Ecological site soil erosion Variation in the simulated erosion rates

91

LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA OF THE URANYL ION IN TWO GEOMETRICALLY SIMILAR COORDINATION ENVIRONMENTS: URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE AND DI-u-AQUO-BIS (DIOXODINITRA-TOURANIUM(VI) DI-IMIDAZOLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coordination sphere of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH). U-Coordination Environments: Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate andin the crystal hosts of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and

Brittain, Harry G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT2.4 Plays a Double Role in Roots and Shoots of Nitrogen-Starved Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...analyzed using the ANCA-MS system (PDZ Europa). Influx...The mobile phase was pumped at a rate of 1 mL/min...laevis Oocyte Expression System The pGEM-T Easy vector...L.] Merr.) seed storage protein gene in transgenic...high-affinity nitrate uptake system in Arabidopsis. Physiology...

Takatoshi Kiba; Ana-Belen Feria-Bourrellier; Florence Lafouge; Lina Lezhneva; Stéphanie Boutet-Mercey; Mathilde Orsel; Virginie Bréhaut; Anthony Miller; Françoise Daniel-Vedele; Hitoshi Sakakibara; Anne Krapp

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

94

Thorium Nitrate Stockpile--From Here to Eternity  

SciTech Connect

The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The stockpile is made up of approximately 3.2 million kg (7 million lb) of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States. DNSC sought technical assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define and quantify the management options for the thorium nitrate stockpile. This paper describes methodologies and results comprising the work in Phase 1 and Phase 2. The results allow the DNSC to structure and schedule needed tasks to ensure continued safe long-term storage and/or phased disposal of the stockpile.

Hermes, W. H.; Hylton, T. D.; Mattus, C.H.; Storch, S. N.; Singley, P.S.; Terry. J. W.; Pecullan, M.; Reilly, F. K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Soils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soils Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoils&oldid612253" Category: NEPA Resources...

96

STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate and urea which wasALL f(O,O.t» URANYL UREA NITRATE FOB AND FCA ARE THEFACTORS CO~TINUE& FOf URANYL UREA NITRATE l F[) B PAGE . ,

Zalkin, Allan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Soil Sterilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... received the notice they deserved. Among them is soil sterilization as a factor in food production. How to produce the greatest amount of good food has become an urgent problem ... proper consideration. Pests and diseases, for example, not only cause serious losses in food production, but they also waste time, labour and materials. Thus, by employing measures for ...

W. J. C. L.

1944-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nitrates Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

common co.contaminant with uranium. Nitrate inhib- ited U... Mexico. Once nitrate was depleted, both U(VI) and Fe(lIl) were Ireduced concurrently. When ... Source: Lovley, Derek -...

100

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ferraro, J.R.; Katzin, L.I. Temp Data Storage 3: Argonne...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Extraction of U(VI) with N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctylmalonamide from nitrate media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraction of uranyl nitrate with the novel extractant N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctylmalonamide (DMDOMA) from aqueous sodium nitrate (and nitric acid) was investigated. The extraction mechanism was established an...

Yu Cui; Yufen Hu; Yanju Zhang; Shaohong Yin…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nitrate occurrence and attenuation in the major aquifers of England and Wales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Examination of the delta15N composition of infiltrating nitrate relative...L., Zech, W., The composition of dissolved organic matter...Migration and attenuation of agrochemical pollutants: insights from...The nitrogen isotope composition of groundwater nitrates from...

M.O. Rivett; J.W.N. Smith; S.R. Buss; P. Morgan

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate-fuel oil Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nitrate-fuel oil Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ammonium nitrate-fuel oil Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORNL 2010-G01068jcn UT-B ID...

104

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEPA filtration. On April 11, 2014, in anticipation of investigation of the source of a radiological on the possibility that a container of inadequately remediated nitrate salt bearing waste had caused the release and is the most Page 1 of 17 #12;likely source of the release. Further investigation is underway to determine

Napp, Nils

105

Uncovering Role of Symbiotic Fungi in Soil Carbon Storage | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

scarce for other carbon decomposers in the soil and consequently reducing their biomass and rates of decomposition. By contrast, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi lack many of...

106

Rate Schedules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

107

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

Hyder, M.L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Conifer root discrimination against soil nitrate and the ecology of forest succession  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... By contrast, the scarcity of NO would render efficient NO assimilation virtually irrelevant. Indeed, conifers are reported to grow much better on NHJ than NO (refs 2, 16, ... for 3 days. Error bars indicate s.e. (N > 12).

Herbert J. Kronzucker; M. Yaeesh Siddiqi; Anthony D. M. Glass

1997-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reduced nitrate leaching and enhanced denitrifier activity and efficiency in organically fertilized soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mediating the magnitude and composition of gaseous N emissions and...the exclusion of synthetic agrochemicals, and the integrated system used...differences in microbial community composition using phospholipid fatty...microbial community size and composition. Fig. 1. PLFA analysis...

Sasha B. Kramer; John P. Reganold; Jerry D. Glover; Brendan J. M. Bohannan; Harold A. Mooney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

112

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

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Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

114

Infrared absorption coefficients of gaseous chlorine nitrate at 296 K  

SciTech Connect

Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a temporary reservoir species which couples the ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} catalytic cycles responsible for ozone depletion in the stratosphere. The identification and quantitative estimation of ClONO{sub 2} in the stratosphere has been achieved using its characteristic absorptions around 1,292 cm{sup {minus}1}. Peak and integrated absorption coefficients of the {nu}{sub 1}, {nu}{sub 2}, {nu}{sub 3} and {nu}{sub 4} fundamental bands of chlorine nitrate were measured at resolutions of 0.13 cm{sup {minus}1} for both pure and pressure-broadened samples at 296 K. The results are compared to previous literature data.

Tuazon, E.C. (Univ. of California, Riverside (USA)); Wallington, T.J. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Role of methyl nitrate in plasma exhaust treatment  

SciTech Connect

There is growing interest in the use of a nonthermal plasma combined with a catalyst for NO{sub x} removal from diesel engine exhaust streams. Such exhaust streams contain excess oxygen (typically 6--10%), low concentrations of hydrocarbons (typically 100--1,000 ppm), and significant concentrations of water (typically 5--12%). Conversion of NO{sub x} to environmentally acceptable compounds, without requiring a scrubber or an added reductant, is the desired end result. In their research the authors observe the formation of substantial amounts of methyl nitrate (CH{sub 3}ONO{sub 2}) in the plasma-catalyst system. CH{sub 3}ONO{sub 2} was prepared and added to the gas blend on test equipment simulating a diesel exhaust gas. A dielectric barrier plasma discharge was followed by a zeolite-based catalyst. Methyl nitrate introduced upstream of the plasma discharge is largely unreacted upon passing through the plasma. CH{sub 3}ONO{sub 2} arriving at the catalyst is converted to methanol and NO{sub 2}. While methyl nitrate was shown to be formed in this system, it is not a significant intermediate in the mechanism of conversion of NO{sub x} to nitrogen.

Hoard, J.W.; Wallington, T.J.; Ball, J.C.; Hurley, M.D.; Wodzisz, K.; Balmer, M.L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Rate schedule  

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Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

117

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effect of Ultrasound on Surfactant-Aided Soil Washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of ultrasound as an enhancement mechanism in the surfactant-aided soil-washing process was examined by conducting desoption tests of soils contaminated with naphthalene or diesel-oil. The experiments were conducted to elucidate the effect of ultrasound on the mass transfer from soil to the aqueous phase using naphthalene-contaminated soil. In addition, the use of ultrasound for the diesel-oil-contaminated soil was investigated under a range of conditions of surfactant concentration, sonication power, duration, soil/liquid ratio, particle size and initial diesel-oil concentration. The ultrasound used in the soil-washing process significantly enhanced the mass transfer rate from the solid phase to the aqueous phase. The removal efficiency of diesel-oil from the soil phase generally increased with longer sonication time, higher power intensity, and large particle size.

Seungmin Na; Yongwoon Park; Anna Hwang; Jeongsook Ha; Younguk Kim; Jeehyeong Khim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ethylene and soil fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... SMITH1 has reported that ethylene is a causative agent of soil fungistasis, that its production in soil varies with ... earlier work3; more recent observations4 suggest that soil anaerobiosis is necessary to mobilise substrates3 for ethylene formation by soil microorganisms.

J. M. LYNCH; S. H. T. HARPER

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nickel Solubility and Precipitation in Soils: A Thermodynamic Study  

SciTech Connect

The formation of mixed-metal-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases similar to hydrotalcite has been identified as a significant mechanism for immobilization of trace metals in some environmental systems. These precipitate phases become increasingly stable as they age, and their formation may therefore be an important pathway for sequestration of toxic metals in contaminated soils. However, the lack of thermodynamic data for LDH phases makes it difficult to model their behavior in natural systems. In this work, enthalpies of formation for Ni LDH phases with nitrate and sulfate interlayers were determined and compared to recently published data on carbonate interlayer LDHs. Differences in the identity of the anion interlayer resulted in substantial changes in the enthalpies of formation of the LDH phases, in the order of increasing enthalpy carbonatenitrate. Substitution of silica for carbonate resulted in an even more exothermic enthalpy of formation, confirming that silica substitution increases the stability of LDH precipitates. Both mechanical mixture and solid-solution models could be used to predict the thermodynamic properties of the LDH phases. Modeling results based on these thermodynamic data indicated that the formation of LDH phases on soil mineral substrates decreased Ni solubility compared to Ni(OH)2 over pH 5-9 when soluble Al is present in the soil substrate. Over time, both of these precipitate phases will transform to more stable Ni phyllosilicates.

Peltier,E.; Allada, R.; Navrotsky, A.; Sparks, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: Proteomic identification of nitrated proteins  

SciTech Connect

Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6 kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity. - Highlights: > Proteomic approaches are used to identify nitrated proteins in the spleen. > Twenty five nitrated proteins were found only in the spleen of aniline-treated rats. > Aniline exposure led to increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen. > Results support the role of nitrosative stress in splenic toxicity of aniline.

Fan Xiuzhen; Wang Jianling [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Soman, Kizhake V. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Ansari, G.A.S. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

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Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous magnesium nitrate Sample Search...  

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in aqueous-phase atmospheric aerosols from... , a fundamental understanding of nitrate ions at the ... Source: Allen, Heather C.- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate flowsheet Sample Search...  

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in aqueous-phase atmospheric aerosols from... , a fundamental understanding of nitrate ions at the ... Source: Allen, Heather C.- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate aerosols Sample Search...  

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ON MINERAL DUSTS: CRYSTALLINE OR AQUEOUS? Summary: 02138, USA Keywords: Phase transition; Atmospheric Aerosols; Ammonium sulfate; Ammonium nitrate... that of ammonium...

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

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Biology and Medicine 23 Evaluation for Biological Reduction of Nitrate and Perchlorate in Brine Water Using Summary: in high salt solution. One culture was capable of reducing up...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrates Sample Search Results  

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an electron acceptor... production, but when either ... Source: Collection: Renewable Energy ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 10 Nitrate accumulation Ammonium nitrogen...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

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2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net1039992010 Summary: . The model in- cludes explicit transport of size-resolved mineral dust and its alkalinity, nitrate... in terms of...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation Sample...  

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of the experiment... nitrate- dependent Fe(II) ... Source: Roden, Eric E. - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Environmental...

130

Extraction, Degradation, and Microbial Respiration Effects of Mesotrione in Selected Texas Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of atrazine on mesotrione degradation in soil; and 3) determine if mesotrione, mesotrione + atrazine treatments, and application rates had an impact on soil microbial activity (respiration). In the first experiment, mesotrione recoveries were...

Romero, Madahy B

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Soil and Water Assessment Tool Theoretical Documentation Version 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the runoff volume and a partitioning factor. Sediment transport of P is simulated with a loading function as described in organic N transport. INTRODUCTION 19 Figure 0.7: Partitioning of Phosphorus in SWAT 0.2.1.6 PESTICIDES Although SWAT...:1.9 NITRATE IN THE SHALLOW AQUIFER 199 3:1.10 NOMENCLATURE 201 3:1.11 REFERENCES 203 CHAPTER 3:2 EQUATIONS: PHOSPHORUS 206 3:2.1 PHOSPHORUS CYCLE 207 INITIALIZATION OF SOIL PHOSPHORUS LEVELS 208 3:2.2 MINERALIZATION...

Neitsch, S.L.; Arnold, J.G.; Kiniry, J.R.; Williams, J.R.

132

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Extractable soil phosphorus, correlation with P forms in soil runoff, and relationships with the Texas p index as a nutrient management tool for cafos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................. 125 35 Relationship between P index ratings with Mehlich III or TAMU soil test P (STP) and phosphorus loads using RUSLE2 erosion estimates............................................................................................ 126... 36 Relationship between P index ratings with Mehlich III or TAMU soil test P (STP) and phosphorus loads using measured erosion rates................................................................................................... 128...

Jacoby, Freddy J.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow'' by Kelly

Flury, Markus

137

Dietary inorganic nitrate reverses features of metabolic syndrome in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitochondria to affect oxygen consumption, substrate oxidation, and generation...that dietary nitrate fuels a nitrate-nitrite-NO...libitum. Water and food consumption were determined...microreaction purge vessel coupled with a condenser...integrated with the purge vessel and the outlet of the...

Mattias Carlström; Filip J. Larsen; Thomas Nyström; Michael Hezel; Sara Borniquel; Eddie Weitzberg; Jon O. Lundberg

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

J. Phycol. 38, 971982 (2002) FIELD ASSAYS FOR MEASURING NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN ENTEROMORPHA SP.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and subsequent storage at 80 C preserved NR activity and allowed for later laboratory use of the optimized.; nitrate reductase; macroalgae; Mobile Bay; Ulva sp. Abbreviation: ASW, artificial seawater; FSW, filtered seawater; NR, nitrate reductase Macroalgal production is frequently limited by the availability

Sherman, Tim

139

Nitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supplyNitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in ArabidopsisR393/AFB3 is a unique N- responsive module that controls root system architecture in response

Green, Pamela

140

Relation of Soil Acidity to Cotton Root Rot.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R79-437-6m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. 13. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BllAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS LLETIN NO. 545 JUNE, 1937 DIVISION OF PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY AND DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY RELATION OF SOIL ACIDITY... at various depths in small plats Sulphur applied at small rates to surface soil, in plats i? which root rot was well established Discussion Summary Literature cited BULLETIN NO. 545 JUNE, 1937 RELATION OF SOIL ACIDITY TO COTTON ROOT ROT By J. J...

Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph); Ezekiel, Walter N. (Walter Naphtali); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon  

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Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including 3 Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in Whole-air Samples graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Donald Blake Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, California, 92697 USA Period of Record April 1979 - December 2012 Methods Whole-air samples are collected in conditioned, evacuated, 2-L stainless steel canisters; each canister is filled to ambient pressure over a period of about 1 minute (approximately 20 seconds to 2 minutes). These canisters are returned to the University of California at Irvine for chromatographic analysis. Analysis for methane includes gas chromatography with flame ionization, as

143

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Studies on the reverse osmosis treatment of uranyl nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect

The aqueous effluent generated in uranium processing, particularly in the nuclear fuel fabrication step, contains mainly uranium nitrate. This requires treatment before discharge into the environment to meet stringent standards. This paper presents the performance of cellulose acetate membranes with regard to rejection of uranium under reverse osmotic conditions for feed concentrations up to 200 mg/l of uranium, which corresponds to the levels normally prevalent in the effluents. The use of additives like the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium sulfate for the improvement of reverse osmosis performance of the above membranes was also investigated. In the light of the experimental results, the suitability of reverse osmosis for the decontamination of uranium effluents is discussed.

Prabhakar, S.; Panicker, S.T.; Misra, B.M.; Ramani, P.S. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Role of Nitrate in Conditioning Aquifer Sediments for Technetium Bioreduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Earth System Science Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, U.K., Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, U.K., and Centre for Radiochemistry Research, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, U.K. ... These results have implications for Tc-cycling in contaminated environments where nitrate has been considered undesirable, but where it may enhance Fe(III)-reduction via a novel pH “conditioning” step. ... Wilkins, M. J.; Livens, F. R.; Vaughan, D. J.; Beadle, I.; Lloyd, J. R. The influence of microbial redox cycling on radionuclide mobility in the subsurface at a low-level radioactive waste storage site Geobiology 2007, 5, 293– 301 ...

Gareth T. W. Law; Andrea Geissler; Christopher Boothman; Ian T. Burke; Francis R. Livens; Jonathan R. Lloyd; Katherine Morris

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Surfactant-enhanced extraction of hazardous wastes from soils. First report  

SciTech Connect

Through combined efforts, researchers at Clark Atlanta University and Savannah River Site propose to develop improved soil washing techniques for decontaminating soils containing organic, inorganic and radioactive wastes. This project encompasses several tasks including (1) identification of organic, inorganic and radioactive pollutants in selected soils, (2) separation of soils into various fractions and the determination of wastes in each fraction, (3) soil decontamination by washing with surfactants and evaluation of the effectiveness of various types of surfactants in removing contaminants from soils, (4) determination of soil remediation and the effects of the surfactant concentration and wash solution-to-soil ratio on the desorption and removal of organic wastes from soils, (5) assessment of soil particle size distribution on waste efficiency, (6) evaluating the effects of temperature, mixing rates, and extraction times on waste solubilization and extraction, and (7) determination of the influence of surface charge properties and the pHs of the souls slurries on the decontamination efficiency.

Abotsi, G.; Davies, I.; Saha, G.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Soil remediation using soil washing followed by Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was applied to a contaminated soil with p-Cresol by using a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). A mathematical model has also been proposed to describe both the pollutant desorption and the surfactant adsorption, taking place simultaneously. The effect of temperature (20–40 °C) and surfactant concentration (0.1–10 g L?1) have been analyzed on both kinetic rates. The kinetic desorption rate of p-Cresol increases as the initial solubilizer concentration. Desorption of p-Cresol was slightly greater with increasing temperature. The obtained kinetic model represents quite well the experimental results. Soil washing wastewater (20 mg L?1 of p-Cresol and 0.86 g L?1 of Tween 80) has been treated with Fenton Reagent to remove the pollutant extracted (p-Cresol) and to recover the surfactant solution. The pH of the soil washing wastewater was about 6.5 and did not change significantly during the Fenton Reagent treatment. Total conversions of p-Cresol were observed, at very short times, at the conditions tested for the Fenton reaction (100 mg L?1 of H2O2 and 10 mg L?1 of Fe2+). The hydrogen peroxide was not totally exhausted, showing conversions near 60% at 120 min. Besides, the removal of Tween 80 during the Fenton’s reaction was lower than 10%, which suggests that the reaction is mainly selective to p-Cresol degradation. The toxicity of the liquids, measured by Microtox bioassay, was significantly reduced after the oxidation reaction, suggesting the negligible formation of degradation intermediates with higher toxicity than p-Cresol.

J.M. Rosas; F. Vicente; A. Santos; A. Romero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Selective and quantitative nitrate electroreduction to ammonium using a porous copper electrode in an electrochemical flow cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,version1-10Jul2014 #12;3 1. Introduction Nitrate ions (NO3 - ) contamination of ground and surface water and physiochemical methods are used for nitrate removal from contaminated water but show drastic limits are costly [10] and produce secondary brine wastes, because the nitrate are only separated but not destroyed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Method for the Analysis of Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including phosphorus (P) recycling by soil microorganisms, uptake by plants and P adsorption, precipitation.Twoagriculturalsoilsamples receiving reclaimed wastewater or fresh water were analyzed, and results indicate that all soil fractions, where rates of biological uptake and recycling through the biomass are relatively low, 18 OP (the ratio

Paytan, Adina

150

Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus, and bucking using a chainsaw and skidding logs with a rubber-tired grapple skidder and a mechanical system

Dodson, Beth

151

THE ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS OF SOILS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as pure clays and sands. In all other cases...you the results of a phase of this investigation...and alcohols, carbo-hydrates, hexone bases, pyrimidine...these com-pounds in its behavior when nitrates are present...addition. Nor is this behavior of nitrate in influ-encing...

Oswald Schreiner

1912-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

153

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

Post, Wilfred M.

154

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

155

Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miscellaneous Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master...

156

On the Chemla effect in molten alkali nitrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Chemla effect concerns the strong composition dependence of the internal ionic mobilities of cations in mixtures of two molten salts with a common anion in which the mobility of the large cation can be higher than the small one at low concentrations of the latter. Molecular dynamics simulations of molten ( Li Cs)NO 3 ( Li K)NO 3 ( Li Na)NO 3 ( Na Cs)NO 3 each at two different compositions at a given temperature and also pure LiNO 3 and pure KNO 3 have been performed with the aim of reproducing the Chemla effect. The key role played by anion polarization on the Chemla effect in molten alkali nitrates is demonstrated by comparing the calculated mobilities using nonpolarizable and polarizable models. Polarization effects were included in the simulations by using a previously proposed fluctuating charge model (FCM) for the NO 3 ? anion. It is shown that a single potential model for a ( M 1 M 2 ) NO 3 mixture gives the correct composition dependence of the M 1 and the M 2 mobilities provided that polarization effects are included in the model. The FCM is thus transferable between different systems but not its nonpolarizable counterpart. Structure and dynamics of the simulated systems are discussed in light of proposed models for the Chemla effect.

Mauro C. C. Ribeiro

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of electrochemical denitrification from waste water containing ammonium nitrate  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed processes to dentrify waste water containing ammonium nitrate discharged from the nuclear fuel manufacturing works and to recover nitric acid and ammonia. For denitrification they applied the operating method and the conditions of operation to make 0.4mM or less from NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} waste water of 1.5 M by 3 stages of electrodialysis cells. To recover nitric acid and ammonium water, they separated HNO{sub 3} solution of 6 M and NH{sub 4}OH solution with one unit of electrolysis cell, then absorbed NH{sub 3} gas from NH{sub 4}OH solution with water and applied the condition of operation to recover 8 M NH{sub 4}OH solution. The authors demonstrated that treatment and recovery can be carried out stably with actual waste water with a system through the combination of previously mentioned electrodialysis cells, electrolysis cells and an ammonia gas absorber. At present they are planning a plant where NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} waste water of 4,500 mol can be treated per day.

Sawa, Toshio; Hirose, Yasuo; Ishii, Yoshinori; Takatsudo, Atsushi; Wakasugi, Kazuhico; Hayashi, Hiroshi

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hugoniot and Shock Initiation Studies of Isopropyl Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isopropyl nitrate (IPN) is a liquid explosive of rather low energy. We have measured the sound speed and used it in the universal liquid Hugoniot to produce an estimated Hugoniot for this material. Gas?gun?driven multiple?magnetic?gauge measurements were made to measure a Hugoniot state at 6 GPa; it was in good agreement with the prediction. Two similar experiments were conducted at higher pressure inputs to study the shock?to?detonation transition in IPN; the high inputs required for initiation necessitated the use of a two?stage gun. One experiment with an input of 9.0 GPa into the IPN produced a run to detonation of about 3 mm and the in?situ particle velocity profiles showed the expected homogeneous initiation behavior of a growing wave behind the shock front that overtakes the front and decays to a steady detonation. The reactive wave in the shocked IPN appears to have achieved a steady superdetonation in both of the initiation experiments. This is the first time a steady superdetonation has been measured with in?situ gauges.

S. A. Sheffield; L. L. Davis; M. R. Baer; Ray Engelke; R. R. Alcon; A. M. Renlund

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hugoniot and shock initiation studies of isopropyl nitrate  

SciTech Connect

Isopropyl nitrate (IPN) is a liquid explosive of rather low energy. We have measured the sound speed and used it in the universal liquid Hugoniot to produce an estimated Hugoniot for this material. Gas-gun-driven, multiple-magnetic-gauge measurements were made to measure a Hugoniot state at 6 GPa; it was in good agreement with the prediction. Two similar experiments were conducted at higher pressure inputs to study the shock-to-detonation transition in IPN; the high inputs required for initiation necessitated the use of a two-stage gun. One experiment with an input of 9.0 GPa into the IPN produced a run to detonation of about 3 mm and the in-situ particle velocity profiles showed the expected homogeneous initiation behavior of a growing wave behind the shock front that overtakes the front and decays to a steady detonation. The reactive wave in the shocked IPN appears to have achieved a steady superdetonation in both of the initiation experiments. This is the first time a steady superdetonation has been measured with in-situ gauges.

Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Davis, L. L. (Lloyd L.); Baer, M. R. (Mel R.); Engelke, R. P. (Raymond P.); Alcon, R. R. (Robert R.); Renlund, Anita Mariana

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Abengoa logo Photo of two lit towers surrounded by much smaller blue flat plates that are mounted on the ground. Commercial central receiver plant designs Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator. Approach The plan is to operate the plant at full load for 6,400 hours each year using only solar energy. Abengoa is working to create a team of suppliers capable of deploying a commercially ready nitrate salt central receiver technology that can be competitive in the current power marketplace. Innovation Abengoa is developing a new molten-salt power tower technology with a surround heliostat field. Key components include:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Conceptual Nitrate Transport Model and Its Application at Different Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liu et al. [12...] reported the calibration of a diffuse nitrate model (the DNMT model) at White Cart Water Catchment against the observed water quality...K 0 (the hydraulic conductivity at grou...

Shuming Liu; Peter Tucker; Martin Mansell

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Spring-neap modulation of internal tide mixing and vertical nitrate ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2007 ... Measurements of the intra-tidal and spring–neap variation in the vertical flux of nitrate into ... ultimately dissipates the energy of the internal tide.

2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ethylene oxidation by lithium nitrate in the presence of palladium acetate in acetic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data are reported on variations of the gas phase volume and product accumulation in ethylene oxidation by lithium nitrate in acetic acid solutions, catalyzed by palladium acetate. An assumption is made on the rou...

N. I. Kuznetsova; A. F. Danilyuk…

164

Water purification of nitrates by low-pressure reverse osmosis method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper has investigated possibilities and basic regularities of water purification of nitrates by low pressure reverse osmosis. The negative influence of chlorides and sulfates ... made on expediency of using ...

V. V. Goncharuk; V. O. Osipenko…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

166

Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Ettringite formation and behaviour in clayey soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failures in soil stabilization have been reported previously as being due to the formation of ettringite, an expansive mineral which develops in the presence of sulfate, calcium, and aluminum compounds of clay fraction in high pH levels between 10.36 and 14. By comparing the pattern of formation of ettringite, formed from different possible sources and specifically in stabilized soil, it is expected that a clearer picture of the kinetics of ettringite formation from different sources will be obtained. In this paper, a set of physico-chemical experiments and XRD tests were performed to investigate the process of ettringite formation and to explore its possible performance in clayey soils. The growth of the ettringite XRD peaks was used as a measure of the rate and its formation pattern. It is shown that the rate of ettringite formation in soil stabilization is much slower than that of artificial ettringite. Furthermore, it is shown that ettringite swells to the order of 50% and its fluid retention is significantly higher (by as much as 400%) than that of the soil sample studied in this research.

Vahid R. Ouhadi; Raymond N. Yong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Soil loss: An overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earth's soil budget is analysed and the causes of loss and degeneration are described. The main efforts to solve the problems of soil los should be concentrated on: 1. (i) the preparation of international guidelines for conservation policy; 2. (ii) declaration of an International Soil Conservation Decade; 3. (iii) acceleration of and support for land assessment; 4. (iv) development of national planning for alternative land uses; 5. (v) research to establish ecologically sound policies for land use and conservation.

V.A. Kovda

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. [Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a...

Naiser, Donald David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Managing Soil Salinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is high enough, the plants will wilt and die, no matter how much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil?s salinity levels and suggest measures you can take to correct the specific salinity problem in your soil. Salinity and salt... The terms salt and salinity are often used inter- changeably, and sometimes incorrectly. A salt is sim- ply an inorganic mineral that can dissolve in water. Many people associate salt with sodium chloride? common table salt. In reality, the salts that affect...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

EMSL - soil organic matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

soil-organic-matter en Structures and Stabilities of (MgO)n Nanoclusters. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsstructures-and-stabilities-mgon-nanoclusters

174

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Rates & Repayment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current and Historical Rate Information Collbran Power Rates CRSP Power Rates CRSP Transmission System Rates CRSP Management Center interest rates Falcon-Amistad Power Rates Provo River Power Rates Rio Grande Power Rates Seedskadee Power Rates SLCA/IP Power Rates Rate Schedules & Supplemental Rate Information Current Rates for Firm Power, Firm & Non-firm Transmission Service, & Ancillary Services Current Transmission & Ancillary Services Rates Tariffs Components of the SLCA/IP Existing Firm Power Rate Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Page MOA Concerning the Upper Colorado River Basin

177

Ethylene and soil fungistasis (reply)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... research1. We have shown clearly that spore-forming anaerobic bacteria are the major producers of ethylene in soil; that ... in soil; that ethylene is produced in anaerobic microsites in even (relatively dry soil; that the anaerobic microsites ...

SMITH

1974-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

communications in soil scienceand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) IMPACT OF HIGH-VOLUME WOOD-FIRED BOILER ASH AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND NUTRIENTS Tait Chirenje-0290 ABSTRACT Forest application of boiler ash is fast becoming a popular alternative to landfilling. Boiler ash following the application of large quantities of boiler ash in a sandy soil (with a spodic horizon). Two

Ma, Lena

179

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

180

Reappraisal of the Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ions of the solid phase of the soil system...liquid and gaseous phases of the soil system...solid and non-solid phases of the system show...than that of fine sand. 187 Oxidation...and to formation of hydrates and hydrated sec-ondary...brief review of the behavior of carbon in the...

C. C. Nikiforoff

1959-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Soil Studies with Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... reference are even strained to include the use of steam from nuclear reactors for the desalination of water. The proceedings are divided into five sections dealing respectively with equipment and ... moisture profile; soil water movement ; the interaction between soil, vegetation and water; and desalination of water for agriculture. Among the most valuable contributions are comparisons between the performance ...

E. C. CHILDS

1968-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ethylene in soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... we have confirmed earlier reports that heat8 and even autoclaving9 can stimulate the production of ethylene by soils (Table 1). The effect of heat at 100 C on the ... soils (Table 1). The effect of heat at 100 C on the release of ethylene from pure cultures of M. hiemalis was therefore investigated. No ...

J. M. LYNCH

1975-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

184

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

185

Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke  

SciTech Connect

Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Englander, Ella W. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)], E-mail: elenglan@utmb.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators  

SciTech Connect

Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup ?} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup ?} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium?related diseases. -- Highlights: ? Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ? At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ? At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNF?. ? Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martín, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Soil washing treatability study  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

Krstich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ultrasound enhanced soil washing  

SciTech Connect

The development of an ultrasonic enhanced soil-washing process requires a comprehensive, well-designed experimental program, with the results carefully analyzed on the basis of known ultrasonic cleaning mechanisms. There has been no systematic work carried out to develop information on the important variables that can affect the efficacy of ultrasonic enhancement of contaminant removal from soil. The goal of this study is to examine the potential of ultrasonic energy to enhance soil washing and to optimize conditions. Ultrasonic energy potentially can be used in enhancing contaminant removal from the entire soil mix, or it can be used as a polishing operation on the fines portion of the soil mixture after traditional soil washing operations. The research study was designed to demonstrate that ultrasonic energy can: improve process performance, e.g., remove contaminants to lower residual concentrations; and improve process economics, e.g., shorter treatment (residence) times, less surfactant use. This process was demonstrated using soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Meegoda, J.; Ho, W.; Bhattacharajee, M.; Wei, C.F.; Cohen, D.M.; Magee, R.S. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Frederick, R.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Crystal chemistry of new thorium nitrates and chromates  

SciTech Connect

The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) Å, ?=101.014(2)°. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) Å. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P21/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) Å, ?=131.01(1)°. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P21/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) Å, ?=128.647(4)°. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P21/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) Å, ?=91.793(2)°. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) Å. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th.

Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Factors affecting the discharge lifetime of lithium-molten nitrate thermal battery cells using soluble cathode materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of soluble cathode materials in molten nitrate electrolyte thermal battery cells presents several problems related to cathode...? rich separator layer.

G. E. McManis; A. N. Fletcher; M. H. Miles

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

a Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee ... Abstract. We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N–NO { .... (4) Does denitrifica- ... S or a Europa 20–20 mass spectrometer in the Mass.

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site—10281  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Navajo Nation, and the University of Arizona are exploring natural and enhanced attenuation remedies for groundwater contamination at a former uranium-ore processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. DOE removed radioactive tailings from the Monument Valley site in 1994. Nitrate and ammonium, waste products of the milling process, remain in an alluvial groundwater plume spreading from the soil source where tailings were removed. Planting and irrigating two native shrubs, fourwing saltbush and black greasewood, markedly reduced both nitrate and ammonium in the source area over an 8-year period. Total nitrogen dropped from 350 mg/kg in 2000 to less than 200 mg/kg in 2008. Most of the reduction is attributable to irrigation-enhanced microbial denitrification rather than plant uptake. However, soil moisture and percolation flux monitoring show that the plantings control the soil water balance in the source area, preventing additional leaching of nitrogen compounds. Enhanced denitrification and phytoremediation also look promising for plume remediation. Microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling results suggest that (1) up to 70 percent of nitrate in the plume has been lost through natural denitrification since the mill was closed in 1968, and (2) injection of ethanol may accelerate microbial denitrification in plume hot spots. A field-scale ethanol injection pilot study is underway. Landscape-scale remote sensing methods developed for the project suggest that transpiration from restored native phreatophyte populations rooted in the aquifer could limit further expansion of the plume. An evaluation of landfarm phytoremediation, the irrigation of native shrub plantings with high nitrate water pumped from the alluvial aquifer, is also underway.

Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Miller, D.E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Morris, S.A. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Sheader, L.R. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO; Glenn, E.P. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Moore, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Carroll, K.C. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Benally, L. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ; Roanhorse, M. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, CO; none,

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nitrification in Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Set 8 Period . - Average Average Average nitrate 0 weeks ..... May 1 1913 4 weeks ..... May 29: 1913 8 weeks ..... June 26 1913 2 weeks ..... July 25' 1913 6 weeks ..... Aug . 21: 1913 10 weeks ..... Sept . 18. 1913 :4 weeks ..... Oct... . 15. 1913 . 8 weeks ..... Nov . 13. 1913 '2 weeks ..... Dec . 11. 1913 6 weeks ..... Jan . 8. 1914 0 weeks ..... Feb . 8. 1914 4 weeks ..... Mar 5 1914 8 weeks ..... hprii 4' 1914 2 weeks ..... April 30: 1914 6 weeks ..... May 28. 1914 0 weeks...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Nitrate to Distinguish Contaminant Sources in Hanford Soil and Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stable isotopes at the Hanford Site, WA: Environ. Sci.Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA: Vadose ZoneRev. 0, Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA.

Conrad, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

197

Oil degradation in soil.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...homa, and Corpus Christi, Texas. The...fractionation, gas chromatography...depended upon the natural soil flora to...except at Corpus Christi (Table 13...recovered at Corpus Christi. Bean and turnip...extracts to gas chromatographic...

R L Raymond; J O Hudson; V W Jamison

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The reactivity of cesium nickel ferrocyanide towards nitrate and nitrite salts  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in late 1988, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began an experimental program at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to investigate the effects of temperature on the oxidation reaction between synthetic nickel cesium ferrocyanide (FeCN) and nitrates and nitrites representative of materials present in some of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). After completing a preliminary series of experiments in 1988, the program was expanded to include five tasks to evaluate the effect of selected compositional and operational parameters on the reaction and explosion temperatures of FeCN and nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures. 10 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alkyl nitrate (C1-C3) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean E. E. Dahl,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and distribution of tropo- spheric ozone. Atmospheric alkyl nitrates are normally associated with polluted air free radical processes initiated by radioactive decay or cosmic rays, enzymatically mediated reactions expedition in the equatorial Pacific, an equatorial maximum in atmospheric ethyl and isopropyl nitrate

Saltzman, Eric

202

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe) AVAILABILITY AND SEASONAL LIGHT LIMITATION--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe utilization in this oligotrophic system. Clean sampling methods were used to collect water from Lake Superior during spring and summer 2004, and nitrate utilization was measured by monitoring bioreporter

Sterner, Robert W.

203

Change in Bacterial Community Structure during In Situ Biostimulation of Subsurface Sediment Cocontaminated with Uranium and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...403-410. 2 American Public Health Association. 1969...604-609. American Public Health Association, Washington...Geobacter species to remove uranium from the groundwater...nitrate, Fe(III), and uranium were extensively reduced...while nitrate was largely depleted. A large diversity of...

Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; Lainie Petrie; Jonathan D. Istok; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Structural Changes of Bimetallic PdX/Cu (1-X) Nanocatalysts Developed for Nitrate Reduction of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Drinking Water Huiping Xu1,2 , Ray Twesten3 , Kathryn Guy4 , John Shapley4 , Charles Werth5 , Anatoly alternative for nitrate removal in drinking water [1]. Fundamental understanding how the atomic arrangement for the purification of drinking water. INTRODUCTION Presently nitrate in drinking water is either not removed

Frenkel, Anatoly

205

The effect of additions of nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash on the yield and composition of seabreeze wheat and sweet sudan grass grown on Austin clay soil in the greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

his grateful appreciation to the following nsn for the guidance and assistance g5ven during this study' Dr. J, F, Fudge~ Professor~ and Drs C ~ E. Ferguson and L. C. Kapp, kssociate Professors of the Department of kgronosgr; and Professor C. B... and Anderson (20) stated that in the absenoe of potassium plant oells vill elongate but not divide, Nightingale (23) reported that potassium was necessary for nitrate reduction~ and that the rate of nitrate absorption vas ~ lowered with reduced potassium...

Fisher, Flake Leroy

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

210

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choices (2003-06) Power Function Review (PFR) Firstgov Power Rate Cases BPA's wholesale power rates are set to recover its costs and repay the U.S. Treasury for the Federal...

211

Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by the Antitumor Agent Gallium Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Gallium is known to bind to the iron transport protein transferrin...NSC 166828. gallium, tris(acetylacetonate). The gallium nitrate:transferrin...the binding of gallium to the iron transport protein transferrin...and incorporation into the iron storage protein ferritin...

Margareta M. Berggren; Leigh Ann Burns; Robert T. Abraham; and Garth Powis

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably] At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, colloid-facilitated transport is a potential of colloids through Hanford sediments under steady state, unsaturated flow conditions. We isolated colloids

Flury, Markus

213

Applicability of Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation to Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furthermore, both of the substrates of the NDFO organisms [Fe(II) and nitrate] and the various end products of the metabolism [Fe(III), nitrite, nitric oxide, and nitrous oxide] all have known anti-souring and sulfide-scouring activities. ... A glass wool pad was placed on the bottom of the bead beds to prevent beads from falling into the inlet tubing. ...

Hongbo Zhu; Han K. Carlson; John D. Coates

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

214

Bacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with an increase in ammonia showing there had to be an additional P removal process at the same timeBacterially mediated removal of phosphorus and cycling of nitrate and sulfate in the waste stream sludge Phosphorus removal Denitrification Apatite formation Sulfur cycling a b s t r a c t Simultaneous

Benning, Liane G.

215

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.1±0.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 ± 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total AN (gas + aerosol) and ANaer show that on average 21% of ANs are in the condensed phaseGas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield A. W. Rollins samples. These measurements show that ANs are a ubiquitous component of the OA with the ­ONO2 subunit

Cohen, Ronald C.

217

Carbon 14 Production From Ammonium Nitrate Solution in the Chain-reacting Pile  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expected, there is also dissolved in the solution a small residual amount of C1402 which can be recovered easily by 0M14 AC PILC FIG. 1. C14 factory using circulating solution of ammonium nitrate. that most of the C14 would be evolved from such a solution...

L. D. NORRIS; ARTHUR H. SNELL

1947-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

High-Resolution In Situ Analysis of Nitrate and Phosphate in the Oligotrophic Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Resolution In Situ Analysis of Nitrate and Phosphate in the Oligotrophic Ocean ... Upon power up, the instrument will sequentially execute all commands in the current method until termination by lack of further commands or power interruption. ... The SEAS instrument was connected to a CTD and a PAR sensor, powered on deck, and lowered to 30 m depth. ...

Lori R. Adornato; Eric A. Kaltenbacher; Danielle R. Greenhow; Robert H. Byrne

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Acetate Production from Oil under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions in Bioreactors Injected with Sulfate and Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfate- and nitrate- reducing bacteria from an oil field in Argentina. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74 :4324-4335. 34. Callbeck...6908-6917. 41. Gieg, LM , KE Duncan and JM Suflita. 2008. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Cameron M. Callbeck; Akhil Agrawal; Gerrit Voordouw

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

The structure of the complex formed by tetrahethylamalondiamide and lanthanum(III) nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the complex LaL2(NO3)3 [L = (C2H5)2NCOCH2CON(C2H5)2] has been investigated. It has been shown that the lanthanum is 10 coordinate with two bidentate L ligands and three bidentate nitrate groups.

Paul Byers; Michael G.B. Drew; Michael J. Hudson; Neil S. Isaacs; Charles Madic

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods, Katharine N. ; Singleton,reside at DOE sites across the USA. Nitrate concentrations >

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and Geomorphology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Remote Sensing of Soils, Minerals, and GeomorphologyMinerals, and Geomorphology · Soil is unconsolidated material). ·· SoilSoil is unconsolidated material at the surface of the Earth thatis unconsolidated material

223

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling responses to increasing precipitation variability depends on precipitation amount and soil texture, and that accurate prediction of future N cycling and gas effluxes requires models with relatively sophisticated representation of the relevant processes.

Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effects of elevated CO2 concentration on growth and water usage of tomato seedlings under different ammonium/nitrate ratios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is generally expected to enhance photosynthesis and growth of agricultural C3 vegetable crops, and therefore results in an increase in crop yield. However, little is known about the combined effect of elevated CO2 and N species on plant growth and development. Two growth-chamber experiments were conducted to determine the effects of NH4+/NO3? ratio and elevated CO2 concentration on the physiological development and water use of tomato seedlings. Tomato was grown for 45 d in containers with nutrient solutions varying in NH4+/NO3? ratios and CO2 concentrations in growth chambers. Results showed that plant height, stem thickness, total dry weight, dry weight of the leaves, stems and roots, G value (total plant dry weight/seedling days), chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, leaf-level and whole plant-level water use efficiency and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings were increased with increasing proportion of NO3? in nutrient solutions in the elevated CO2 treatment. Plant biomass, plant height, stem thickness and photosynthetic rate were 67%, 22%, 24% and 55% higher at elevated CO2 concentration than at ambient CO2 concentration, depending on the values of NH4+/NO3? ratio. These results indicated that elevating CO2 concentration did not mitigate the adverse effects of 100% NH4+-N (in nutrient solution) on the tomato seedlings. At both CO2 levels, NH4+/NO3? ratios of nutrient solutions strongly influenced almost every measure of plant performance, and nitrate-fed plants attained a greater biomass production, as compared to ammonium-fed plants. These phenomena seem to be related to the coordinated regulation of photosynthetic rate and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings.

Juan LI; Jian-min ZHOU; Zeng-qiang DUAN

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Soil radioactivity levels and radiological risk assessment in the highlands of Hunza, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......will require some additional remediation of the soil. Similar to external...dose rate in air at 1 m above ground level. It is calculated as...gamma-dose at 1 m height above the ground level due to the presence of...gamma-ray spectrometry. Water Air Soil Pollut. (2010......

Manzoor Ali; Sajid Iqbal; Mohammad Wasim; Mohammad Arif; Farhan Saif

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les diffrents m-langes prsentaient sensiblement la mme densit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

434 1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les différents mé- langes présentaient sensiblement la mème pour des solutions de nitrate d'uranyle dont la densité a été reliée au moyen de chlorure ferrique nitrate d'uranyle sans chlorure fer- rique. En résumé, la mesure précise de l'activité des so- lutions de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Slow delivery of a nitrification inhibitor (dicyandiamide) to soil using a biodegradable hydrogel of chitosan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using chemical inhibitors to reduce soil nitrification decreases emissions of environmental damaging nitrate and nitrous oxide and improves nitrogen use efficiency in agricultural systems. The efficacy of nitrification inhibitors such as dicyandiamide (DCD) is limited in soil due to biodegradation. This study investigated if the persistence of DCD could be sustained in soil by slow release from a chitosan hydrogel. DCD was encapsulated in glyoxal-crosslinked chitosan beads where excess glyoxal was (i) partly removed (C beads) or (ii) allowed to dry (CG beads). The beads were tested in water and in soil. The beads contained two fractions of DCD: one which was quickly released in water, and one which was not. A large DCD fraction within C beads was readily available: 84% of total DCD bead content was released after 9 h immersion in water, while between 74% and 98% was released after 7 d in soil under low to high moisture conditions. A lower percentage of encapsulated DCD was readily released from CG beads: 19% after 9 h in water, and 33% after 7 d in soil under high rainfall conditions. Kinetic analysis indicated that the release in water occurred by quasi-Fickian diffusion. The results also suggest that DCD release was controlled by bead erosion and the leaching of glyoxal derivatives, predominantly a glyoxal-DCD adduct whose release was positively correlated with that of DCD (R2 = 0.99, p ? 0.0001). Therefore, novel chitosan/glyoxal composite beads show a promising slow-release potential in soil for agrochemicals like DCD.

E.P. Minet; C. O’Carroll; D. Rooney; C. Breslin; C.P. McCarthy; L. Gallagher; K.G. Richards

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Economic Optimum Rates and Returns from Nitrogen Fertilization of Coastal Bermudagrass for Hay in East Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BULLETIN THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION1 J. E. Miller, Director/ Texas A&M University/ College Station, f exas B-1151 May 1975 ECONOMIC OPTIMUM RATES AND RETURNS FROM NITROGEN FERTILIZATION OF COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS FOR HAY IN EAST... at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Overton. The 5-year study compared urea, ammoniutn nitrate, ammonium sulfate and two nitrogen experimental con- trolled-release materials (sulfur-coated ureas) on a rela- tively deep...

Matocha, J. E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil  

SciTech Connect

Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Root elongation of seedling peas through layered soil of different penetration resistances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field soils contain localized zones of larger penetration resistance within peds and compacted layers, while ... study examined what happens to the root elongation rate when roots grew through a layer of...

A. G. Bengough; I. M. Young

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Leaching of depleted uranium in soil as determined by column experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic features of the leachability of depleted uranium (DU) projectiles in soil was investigated...235U and 238U were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The leaching rates of 238U fro...

W. Schimmack; U. Gerstmann; U. Oeh; W. Schultz…

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid uranyl nitrate Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cell conditions with uranyl... .1089ees.2006.0009 Soil Humic Acid Decreases Biological Uranium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens CN... the filter. Identical experiments...

238

Using Multiple Chemical Indicators to Assess Sources of Nitrate and Age of Groundwater in a Karstic Spring Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important implications regarding sources of nitrate and other agrochemical contaminants in the spring basin. Conversely, spring-water...Lexington, KY, 151 p. Deines, P., 1980, The carbon isotope composition of reduced organic carbon: In Fritz, P. and Fontes, J...

Brian Katz; Rick Copeland; Tom Greenhalgh; Ron Ceryak; Warren Zwanka

239

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Model validation and uncertainty analysis -- An example using a nitrate percolation model  

SciTech Connect

Model validation and uncertainty analysis are demonstrated using a model previously developed for estimating nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) concentrations in percolation water from land application of sewage sludge. The objectives are to demonstrate alternate validation techniques and to analyze uncertainty associated with model use following validation. Field data from three published sludge application studies and two separate methods are used for the validation. The first method, point validation, is accomplished by inserting mean values into the model to make point predictions. Model accuracy is then assessed by calculating coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}), relative error and standard error. Statistical accuracy is tested using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The second method, statistical validation, uses Monte Carlo simulation to obtain distributions of model predictions. The hypothesis that field data represent reasonable samples from the distribution of model predictions is tested by checking whether observed values are within a range bounded by the 5 and 95% quantities of the distribution. Both validation methods demonstrate that the land application model generally overestimates nitrate concentrations. Monte Carlo simulation is used to identify which model input parameters are the largest contributors to the uncertainty in model predictions.

Mummert, M.C. [R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc., Middletown, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Tof-SIMS analysis of the effect of lead nitrate on rare earth flotation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of lead nitrate on rare earth flotation in the presence of hydroxamates as collectors has been investigated by a combination of micro-flotation tests and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) surface chemical analysis. Micro-flotation tests identified a link between lead nitrate dose and an improved grade of REE minerals for concentrates. The testing also identified differences in the flotation behaviour of light rare earth (LREEs, La or Ce bearing minerals) and Y and Zr bearing minerals. TOF-SIMS analyses evaluated the variability in surface components on undifferentiated REE grains from the concentrates and tails samples in response to the varied lead nitrate dosing in micro-flotation tests. The surface analyses showed that both the REE grains and gangue phases reporting to the concentrate have higher relative surface proportions of both Pb and collectors as compared to those reporting to the tails. It is noted that the lead does not appear to be associated with an increase in collector adsorption, so the grade of REE can go up is not by selective adsorption of collectors. The significantly higher intensity of Pb species identified on the surface of the concentrate would suggest that lead addition can actually reverse the surface charge making it efficient for collectors to adsorb onto surfaces that they could not easily close to. It is also possible PbOH+ potentially acting as a point activator.

Liuyin Xia; Brian Hart; Brandon Loshusan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The influence of dose-rest cycles on the nitrate concentration of deep percolate below septic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(1970), however, observed that the introduction of oxygen into an otherwise anaerobic system containing adsorbed ammonium caused the formation of nitrates in the presence of nitrifying bacteria. Bouwer (1970) stated that sewage contains a large... quantity of nitrogen, most of which is in the ammonium form. Gillham and Webber (1969) showed that barnyards, which contained livestock manure, could be leached by rainwater and contribute up to 90% of the nitrates found in the aquifer below the yard...

Allison, John Bryan

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hydrogen oxidation in soils as a possible toxic-effects indicator  

SciTech Connect

Efficient soil bioassays are needed in a screening array to determine the toxicities of industrial products and wastes. Hydrogen consumption is a common soil microbiological process that we evaluated as a possible soil indicator of toxic effects. Elemental tritium was used as a tracer to determine the H/sub 2/ oxidation rates in soils. The H/sub 2/ bioassay can be completed within 24 h using liquid scintillation counting of the tritium tracer. This test was used to evaluate the effects of known toxic chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, herbicides, and air pollutants), as well as a variety of suspected environmentally harmful compounds (e.g., waste waters, particulates, and sludges from industrial processes) on H/sub 2/ oxidation in soils. This bioassay responded to test compounds at concentrations shown to be toxic in other soil microbiological investigations.

Rogers, R.D. (U.S. EPA, Las Vegas); McFarlane, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Microbiological and physicochemical changes occurring in a contaminated soil after surfactant-enhanced soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminated soil after surfactant-enhanced soil washing R. Iturbe 1 J. Lopez...augmented because of the surfactant soil washing. However, statistical...etc. INTRODUCTION Surfactant-enhanced soil washing has become a very important...

R. Iturbe; J. Lopez; L. G. Torres

248

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration ... Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. ...

J.-D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann; D. C. Olk; E. G. Neves; M. L. Thompson; K. Schmidt-Rohr

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

rates | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

rates rates Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

250

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

251

Operation Redwing. Project 2. 52. Neutron-induced soil radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples were exposed to neutron radiation from Shot Cherokee to help establish the importance of neutron-induced residual gamma radiation. After exposure and recovery, the samples had no detectable activity because the slant range to the nearest sample was nearly 3.5 miles, due to an error in bomb drop. After this failure, an experiment was designed in the field for Shot Yuma in order that induced-activity data could be obtained for a soil other than Nevada Test Site soil. Samples of sodium, manganese, and coral sand from Site Sally were exposed above and below the surface at a slant range of 120 yards. The difference between the effects of pure fission and fission-fusion neutron spectra on induced activity in soil was not measured, since the soil samples on Shot Cehrokee were not activated. However, a method for predicting neutron-induced gamma-radiation intensities was tested for coral soil on Shot Yuma. Predicted values were within + or - 50% of induced dose rates inferred from field measurements.

Cowan, M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Basicity of Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemical prob- lems connected with the investigations of cotton root rot being made by the Division of Plant Pathology and Physiology. Lab- oratory methods were needed for estimating the amounts of acid or sulphur required to bring experimental soils... approxi- mately to a desired degree of acidity. Information was needed regarding the amounts of acid or sulphur required to make acid various kinds of soil. This Bulletin discusses the basicity of Texas soils, and the amounts of acid or sulphur...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Historical Interest Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current and Historical Interest Rates Current and Historical Interest Rates The table lists interest rates, from the project's inception through the present, for all projects with repayment supervised by the CRSP MC. The latest available interest rate is used for all future interest rate calculations. The Amistad-Falcon, Collbran, Provo River, and Rio Grande Projects are all assigned the average daily "Yield Rate" calculated by the U.S. Treasury, on an annual basis, for Treasury bonds having terms of 15 years or more remaining to maturity. The calculated yield rate is rounded to the nearest one-eighth of one percent. The yield rate is based upon the bond's interest rate, as well as its market value. The Colorado River Storage Project and its participating projects, Dolores and Seedskadee, are assigned the average daily "Coupon Rate," annualized for the same U.S. Treasury bonds used in "Yield Rate" calculations. The coupon rate is the interest rate that the bond carries upon its face.

254

Rating underground pipeline tape and shrink sleeve coating systems  

SciTech Connect

A rating system was developed for several coating types used for underground pipeline systems. Consideration included soil stress, adhesion, surface preparation, cathodic protection (CP) shielding, CP requirements, handling and construction, repair, field joint system, bends and other components, and the application process. Polyethylene- and polyvinyl chloride-backed tapes, woven polyolefin geotextile fabric (WGF)-backed tapes, hot-applied tapes, petrolatum- and wax-based tapes, and shrink sleeves were evaluated. WGF-backed tapes had the highest rating.

Norsworthy, R.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cost Analysis Rate Settin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Analysis and Rate Settin for Animal Research Facilities #12;#12;Cost Analysis and Rate ... .. . ...................... . . . ................................. . .... 7 Chapter 2 Preparation for Cost Analysis ......................................................... 9 Chapter 3 Assignment of Costs to Animal Research Facility Cost Centers

Baker, Chris I.

257

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Formation of Chloropyromorphite in a Lead-Contaminated Soil Amended with Hydroxyapatite  

SciTech Connect

To confirm conversion of soil Pb to pyromorphite [Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl], a Pb contaminated soil collected adjacent to a historical smelter was reacted with hydroxyapatite in slurries of soil and hydroxyapatite separated by a dialysis membrane and incubated. A crystalline precipitate formed on the dialysis membrane in the slurry systems was identified as chloropyromorphite. Soluble species measured in the soil slurry indicated that dissolution of solid-phase soil Pb was the rate-limiting step for pyromorphite formation. Additionally samples reacted with hydroxyapatite were incubated at field-capacity moisture content. The sequential chemical extraction used to identify species in the field-moist soil incubation experiment showed that hydroxyapatite treatment reduced the first four fractions of extractable Pb and correspondingly increased the recalcitrant extraction residue fraction by 35% of total Pb at 0 d incubation and by 45% after 240 d incubation. the increase in the extraction residue fraction in the 240 d incubation as compared to the 0 d incubation implies that the reaction occurs in the soil but the increase in the hydroxyapatite amended 0 d incubated soil as compared to the control soil illustrates the chemical extraction procedure caused changes in the extractability. Thus, the chemical extraction procedure cannot easily be utilized to confirm changes occurring in the soil as a result of incubation. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy indicated that the 240 d incubated hydroxyapatite treatment caused a change in the average, local molecular bonding environment of soil Pb. Low-temperature EXAFS spectra (chi data and radial structure functions - RSFs) showed a high degree of similarity between the chemical extraction residue and synthetic pyromorphite. Thus, confirming that the change of soil Pb to pyromorphite is possible by simple amendments of hydroxyapatite to soil.

RYAN,JAMES A.; ZHANG,PENGCHU; HESTERBERG,DEAN; ZHOU,WEIQING; SAYERS,DALE E.

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

259

Climatic influences on hillslope soil transport efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The soil transport coefficient D represents the relationship between local topographical gradient and soil flux in the landscape evolution model. This work presents new estimates of the soil transport coefficient D at 9 ...

Schurr, Naomi D. (Naomi Daika)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Soil stabilization properties of flexible intruders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many locations, soil is held in place by the roots of plants. When these plants are removed or die, the soil loses its cohesive strength and erodes away. We seek to create artificial soil stabilizers that use the same ...

Luginbuhl, Katharine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The response of some putting green soil mixtures to compaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , 11 Sand, soil, and peat ratios used in the test . . . . . . 11 Capillay porosity, non-capillary porosity, visual ratings, weight of clippings, hydraulic conductivity, bulk density and total porosity as indicated . . . , . . . 60 Grams of oven dried...-percent-moisture sand-Houston Black clay various tensions retained by cores of concrete soil-peat when sub]ected to 12. 13. Volume-percent-moisture sand-Houston Black clay various tensions Volume-percent-moisture land sand-Houston Black to various tensions...

Howard, Hugh Leon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biological Diversity, Soils, and Economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrestrial biological diversity is supported by solar energy captured by plants growing in soil...Terrestrial biological diversity is supported by solar energy captured by plants growing in soil...Bhutan e De*Panara X 15 e* Norway i Tanzania_ * Costa Rica * *SnLanka &F.R.Germany...

Michael Huston

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Note Engineering Soils Maps PAUL M. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological database. In this technique, rose-pie charts provide an overall assessment of soils hazards structures such as pipelines, power lines, and roads; and regional evaluations of sources of ag- gregate

265

The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure  

SciTech Connect

The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure  

SciTech Connect

The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Gradients of soil salinity and moisture, and plant distribution, in a Mediterranean semiarid saline watershed: a model of soil–plant relationships for contributing to the management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports the soil–plant relationships within a protected landscape in semiarid SE Spain that includes salt marshes and temporary streams and that is affected by agricultural water leaching. The main objective was to establish a conceptual model in order to use vegetation as bioindicator of soil conditions. With this model, environmental changes – based on the observation of vegetation – could be detectable, allowing the prevention of environmental impacts and the improvement of the environmental management of the studied area. Eight sampling stations with a total of 39 plots were established for the sampling of vegetation (floristic composition and species abundance) and soil (moisture, pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity and soluble ions). Multivariate analysis showed that vegetation was closely related to soil moisture and salinity. The soils colonised by steppe grasses (dominated by Lygeum spartum) and halophilus and halonitrophilus shrubs (dominated by Suaeda vera and Limonium spp.) were the driest (moisture saline (EC saline and wettest soils. P. australis reached maximum cover at EC values ~ 40 dS m? 1 and soil moisture ~ 30% and consistently appeared on those soils with lower seasonal contrasts of moisture and salinity. Between 30 and 80 dS m? 1 of soil salinity, S. fruticosa reached maximum cover (~ 100%) while A. macrostachyum did not exceed ~ 80%. Outside this range of salinity S. fruticosa declined (cover  ~ 40%. In addition, A. macrostachyum grew in soils with stronger seasonal changes of moisture and salinity. Based on the model established, if an expansion of P. australis is detected, an increase in soil moisture and a decrease in soil salinity during the year could be inferred. These changes could be due to an increased entry of effluents of fresh and/or brackish water from agricultural areas. In turn, an increase in the cover of A. macrostachyum would indicate higher soil salinity, which could be a consequence of an increase in the evaporation rates (due to rising temperatures) and a decrease in rainfall (predicted consequences of global warming). The expansion of S. fruticosa would be favoured under relatively high soil salinity conditions (which limit P. australis expansion) jointly with high soil moisture, without strong seasonal changes (which limit A. macrostachyum expansion). Our results support the role of vegetation as bioindicator of disturbances and the use of soil–plant relationships models to improve the environmental management of saline ecosystems.

M.N. González-Alcaraz; F.J. Jiménez-Cárceles; Y. Álvarez; J. Álvarez-Rogel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Safe handling of TBP and nitrates in the nuclear process industry  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory and literature study was made of the reactions of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid and nitrates. Its goal was to establish safe conditions for solvent extraction processes involving these chemicals. The damaging explosions at the Tomsk-7 PUREX plant in Russia graphically illustrated the potential hazard involved in such operations. The study has involved a review of prior and contemporary experiments, and new experiments to answer particular questions about these reactions. TBP extracts nitric acid and some metal nitrates from aqueous solutions. The resulting liquid contains both oxidant and reductant, and can react exothermically if heated sufficiently. Safe handling of these potentially reactive materials involves not only limiting the heat generated by the chemical reaction, but also providing adequate heat removal and venting. Specifically, the following recommendations are made to ensure safety: (1) tanks in which TBP-nitrate complexes are or may be present should be adequately vented to avoid pressurization. Data are supplied as a basis for adequacy; (2) chemically degraded TBP, or TBP that has sat a long time in the presence of acids or radiation, should be purified before use in solvent extraction; (3) evaporators in which TBP might be introduced should be operated at a controlled temperature, and their TBP content should be limited; (4) evaporator bottoms that may contain TBP should be cooled under conditions that ensure heat removal. Finally, process design should consider the potential for such reactions, and operators should be made aware of this potential, so that it is considered during training and process operation.

Hyder, M.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality  

SciTech Connect

Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

271

In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.  

SciTech Connect

The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

Covert, Timothy T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Neutron scattering study of two-magnon states in the quantum magnet copper nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report measurements of the two-magnon states in a dimerized antiferromagnetic chain material, copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)2?2.5D2O]. Using inelastic neutron scattering we have measured the one- and two-magnon excitation spectra in a large single crystal. The data are in excellent agreement with a perturbative expansion of the alternating Heisenberg Hamiltonian from the strongly dimerized limit. The expansion predicts a two-magnon bound state for q?(2n+1)?d which is consistent with the neutron scattering data.

D. A. Tennant; C. Broholm; D. H. Reich; S. E. Nagler; G. E. Granroth; T. Barnes; K. Damle; G. Xu; Y. Chen; B. C. Sales

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

273

Instrument Development and Measurements of the Atmospheric Pollutants Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrate Radical, and Nitrous Acid by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. , A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxidedetermination of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide in theDOAS) have measured nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrate

Medina, David Salvador

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Heavy metal balances of an Italian soil as affected by sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture applications  

SciTech Connect

Applications of sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture (Bm) (a mixture of copper sulfate and lime) add heavy metals to the soil. At an experimental farm in the Cremona district (Italy), the authors measured current heavy metal contents in soil and their removal via harvested products. They also measured heavy metal adsorption by soil from this farm. With these data, projections were made of the long-term development of heavy metal (Cd, Cu, and Zn) contents in soil, crop removal, and leaching at different application rates of sewage sludge and Bm. These projections were compared with existing quality standards of the European Union (EU) and Italy with regard to soil and groundwater. The calculations reveal that the permitted annual application rates of sewage sludge and Bm are likely to result in exceedance of groundwater and soil standards. Sewage sludge applications, complying with the Italian legal limits, may pose problems for Cd, Cu, and Zn within 30, 70, and 100 yr, respectively. Furthermore, severe Cu pollution of integrated and especially organic (Bm only) vineyards is unavoidable with the currently allowed application rates of Bm. The results suggest that the current Italian soil protection policy as well as the EU policy are not conducive of a sustainable heavy metal management in agroecosystems.

Moolenaar, S.W. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands); Beltrami, P. [Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza (Italy)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

About the Ratings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 Ratings Changes 2008 Ratings Changes EPA's "New" Fuel Economy Ratings Video about EPA's New Fuel Economy Ratings Windows Media Video (6.8 MB) Quicktime Video (7.8 MB) Text Version EPA changed the way it estimates fuel economy starting with the 2008 model year. This "new" way of estimating fuel economy supplements the previous method by incorporating the effects of Faster speeds and acceleration Air conditioner use Colder outside temperatures What else do I need to know about the "new" ratings? The tests lower MPG estimates for most vehicles. View old/new MPG ratings for a specific vehicle The actual mileage you get will still vary based on your driving habits, traffic conditions, and other factors. All MPG estimates in Find-a-Car have been converted to the new

279

Operational strategy for soil concentration predictions of strontium/yttrium-90 and cesium-137 in surface soil at the West Valley Demonstration Project site  

SciTech Connect

There are difficulties associated with the assessment of the interpretation of field measurements, determination of guideline protocols and control and disposal of low level radioactive contaminated soil in the environmental health physics field. Questions are raised among scientists and in public forums concerning the necessity and high costs of large area soil remediation versus the risks of low-dose radiation health effects. As a result, accurate soil activity assessments become imperative in decontamination situations. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a US Department of Energy facility located in West Valley, New York is managed and operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. (WVNS). WVNS has identified contaminated on-site soil areas with a mixed variety of radionuclides (primarily fission product). Through the use of data obtained from a previous project performed during the summer of 1994 entitled ``Field Survey Correlation and Instrumentation Response for an In Situ Soil Measurement Program`` (Myers), the WVDP offers a unique research opportunity to investigate the possibility of soil concentration predictions based on exposure or count rate responses returned from a survey detector probe. In this study, correlations are developed between laboratory measured soil beta activity and survey probe response for the purposes of determining the optimal detector for field use and using these correlations to establish predictability of soil activity levels.

Myers, J.A.

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effective Rate Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

LCC Guidance Rates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

282

Draft Tiered Rate Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

year's weather and other specific factors are removed from the loads of irrigated agriculture. ( ) "Irrigation Rate Mitigation" means the form of a discount by BPA to...

283

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the system’s ability to extract… (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

285

Soil organisms are the catalysts that link elemen-tal exchange among the lithosphere,biosphere,and at-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,biosphere,and at- mosphere. Understanding the rates of these exchanges, and the sequestration of elements within in carbon (C) compounds.Soil C is derived largely from plant photosynthesis and allocated to the soil either ) is oxidized and broken down to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and water (H2 O), releasing ATP (adenosine triphosphate

Soatto, Stefano

286

Remediation of contaminated soils and sediments using Daramend bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

Soils and sediments containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, chlorinated phenols, pesticides, herbicides and phthalates, either individually or in combination, have been difficult to remediate in the past. Not only the species of contaminant, but contaminant concentrations were roadblocks to successful use of bioremediation. Daramend{sup Tm} remediation has removed many of these obstacles through extensive research. Bench-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations have been conducted at a variety of industrial sites. At a manufactured gas site, 295 days of Daramend remediation reduced concentrations of chrysene and fluoranthene from 38.9 mg/kg to 5.9 mg/kg and 84.6 mg/kg to 7.8 mg/kg respectively. Elsewhere, the total PAH concentration in a silty soil was reduced from 1,442 mg/kg to 36 mg/kg. Concentrations of even the most refractory PAHs (e.g. pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) were reduced to below the established clean-up guidelines. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) have also been reduced from 8,700 mg/kg to 34 mg/kg after 182 days of treatment. Similarly, in a clay soil contaminated by crude oil processing, the concentrations of high molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons were rapidly reduced (138 days) to below the remediation criteria. Demonstrations with wood treatment site soils have proven Daramend remediation effective in enhancing the target compound degradation rates. Soils containing 2170 mg PCP/kg were shown to contain only 11 mg PCP/kg after 280 days of Darmend remediation. The issue of toxicity of soil containing increased amounts of pentachlorophenols was solved. Performance data collected during these projects indicate that Daramend remediation provides a cost effective method for clean-up of soils and sediments containing a variety of organic compounds.

Burwell, S.W.; Bucens, P.G.; Seech, A.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Treatment of nitrate-rich water in a baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) employing waste derived materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nitrate removal in submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is limited as intensive aeration (for maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels and for membrane scouring) deters the formation of anoxic zones essential for biological denitrification. The present study employs baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) to overcome this constraint. Treatment of nitrate rich water (synthetic and real groundwater) was investigated. Sludge separation was achieved using ceramic membrane filters prepared from waste sugarcane bagasse ash. A complex external carbon source (leachate from anaerobic digestion of food waste) was used to maintain an appropriate C/N ratio. Over 90% COD and 95% NO3–N reduction was obtained. The bagasse ash filters produced a clear permeate, free of suspended solids. Sludge aggregates were observed in the reactor and were linked to the high extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content. Lower sludge volume index (40 mL/g compared to 150 mL/g for seed sludge), higher settling velocity (47 m/h compared to 10 m/h for seed sludge) and sludge aggregates (0.7 mm aggregates compared to <0.2 mm for seed sludge) was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of waste-derived materials viz. food waste leachate and bagasse ash filters in water treatment.

Subhankar Basu; Saurabh K. Singh; Prahlad K. Tewari; Vidya S. Batra; Malini Balakrishnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical held designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... ACS MEMBER RATES "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sustainable management of regional agroecosystems. Theoretical and practical basis for quantifying physical. Fundamentals of soil mechanics including key processes; recent case histories of field monitoring experiments · understand composition and structure of soil · study key processes in soils and their relation to soil

Giger, Christine

293

Ethylene as a Cause of Soil Fungistasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... by gas chromatography from about fifty soils collected throughout Australia with different origins and histories. Ethylene was the only material identified in all soils in concentrations likely to be biologically active ... was the only material identified in all soils in concentrations likely to be biologically active. Ethylene has recently been identified in soil under anaerobic conditions5. In this study, ...

A. M. SMITH

1973-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal {sup 14}C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.

Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Automated Monitoring of Soil Respiration: A Moving Chamber Design Nelson T. Edwards* and Jeffery S. Riggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growthdifferential mode, and equivalent flow rates of reference gas (ambient air) and sample gas (air exiting chamber by establishing chamber when closed, provided an airtight seal. This feature and the temperature response rates continuously monitored soil temperature, or air temper- even in an environment with highly

296

High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season tall fescue/legume pastures: II. Forage production, soil and plant tissue comparisons between grazed and ungrazed pastures  

SciTech Connect

The Midway Mine is located 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres were topsoiled and revegetated with a cool season tall fescue/legume pasture. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing has become the preferred management practice on these pastures. This study evaluated soil and vegetation data collected on 1,250 acres of pasture which was grazed by about 550 cow/calf units. Ongoing monitoring programs are evaluating the effects of rotational grazing. Soil testing includes macro-nutrients, micro-nutrients and microbial activity. Plant tissue analyses monitor levels of principal macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients. Vegetation monitoring consists of measuring forage production. Results were contrasted between pregrazing and postgrazing, and grazed and ungrazed pasture. Agronomic data from the grazed versus ungrazed treatments documented the following results: (1) higher levels of plant tissue nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; (2) higher microbial activity; (3) similar levels of soil nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; and (4) increased biomass production.

Carlson, K.E.; Erickson, W.R. [Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co., Englewood, CO (United States); Bonine, R.C. [Agri-Resource Management, Inc., Gallup, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Towards the reproducibility in soil erosion modeling: a new Pan-European soil erosion map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil erosion by water is a widespread phenomenon throughout Europe and has the potentiality, with his on-site and off-site effects, to affect water quality, food security and floods. Despite the implementation of numerous and different models for estimating soil erosion by water in Europe, there is still a lack of harmonization of assessment methodologies. Often, different approaches result in soil erosion rates significantly different. Even when the same model is applied to the same region the results may differ. This can be due to the way the model is implemented (i.e. with the selection of different algorithms when available) and/or to the use of datasets having different resolution or accuracy. Scientific computation is emerging as one of the central topic of the scientific method, for overcoming these problems there is thus the necessity to develop reproducible computational method where codes and data are available. The present study illustrates this approach. Using only public available datasets, we ap...

Bosco, Claudio; Dewitte, Olivier; Montanarella, Luca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree Species Effects on Soil Organic Matter Dynamics: The Role of Soil Cation Composition Sarah E the influence of tree species on soil carbon and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a common garden of replicated substantial divergence in foliar and soil base cation concentrations and soil pH among spe- cies, we

Minnesota, University of

299

Development of a Method for Predictively Simulating Penetration of a Low Speed Impactor into a Weak Cohesionless Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geotextile barrier system that utilizes soil as ballast to prevent ballistic or vehicular impacts LSTC Livermore Software Technology Corporation LS-DYNA A complex non-linear explicit FEA software package developed by LSTC to simulate complex high rate non...

Arrington, Dusty Ray

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

Analysis of factor productivity in agricultural systems in Zimbabwe and application of Geographic Information Systems in soil erosion prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Balley Hooley Farm, Glendale, Zimbabwe. Results from the two areas were used for comparing factor use efficiency and respective rates of land degradation through soil erosion in the two agricultural systems. Crop production figures, crop market prices...

Mugabe, Phanuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2007-2009 Power Rate Adjustments (pbl/rates)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Function Review (PFR) Firstgov FY 2007 2009 Power Rate Adjustments BPA's 2007-2009 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions (GRSPs) took effect on...

302

Trees, soils, and food security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...providing resilience against weather or price disruptions, soil erosion is minimized...to inputs and markets at reason- able prices (Place 1996). Public investment to increase...with Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit and Acioa barteri (Hook. f.) Engl...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Algae from a Connecticut soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While studying the effect of a broad range of incubation temperatures on growth of algae fromone cornfield soil, 23 species of algae, 19 Chlorophyta and 4 Cyanophyta, were isolated and identified. No members of t...

R. L. Hilton; F. R. Trainor

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Soil Decontamination at Rocky Flats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last few years, many articles have appeared in newspapers and journals concerning radioactive contamination around Rocky Flats.1,2 The amount of plutonium in the soil has been of particular interest. T...

R. L. Olsen; J. A. Hayden; C. E. Alford…

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

306

OpenEI - rates  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Electric Utility U.S. Electric Utility Companies and Rates: Look-up by Zipcode (Feb 2011) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/899 This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011.

307

Water Rate Escalations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Federal agencies need accurate water cost escalation rates to perform life cycle cost analyses for water efficiency projects to meet Executive Order 13514 and Energy Independence and Security Act...

308

Before a Rate Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is made up of two processes. The first part of the IBR is the Integrated Program Review (IPR), which will address proposed program costs prior to their inclusion in a rate case,...

309

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted "advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202. ...

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tiered Rate Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Period limit. This 23 exception is limited for the duration of this TRM to the first ten requesting utilities that 24 BP-12-A-03 Section 4 Page 46 meet the size threshold and...

311

Stocking Rate Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to predict potential forage shortfalls, determine the im- pact of the decision on finances and other ranch re- sources, and make any necessary adjustments before the forage resource is harmed or financial problems occur. Through adequate planning and periodic... rates with limited knowledge of future forage and market conditions. But they can use past records, experience and range surveys to make realistic projections of forage and market conditions (Figure 3). Then, the planned stock- ing rate should...

White, Larry D.; McGinty, Allan

1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pearl millet (Pennisetum typhoides) response to soil variability in sandy ustalfs near Niamey, Niger, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were digested and analyzed as described previously. 20 Table 4. Treatments lo ed in the limin trial 0 lie Rate Factor'r 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Producnve Pmductive... water extracts (1:1) were taken trom all 26 surface soils and analyzed for Al, K, Ca, and Mg. Soil fmm each site was thoroughly mixed by hand in a large basin before placing it into the pots. Each pot contained 7250 g of air dried soil. Millet...

Wendt, John William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Cat Heart Rate Monitoring Name: Shakti Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Summer 2010 Question: What is the best way to find a cat's heart rate using a stethoscope? Because I have tried to hear their heart beat but their purring is all I can hear. If I shouldn't use a stethoscope, then what should I use? Replies: Hi Shakti! If you want to use a stethoscope, the trick is to get your cat to stop purring. Two good ways that I have found to help stop the purring 1. Cover their nose (generally cats don't like this and will stop purring) or 2. Put on the tap to drip or lightly stream water (also, they generally don't like this and will stop purring). Alternatively, you can get their heart rate from feeling their pulse. A good place to try to feel a pulse is right where the leg attaches to the abdomen - in an area called the inguinal region. Now granted there are some heart conditions that will cause an animals pulse and their heart rates don't match up, and it's hard to feel if you have a fat cat, but it's a good place to try if you are really trying to get a heart rate in a healthy kitty!

315

October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2001 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY 2002-2006 rate period were originally established in May 2000 during the WP-02 Rate...

316

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Tracking the Sources of Nitrate in Groundwater Using Coupled Nitrogen and Boron Isotopes:? A Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studied were carried out in three different hydrogeological contexts in Francefractured bedrock (Arguenon, Brittany), deep alluvial groundwater (Pia, Pyrenees), and subsurface alluvial groundwater (Ile du Chambon, Allier)in order to determine whether, regardless of the hydrogeological context, the combined use of nitrogen and boron would allow both the identification of pollution sources and the semiquantification of their respective contributions to the observed NO3 levels in groundwater. ... For isotope measurements, the groundwater samples were collected in either 10-L jerry cans (for nitrogen isotopes determination) or 1-L bottles (for boron isotopes). ... The stable isotopes of the conservative element boron, 11B and 10B, have been employed as co-migrating isotopic tracers to trace potential sources of nitrate obsd. in groundwater pumped from a large capacity 0.167 m3/s irrigation well in the Avra Valley of southeastern Arizona. ...

David Widory; Emmanuelle Petelet-Giraud; Philippe Négrel; Bernard Ladouche

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH  

SciTech Connect

Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Panikov, Nikolai [ORNL; Ariyawansa, Thilini [Northeastern University; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Epstein, Slava [Northeastern University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Spatial and diurnal variability in reactive nitrogen oxide chemistry as reflected in the isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exchange between gas-phase precursors and variability in reactive nitrogen sources. These findings product of NOx in the atmosphere. Due to its exceptionally high solubility in water, nitrate is rapidly deSpatial and diurnal variability in reactive nitrogen oxide chemistry as reflected in the isotopic

322

Size effect of hematite and corundum inclusions on the efflorescence relative humidities of aqueous ammonium nitrate particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution ammonium nitrate particles Jeong-Ho Han Department of Environmental Chemistry, Atmospheric Science Division by the saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to the solid. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition

323

Developing a Soil Property Database for the Oklahoma Mesonet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study was to create a comprehensive database of soil hydraulic and physical properties of the Oklahoma Mesonet station soils. Replicate soil… (more)

Scott, Bethany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal characterisation of an innovative quaternary molten nitrate mixture for energy storage in CSP plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Enhancements to energy storage systems developed for solar thermoelectric technologies can yield considerable increases in efficiency for this type of renewable energy. Important improvements include the design of innovative storage fluids, such as molten salts possessing low melting points and high thermal stabilities. This research examines the design of an innovative quaternary molten nitrate mixture, with the goal of improving the solar salt used currently as an energy storage fluid in CSP plants. This quaternary salt, which contains different weight percentages of NaNO3, KNO3, LiNO3 and Ca(NO3)2, exhibits better physical and chemical properties than the binary solar salt (60% NaNO3+40% KNO3) currently used. The melting points, heat capacities and thermal stability of the quaternary mixtures were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition to DSC and TGA tests, viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements were carried out for the quaternary mixtures at different temperatures. The new salt was designed by taking into consideration the risk of solid species formation at high temperatures when calcium nitrate is present (which requires that the wt% does not exceed 20%) and the costs of LiNO3. These boundaries set the maximum wt% of LiNO3 to values below 15%. Finally it was determined that the proposed quaternary mixture, when used as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in parabolic trough solar power plants, is able to expand plants? operating range to temperatures between 132 and 580 °C.

A.G. Fernández; S. Ushak; H. Galleguillos; F.J. Pérez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Global Soils Data, Sept. 5, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soils Data, Sept. 5 Soils Data, Sept. 5 The ORNL DAAC expanded its global data holdings to include the three additional data sets related to soil characteristics. "Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)" This data set consists of homogenized data for 1125 soil profiles, including soil classification, site data, soil horizon data, source of data, and methods used for determining analytical data. The profiles were derived from the World Inventory of Soil Emissions Potentials (WISE) project. The data set contains a selection of 665 profiles from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, 250 profiles from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and 210 profiles from the reference collection of the International Soil Reference and Information

326

Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

Bond, D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Upper Great Plains Rates information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and Repayment Services Rates and Repayment Services Rates 2010 Firm Power Rate (effective January 1, 2010) Rate Adjustments 2010 Firm Power Rate Adjustment 2009 Firm Power Rate Adjustment IS Rate Adjustments Rate Adjustment Process Rate Orders Signed, December 23, 2009 (16kb pdf) Announcements Firm Electric Service Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component, June 27, 2013 (74kb pdf) Customer Letter - Final Notice of Drought Adder Component, October 2, 2013 (68kb pdf) Integrated System (IS) Rates 2014 IS Rates Customer Information Meeting Presentation, October 15, 2013 (611kb pdf) Customer Letter - Notification of 2014 Rates, September 13, 2013 (160kb pdf) 2014 Transmission and Ancillary Services Rate Calculation and 2012 Rate True-up Calculation (4.9mb pdf) 2013 IS Rates

328

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Effect of nanoparticle dispersion on specific heat capacity of a binary nitrate salt eutectic for concentrated solar power applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we investigate nanoparticle dispersions in a molten binary nitrate salt eutectic. It has been recently reported that nanoparticle dispersions in molten salt mixtures can significantly enhance the specific heat capacity of the salt mixtures. These molten salt mixtures can be used as heat transfer fluid (HTF)/thermal energy storage (TES) in a concentrated solar power (CSP) plant and enhancing their specific heat capacity can significantly reduce the cost of electricity produced by CSP. However, the mechanism for the enhanced specific heat capacity is still under investigation and has not been clearly explained. In this paper, we investigate the effect of nanoparticle size on the specific heat capacity of nanoparticle/molten salt eutectic mixture. Four different sizes of nanoparticles (5 nm, 10 nm, 30 nm, and 60 nm) were dispersed in a molten nitrate salt eutectic at 1% concentration by weight. The molten nitrate salt eutectic consisted of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and potassium nitrate (KNO3) at compositions of 60% and 40% by weight. A modulated differential scanning calorimeter (MDSC) was employed to measure the specific heat capacity of the pure molten salt eutectic and the nanomaterials (pure molten salt eutectic mixed with nanoparticles). The specific heat capacity of the nanomaterials was enhanced with increase of nanoparticle size. The observed enhancement was found to be 8% for 5 nm, 12% for 10 nm, 19% for 30 nm and 27% for the 60 nm. Material characterization analyses were carried out to investigate microstructural change of the nanomaterials. It was observed that special nanostructures were formed by molten salt mixtures in the nanomaterial samples and the amount of observed nanostructures was increased with the measured specific heat capacity. This indicates that nanostructures formed in the nanomaterials may be responsible for the enhanced specific heat capacity of the nanomaterials.

Bharath Dudda; Donghyun Shin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

BCP Annual Rate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 BCP Annual Rate Process 2013 BCP Annual Rate Process Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 6, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4 Informal Customer Meeting Presentation (Pdf) PRS Executive Summary (Mar 07, 2013) (Pdf) FY2014 Final Ten Year Operating Plan PRS Executive Summary (PDF) FORM for Foreign Visits (doc) Formal Process Initial Federal Register Notice (pdf) Public Information Forum March 27,2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 Customer Meeting Presentation PIF Presentation (PPT) Presentation Details (pdf) Reclamation Fund Status Report PIF PRS Executive Summary (pdf) PIF Transcripts (PDF) Visitor Center Cost Analysis Questions - Responses Public Comment Forum April 10, 2013 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms3&4 PCF Transcripts Customer Letters

331

Multiple System Rate Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process Federal Register Notice Withdrawing Rate Proposal (PDF) Formal Process Extension Federal Register Notice (PDF) Customer Savings Under Various MSTR (XLS) Public Information Forum March 29, 2005 Customer Meeting Overview (Power Point) Customer Meeting Overview (PDF) Customer Meeting Transcript (PDF) Public Comment Forum April 6, 2005 Customer Meeting Transcript (PDF) Response Letter 5-17-05 (PDF) Customer Letters Tonopah ID-5/25/05 (PDF) APS-5/26/05 (PDF) SRP-5/27/05 (PDF) RSLynch-6/1/05 (PDF) KRSaline-6/1/05 (PDF) Formal Process Federal Register Notice (Word) Federal Register Notice (PDF) Brochure (Word) Appendices to Brochure: A B C D E1 E2 F1 F2 GH Public Information Forum July 14, 2004 Customer Meeting Overview (Power Point)

332

The Chemical Composition of Some Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The postoffice address is College, Station, Texas. Reports and bulletins are sent free upon application to the Director. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF SOME TEXAS SOILS. BY G. S. FRAPS. This bulletin is a popular account of a study of a nnmber of Texas soils... of the soil in pots, fertilized with different fertilizing ingredients, also show the needs of the soil for plant food. This is the method we used in our work on the soils described in this bulletin. Third, to ascertain whether or not the soil is acid. A...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Innovative technologies for soil cleanup  

SciTech Connect

These notes provide a broad overview of current developments in innovative technologies for soil cleanup. In this context, soil cleanup technologies include site remediation methods that deal primarily with the vadose zone and with relatively shallow, near-surface contamination of soil or rock materials. This discussion attempts to emphasize approaches that may be able to achieve significant improvements in soil cleanup cost or effectiveness. However, since data for quantitative performance and cost comparisons of new cleanup methods are scarce, preliminary comparisons must be based on the scientific approach used by each method and on the sits-specific technical challenges presented by each sold contamination situation. A large number of technical alternatives that are now in research, development, and testing can be categorized by the scientific phenomena that they employ and by the site contamination situations that they treat. After cataloging a representative selection of these technologies, one of the new technologies, Dynamic Underground Stripping, is discussed in more detail to highlight a promising soil cleanup technology that is now being field tested.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Verifiable Metamodels for Nitrate Losses to Drains and Groundwater in the Corn Belt, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil hydraulic parameters, N inputs, irrigation, and climatic variables were systematically varied by the SENSAN utility in PEST parameter estimation software. ... The wells were identified through classification and regression tree (CART) analysis and represented recently recharged groundwater in intensively cropped areas (see the SI). ...

Bernard T. Nolan; Robert W. Malone; Jo Ann Gronberg; Kelly R. Thorp; Liwang Ma

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Assessing FES Density and Dissolution-independent Nitrate Desorption in Hyperalkaline Weathered Hanford Sediment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford Sediment Yi-Ting (Emmy) Deng Crop and Soil Sciences Seminar Wednesday March 2, 2011 at 3:35 PM with sediments in the "near field" (close to the contaminant source). These minerals, such as NO3-feldspathoids must be considered to accurately forecast the stability of waste-impacted sediments. The overall goal

Arnold, Jonathan

336

Obsidian Hydration Rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSIDIAN HYDRATION RATE FOR KLAMATH BASIN OF CALIFORNIA AND OREGON...as the material is excreted, falls through the air, and dries...Friedman. Table 1 presents two new groups of hydra-tion readings for...the true age is believed to fall (3). The Snaketown age is...

Clement W. Meighan

1970-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19067-1612. ...

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements wilt be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

344

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2000-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted"advertisements wilt be classified by the chemical field designated by the members, if not designated, placement will be determined by the first word of the text submitted. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Road, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

346

Advertising Rate Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advertising Rate Information ... "Situations Wanted" advertisements will be classified by the chemical field designated by the members. ... State ACS membership status and mail advertisements to: Chemical & Engineering News, Classified Advertising, 676 East Swedesford Koad, Suite 202, Wayne, PA 19087-1612. ...

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

347

Baseline geochemistry of soil and bedrock Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at MDA-P  

SciTech Connect

This report provides baseline geochemistry for soils (including fill), and for bedrock within three specific areas that are planned for use in the remediation of Material Disposal Area P (MDA-P) at Technical Area 16 (TA-16). The baseline chemistry includes leachable element concentrations for both soils and bedrock and total element concentrations for all soil samples and for two selected bedrock samples. MDA-P operated from the early 1950s to 1984 as a landfill for rubble and debris generated by the burning of high explosives (HE) at the TA-16 Burning Ground, HE-contaminated equipment and material, barium nitrate sand, building materials, and trash. The aim of this report is to establish causes for recognizable chemical differences between the background and baseline data sets. In many cases, the authors conclude that recognizable differences represent natural enrichments. In other cases, differences are best attributed to analytical problems. But most importantly, the comparison of background and baseline geochemistry demonstrates significant contamination for several elements not only at the two remedial sites near the TA-16 Burning Ground, but also within the entire region of the background study. This contamination is highly localized very near to the surface in soil and fill, and probably also in bedrock; consequently, upper tolerance limits (UTLs) calculated as upper 95% confidence limits of the 95th percentile are of little value and thus are not provided. This report instead provides basic statistical summaries and graphical comparisons for background and baseline samples to guide strategies for remediation of the three sites to be used in the restoration of MDA-P.

Warren, R.G.; McDonald, E.V.; Ryti, R.T.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Physical properties of soils contaminated by oil lakes, Kuwait  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for a marine assault by the coalition forces, the Iraqi Army heavily mined Kuwait`s coastal zone and the oil fields. Over a million mines were placed on the Kuwait soil. Burning of 732 oil wells in the State of Kuwait due to the Iraqi invasion caused damages which had direct and indirect effect on environment. A total of 20-22 million barrels of spilled crude oil were collected in natural desert depressions and drainage network which formed more than 300 oil lakes. The total area covered with oil reached 49 km{sup 2}. More than 375 trenches revealed the existence of hard, massive caliche (CaCO{sub 3}) subsoil which prevent leached oil from reaching deeper horizons, and limited the maximum depth of penetration to 1.75 m. Total volume of soil contaminated reached 22,652,500 m{sup 3} is still causing environmental problems and needs an urgent cleaning and rehabilitation. Kuwait Oil Company has recovered approximately 21 million barrels from the oil lakes since the liberation of Kuwait. In our examined representative soil profiles the oil penetration was not deeper than 45 cm. Infiltration rate, soil permeability, grain size distribution, aggregates formation and water holding capacity were assessed. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Mohammad, A.S. [Kuwait Univ., Safat (Kuwait); Wahba, S.A.; Al-Khatieb, S.O. [Arabian Gulf Univ. (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.), other forage grasses, cultivated crops, and forest were collected seasonally at six locations. Soil organic C (SOC), total N, soil microbial biomass C (SMBC) and N (SMBN), soil mineralizable C and N, and basal soil respiration (BSR) were in general...

Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Soil Gas Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Soil Gas Sampling Add.png Add a new Soil Gas Sampling...

352

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

353

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect Second edition Rattan Lal & Ronald F. Follett. Printed in the United States of America. #12;181 Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect, 2nd

Archer, Steven R.

354

Maryland Soil Conservation Districts Law (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to conserve the soil, water, and related resources of the state through establishing regulations for land-use practices related to soil erosion. This legislation...

355

Rainwater Harvesting: Soil Storage and Infiltration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A soil storage and infiltration system collects rainfall runoff from the roofs of buildings and directs it underground where it infiltrates the soil. Such a system conserves water and protects it from surface pollution. This publication describes...

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Wetland Soils --Opportunities and Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sciences entitled "Restoration of aquatic ecosystems: Science, technol- ogy and public policy" failed of Interior, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service. Wetlands are complex ecosystems that are poorly understood relative to terrestrial and aquatic systems. Difficulties in characterizing wetlands

Florida, University of

357

The effect of soil moisture levels on evapotranspiration from cotton and grain sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measured value of soil t moisture. Substituting these values into Equations (I), (2) and (3) gave the following three equations: SM =be ct t SM =bK t t SM = d ? b log (t+c ) t (5) (6) The next logical step would have been to evaluate... as several atmospheres pressure which is sufficient tc move water to the leaves of even the tallest trees. The flew cf water can be governed by either the rate at which it is extracted from the soil or the rate at which it moves through the plants...

Schneider, Arland David

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the zonal steppe soils of Russia. J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci. ,CD-ROM "Land Resources of Russia", International Institute

Hammes, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Author's personal copy Soil total carbon analysis in Hawaiian soils with visible, near-infrared and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Soil total carbon analysis in Hawaiian soils with visible, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy Agriculture Hawaii Mid-infrared Soil carbon Visible near-infrared Accurate assessment of DRS for Ct prediction of Hawaiian ag- ricultural soils by creating visible, near-infrared (VNIR

Grunwald, Sabine

360

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

reports reports Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector With Data through 2010 | Release Date: November 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: December 2013 | Correction Previous editions Year: 2011 2004 Go Figure 1. Deliveries from major coal basins to electric power plants by rail, 2010 Background In this latest release of Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) significantly expands upon prior versions of this report with the incorporation of new EIA survey data. Figure 1. Percent of total U.S. rail shipments represented in data figure data Previously, EIA relied solely on data from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board (STB), specifically their confidential Carload Waybill Sample. While valuable, due to the statistical nature of the Waybill data,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

362

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: 2.5% Aug '12 to Aug '13: -1.3% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 1.5% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: -0.8%

363

Airborne microwave remote sensing of soil moisture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Newton [1]) . . . . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ 23 10 12 Location of aircraft soil moisture experiments. . . Soil types for fields at the 1975 Phoenix experiment. Soil types for fields at the 1976 Finney County, Kansas experiment . 34 43 44 13 14 Soil... Algorithms. Penetration Depth. EXPERII4ENTAL PROGRAM. I ntr oducti on. Phoenix, 1975. Lawrence-Topeka, Kansas Experiment Fi nney County Experiment South Dakota Experiment. . . . . . Colby, Kansas Experiment . . Moisture Sampling and Accuracy...

Black, Quentin Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Physical Degradation of Soils, Risks and Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Physical soil degradation...is one of the eight main risks and threats defined by the European Thematic Strategy for...

Winfried E. H. Blum

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................... ltudy by Means of Carbon Dioxide Formed 8 ............................... lomparison of . Various Materials 9 ...................................... lffect of Nature of Soil 14 ..................................... Ixidation of Soil Carbon 18... was drawn to take out the carbon dioxide. Althongl~ such experi- ments are well adapted to estimate carbon cliosicle, obviously, such con- ditions do not prevail in the soil, and while it is possible that Wollnp's conclusions may appl~r to the soil uncler...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

VOCs Miamisburg Environmental Management Project - Tritium More Documents & Publications Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

367

Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjusted Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 5,000 5,500 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -7.4% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -0.1% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -0.1% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -16.8% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -3.2% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -3.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -9.3% Jan '99 to Jan '00: +3.5% YTD '99 to YTD '00: +3.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

368

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement Documents CRSP Transmission 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates extension Letter announcing two-year extension to CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2014 Accompanying calculation table for FY 2014 CRSP transmission rate letter Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2013 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2012 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2011 Letter announcing revised CRSP transmission rates for FY 2010 SLCA/IP 9/16/2013 WAPA-161 FRN, SLCA/IP firm power rate extension Letter announcing two-year extension to SLCA/IP firm power rate SLCA/IP Tentative Rate Adjustment Schedule

369

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June '99 to July '99: -5.4% June '99 to July '99: -5.4% July '98 to July '99: +3.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: -0.5% July '98 to July '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +0.5% July '98 to July '99: +1.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +1.5% July '98 to July '99: +10.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

370

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +8.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +6.0% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +4.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +2.4% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +3.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +32.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +2.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.5%

371

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +1.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -1.9% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -0.1% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: +22.3% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +21.1%

372

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.4% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.1% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: 0.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: +7.3% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +8.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +8.3%

373

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +5.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: -0.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +1.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +2.5% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +6.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +9.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +2.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.2%

374

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: +2.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -0.2% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -1.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -2.1% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -6.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.6%

375

Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a, , Birl Lowery a , Carl Wacker b a University May 2012 Accepted 15 May 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: Soil maps Historical maps Digital soil mapping Soil survey Legacy soil maps are an important input in digital soil mapping. This paper traces how

Mladenoff, David

376

Transportation Rates For Fishery Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

express (Railway Express Agency), and motor carriers. Air transporta- tion and water transportation 2 Rail-freight rates 2 Rail-express rates 3 Motor-carrier rates 3 Protective-service charges 4 used in sample 7 2. Rail-express rate index: Routes used in sample 7 3. Motor-carrier rate index

377

Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH- and PCB-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

The role of surfactants in the desorption of soil-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was investigated. The solubilization of individual PAHs in an extract of a weathered, coal tar-contaminated soil containing a mixture of PAHs and other petroleum derivatives was found to be significantly less than that for pure compounds. Batch soil washing with Triton X-100 (a commercial, nonionic alkyl phenol ethoxylate) was found to increase the effective diffusion rate of PAHs from the contaminated soil by four orders of magnitude compared to that obtained by gas purging when the results were analyzed using a radial diffusion model. At concentrations of up to 24 times its critical micelle concentration (CMC), Triton X-100 did not seem to enhance hydrocarbon degradation in the coal tar-contaminated soil; however, the biosurfactant rhamnolipid R1, at a concentration of 50x CMC, increased the rate of mineralization of 4,4{prime}-chlorinated biphenyl mobilized from a laboratory-contaminated soil by more than 60 times.

Ghosh, M.M.; Yeom, I.T.; Shi, Z.; Cox, C.D.; Robinson, K.G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Common Questions Why should I soil test?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Common Questions Why should I soil test? Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth. The most important reason to soil test is to have a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain

Isaacs, Rufus

379

Effect of soil freezing on particulate resuspension  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of small scale laboratory tests that were conducted to determine the effect of soil freezing on soil resuspension. Nontransuranic contaminated soil form the Radioactive Waste Management Complex was subjected to a series of test conditions to determine respirable and nonrespirable fractions of airborne dust. A separate fraction of the same soil was spiked with Pu-239 and subjected to the same test conditions. Concentrations of resuspended soil and Pu in air were determined. Test results show that: (a) the largest fraction of soil resuspended is in the nonrespirable size fraction, (b) the concentration of resuspended soil in air is highly dependent on surface air velocity, and (c) freezing is not as effective at reducing resuspension of fine dry soil as it is with coarse soil, and (d) artificially prepared Pu contaminated soil has a high proportion of the total activity distributed on ultrafine material, reacts inversely to the mass movement of soil, and does not adequately imitate Pu movement in an actual contaminated soil. 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Duce, S.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Winberg, M.R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an expandable mineral...

Bredenkamp, Sanet

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Chemical Composition of Soils of Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATION Table 5. Analyses of soils of the Gulf Coast Prairie-Continued Type Name Flat marshy to semi-marshy soils ....................... Harr~e clay, surface.. Harris clay, subsoil. ........................ Harris fine sandy loam, surface.... ............. Harris fine sandy loam. subsoil.. ............. Tidal marsh. surface.. ...................... Tidal marsh. subsoil. ....................... Flat stream bottom soils Guadalupe clay. surface.. ................... Guadalupe clay, subsoil...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Measurement of Radon in Soil Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CONCENTRATIONS of the order of 100,000-1,000,000 pc. radon/m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation ... m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation of radon in the soil gas and the free atmosphere has been suggested as a tool for ...

K. G. VOHRA; M. C. SUBBARAMU; A. M. MOHAN RAO

1964-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

October 1996 - September 2001 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

affecting a specific power purchase. For more specific information see: 1996 Final Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate Schedules: Power Rates (PDF, 84 pages, 188 kb) Ancillary...

385

Comparison of soil washing using conventional surfactant solutions and colloidal gas aphron suspensions  

SciTech Connect

Surfactants have proven to be an effective way of augmenting the removal and mobilization of organics from contaminated soil. A more recent and innovative technology to aid the removal of contaminants from soil is the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) suspensions. The performance of CGAs and surfactant solutions in washing soils contaminated with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) was investigated and compared with the process of washing soils with aqueous solutions of surfactants as in conventional surfactant flushing. In general it was observed that there was no significant difference in the performance of the two processes of soil washing for a highly soluble compound like 2,4-D. However, the surfactant consumption per gram of 2,4-D recovered from the soil was higher for conventional washing than for CGA solutions. CGAs also had a significant advantage over surfactant solutions in that at low flow rates, the pumping of CGAs showed lower pressure drops across the soil column.

Roy, D.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Tamayo, A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts – Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

Melillo, Jerry M.

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Degradation and resilience of soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...7, 99119. Lal, R. 1997a Long-term tillage and maize monoculture...the press.) Lal, R. 1997b Long-term tillage and maize monoculture...thus reduce the potential `storage capacity' of the soil. What...use of crop residue and farm waste can lead to improvement in...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Turning a negative into a positive: Researchers find promising use for excessive nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acre of nitrogen for each inch of water applied. tx H2O | pg. 17 _ Turning a negative into a positive tx H2O | pg. 18 According to Sij, previous research has shown that properly designed and managed drip irrigation systems reduce deep percola... agencies involved in the project were local soil and water conservation districts, U.S. Department of Agriculture?s Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Texas AgriLife Extension Service, and Rolling Plains Groundwater Conservation District...

Wythe, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

390

Wind resuspension of trace amounts of plutonium particles from soil in a semi-arid climate  

SciTech Connect

This study of resuspension of soil containing minute amounts of plutonium (Pu-239) has been in progress at the Rocky Flats (RF) Plant since 1978. It is one of several studies initiated after wind relocated small amounts of soil-borne Pu-239 during cleanup of an outdoor storage area. The Pu-239-settled field is now sparsely covered with prairie grass typical of the area. Past studies were limited to comparisons of bulk soil activity with total activity in the airborne dust. This work covers the physics of the particle resuspension process. This report covers the following: (1) Pu-239 resuspension rate versus wind speed, (2) mechanisms of soil particle resuspension, (3) vertical concentration profile of Pu-239 particles, (4) Pu-239 and host particle size distribution and activity concentration. 5 references, 1 table.

Langer, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tier 2 Vintage Rate Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Tier 2 Rate Alternatives Tier 2 Rate Alternatives Load Growth Rate BPA commits to meet Load Following customers' load growth placed on BPA for the term of the commitment period...

392

Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at Low Temperature under Aerobic and Nitrate-Reducing Conditions in Enrichment Cultures from Northern Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from well-drained areas. In general, most successful enrichment...temperature and freeze-thaw cycles on hydrocarbon biodegradation...Krieg. 1994. Methods for general and molecular bacteriology...Canada creosote degradation diesel fuel Eastern Canada Ellesmere...

Mikael Eriksson; Erik Sodersten; Zhongtang Yu; Gunnel Dalhammar; William W. Mohn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Plasma Adiabatic Lapse Rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient ??? and difference in average ionization states Z2-Z1. Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

Peter Amendt; Claudio Bellei; Scott Wilks

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Soil physical and hydrological properties under three biofuel crops in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

While biofuel crops are widely studied and compared for their energy and carbon footprints, less is known about their effects on other soil properties, particularly hydrologic characteristics. Soils under three biofuel crops, corn (Zea mays), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and willow (Salix spp.), were analyzed seven years after establishment to assess the effects on soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), penetration resistance (PR), water-holding capacity, and infiltration characteristics. The PR was the highest under corn, along with the lowest associated water content, while PR was 50-60% lower under switchgrass. In accordance with PR data, surface (0-10 cm) bulk density also tended to be lower under switchgrass. Both water infiltration rates and cumulative infiltration amounts varied widely among and within the three crops. Because the Philip model did not fit the data, results were analyzed using the Kostiakov model instead. Switchgrass plots had an average cumulative infiltration of 69 cm over 3 hours with a constant infiltration rate of 0.28 cm min{sup -1}, compared with 37 cm and 0.11 cm min{sup -1} for corn, and 26 cm and 0.06 cm min{sup -1} for willow, respectively. Results suggest that significant changes in soil physical and hydrologic properties may require more time to develop. Soils under switchgrass may have lower surface bulk density, higher field water capacity, and a more rapid water infiltration rate than those under corn or willow.

Bonin, Catherine [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Schmitz, Matthias [Rheinsche Friedrich/Wilhelms Universitaet Boon; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Simulation of detonation of ammonium nitrate fuel oil mixture confined by aluminum: edge angles for DSD  

SciTech Connect

Non-ideal high explosives are typically porous, low-density materials with a low detonation velocity (3--5 km/s) and long detonation reaction zone ({approx} cms). As a result, the interaction of a non-ideal high explosive with an inert confiner can be markedly different than for a conventional high explosive. Issues arise, for example, with light stiff confiners where the confiner can drive the high explosive (HE) through a Prandtl-Meyer fan at the HE/confiner interface rather than the HE driving the confiner. For a non-ideal high explosive confined by a high sound speed inert such that the detonation velocity is lower than the inert sound speed, the flow is subsonic and thus shockless in the confiner. In such cases, the standard detonation shock dynamics methodology, which requires a positive edge-angle be specified at the HE/confiner interface in order that the detonation shape be divergent, cannot be directly utilized. In order to study how detonation shock dynamics can be utilized in such cases, numerical simulations of the detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum 6061 are conducted.

Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quirk, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Briggs, Matthew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shinas, Micheal A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Combined uranous nitrate production consisting of undivided electrolytic cell and divided electrolytic cell (Electrolysis ? Electrolytic cell)  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, mild way to make uranous ions. Undivided electrolyzers whose maintenance is less but their conversion ratio and current efficiency are low, have been chosen. However, at the beginning of undivided electrolysis, high current efficiency can also be maintained. Divided electrolyzers' conversion ratio and current efficiency is much higher because the re-oxidation of uranous on anode is avoided, but their maintenance costs are more, because in radioactive environment the membrane has to be changed after several operations. In this paper, a combined method of uranous production is proposed which consists of 2 stages: undivided electrolysis (early stage) and divided electrolysis (late stage) to benefit from the advantages of both electrolysis modes. The performance of the combined method was tested. The results show that in combined mode, after 200 min long electrolysis (80 min undivided electrolysis and 120 min divided electrolysis), U(IV) yield can achieve 92.3% (500 ml feed, U 199 g/l, 72 cm{sup 2} cathode, 120 mA/cm{sup 2}). Compared with divided mode, about 1/3 working time in divided electrolyzer is reduced to achieve the same U(IV) yield. If 120 min long undivided electrolysis was taken, more than 1/2 working time can be reduced in divided electrolyzer, which means that about half of the maintenance cost can also be reduced. (authors)

Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Hui; Xian, Liang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275-26, Beijing 102413 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Staining of in vivo subsurface degradation in dental composites with silver nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A previously reported technique for staining areas of degradation in dental composite restorations was evaluated in 51 removed restorations. The staining reagent was silver nitrate, which penetrated the degraded subsurface as ionic silver and was subsequently developed into colored deposits of metallic silver. Several artefacts were recognized that resulted in an apparent image of subsurface stain. Most importantly, the presence of a layer of adsorbed silver on the edge of the specimen exaggerated the extent of staining. In order for the true depth of stain to be determined, thin sections of the materials should first be examined with a stereomicroscope to distinguish any contribution from adsorbed silver on the specimen edge. With this regimen, no stain was present in 41% of the restorations, and in a further 30%, the depth of stain was less than 50 microns. In two composites, the depth of stain was greater than 900 microns, and in a number of specimens, localized stain was found in association with attrition scars. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated that the amount of silver present in the degraded layers was very small. Overall, the results indicated that the staining technique is useful in the study of composite degradation.

Mair, L.H. (Univ. of Liverpool (England))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Phase equilibrium conditions for simulated landfill gas hydrate formation in aqueous solutions of tetrabutylammonium nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for the simulated landfill gas (LFG) of methane and carbon dioxide (50 mol% methane, 50 mol% carbon dioxide) were investigated with the pressure range of (1.90 to 13.83) MPa and temperature range of (280.0 to 288.3) K at (0.050, 0.170, 0.340, and 0.394) mass fraction (w) of tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBANO3). The phase boundary between liquid–vapor–hydrate (L–V–H) phases and liquid–vapor (L–V) phases was determined by employing an isochoric pressure-search method. The phase equilibrium data measured showed that TBANO3 appeared a remarkable promotion effect at w TBANO 3  = 0.394, corresponding to TBANO3 · 26H2O, but inhibition effect at w TBANO 3  = (0.050, or 0.170) on the semiclathrate hydrate formation. In addition, the application of TBANO3 at 0.340 mass fraction, corresponding to TBANO3 · 32H2O, displayed promotion effect at lower pressures (below 6.38 MPa) and inhibition effect at higher pressures (above 6.38 MPa).

Ling-Li Shi; De-Qing Liang; Dong-Liang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution  

SciTech Connect

About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect

Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [{sup 13}C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Watson, David B [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

402

Soil: Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil carbon sequestration can contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and at the same time improving soil health and sustainability. This article outlines the basic principles and controlling mechanisms involved in soil carbon sequestration and reviews how improved agricultural practices impact soil carbon stocks, based on data from long-term field experiments and other sources. It concludes with a section outlining challenges and opportunities for implementation of GHG mitigation strategies involving soil carbon sequestration, summarizing key science and policy-related issues.

K. Paustian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Enhanced Growth of Acidovorax sp. Strain 2AN during Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation in Batch and Continuous-Flow Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 3b). Acetate was depleted at day 2 and was replenished...Multiple influences of nitrate on uranium solubility during bioremediation of uranium-contaminated subsurface...18th ed. American Public Health Association, Washington...

Anirban Chakraborty; Eric E. Roden; Jürgen Schieber; Flynn Picardal

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electrochemical reductions of Hg(II), ruthenium-nitrosyl complex, chromate, and nitrate in a strong alkaline solution  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemistry of low-level nuclear wastes, the reductions of Hg(II), [RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 4}OH]{sup 2{minus}}, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} in 1.33 M NaOH solution have been studied primarily at nickel electrodes for electrocatalytic advantages. Hg(II) was reduced to Hg metal [equilibrium potential of 0.099 V vs NHE (normal hydrogen electrode)]. The ruthenium-nitrosyl complex, [RuNO(NO{sub 2}){sub 4}OH]{sup 2{minus}}, was reduced to Ru metal (half-wave potential of {minus}0.38 V vs NHE). Chromate was reduced to chromic hydroxide (equilibrium potential of {minus}0.24 V vs NHE). Nitrate reduction has two different regions of Tafel behavior from which reduction mechanisms are proposed. The exchange current densities for the nitrate reduction at Ni, Pb, Fe, and graphite were measured and the competition of the nitrate reduction with the hydrogen evolution investigated.

Bockris, J.O`M.; Kim, J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Scheck, R.W. [Mactec/Dames and Moore (United States); Goller, E.D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils  

SciTech Connect

The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

Ludowise, J.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Rate types for stream programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce RATE TYPES, a novel type system to reason about and optimize data-intensive programs. Built around stream languages, RATE TYPES performs static quantitative reasoning about stream rates -- the frequency of data items in a stream being ... Keywords: data processing rates, data throughput, performance reasoning, stream programming, type systems

Thomas W. Bartenstein, Yu David Liu

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site  

SciTech Connect

The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

410

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

411

Review of soil contamination guidance  

SciTech Connect

A review of existing and proposed radioactive soil contamination standards and guidance was conducted for United Nuclear Corporation (UNC), Office of Surplus Facilities Management. Information was obtained from both government agencies and other sources during a literature survey. The more applicable standards were reviewed, evaluated, and summarized. Information pertaining to soil contamination for both facility operation and facility decommissioning was obtained from a variety of sources. These sources included: the Code of Federal Regulations, regulatory guides, the Federal Register, topical reports written by various government agencies, topical reports written by national laboratories, and publications from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). It was difficult to directly compare the standards and guidance obtained from these sources since each was intended for a specific situation and different units or bases were used. However, most of the information reviewed was consistent with the philosophy of maintaining exposures at levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

Mueller, M.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Patterns and mechanisms of soil acidification in the conversion of grasslands to forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no aboveground acidic inputs were detected in wet + dry deposition, throughfall and forest floor leachates. Our and base cation cycles. Introduction Plants influence the earth surface through the uptake, transformation of vegetation type on soils is important because current rates of vegetation change are high and may lead

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

413

Nitrogen Addition Increases Carbon Storage in Soils, But Not in Trees, in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nitrogen (N) species and car- bon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere globally. Received 18 August 2012Nitrogen Addition Increases Carbon Storage in Soils, But Not in Trees, in an Eastern U.S. Deciduous regions receive elevated rates of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition from air pollution. To evalu- ate

Templer, Pamela

414

Use of Bioaugmentation To Stimulate Complete Reductive Dechlorination of Trichloroethene in Dover Soil Columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These results suggest that a critical bacterial population was missing in these soils and that bioaugmentation is an appropriate remedial strategy under such circumstances. ... Bioaugmentation to enhance the rate and extent of reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes was investigated in intermediate (?1 m) scale physical aquifer models (PAMs) designed to simulate the groundwater flow field near an injection well. ...

Mark R. Harkness; Angelo A. Bracco; Michael J. Brennan, Jr.; Kim A. DeWeerd; James L. Spivack

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

Description of Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov., isolated from nitrate-rich zones of a contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 were isolated from the subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site where sediments are co-contaminated with large amounts of acidity, nitrate, metal radionuclides and other heavy metals. A combination of physiological and genetic assays indicated that these strains represent the first members of the Rhodanobacter genus shown to be capable of complete denitrification. Cells of strain 2APBS1T and 116-2 were Gram negative, non-spore-forming, rods, 3-5 micro;m long and 0.25-0.5 m in diameter. The isolates were facultative anaerobes, and had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 C and pH 6.5, respectively, and could tolerate up to 2.0 % NaCl, though growth improved in its absence. Strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 contained fatty acid profiles and 100 % Q-8 ubiquinone, that are characteristic features of the genus Rhodanobacter. Although strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 share high SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity to R. thiooxydans (>99%), DNA-DNA hybridization values were substantially below the 70% threshold used to designate novel species. Thus, based on genotypic, phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological differences, strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodanobacter, for which the name Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov is proposed. The type strain is 2APBS1T (=DSM 23569T =JCM 17641T). Strain 116-2 (=DSM 24678 = JCM 17642) is a reference strain.

Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Overholt, Will [Florida State University; Canion, Andy [Florida State University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Description of Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov., isolated from nitrate-rich zones of a contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 were isolated from the subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site where sediments are co-contaminated with large amounts of acidity, nitrate, metal radionuclides and other heavy metals. A combination of physiological and genetic assays indicated that these strains represent the first members of the Rhodanobacter genus shown to be capable of complete denitrification. Cells of strain 2APBS1T and 116-2 were Gram negative, non-spore-forming, rods, 3-5 micro;m long and 0.25-0.5 m in diameter. The isolates were facultative anaerobes, and had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 C and pH 6.5, respectively, and could tolerate up to 2.0 % NaCl, though growth improved in its absence. Strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 contained fatty acid profiles and 100 % Q-8 ubiquinone, that are characteristic features of the genus Rhodanobacter. Although strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 share high SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity to R. thiooxydans (>99%), DNA-DNA hybridization values were substantially below the 70% threshold used to designate novel species. Thus, based on genotypic, phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological differences, strains 2APBS1T and 116-2 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodanobacter, for which the name Rhodanobacter denitrificans sp. nov is proposed. The type strain is 2APBS1T (=DSM 23569T =JCM 17641T). Strain 116-2 (=DSM 24678 = JCM 17642) is a reference strain.

Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

electric rates | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electric rates electric rates Dataset Summary Description This dataset, compiled by NREL and Ventyx, provides average residential, commercial and industrial electricity rates by zip code for both investor owned utilities (IOU) and non-investor owned utilities. Note: the file includes average rates for each utility, but not the detailed rate structure data found in the database available via the zip-code look-up feature on the OpenEI Utilities page (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Utilities). The data was released by NREL/Ventyx in February 2011. Source NREL and Ventyx Date Released February 24th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords electric rates rates US utilities Data text/csv icon IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 1.7 MiB) text/csv icon Non-IOU rates by zipcode (csv, 2.1 MiB)

419

Rate Schedules | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rate Schedules Rate Schedules Rate Schedules One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate levels and these studies for each of Southeastern's four power marketing systems are updated annually. They demonstrate the adequacy of the rates for each system. Rates are considered to be adequate when revenues are sufficient to repay all costs associated with power production and transmission costs, which include the amortization of the Federal investment allocated to power. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012

420

DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION  

SciTech Connect

This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging obstacles is not within the scope of this work, as it would require a more elaborate sensor than is practical within the HDD head.

Maximillian J. Kieba

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2007-2009 Power Rates Quarterly Updates (pbl/rates)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PFR) Firstgov FY 2007 2009 Power Rates Quarterly Updates In BPAs 2007-2009 Wholesale Power Rate Case (WP-07), BPA agreed that it would post reports about BPAs power...

422

WP-07 Power Rate Case (rates/ratecases)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rate Cases Financial Choices (2003-06) Power Function Review (PFR) Firstgov 2007 Wholesale Power (WP-07) Rate Case Related Links: Power Function Review (PFR) On July 17, 2006,...

423

Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

Knight, M.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

In situ feldspar dissolution rates in an aquifer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ silicate dissolution rates within the saturated Navajo sandstone, at Black Mesa, Arizona were determined from elemental fluxes in the aquifer. The mass transfer between groundwater and mineral matrix along flow paths was calculated from inverse mass balance modeling. The reaction time is bound by 14C-based travel time. BET surface areas were measured with N2 gas adsorption. Dissolution rates for K-feldspar and plagioclase are 10?19 and 10?16 mol (feldspar) m?2 s?1, respectively, which are ?105 times slower than laboratory experiment-derived rates under similar pH and temperature but at far from equilibrium conditions. The rates obtained in this study are consistent with the slower field rates found in numerous watershed and soil profile studies. However, these rates are from saturated aquifers, overcoming some concerns on estimated rates from unsaturated systems. The Navajo sandstone is a quartz-sandstone with a relatively simple and well-studied hydrogeology, groundwater geochemistry, and lithology, a large number of groundwater analyses and 14C groundwater ages, groundwater residence times up to ?37 ky, groundwater pH from ?8 to 10, and temperature from ?15 to 35°C.

Chen Zhu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The effect of soil parameters on earth penetration of projectiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constitutive Relationship for Earth Materials; 2& A Dynamic Elasto-Plastic Finite Element Analysis of Pro- jectile Penetration of a Half-Space; 3) The Dynamic Shearing Resistance of Clay as a Function of the Rate of Shear Deformation; 4) The Dynam...THE EFFECT OF SOIL PARAMETERS ON EARTH PENETRATION OF PROJECTILES A Thesis by George Harley Ferguson, I I I Submitted to the Graduate Col lege of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

Ferguson, George Harley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environment - Nano soil science | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment - Nano soil science Environment - Nano soil science Cross-disciplinary research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility. An ORNL team is using a novel combination of neutron reflectometry experiments and supercomputer simulations to provide a detailed view of the interactions between organic matter and minerals in soil. The research suggests that relationships among these compounds are governed by simpler principles than previously thought. "It changes the whole way we think about how carbon, nutrients and contaminants interact with soils, which therefore affects fertility, water quality, and the terrestrial carbon cycle," said ORNL's Loukas Petridis. "We don't understand these topics very well because until now we haven't had the techniques capable

428

Rating the NRF's rating system Michael I. Cherry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the NRF's raison d'être--thetrainingofhigh-qualityresearch manpower. The progress of the rating systemRating the NRF's rating system Michael I. Cherry a* and Mark J. Gibbons b T HE LATEST REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL Research Foundation (NRF), chaired by Wieland Gevers, and released surreptitiously

Wagner, Stephan

429

Soil phosphorus status and fertilizer use in select agricutural soils in Nicaragua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

Niemeyer, Patrick G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The behavior of soil-applied cyclotri- and cyclotetraphosphate in Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclotriphosphate (C3P) is of interest to soil scientists because it demonstrates little or no retention by soil constituents. Non-sorption is desirable in the development of mobile P fertilizers. Work was expanded to include cyclotetraphosphate...

Trostle, Calvin Lewie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. But reaching these outcomes requires an understanding of the relations...

J. D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Consolidation theories for saturated-unsaturated soils and numerical simulation of residential buildings on expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to perform uncoupled two or three dimensional consolidation calculation for both expansive soils and collapsible soils. From the analysis, the equivalent effective stress and excessive pore water pressure can be easily calculated. At the same time...

Zhang, Xiong

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Effects of Soil Moisture on the Responses of Soil Temperatures to Climate Change in Cold Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At high latitudes, changes in soil moisture could alter soil temperatures independently of air temperature changes by interacting with the snow thermal rectifier. The authors investigated this mechanism with model experiments in the Community Land ...

Zachary M. Subin; Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn; David M. Lawrence; Sean C. Swenson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Helping People Help the Land Web Soil Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helping People Help the Land Web Soil Survey Jorge L. Lugo-Camacho MLRA Soil Survey Project Leader provee igualdad de oportunidades en empleo y programas. #12;�Qu� es el Web Soil Survey? El Web Soil catastros de suelos. #12;�C�mo puedo entrar al Web Soil Survey? Se puede entrar a trav�s de las siguientes

Gilbes, Fernando

435

Surface mining: soil, coal, and society  

SciTech Connect

The book concentrates on the effects of surface mining of coal upon the utilization of another resource, soil. Possible planning and management strategies for land reclamation are studied and the problem of choosing the correct solution for a particular situation is considered taking the many factors into account. The goal of reconstructing soil after mining is to equal or exceed the productivity of pre-mine soils, with a change in landscape if necessary, with minimum disturbance to the local community. (252 refs.)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Soil Fumigation for Plant Disease Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T- 0. WALTON, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] The control of soit-borne plant diseases by soil fumigation hm been nhown to be efficient and practicable in greenhouses, seed Ws, cold frames, small... diseases. Undesirable weeds are als~ frequently present. This bulletin deals with soil fumigation clesignecl especially to control these disease-producing organisms that infest the soil. It is based on experi- ments conducted in the last seven years...

Young, P. A. (Paul Allen); Godfrey, G. H. (George Harold)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by CATHERINE KOBYLINSKI FINGERPRINTING SOILS ? A PROOF OF CONCEPT Approved by: Research Advisor: Cristine Morgan Director for Honors and Undergraduate Research: Sumana Datta Major... iii ABSTRACT Fingerprinting Soils - A Proof of Concept. (April 2011) Catherine Kobylinski Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Cristine Morgan Department of Soil and Crop Sciences...

Kobylinski, Catherine

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Heavy metal concentrations in soils of five United States cities, 1972 urban soils monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

Research report:Lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic levels detected in soil samples taken from five U.S. cities are reported. Cities studied were: Des Moines, Iowa; Fitchburg, Mass.; Lake Charles, La.; Reading, Pa.; and Pittsburgh. In all cities except Fitchburg, urban soils had higher concentrations of the metals than suburban soils had. Higher metals concentrations in urban soil are attributed to atmospheric fallout of aerosols from industrial processes and fossil fuel burning. (26 references, 2 tables)

Carey, A.E.; Gowen, J.A.; Forehand, T.J.; Tai, H.; Wiersma, G.B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sorption Behavior of Triazole Fungicides in Indian Soils and Its Correlation with Soil Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2)?Futch, S. H.; Singh, M. Herbicide mobility using soil leaching columns. ... Futch, S. H.; Singh, M. ...

Neera Singh

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Pullman Soils: Distribution, Importance, Variability, and Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soils in Texas is bounded by the New Mexico-Texas state line on the west, the Canadian River on the north, and the caprock escarpment at the High Plains-Rolling Plains boundary on the east. A catena of loamy soils extending from Farwell to near...). The portions of different counties occupied by Pullman soil range from about 0.1 to 70 percent (Table 2). The area of Pullman soils is bounded by the New Mexico- Texas state line on the west, the caprock escarpment at the Canadian River on the north...

Unger, Paul W.; Pringle, Fred B

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dynamics Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:http:smd.co.ukproduc This company...

442

Azimsulfuron Sorption?Desorption on Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Azimsulfuron Sorption?Desorption on Soil ... The Freundlich desorption data indicated that a significant amt. of the imazosulfuron sorbed is not easily desorbed. ...

Alba Pusino; M. Vittoria Pinna; Carlo Gessa

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TELECOMMUNICATIONS RATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE TELECOMMUNICATIONS RATE BACKGROUND The University recently the desktop phone service costs back to individual units/departments by creating a telecommunications rate in the Other Expenses category of the budget as a "Telecommunications Charge". NOTE- direct charging

Straight, Aaron

444

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.  

SciTech Connect

This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides from a Commercial Building Initiative webinar outlining the Commercial Building Asset Rating Program on August 23, 2011.

446

Soil compaction: track induced soil stress isn't so positive in comparison with tyre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil compaction: track induced soil stress isn't so positive in comparison with tyre Ingeniors presence and the overall higher load of the track system. Conversely, tyres distribute uniformly the load the easy to obtain contact area surface of the track -or tyre- with the soil, the interface pressure

Boyer, Edmond

447

Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Larson Dep. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences Univ. of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309 Eni G. Njoku Jet security. Large-scale soil moisture monitoring has advanced in recent years, creating opportunitiesSoil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. doi:10.2136/sssaj2013

Small, Eric

448

Effects of wildfire and permafrost on soil organic matter and soil climate in interior Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of wildfire and permafrost on soil organic matter and soil climate in interior Alaska J E NGeological Sciences and Environmental Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, CB-399, Boulder, CO 80309, USA soil climates was examined after a wildfire near Delta Junction, AK in July 1999. At this site, we

Neff, Jason

449

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 7188 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied Soil Ecology 21 (2002) 71­88 Soil invertebrate and microbial communities, and decomposition. Spongberg Department of Earth, Ecological and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 for quantification of ecological impact of chemical contamination of soils. This study examined the effects

Neher, Deborah A.

450

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

SciTech Connect

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Adsorption and desorption kinetics of cesium in an organic matter-rich soil saturated with different cations  

SciTech Connect

The fallout from nuclear weapons tests conducted on Bikini Atoll Island in 1954 resulted in contamination of soil with Cesium 137. To develop effective regimes for decontaminating the Bikini Atoll soil, the exchange of Cs for K, Na, and other cations on the soil must be understood. Samples of soils made homoionic with K, Na, or Ca were reacted with solutions containing Cs ions, and the quantities of Cs sorbed and the rates of exchange were measured. The samples were then reacted with solutions containing K, Na, or Ca, and the quantities of Cs desorbed and the rates of exchange were again measured. Samples made homoionic with Na had a greater ion exchange capacity than samples made homoionic with K, and, in both cases, the ion exchange capacity increased with the organic matter content of the soil. For samples pretreated with Ca, the ion exchange capacity is not related in a simple way to the organic matter content. The kinetics were assessed by plotting the rate of exchange vs. the time and vs. the quantity exchanged. A first-order equation was obeyed during most of the run in Cs desorption experiments and during a limited part of the run in Cs adsorption experiments. An increase in the rate of Cs exchange was observed at the beginning of the experiments especially for Cs adsorption. This increase is presumably due to an increase of the ionic strength of the liquid phase during the exchange process. 33 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Aharoni, C. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Technology, Haifa (Israel)); Pasricha, N.S. (Punjab Agricultural Univ., Ludihana (India)); Sparks, D.L. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Experimental Study of Bridge Scour in Cohesive Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bridge scour depths in cohesive soil have been predicted using the scour equations developed for cohesionless soils due to scarce of studies about cohesive soil. The scour depths predicted by the conventional methods will result in significant...

Oh, Seung Jae

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

454

University of Florida Soil and Water Science Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to soil properties, water/soil quality, and water/soil management · Highlight important and/or innovative environmental contamination prevention strategies and remediation techniques that serve to protect and promote

Ma, Lena

455

Acid soil fertility at the Cinzana station, Mali, West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that may be associated with acid soil infertility include biological organisms (nematodes, termites), restrictive subsoil layers (claypans, ironpans, silt pans, plow pans, etc. ), soil erosion, zones of low soil moisture retention, and other physical...

Doumbia, Mamadou Diosse

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

An analysis of selected factors controlling or affecting the hydraulic conductivity of compacted soil liners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 19B6 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AM ANALYSIS OF SELECTED FACTORS CONTROLLING OR AFFECTING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF COMPACTED SOIL LINERS A Thesis by ROBERT CARY SPEAKE, JR. Approved... Figure 4. Double-liner design for a surface impoundment Figure 5. Schematic of example macrofeatures found in soil liners 21 Figure 6. Parallelopiped showing components of fractured-liner model 23 Figure 7. Head of leachate on liner ver sus flow rate...

Speake, Robert Cary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

Characteristics of pimple mounds associated with the Morey soil of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ross et al. (1968) discovered most mounds in Minnesota occurred on the slopes and tops of rises and only 5X occurred on flats between rises. M d ~. 9 1 (1999) 1 ' g 1 d g on mounded soils in Texas. Mound vegetation on a Minnesota site is always... mound and intermound soils. Depth to free water varied by year and by different sites. Mound sites were never saturated with ground water whereas flats became saturated in the winter and spring. Uniform water extraction rates occurred sooner...

Carty, David Jerome

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

Buckley, R.

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative to Flat Rate Billing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 22 IntroductionIntroduction ·· Modern societies rely on electrical collectionMetering and Rate Models facilitate collection #12;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 33 Rate

Hughes, Larry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia 1-6 August 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The investigated ES were climate regulation through carbon sequestration in soil and biomass, soil conservation of these results are discussed. Key Words Land use change, socioeconomic drivers, carbon sequestration, soil

Boyer, Edmond

462

Effect of Mineral and Organic Soil Constituents on Microbial Mineralization of Organic Compounds in a Natural Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remediation technology of in situ soil washing (10, 28). Most modern surfactants...Knaebel and Vestal (20). The surfactant-soil constituent complexes were added...small amount (100 mg) of the surfactant-soil constituent complex was mixed...

David B. Knaebel; Thomas W. Federle; Drew C. McAvoy; J. Robie Vestal

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

SOME SOIL FACTORS AFFECTING TREE GROWTH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...characterized by measuring the water held by a soil at varying...1931 ). MATTSON, S, Electrodialysis of the colloidal soil...normal entrance of both water and mineral nutrients...adequately controlled, any treatment which either de-creases...normal entrance of both water and mineral nutrients...

ROBT. M. SALTER

1940-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

464

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

CCA Training : Soil and Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dry 25,000,000 acresa Includes both external surfaces and surfaces between crystal plates. #12;The and nutrient transformations · Associated with soil porosity #12;Soil Physical Properties: Structure Properties: Structure · Structure type = aggregation has different shape and varies with depth ­Granular

Balser, Teri C.

466

Analysis of large soil samples for actinides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

Maxwell, III; Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

467

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m...

Mueller, Ryan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

468

Mineral Soils as Carriers for Rhizobium Inoculants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...looked healthier and greener than the uninoculated...example, when peat-lime pelleted clover seeds...rhizobia survive better in mineral soil-based inoculant...inoculated plants were greener and looked healthier...ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. MINERAL SOILS AS CARRIERS FOR...

W.-L. Chao; Martin Alexander

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Original article Imidacloprid and pyrimethanil soil sorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Imidacloprid and pyrimethanil soil sorption Ettore CAPRIa*, M.G. CAMISAa, F 2000) Abstract ­ The sorption of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil was measured in different soils of southern Europe. Pyrimethanil sorption (Kf=1.2­4.60) was higher than that of imidacloprid (Kf=0

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 - March 2004 (CRAC 5 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2003 - March 2004 (CRAC 5 period) (PDF, 4 pages, 15 kb, corrected December 18, 2003,...

471

April - September 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 (CRAC 6 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective April 1 - September 30, 2004 (CRAC 6 period) (PDF, 4 pages, 14 kb, originally posted January 12, 2004;...

472

April - September 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April - September 2005 (CRAC 8 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective April - September 2005 (CRAC 8 period) (PDF, 3 pages, 108 kb, posted December 17, 2004)...

473

October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2005 - March 2006 (CRAC 9 period) "Monthly Adjusted" Wholesale Power Rates Effective October 2005 - March 2006 (CRAC 9 period) (PDF, 4 pages, 116 kb, originally posted...

474

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach M. Sperow Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 M. Eve US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit Fort Collins, Colorado 80522 K. Paustian Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 Abstract Field studies across the U.S. have been used to estimate soil C stock changes that result from changes in agricultural management. Data from these studies are not easily extrapolated to reflect changes at a national scale because soils and climate vary locally and regionally. These studies are also limited to addressing existing changes in

475

Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application for enhancing carbon sequestration . Mechanisms controlling soil carbon turnover and their potential application...

476

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

477

Dynamics of decadally cycling carbon in subsurface soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dynamics in a California conifer forest, Soil Sci. Soc. Am.in a range of temperate conifer forest soils, Global Change

Koarashi, Jun; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Trumbore, Susan E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments...

479

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

480

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Soil Gas Sampling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nitrate rates soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sawyer, J. Wayne (Hampton, VA); Hess, John R. (Ashton, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements.

Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Water sorption behaviour of highly swelling (carboxy methylcellulose-g-polyacrylamide) hydrogels and release of potassium nitrate as agrochemical  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel types of highly swelling hydrogels have been prepared by grafting crosslinked polyacrylamide chains onto carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) via a free radical polymerization method. The hydrogels were characterized by IR spectral analysis and by evaluating various network parameters such as average molecular weight between crosslinks (Mc), crosslink density (q) and the number of elastically effective chains (Vc). The hydrogels showed enormous swelling in aqueous medium and displayed swelling characteristics which were highly dependent on the chemical composition of the hydrogel and pH and ionic strength of the medium in which the hydrogel was immersed. The kinetics of water uptake and the water transport mechanism were studied as a function of the composition of the hydrogel and the pH of the medium. The hydrogels were also loaded with potassium nitrate as a model agrochemical and their potential for controlled release of potassium nitrate was judged by measuring conductivity. Various kinetic parameters such as the diffusion coefficient and swelling exponents were also calculated.

A.K Bajpai; Anjali Giri

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

A study of the homogenization of soils  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, areas of land that have been contaminated must be returned to an environmental condition that permits less restrictive forms of use. In anticipation of being listed as an EPA Superfund Site, the United States Department of Energy`s (US DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is evaluating existing the technologies, and supporting the development of new technologies, for the removal of plutonium contaminants from soils. During the 1950s, DOE conducted a series of tests on the NTS wherein attempts were made to detonate nuclear weapons by igniting charges of high explosives packed around the weapons` warheads. While the warheads never achieved criticality, each test disseminated particulate plutonium over several square miles, principally in Area 11 of the NTS.DOE`s Nevada Operations Office has committed to a Plutonium In Soils Integrated Demonstration Project (PuID) to evaluate existing and developmental technologies for the safe removal of plutonium contamination from soils. It is DOE`s intention to provide approximately one ton of Area 11 soil, traced with a non-radioactive plutonium surrogate, to each of several companies with expertise in the removal of soil contaminants. These companies have expressed an interest in contracting with DOE for remediation of NTS soils. DOE wishes to evaluate each company`s process in an unbiased and statistically justifiable manner. For this reason, DOE must provide to each company a large sample of soil for prototype testing. The soil must be homogenized such that the representativeness of each split is well documented and defensible. The process of uniformly mixing large volumes of soil has not been addressed, to our knowledge, in the hydrogeologic, soil science or mining literature. Several mixing devices are currently being evaluated by DOE for use in the PuID. This report describes the results of some initial experimentation with a small cement mixer.

Giovine, L.R.S.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Evaluation of powdered elemental iron as a plant nutrient in Texas soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a Frio clay loam soil at IIico, Texas, to determine if different I'e materials could correct o. very chlorotic condition in peanuts and increase the nut yield. The Fe chlorosis was eliminated by the addition of Fe EDDIIA at rates of' Fe as low... Fe. The addition of Fe, regardless of source or rate, had little effect on extra, ctable Zn. The pH was lowered significantly by Fe sources, but the decrease was more pronounced by FeSO than by elemental Fe. Ig Increasing the Fe rate also lowered...

Schneider, Russell Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

487

LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family #12;The top 25% of new homes based% REGULATIONS lawbreakers DEGREE OF GREEN MARKET SHIFT typical building practices market leaders innovators the negative impact of buildings on their occupants and on the environment. LEED for Homes categories

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

488

Selective sorption of PCBs by low-cost polymers and application to soil washing processes  

SciTech Connect

Surfactant-assisted soil washing and soil flushing processes have shown to be a promising soil decontamination method. In these and other remediation technologies that employ surfactants to mobilize organic contaminants, large volumes of contaminated aqueous solutions are generated. An efficient process to selectively concentrate the organic contaminant from the aqueous surfactant solution, thereby allowing the recycle of the surfactant, is considered essential for cost-effective application of these remediation methods. To this end, a process was developed wherein commercial, low-cost polymers are used to selectively sorb PCBs and petroleum oils from aqueous surfactant solutions. Sorption isotherms and sorption rates were determined for a large number of polymer sorbents and several significant structure-property relationships were observed. Two classes of polymers, polyester elastomers and carbon-filled elastomer rubbers (e.g., recycled rubber tire), were found to perform superiorly in this application and a successful pilot-scale demonstration of the process was conducted.

Sivavec, T.M.; Webb, J.L.; Gascoyne, D.G. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

REGULAR ARTICLE Soil nitrogen cycling rates in low arctic shrub tundra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Betula Introduction Arctic research has detected climate warming impacts over the past 20­30 years and plot-level inves- tigations have linked this biomass change to an increase in abundance and density cover results in enhanced absorption of solar radiation and therefore localized atmospheric heating

Grogan, Paul

490

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) response to clomazone as influenced by rate, soil type, and planting date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ____________________________ ____________________________ James M. Chandler Scott A. Senseman (Chair of Committee) (Member) ____________________________ ____________________________ Garry N. McCauley Rodney W. Bovey (Member) (Member.... If bleaching is severe, it can lead to necrosis and eventual plant death. Clomazone is taken up by plant roots and shoots and moves primarily in the xylem to plant leaves (Duke and Paul 1986). Clomazone indirectly inhibits 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate...

O'Barr, John Houston

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

The Coal Transportation Rate Database  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Transportation Rate Database (CTRDB) adds new data for 2000 and 2001. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Form 580 "interrogatories" are the primary source for...

492

BPA revises oversupply rate proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oversupply-rate-proposal Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

493

Biogenesis (trade name) soil washing technology: Innovative technology evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BioGenesis Soil Washing Technology uses soil washing with a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soils to wastewater. The BioGenesis soil washing process was evaluated under the SITE program at a refinery where soils were contaminated with crude oil. Results of chemical analyses show that levels of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), an indicator of degraded crude oil, decreased by 65 to 73 percent in washed soils. The TRPH in residual soils were allowed to biodegrade for an additional 120 days. Results indicate that soil washing and biodegradation removed 85 to 88 percent of TRPH in treated soils. The Innovative Technology Evaluation Report provides information on the technology applicability, economic analysis, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, vendors claims, and the source of further information.

Bannerjee, P.

1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

494

The Effect of Iron Oxide on Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium (DNRA) in Lignin Cellulose medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of anthropogenic nitrogen into coastal habitats. Sources of nitrogen loading include agricultural and home Cod, Mass., indicate that nitrogen loading rates are directly related to macroalgal populations. A PRB contains a mixture of woodchips, limestone, sand, and gravel which provide a high carbon

Vallino, Joseph J.

495