National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nist verification specimens

  1. CHARPY IMPACT TEST RESULTS ON FIVE MAERIALS AND NIST VERIFICATION SPECIMENS USING INSTRUMENTED

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CHARPY IMPACT TEST RESULTS ON FIVE MAERIALS AND NIST VERIFICATION SPECIMENS USING INSTRUMENTED 2-mm A N D 8-mm STRIKERS* Randy K. Nanstad and Mikhail A. Sokolov Metals and Ceramics Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6151 *Research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, under Interagency Agreement DOE- 1886-81W-BL with the U.S. Department o f Energy under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 with Martin Marietta

  2. NIST Presents Green Button: Technical

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2012-01-01

    Part 3/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  3. NIST Presents Green Button: Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2012-01-01

    Part 2/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  4. NIST Presents Green Button: Intro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2012-01-01

    Part 1/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  5. NIST Presents Green Button: Intro

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29

    Part 1/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  6. NIST Presents Green Button: Technical

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29

    Part 3/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  7. NIST Presents Green Button: Policy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29

    Part 2/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.

  8. NIST Green Button Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NIST Green Button Presentation NIST Green Button Presentation File Green.Button.webinar.for_.DOE_.Apps_.Energy.pptx More Documents & Publications Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations March 2012 - Tuesday, March 6, 2012 SG Network System Requirements Specification- Interim Release 3 2014 Smart Grid R&D Peer Review - Day Two, Session Two

  9. Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap Under the Energy Independence and Security Act ...

  10. CHARPY IMPACT TEST RESULTS ON FIVE MAERIALS AND NIST VERIFICATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) l or that of the International ... a 2-mm radius compared to the 8mm radius of the striker described in the ASTM standard. ...

  11. NIST approach to Promoting US Innovation and Industrial Competitiveness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-A: Biomass and the U.S. Competitive Advantages for Manufacturing Clean Energy Products Gary Anderson, Economist, NIST

  12. NIST Releases Test Framework for Upgrading of Smart Meters |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Releases Test Framework for Upgrading of Smart Meters NIST Releases Test Framework for Upgrading of Smart Meters July 12, 2012 - 10:46am Addthis The National Institute of Standards ...

  13. NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provide 10% of our electricity by 2012 and 25% by 2025; and that 1 million Plug-In Hybrid cars are on the roads by 2015. PDF icon NIST Activities in Support of the Energy ...

  14. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) works with stakeholders to develop a voluntary Framework for reducing cyber risks to critical infrastructure. The Framework aims to be flexible and repeatable, while helping asset owner and operators manage cybersecurity risk.

  15. Nuclear Data Verification and Standardization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karam, Lisa R.; Arif, Muhammad; Thompson, Alan K.

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction verification and standardization data for the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Nuclear Physics programs which include astrophysics, radioactive beam studies, and heavy-ion reactions. The measurements made in this program are also useful to other programs that indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. These include homeland security, personnel health and safety, nuclear waste disposal, treaty verification, national defense, and nuclear based energy production. The work includes the verification of reference standard cross sections and related neutron data employing the unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; and the preservation of standard reference deposits. An essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data standards including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  16. NIST Finalizes Initial Set of Smart Grid Cyber Security Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued today its first Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security, which includes high-level security requirements, a framework for assessing risks, an evaluation of privacy issues at personal residences, and additional information for businesses and organizations to use as they craft strategies to protect the modernizing power grid from attacks, malicious code, cascading errors, and other threats.

  17. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D. J.; Baek, J. S.; Hanson, A. L.; Cheng, L-Y; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  18. Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability and Implementing NIST's Interoperability Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso,T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2010-04-01

    The IEEE American National Standards project P2030TM addressing smart grid interoperability and the IEEE 1547 series of standards addressing distributed resources interconnection with the grid have been identified in priority action plans in the Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap. This paper presents the status of the IEEE P2030 development, the IEEE 1547 series of standards publications and drafts, and provides insight on systems integration and grid infrastructure. The P2030 and 1547 series of standards are sponsored by IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee 21.

  19. DOE-EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications in Energy | Department of Energy EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for Applications in Energy DOE-EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for Applications in Energy The Hydrogen Storage Subprogram of the U.S. Department of Energy co-hosted with the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Combinatorial Methods Center (NCMC) a workshop titled "High-Throughput/Combinatorial Material Science for Applications in

  20. Public-key data authentication for treaty verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draelos, T.J.; Goldsmith, S.Y.

    1992-08-01

    A public-key Treaty Data Authentication Module (TDAM) based on the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Digital Signature Standard (DSS) has been developed to support treaty verification systems. The TDAM utilizes the Motorola DSP56001 Digital Signal Processor as a coprocessor and supports both the STD Bus and PC-AT Bus platforms. The TDAM is embedded within an Authenticated Data Communication Subsystem (ADCS) which provides transparent data authentication and communications, thereby concealing the details of securely authenticating and communicating compliance data and commands. The TDAM has been designed according to the NIST security guidelines for cryptographic modules. Public-key data authentication is important for support of both bilateral and multi-lateral treaties. 8 refs.

  1. Public-key data authentication for treaty verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draelos, T.J.; Goldsmith, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    A public-key Treaty Data Authentication Module (TDAM) based on the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Digital Signature Standard (DSS) has been developed to support treaty verification systems. The TDAM utilizes the Motorola DSP56001 Digital Signal Processor as a coprocessor and supports both the STD Bus and PC-AT Bus platforms. The TDAM is embedded within an Authenticated Data Communication Subsystem (ADCS) which provides transparent data authentication and communications, thereby concealing the details of securely authenticating and communicating compliance data and commands. The TDAM has been designed according to the NIST security guidelines for cryptographic modules. Public-key data authentication is important for support of both bilateral and multi-lateral treaties. 8 refs.

  2. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  3. Method for thinning specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  4. Headquarters Employment Verification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    M&P Employees should contact Marilyn Samuels at 202-586-8571 for basic employment verification. S&E Employees should contact Mike Dols at 865-574-7923 for basic employment verification.

  5. ORISE: Independent verification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Independent verification ORISE techinician performs environmental scanning The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent environmental assessments and verification to determine the effectiveness of radiological cleanup at decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects across the United States. Since 1980, ORISE has performed independent verification at more than 500 sites in 42 states and the District of Columbia. As the primary independent verification

  6. NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security Act

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (EISA) of 2007 | Department of Energy NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 NIST Activities in Support of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 Revitalizing the electric power grid has become one of our Nation's top priorities, promising to reduce our dependence on oil and to meet the anticipated 1.1% annual increase in demand for electricity1. In his New Energy for America plan, President-elect Obama calls for increased

  7. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  8. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector ICPMS Analysis of Uranium Isotopes in NIST Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Springer, Kellen WE; Ward, Jesse D.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, John W.; Endres, Mackenzie C.; Hart, Garret L.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Oropeza, Dayana; Russo, Richard; Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-02-06

    We have utilized femtosecond laser ablation coupled to multi-collector inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry to measure the uranium isotopic content of NIST 61x (x=0,2,4,6) glasses. The uranium content of these glasses is a linear two-component mixing between isotopically natural uranium and the isotopically depleted spike used in preparing the glasses. Laser ablation results match extremely well, generally within a few ppm, with solution analysis following sample dissolution and chemical separation. In addition to isotopic data, sample utilization efficiency measurements indicate that over 1% of ablated uranium atoms reach a mass spectrometer detector, making this technique extremely efficient. Laser sampling also allows for spatial analysis and our data indicate that rare uranium concentration inhomogeneities exist in NIST 616 glass.

  9. Isotopic Analysis of Uranium in NIST SRM Glass by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Hart, Garret L.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2013-05-19

    We employed femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry for the 11 determination of uranium isotope ratios in a series of standard reference material glasses (NIST 610, 612, 614, and 12 616). This uranium concentration in this series of SRM glasses is a combination of isotopically natural uranium in 13 the materials used to make the glass matrix and isotopically depleted uranium added to increase the uranium 14 elemental concentration across the series. Results for NIST 610 are in excellent agreement with literature values. 15 However, other than atom percent 235U, little information is available for the remaining glasses. We present atom 16 percent and isotope ratios for 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U for all four glasses. Our results show deviations from the 17 certificate values for the atom percent 235U, indicating the need for further examination of the uranium isotopes in 18 NIST 610-616. Our results are fully consistent with a two isotopic component mixing between the depleted 19 uranium spike and natural uranium in the bulk glass.

  10. Voltage verification unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Edward J.

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  11. Employment Eligibility Verification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instructions for Employment Eligibility Verification Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services USCIS Form I-9 OMB No. 1615-0047 Expires 03/31/2016 Read all instructions carefully before completing this form. Anti-Discrimination Notice. It is illegal to discriminate against any work-authorized individual in hiring, discharge, recruitment or referral for a fee, or in the employment eligibility verification (Form I-9 and E-Verify) process based on that individual's

  12. Verification Monitoring Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Analytical Update for the Durango, Colorado, Processing Site August 2014 LMS/DUP/S11345 This page intentionally left blank LMS/DUP/S11345 Verification Monitoring Report and Analytical Update for the Durango, Colorado, Processing Site August 2014 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Verification Monitoring Report and Analytical Update-Durango, Colorado, Processing Site August 2014 Doc. No. S11345 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  13. Baseline Test Specimen Machining Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mark Carroll

    2009-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project is tasked with selecting a high temperature gas reactor technology that will be capable of generating electricity and supplying large amounts of process heat. The NGNP is presently being designed as a helium-cooled high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. The graphite baseline characterization project is conducting the research and development (R&D) activities deemed necessary to fully qualify nuclear-grade graphite for use in the NGNP reactor. Establishing nonirradiated thermomechanical and thermophysical properties by characterizing lot-to-lot and billet-to-billet variations (for probabilistic baseline data needs) through extensive data collection and statistical analysis is one of the major fundamental objectives of the project. The reactor core will be made up of stacks of graphite moderator blocks. In order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the varying characteristics in a wide range of suitable graphites, any of which can be classified as nuclear grade, an experimental program has been initiated to develop an extensive database of the baseline characteristics of numerous candidate graphites. Various factors known to affect the properties of graphite will be investigated, including specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation within a billet (either parallel to [P] or transverse to [T] the long axis of the as-produced billet), and billet-to-billet variations within a lot or across different production lots. Because each data point is based on a certain position within a given billet of graphite, particular attention must be paid to the traceability of each specimen and its spatial location and orientation within each billet. The evaluation of these properties is discussed in the Graphite Technology Development Plan (Windes et. al, 2007). One of the key components in the evaluation of these graphite types will be mechanical testing on specimens drawn from carefully controlled sections of each billet. To this end, this report will discuss the machining of the first set of test specimens that will be evaluated in this program through tensile, compressive, and flexural testing. Validation that the test specimens have been produced to the tolerances required by the applicable ASTM standards, and to the quality control levels required by this program, will demonstrate the viability of sending graphite to selected suppliers that will provide valuable and certifiable data to future data sets that are integral to the NGNP program and beyond.

  14. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of achievement in V&V activities, how closely related the V&V benchmarks are to the actual application of interest, and the quantification of uncertainties related to the application of interest.

  15. Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

  16. Developing an Evaluation Measurement, and Verification Plan:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing an Evaluation Measurement, and Verification Plan: Residential Retrofits Developing an Evaluation Measurement, and Verification Plan: Residential Retrofits DOE's...

  17. Apparatus for automated testing of biological specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Layne, Scott P.; Beugelsdijk, Tony J.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for performing automated testing of infections biological specimens is disclosed. The apparatus comprise a process controller for translating user commands into test instrument suite commands, and a test instrument suite comprising a means to treat the specimen to manifest an observable result, and a detector for measuring the observable result to generate specimen test results.

  18. RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

    2012-03-18

    Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

  19. DOE Challenge Home Verification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Challenge Home Verification Projected Rating: Based on Plans - Field Confirmation Required. Energy Performance House Ty pe DOE Challenge Home Builder Partner ID# Single-family det ac hed 12345 Y ear built Square footage of Conditioned Space including Basement 2013 3968.0 Numbe r of Bedrooms Square footage of Conditioned Space without Basement 4 2368.0 Site addre ss (if no t available , list the site Lo t #) Registered Builder 555 Main St r eet Cold City Certified Rater MN, 20853 HERS Index

  20. verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    verification Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear nonproliferation commitments. Solution: Develop and deploy measures to ensure verifiable compliance with treaties and other international agreements,... International Nuclear Safeguards Challenge: Detect/deter undeclared nuclear materials and activities. Solution: Build capacity of the International Atomic Energy Agency and

  1. Software Verification and Validation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olund, Thomas S.

    2008-09-15

    This Software Verification and Validation procedure provides the action steps for the Tank Waste Information Network System (TWINS) testing process. The primary objective of the testing process is to provide assurance that the software functions as intended, and meets the requirements specified by the client. Verification and validation establish the primary basis for TWINS software product acceptance.

  2. Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification This document provides information about the benefits of performing ...

  3. Analysis of LOCA Scenarios in the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, J. S.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D.

    2015-08-30

    An analysis has been done of hypothetical loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCAs) in the research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The purpose of the analysis is to determine if the peak clad temperature remains below the Safety Limit, which is the blister temperature for the fuel. The configuration of the NBSR considered in the analysis is that projected for the future when changes will be made so that shutdown pumps do not operate when a LOCA signal is detected. The analysis was done for the present core with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and with the proposed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel that would be used when the NBSR is converted from one to the other. The analysis consists of two parts. The first examines how the water would drain from the primary system following a break and the possibility for the loss of coolant from within the fuel element flow channels. This work is performed using the TRACE system thermal-hydraulic code. The second looks at the fuel clad temperature as a function of time given that the water may have drained from many of the flow channels and the water in the vessel is in a quasi-equilibrium state. The temperature behavior is investigated using the three-dimensional heat conduction code HEATING7.3. The results in all scenarios considered for both HEU and LEU fuel show that the peak clad temperature remains below the blister temperature.

  4. ESPC ENABLE Measurement and Verification Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document contains a comprehensive measurement and verification plan template for a proposed ESPC ENABLE project.

  5. Recommendation 207: Automate the Stewardship Verification Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORSSAB recommends DOE automate the Stewardship Verification Process for the Remediation Effectiveness Report.

  6. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  7. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  8. Leak detection/verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L.

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  9. Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaluzec, Nestor J. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1996-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

  10. Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) Automated M&V from Noesis Automated M&V ...

  11. Uncertainty in verification and validation: recent perspective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUSMATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; VALIDATION; VERIFICATION; COMPUTER ...

  12. Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification;

  13. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  14. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  15. Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel; Sudar, Damir; Albertson, Donna

    1999-01-01

    An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

  16. Nuclear Verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Control Nuclear Verification Challenge: Maintain the U.S. ability to monitor and verify nuclear reduction agreements and detect violations of treaties and other nuclear ...

  17. Verification and validation benchmarks. (Technical Report) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and ...

  18. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ready Home Verification Summary DRAFT REMRate - Residential ... annual energy savings Electric: 12024 kWh Natural Gas: ... Home access to utility bill data for one year ...

  20. NREL: Wind Research - Field Verification Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    testing, and field verification needed to fully develop advanced wind energy technologies that lead the world in cost-effectiveness and reliability. The project, completed...

  1. High-resolution, cryogenic, side-entry type specimen stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Wayne E.; Merkle, Karl L.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution, cryogenic side-entry type specimen stage includes a copper block within which a specimen can be positioned in the electron beam of an electron microscope, one end of the copper block constituting a specimen heat exchanger, means for directing a flow of helium at cryogenic temperature into the heat exchanger, and electrical leads running from the specimen to the exterior of the microscope for four point D.C. electrical resistivity measurements.

  2. Why do verification and validation?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Kenneth T.; Paez, Thomas L.

    2016-02-19

    In this discussion paper, we explore different ways to assess the value of verification and validation (V&V) of engineering models. We first present a literature review on the value of V&V and then use value chains and decision trees to show how value can be assessed from a decision maker's perspective. In this context, the value is what the decision maker is willing to pay for V&V analysis with the understanding that the V&V results are uncertain. As a result, the 2014 Sandia V&V Challenge Workshop is used to illustrate these ideas.

  3. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  4. AHAM DOE Verification Test Agreement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Verification Test Agreement AHAM DOE Verification Test Agreement This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program for clothes washers; dishwashers; or residential refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers. PDF icon aham_verification_letter.pdf More Documents & Publications AHAM Letter Acknowledging DOE Letter on Verification Program This letter is to inform AHAM

  5. verification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en NGSI Safeguards by Design http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnnissafeguardssbd

  6. verification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    information with the need to obtain enough data to inform the process.

    Michele Smith, Deputy Director for the Warhead Dismantlement Transparency Program within NNSA's...

  7. The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2014-05-09

    This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers.

  8. California ARB Verification Testing of the CBSTM Soot Filter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California ARB Verification Testing of the CBSTM Soot Filter for Stationary Diesel Applications California ARB Verification Testing of the CBSTM Soot Filter for Stationary Diesel ...

  9. ENERGY STAR Test Procedures and Verification | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance & Equipment Standards ENERGY STAR ENERGY STAR Test Procedures and Verification ENERGY STAR Test Procedures and Verification The Department of Energy (DOE) is the ...

  10. Declaration of Construction Completion and Verification of Readiness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Declaration of Construction Completion and Verification of Readiness to Test Declaration of Construction Completion and Verification of Readiness to Test Salt Waste Processing ...

  11. Numerical Verification of Bounce Harmonic Resonances in Neoclassical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Tokamaks Kimin Kim, Jong-Kyu Park and Allen H. Boozer 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY Tokamaks, Numerical Verification Tokamaks, Numerical Verification This...

  12. Verification of J-integral capability in Sierra Mechanics. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Verification of J-integral capability in Sierra Mechanics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Verification of J-integral capability in Sierra Mechanics. You are...

  13. CARB Verification of Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filters for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CARB Verification of Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filters for Emergency Generator Sets CARB Verification of Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filters for Emergency Generator Sets 2005 ...

  14. Measurement and Verification Options for Federal Energy- and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Energy Management Program measurement and verification (M&V) guidelines and International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol M&V methodologies are broken ...

  15. ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012 ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated ...

  16. FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010 FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010 This document is the ...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verification DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Verification DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Verification, a publication of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Homes program. PDF icon DOE Zero Energy Ready Home - Verification Report.pdf More Documents & Publications The Appraisal Process: Be Your Own Advocate Prescriptive Path compliance form ZERO ENERGY READY HOME UPDATE NEWSLETTER AUGUST 2014

  18. Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Overview | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document provides an overview and definition of EM&V. PDF icon What is EMV? More ... and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency ProjectProgram Developing an ...

  19. Example Measurement and Verification Plan for an ESPC Project | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Measurement and Verification Plan for an ESPC Project Example Measurement and Verification Plan for an ESPC Project Report features a comprehensive measurement and verification (M&V) plan for a fictitious energy savings performance contract (ESPC) project. PDF icon Download the Example M&V Plan. More Documents & Publications M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0) Reviewing Measurement and Verification Plans for

  20. FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 | Department of Energy FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010 FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010 This document is the FAQ's for the ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010 PDF icon faq_final_december-2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program DOE Verification

  1. Verification and Validation Supporting VERA Neutronics Code

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Verification and Validation Supporting VERA Neutronics Code As CASL produces its VERA software each physics capability must be tested, verified, and validated (V&V). The overarching objective of code verification is to establish that a computation- al model implemented in a code accurately represents the de- veloper's conceptual representation of the physics, while vali- dation refers to the process of determining the degree to which a computational model provides an accurate representation

  2. Verification & Validation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Verification & Validation Verification and Validation (V&V) provides assurance that the models in the codes produce mathematically correct answers and that the answers reflect physical reality. The V&V subprogram funds the critical skills needed to apply systematic measurement, documentation, and demonstration of the ability of the models and codes to predict physical behavior. The V&V subprogram is developing and implementing Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) methodologies as part

  3. Oak Ridge Associated VERIFICATION Universities OF OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    y /I/ i Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated VERIFICATION Universities OF OF - Prepared for the Decontamination and 1985 AND 1986 REMEDIAL ACTIONS Decommissioning Division NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE U.S. Department VICINITY PROPERTIES of Energy of Energy LEWISTON, NEW YORK 3I~~~~ ~~~J. D. BERGER l I I I I I Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT JULY 1990 VERIFICATION OF 1985 AND 1986 REMEDIAL ACTIONS NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE VICINITY

  4. Working with NIST

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation prepared by Terry Lynch for the 2005 Manufacturing R&D for the hydrogen economy roadmap workshop.

  5. NIST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CO Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

  6. Monitoring and verification R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W; Fearey, Bryan L

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report outlined the Administration's approach to promoting the agenda put forward by President Obama in Prague on April 5, 2009. The NPR calls for a national monitoring and verification R&D program to meet future challenges arising from the Administration's nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament agenda. Verification of a follow-on to New START could have to address warheads and possibly components along with delivery capabilities. Deeper cuts and disarmament would need to address all of these elements along with nuclear weapon testing, nuclear material and weapon production facilities, virtual capabilities from old weapon and existing energy programs and undeclared capabilities. We only know how to address some elements of these challenges today, and the requirements may be more rigorous in the context of deeper cuts as well as disarmament. Moreover, there is a critical need for multiple options to sensitive problems and to address other challenges. There will be other verification challenges in a world of deeper cuts and disarmament, some of which we are already facing. At some point, if the reductions process is progressing, uncertainties about past nuclear materials and weapons production will have to be addressed. IAEA safeguards will need to continue to evolve to meet current and future challenges, and to take advantage of new technologies and approaches. Transparency/verification of nuclear and dual-use exports will also have to be addressed, and there will be a need to make nonproliferation measures more watertight and transparent. In this context, and recognizing we will face all of these challenges even if disarmament is not achieved, this paper will explore possible agreements and arrangements; verification challenges; gaps in monitoring and verification technologies and approaches; and the R&D required to address these gaps and other monitoring and verification challenges.

  7. Small Specimen Data from a High Temperature HFIR Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, Timothy D; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Thoms, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The HTV capsule is a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target-rod capsule designed to operate at very high temperatures. The graphite containing section of the capsule (in core) is approximately 18 inches (457.2 mm) long and is separated into eight temperature zones. The specimen diameters within each zone are set to achieve the desired gas gap and hence design temperature (900 C, 1200 C or 1500 C). The capsule has five zones containing 0.400 inch (10.16 mm) diameter specimens, two zones containing 0.350 inch (8.89 mm) diameter specimens and one zone containing 0.300 inch (7.62 mm) diameter specimens. The zones have been distributed within the experiment to optimize the gamma heating from the HFIR core as well as minimize the axial heat flow in the capsule. Consequently, there are two 900 C zones, three 1200 C zones, and three 1500 C zones within the HTV capsule. Each zone contains nine specimens 0.210 0.002 inches (5.334 mm) in length. The capsule will be irradiated to a peak dose of 3.17 displacements per atom. The HTV specimens include samples of the following graphite grades: SGL Carbon s NBG-17 and NBG-18, GrafTech s PCEA, Toyo Tanso s IG-110, Mersen s 2114 and the reference grade H-451 (SGL Carbon). As part of the pre-irradiation program the specimens were characterized using ASTM Standards C559 for bulk density, and ASTM C769 for approximate Young s modulus from the sonic velocity. The probe frequency used for the determination of time of flight of the ultrasonic signal was 2.25 MHz. Marked volume (specimen diameter) effects were noted for both bulk density (increased with increasing specimen volume or diameter) and Dynamic Young s modulus (decreased with increasing specimen volume or diameter). These trends are extended by adding the property vs. diameter data for unirradiated AGC-1 creep specimens (nominally 12.5 mm-diameter x 25.4 mm-length). The relatively large reduction in Dynamic Young s Modulus was surprising given the trend for increasing density with increasing volume. The graphite-filler particle size was noted to be influential in the volume dependency data, with finer grained graphites showing the least specimen volume/diameter effect. Here the volume dependency trends are discussed in terms of the graphite s filler-particle size and texture.

  8. Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coombs, A.W. III

    1995-05-02

    A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1{times}10{sup {minus}9} torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating. 5 figs.

  9. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens having dogbone- or T-shaped end sections without introducing bending stresses in the specimens during the application of a dynamic tensile loading on the specimens is described. A pair of elongated pull rods disposed in a side-by-side relationship are used to grip the shoulders on each T-shaped end section. The pull rods are pivotally attached to a piston-displaceable, disk-shaped member so as to be longitudinally movable with respect to one another effecting the self-alignment thereof with the shoulders on the T-shaped end sections of the specimen to compensate for shoulders being located in different longitudinal positions.

  10. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. ...

  11. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range {minus}100 to 100{degree}C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Experiments and analyses on undermatched interleaf specimens in bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.; Epstein, J.S.; Lloyd, L.R.; Reuter, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    Model weldment fracture specimens have been fabricated, tested, and analyzed using finite elements. The specimens consist of an interleaf of commercially pure titanium diffusion-bonded to a harder alloy titanium. A deep edge crack is introduced symmetrically into the interleaf, and the specimens are loaded in pure bending. Variation of the thickness (2h) of the soft interleaf layer provides insight into effects of weld geometry in strongly undermatched weldments tested in plane strain bending. Ductile crack growth (beyond blunting) initiated at loads giving J {doteq} 95 kJ/m{sup 2} in all specimens. In the thickest interleaf geometries, stable tearing was obtained, but in the thinnest interleaf (2h {doteq} 3mm), crack initiation resulted in a massive pop-in of 5.4 mm across an initial ligament of 12 mm. Finite element studies show that the thinnest interleaf geometry had slightly higher peak stress triaxiality at the beginning of cracking, and that the highest triaxiality extended over a larger region than in the thicker interleaf specimens loaded to the same initiation J-values. More importantly, the blockage of plastic straining above and below the crack tip in the 3 mm interleaf specimen forced higher values of plastic strain to spread forward into the {+-} 45{degree} sector of highest stress triaxiality directly ahead of the crack tip. The higher strains, in conjunction with the slightly higher stress triaxiality, led to the unstable pop-in initiation.

  13. Land Ice Verification and Validation Kit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-07-15

    To address a pressing need to better understand the behavior and complex interaction of ice sheets within the global Earth system, significant development of continental-scale, dynamical ice-sheet models is underway. The associated verification and validation process of these models is being coordinated through a new, robust, python-based extensible software package, the Land Ice Verification and Validation toolkit (LIVV). This release provides robust and automated verification and a performance evaluation on LCF platforms. The performance V&Vmore » involves a comprehensive comparison of model performance relative to expected behavior on a given computing platform. LIVV operates on a set of benchmark and test data, and provides comparisons for a suite of community prioritized tests, including configuration and parameter variations, bit-4-bit evaluation, and plots of tests where differences occur.« less

  14. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  15. Land Ice Verification and Validation Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-15

    To address a pressing need to better understand the behavior and complex interaction of ice sheets within the global Earth system, significant development of continental-scale, dynamical ice-sheet models is underway. The associated verification and validation process of these models is being coordinated through a new, robust, python-based extensible software package, the Land Ice Verification and Validation toolkit (LIVV). This release provides robust and automated verification and a performance evaluation on LCF platforms. The performance V&V involves a comprehensive comparison of model performance relative to expected behavior on a given computing platform. LIVV operates on a set of benchmark and test data, and provides comparisons for a suite of community prioritized tests, including configuration and parameter variations, bit-4-bit evaluation, and plots of tests where differences occur.

  16. A golden anniversary for space-based treaty verification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A golden anniversary for space-based treaty verification Fifty years ago this month, LANL ... Los Alamos is commemorating 50 years of space-based arms treaty verification efforts this ...

  17. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0) ...

  18. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version ...

  19. Recommendation 165: Recommendation on Conducting Future Verifications of Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB commends the DOE policy of obtaining independent verification of DOE Environmental Management-related activities.

  20. Invited book review for AIAA Journal of verification of computer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUSMATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER CODES; VERIFICATION; SANDIA ...

  1. Become an SEP Verification Body | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verification Body Become an SEP Verification Body Superior Energy Performance logo Conformity assessment bodies can expand their services and be prepared for customers pursuing Superior Energy Performance® (SEP(tm)) certification. Only ANSI-ANAB-accredited SEP Verification Bodies can certify facilities to SEP. SEP Verification Bodies are required to: conform to the ANSI/MSE 50028 standard obtain ANSI-ANAB accreditation sign an SEP participation agreement with the SEP Administrator (U.S.

  2. Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP May 14, 2014 - 11:40am Addthis Superior Energy Performance (SEP) recognizes industrial facilities that demonstrate energy management excellence and sustained energy savings. Third-party verification using an ANSI-ANAB Accredited Verification Body offers robust, independent confirmation of a facility's conformance to ISO 50001 and improved energy performance-providing accurate energy numbers

  3. ESPC ENABLE Measurement and Verification Protocol | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protocol ESPC ENABLE Measurement and Verification Protocol Document provides an overview of the Measurement and Verification (M&V) Protocol utilized within ENABLE energy savings performance contract projects. File enable_mvprotocol.docx More Documents & Publications ESPC ENABLE Measurement and Verification Plan Template M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0) Using ENABLE in a UESC

  4. AHAM Letter Acknowledging DOE Letter on Verification Program | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Letter Acknowledging DOE Letter on Verification Program AHAM Letter Acknowledging DOE Letter on Verification Program This document is a response to the letter dated April 26, 2013, in which DOE adopted a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program for clothes washers, dishwashers, and residential refrigerator/freezers. PDF icon aham_response_doe_letter.pdf More Documents & Publications This letter is to

  5. Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities The Department of Energy clears property from radiological control after the property has been demonstrated to meet the Department's stringent radiation protection requirements. PDF icon Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities More Documents & Publications Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge

  6. RELAP-7 SOFTWARE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Choi, Yong-Joon; Zou, Ling

    2014-09-01

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  7. treaty verification | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    treaty verification Global Material Security The mission of the Office of Global Material Security (GMS) is to help partner countries secure and account for nuclear weapons, weapons-useable nuclear and radiological materials, as well as to build capacity to deter, detect and interdict the illicit trafficking of such materials. GMS achieves

  8. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manahan, M.P.; Argon, A.S.; Harling, O.K.

    1986-02-04

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions is disclosed. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk. 51 figs.

  9. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  10. Determining mechanical behavior of solid materials using miniature specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manahan, Michael P.; Argon, Ali S.; Harling, Otto K.

    1986-01-01

    A Miniaturized Bend Test (MBT) capable of extracting and determining mechanical behavior information from specimens only so large as to have at least a volume or smallest dimension sufficient to satisfy continuum behavior in all directions. The mechanical behavior of the material is determined from the measurements taken during the bending of the specimen and is processed according to the principles of linear or nonlinear material mechanics or both. In a preferred embodiment the determination is carried out by a code which is constructed according to the finite element method, and the specimen used for the determinations is a miniature disk simply supported for central loading at the axis on the center of the disk.

  11. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryner, Joseph S.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprising (1) a movable grinding surface, (2) a specimen holder, (3) a displacing device for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another, and (4) at least three devices for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  12. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryner, J.S.

    1981-01-07

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprisng: (1) a movable grinding surface; (2) a specimen holder; (3) a dislacing means for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another; and (4) at least three means for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  13. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  14. Systems Approach to Arms Control Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, K; Neimeyer, I; Listner, C; Stein, G; Chen, C; Dreicer, M

    2015-05-15

    Using the decades of experience of developing concepts and technologies for verifying bilateral and multilateral arms control agreements, a broad conceptual systems approach is being developed that takes into account varying levels of information and risk. The IAEA has already demonstrated the applicability of a systems approach by implementing safeguards at the State level, with acquisition path analysis as the key element. In order to test whether such an approach could also be implemented for arms control verification, an exercise was conducted in November 2014 at the JRC ITU Ispra. Based on the scenario of a hypothetical treaty between two model nuclear weapons states aimed at capping their nuclear arsenals at existing levels, the goal of this exercise was to explore how to use acquisition path analysis in an arms control context. Our contribution will present the scenario, objectives and results of this exercise, and attempt to define future workshops aimed at further developing verification measures that will deter or detect treaty violations.

  15. NGSI: IAEA Verification of UF6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2012-06-05

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is often ignorant of the location of declared, uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders following verification, because cylinders are not typically tracked onsite or off. This paper will assess various methods the IAEA uses to verify cylinder gross defects, and how the task could be ameliorated through the use of improved identification and monitoring. The assessment will be restricted to current verification methods together with one that has been applied on a trial basis—short-notice random inspections coupled with mailbox declarations. This paper is part of the NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and International Security’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program to investigate the concept of a global monitoring scheme that uniquely identifies and tracks UF6 cylinders.

  16. TWRS system drawings and field verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, D.G.

    1995-04-11

    The Configuration Management Program combines the TWRS Labeling and O and M drawing and drawing verification programs. The combined program will produce system drawings for systems that are normally operated or have maintenance performed on the system, label individual pieces of equipment for proper identification, even if system drawings are not warranted, and perform verification of drawings that are identified as essential in Tank Farm Essential Drawing Plans. During fiscal year 1994, work was begun to label Tank Farm components and provide user friendly system based drawings for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operations and maintenance. During the first half of fiscal 1995, the field verification program continued to convert TWRS drawings into CAD format and verify the accuracy based on visual inspections. During the remainder of fiscal year 1995 these efforts will be combined into a single program providing system based drawings and field verification of TWRS equipment and facilities. This combined program for TWRS will include all active systems for tank farms. Operations will determine the extent of drawing and labeling requirements for single shell tanks, i.e. the electrical distribution, HVAC, leak detection, and the radiation monitoring system. The tasks required to meet these objectives, include the following: identify system boundaries or scope for drawing being verified; label equipment/components in the process systems with a unique Equipment Identification Number (EIN) per the TWRS Data Standard; develop system drawings that are coordinated by ``smart`` drawing numbers and/or drawing references as identified on H-14-020000; develop a Master Equipment List (MEL) multi-user data base application which will contain key information about equipment identified in the field; and field verify and release TWRS Operation and Maintenance (O and M) drawings.

  17. Survey of Existing Tools for Formal Verification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punnoose, Ratish J.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Wong, Matthew H.; Jackson, Mayo

    2014-12-01

    Formal methods have come into wide use because of their effectiveness in verifying %22safety and security%22 requirements of digital systems; a set of requirements for which testing is mostly ineffective. Formal methods are routinely used in the design and verification of high-consequence digital systems in industry. This report outlines our work in assessing the capabilities of commercial and open source formal tools and the ways in which they can be leveraged in digital design workflows.

  18. Technical safety requirements control level verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-05-21

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL concluded that the TSR control level verification process is clear and logically based upon DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements, and other TSR control selection guidelines. The process provides a documented, traceable basis for TSR level decisions and is a valid reference for preparation of new TSRs.

  19. Localized surface plasmon assisted contrast microscopy for ultrathin transparent specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Feifei; Lu, Dylan; Aguinaldo, Ryan; Ma, Yicong; Sinha, Sunil K.; Liu, Zhaowei

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a high contrast imaging technique, termed localized surface plasmon assisted contrast microscopy, by combining localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) and dark-field microscopy technique. Due to the sensitive response of LSPR to the refractive index of the surrounding media, this technique is capable of converting a small refractive index difference to a change in scattering intensity, resulting in a high-contrast, diffraction limited image of a thin unstained specimen with small, gradual refractive-index variation.

  20. Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of Energy Data | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of Energy Data Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification of Energy Data Evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is the collection of methods and processes used to assess the performance of energy efficiency activities so planned results can be achieved with greater certainty and future activities can be more effective. The main objectives of an EM&V process are to assess the performance of an energy efficiency program or

  1. Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data Measurement & Verification with Green Button Data April 13, 2012 - 4:15pm Addthis Shankar Earni Program Manager at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Measurement and verification (M&V) focuses on ensuring that the savings from energy efficiency projects are being realized with a certain degree of confidence. M&V involves understanding how energy savings arebeing realized from a project; designing a cost-effective assessment

  2. Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contracts | Department of Energy Project Financing » Energy Savings Performance Contracts » Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Measurement and verification (M&V) activities help agencies confirm that legally and contractually required savings guarantees are met in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). When done correctly, M&V: Appropriately

  3. Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Lighting Controls | Department of Energy Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance from Advanced Lighting Controls Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance from Advanced Lighting Controls This document provides a framework for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings, performance, and user satisfaction from lighting retrofit projects involving occupancy-sensor-based, daylighting, and/or other types of automatic lighting. It

  4. Advanced Waste Management Now Available as Accredited SEP Verification Body

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Technical Assistance » Superior Energy Performance » Advanced Waste Management Now Available as Accredited SEP Verification Body Advanced Waste Management Now Available as Accredited SEP Verification Body October 24, 2014 - 2:58pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy is pleased to announce that Advanced Waste Management Systems Inc. (AWM) is now a fully accredited Verification Body for Superior Energy Performance(tm) (SEP). This ANSI-ANAB accreditation enables AWM

  5. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (IDIQ Attachment J-8) | Department of Energy Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8) Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline (IDIQ Attachment J-8) Document outlines measurement and verification planning and savings calculation methods for an energy savings performance contract. Microsoft Office document icon Download the M&V Plan and Savings Calculations Methods Outline. More Documents &

  6. ON THE EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION AND DETERMINATION OF PARAMETERS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ON THE EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION AND DETERMINATION OF PARAMETERS OF STOPPING-POWER THEORY Authors: Turner, J. E. Publication Date: 1964-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 4887408 Report ...

  7. Reviewing Measurement and Verification Plans for Federal ESPC Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides a framework for implementing uniform and consistent reviews of measurement and verification (M&V) plans for federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects.

  8. NEMVP: North American energy measurement and verification protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This measurement and verification protocol discusses procedures that,when implemented, allow buyers, sellers, and financiers of energy projects to quantify energy conservation measure performance and savings.

  9. Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active Desiccant Hybrid Rooftop Systems Combined with a Natural Gas Driven Cogeneration Package, 2008 Design, ...

  10. Verification of the Time Evolution of Cosmological Simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCURACY; ALGORITHMS; COSMOLOGY; SIMULATION; VERIFICATION Word ...

  11. Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentmeasurement-and-verification-low-inco Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible...

  12. Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contracts Measurement and verification (M&V) activities help agencies confirm that ... When done correctly, M&V: Appropriately allocates risks Reduces uncertainty of savings ...

  13. Measurement and Verification Plan and Savings Calculations Methods...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Document outlines measurement and verification planning and savings calculation methods for an energy savings performance contract. Microsoft Office document icon Download the M&V ...

  14. Reviewing Measurement and Verification Plans for Federal ESPC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reviewing Post-Installation and Annual Reports for Federal ESPC Projects Investment-Grade Audit: Review Checklist M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based ...

  15. Verification of the Time Evolution of Cosmological Simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Verification of the Time Evolution of Cosmological Simulations via Hypothesis-Driven Comparative and Quantitative Visualization Citation Details In-Document Search...

  16. DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment submitted by Hoshizaki America, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program Comment submitted by the North American Association of Food Equipment ...

  17. SQA_CodeVerification_Survey_FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survey o f S oftware Q uality Assurance a nd Code Verification Practices i n CASL Michael P ernice Idaho N ational L aboratory Matt S ieger Oak R idge N ational Laboratory March 26, 2 013 INL/EXT-13-28675 CASL-U-2013-0079-000 CASL-U-2013-0079-000 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal

  18. Accelerating functional verification of an integrated circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deindl, Michael; Ruedinger, Jeffrey Joseph; Zoellin, Christian G

    2015-11-05

    Illustrative embodiments include a method, system, and computer program product for accelerating functional verification in simulation testing of an integrated circuit (IC). Using a processor and a memory, a serial operation is replaced with a direct register access operation, wherein the serial operation is configured to perform bit shifting operation using a register in a simulation of the IC. The serial operation is blocked from manipulating the register in the simulation of the IC. Using the register in the simulation of the IC, the direct register access operation is performed in place of the serial operation.

  19. Accelerating functional verification of an integrated circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deindl, Michael; Ruedinger, Jeffrey Joseph; Zoellin, Christian G.

    2015-10-27

    Illustrative embodiments include a method, system, and computer program product for accelerating functional verification in simulation testing of an integrated circuit (IC). Using a processor and a memory, a serial operation is replaced with a direct register access operation, wherein the serial operation is configured to perform bit shifting operation using a register in a simulation of the IC. The serial operation is blocked from manipulating the register in the simulation of the IC. Using the register in the simulation of the IC, the direct register access operation is performed in place of the serial operation.

  20. DESIGN INFORMATION VERIFICATION FOR NUCLEAR SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Bean; Richard R. M. Metcalf; Phillip C. Durst

    2009-07-01

    A critical aspect of international safeguards activities performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the verification that facility design and construction (including upgrades and modifications) do not create opportunities for nuclear proliferation. These Design Information Verification activities require that IAEA inspectors compare current and past information about the facility to verify the operators declaration of proper use. The actual practice of DIV presents challenges to the inspectors due to the large amount of data generated, concerns about sensitive or proprietary data, the overall complexity of the facility, and the effort required to extract just the safeguards relevant information. Planned and anticipated facilities will (especially in the case of reprocessing plants) be ever larger and increasingly complex, thus exacerbating the challenges. This paper reports the results of a workshop held at the Idaho National Laboratory in March 2009, which considered technologies and methods to address these challenges. The use of 3D Laser Range Finding, Outdoor Visualization System, Gamma-LIDAR, and virtual facility modeling, as well as methods to handle the facility data issues (quantity, sensitivity, and accessibility and portability for the inspector) were presented. The workshop attendees drew conclusions about the use of these techniques with respect to successfully employing them in an operating environment, using a Fuel Conditioning Facility walk-through as a baseline for discussion.

  1. SPR Hydrostatic Column Model Verification and Validation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David; Rudeen, David Keith

    2015-10-01

    A Hydrostatic Column Model (HCM) was developed to help differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen for testing the pressure integrity of crude oil storage wells at the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. This effort was motivated by steady, yet distinct, pressure behavior of a series of Big Hill caverns that have been placed under nitrogen for extended period of time. This report describes the HCM model, its functional requirements, the model structure and the verification and validation process. Different modes of operation are also described, which illustrate how the software can be used to model extended nitrogen monitoring and Mechanical Integrity Tests by predicting wellhead pressures along with nitrogen interface movements. Model verification has shown that the program runs correctly and it is implemented as intended. The cavern BH101 long term nitrogen test was used to validate the model which showed very good agreement with measured data. This supports the claim that the model is, in fact, capturing the relevant physical phenomena and can be used to make accurate predictions of both wellhead pressure and interface movements.

  2. Verification and validation for induction heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Kin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tippetts, Trevor B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, David W [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Truchas is a software package being developed at LANL within the Telluride project for predicting the complex physical processes in metal alloy casting. The software was designed to be massively parallel, multi-material, multi-physics, and to run on 3D, fully unstructured meshes. This work describes a Verification and Validation assessment of Truchas for simulating the induction heating phase of a casting process. We used existing data from a simple experiment involving the induction heating of a graphite cylinder, as graphite is a common material used for mold assemblies. Because we do not have complete knowledge of all the conditions and properties in this experiment (as is the case in many other experiments), we performed a parameter sensitivity study, modeled the uncertainties of the most sensitive parameters, and quantified how these uncertainties propagate to the Truchas output response. A verification analysis produced estimates of the numerical error of the Truchas solution to our computational model. The outputs from Truchas runs with randomly sampled parameter values were used for the validation study.

  3. Measurement and Verification Options for Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) measurement and verification (M&V) guidelines and International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol M&V methodologies are broken into four options.

  4. OPS 9.10 Independent Verification 8/24/98 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OPS 9.10 Independent Verification 82498 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the conduct of selected independent verification activities. This surveillance provides a ...

  5. Approaches to verification of two-dimensional water quality models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-11-01

    The verification of a water quality model is the one procedure most needed by decision making evaluating a model predictions, but is often not adequate or done at all. The results of a properly conducted verification provide the decision makers with an estimate of the uncertainty associated with model predictions. Several statistical tests are available for quantifying of the performance of a model. Six methods of verification were evaluated using an application of the BETTER two-dimensional water quality model for Chickamauga reservoir. Model predictions for ten state variables were compared to observed conditions from 1989. Spatial distributions of the verification measures showed the model predictions were generally adequate, except at a few specific locations in the reservoir. The most useful statistics were the mean standard error of the residuals. Quantifiable measures of model performance should be calculated during calibration and verification of future applications of the BETTER model. 25 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Specimen coordinate automated measuring machine/fiducial automated measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hedglen, Robert E.; Jacket, Howard S.; Schwartz, Allan I.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen coordinate Automated Measuring Machine (SCAMM) and the Fiducial Automated Measuring Machine (FAMM) is a computer controlled metrology system capable of measuring length, width, and thickness, and of locating fiducial marks. SCAMM and FAMM have many similarities in their designs, and they can be converted from one to the other without taking them out of the hot cell. Both have means for: supporting a plurality of samples and a standard; controlling the movement of the samples in the +/- X and Y directions; determining the coordinates of the sample; compensating for temperature effects; and verifying the accuracy of the measurements and repeating as necessary. SCAMM and FAMM are designed to be used in hot cells.

  7. Investigation of Asphalt Mixture Creep Behavior Using Thin Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zofka, Adam; Marasteanu, Mihai; Turos, Mugur

    2008-02-15

    The asphalt pavement layer consists of two or more lifts of compacted asphalt mixture; the top of the layer is also exposed to aging, a factor that significantly affects the mixture properties. The current testing specifications use rather thick specimens that cannot be used to investigate the gradual change in properties with pavement depth. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the 3-point bending test with thin asphalt mixture beams (127x12.7x6.35 mm) to determine the low-temperature creep compliance of the mixtures. Several theoretical and semi-empirical models, from the theory of composites, are reviewed and evaluated using numerical and experimental data. Preliminary results show that this method can be used for low-temperature mixture characterization but several crucial factors need further inspection and interpretation.

  8. Specimen Machining for the Study of the Effect of Swelling on CGR in PWR Environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the preparation of ten specimens to be used for the study of the effect of swelling on the propagation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking cracks. Four compact tension specimens, four microscopy plates and two tensile specimens were machined from a AISI 304 material that was irradiated up to 33 dpa. The specimens had been machined such as to represent the behavior of materials with 3.7%swelling and <2% swelling.

  9. ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing- Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012

  10. Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency Project/Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency Project/Program

  11. Comment submitted by Whirlpool Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Whirlpool Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  12. Comment submitted by Earthjustice regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Earthjustice regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  13. Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Savings Performance Contracting-Savings Measurement and Verification Transcript 2-24-2011.doc

  14. State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification (M&V) Webinar.

  15. Comment submitted by Traulsen regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Traulsen regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  16. Comment submitted by Consumers Union regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Consumers Union regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  17. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    high-pressure fluid environment (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap

  18. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kao, C. -C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Mentes, T. O.; Miao, H.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Sayre, D.; et al

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done bymore » computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.« less

  19. Assessment of Automated Measurement and Verification (M&V) Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Touzani, Samir; Custodio, Claudine; Sohn, Michael; Fernandes, Samuel; Jump, David

    2015-07-01

    This report documents the application of a general statistical methodology to assess the accuracy of baseline energy models, focusing on its application to Measurement and Verification (M&V) of whole-building energy savings.

  20. System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SASSI is the System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction, a computer code for ... pedigree of the code and its verification and validation history was not fully traceable. ...

  1. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts Version 4.0 ... Management Program November 2015 FEMP M&V Guidelines 4.0 i ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ...

  2. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) Concepts and Options for Determining Energy and Water Savings Volume 1, April 2007. M&V Guidelines 3.0 FEMP ii Contents Section Page Section...

  3. Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy Savings Performance Contract Process M&V activities span three phases of the the ESPC process. M&V activities span ...

  4. Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document provides a framework for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy ... with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for retrofit projects and to assist in ...

  5. Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Risk," in the context of measurement and verification (M&V), refers to the uncertainty ... and holding certain parameters fixed in the M&V plan can match up responsibilities. ...

  6. Rotary turret and reusable specimen holder for mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banar, Joseph C.; Perrin, Richard E.; Ostrenga, Raymond A.

    1988-01-01

    A sample holder for use in a mass spectrometer is provided for heating a sample to discharge ions through an electrostatic field which focuses and accelerates the ions for analysis. Individual specimen holders form a plurality of filaments for heating the sample materials for ion emission. Mounting devices hold the plurality of filaments at regular spaced apart angles in a closed configuration adjacent the electrostatic field elements. A substantially solid ceramic turret is provided with a plurality of electrical contacts which engage the individual holder means for energizing the filaments and forming a corresponding plurality of radially facing, axially extending first conductive surfaces. A substantially solid stationary turret bearing member is mounted about the rotating turret with a plurality of radially biased second electrical conductive surfaces, mounted to electrically contact facing ones of the plurality of radially facing first conductive surfaces. The assembly provides a large thermal mass for thermal stability and large electrical contact areas for repeatable, stable power input for heating the sample materials. An improved sample holder is also provided having a ceramic body portion for removably engaging conductive wires. The conductive wires are compatible with a selected filament element and the sample material to be analyzed.

  7. Hanford Site Assessment & Characterization/Verification of Buildings Procedure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Revision 2 Hanford Site Assessment & Characterization/Verification of Buildings Procedure Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited DOE-0342-002, Rev. 2 Hanford Site Wide Assessment and Characterization/Verification of Buildings Procedure Published Date: 09/08/15 Effective Date: 09/25/15 ii CHANGE SUMMARY Rev # Date-Section Changed Change Details 2 10/06/14 - 1.0 Add statement

  8. Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sampling | Department of Energy Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle PDF icon Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Simulation Computing: Verification &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation Verification & Validation high-fidelity simulations The Verification and Validation (V&V) program conducts two major activities at Sandia. The first is to perform assessments and studies that quantify confidence in Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) calculation results. The second activity develops and improves V&V and uncertainty quantification methods, metrics, and standards. Assessments This project area conducts studies and assessments for Sandia's engineering

  10. Code Verification by the Method of Manufactured Solutions (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Code Verification by the Method of Manufactured Solutions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Code Verification by the Method of Manufactured Solutions × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  11. Declaration of Construction Completion and Verification of Readiness to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test | Department of Energy Declaration of Construction Completion and Verification of Readiness to Test Declaration of Construction Completion and Verification of Readiness to Test Salt Waste Processing Facility, Project No. 05-D-405 Pam Marks, FPD, DOE-SR March 2, 2016 File Presentation Key Resources PMCDP EVMS PARS IIe FPD Resource Center PM Newsletter Forms and Templates More Documents & Publications Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Turnover to Testing and Commissioning

  12. Verification and Validation of RADTRAN 5.5.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.

    2005-02-01

    This document contains a description of the verification and validation process used for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The verification and validation process ensured the proper calculational models and mathematical and numerical methods were used in the RADTRAN 5.5 code for the determination of risk and consequence assessments. The differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 are the addition of tables, an expanded isotope library, and the additional User-Defined meteorological option for accident dispersion. 3

  13. Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | DOE PAGES Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Moreover, plutonium gloveboxes present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials; these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which

  14. Automated Testing Instrument for Verification of Complex Computational

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Automated Testing Instrument for Verification of Complex Computational Systems Verifying the functionality and proper operation of both hardware and software of complex, low, medium and high speed, Real-Time Instrumentation, Acquisition, Control and Protection systems is typically time consuming and costly. When these systems are expanded, modified, enhanced with new features or software 'bugs' corrected, re-verification of correct operation must be

  15. Automated radiotherapy treatment plan integrity verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Deshan; Moore, Kevin L.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In our clinic, physicists spend from 15 to 60 min to verify the physical and dosimetric integrity of radiotherapy plans before presentation to radiation oncology physicians for approval. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a framework to automate as many elements of this quality control (QC) step as possible. Methods: A comprehensive computer application was developed to carry out a majority of these verification tasks in the Philips PINNACLE treatment planning system (TPS). This QC tool functions based on both PINNACLE scripting elements and PERL sub-routines. The core of this technique is the method of dynamic scripting, which involves a PERL programming module that is flexible and powerful for treatment plan data handling. Run-time plan data are collected, saved into temporary files, and analyzed against standard values and predefined logical rules. The results were summarized in a hypertext markup language (HTML) report that is displayed to the user. Results: This tool has been in clinical use for over a year. The occurrence frequency of technical problems, which would cause delays and suboptimal plans, has been reduced since clinical implementation. Conclusions: In addition to drastically reducing the set of human-driven logical comparisons, this QC tool also accomplished some tasks that are otherwise either quite laborious or impractical for humans to verify, e.g., identifying conflicts amongst IMRT optimization objectives.

  16. Battery Technology Life Verification Testing and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Gary L. Hunt; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2007-12-01

    A critical component to the successful commercialization of batteries for automotive applications is accurate life prediction. The Technology Life Verification Test (TLVT) Manual was developed to project battery life with a high level of statistical confidence within only one or two years of accelerated aging. The validation effort that is presently underway has led to several improvements to the original methodology. For example, a newly developed reference performance test revealed a voltage path dependence effect on resistance for lithium-ion cells. The resistance growth seems to depend on how a target condition is reached (i.e., by a charge or a discharge). Second, the methodology for assessing the level of measurement uncertainty was improved using a propagation of errors in the fundamental measurements to the derived response (e.g., resistance). This new approach provides a more realistic assessment of measurement uncertainty. Third, the methodology for allocating batteries to the test matrix has been improved. The new methodology was developed to assign batteries to the matrix such that the average of each test group would be representative of the overall population. These changes to the TLVT methodology will help to more accurately predict a battery technologys life capability with a high degree of confidence.

  17. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

  18. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  19. Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2006-09-28

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility Superfund Site, where further source-control actions and monitoring are under way.

  20. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS ...

  1. Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of Partial Grid E9, David Witherspoon, Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-06-12

    Conduct verification surveys of available grids at the DWI 1630 in Knoxville, Tennessee. A representative with the Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) team from ORISE conducted a verification survey of a partial area within Grid E9.

  2. July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Science Subject Feed Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 513 /> Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 241 /> Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 194 /> Damage identification and health monitoring of

  3. A Zero Knowledge Protocol For Nuclear Warhead Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Alexander; Goldston, Robert J.

    2014-03-14

    The verification of nuclear warheads for arms control faces a paradox: International inspectors must gain high confidence in the authenticity of submitted items while learning nothing about them. Conventional inspection systems featuring ''information barriers'', designed to hide measurments stored in electronic systems, are at risk of tampering and snooping. Here we show the viability of fundamentally new approach to nuclear warhead verification that incorporates a zero-knowledge protocol, designed such that sensitive information is never measured so does not need to be hidden. We interrogate submitted items with energetic neutrons, making in effect, differential measurements of neutron transmission and emission. Calculations of diversion scenarios show that a high degree of discrimination can be achieved while revealing zero information. Timely demonstration of the viability of such an approach could be critical for the nexxt round of arms-control negotiations, which will likely require verification of individual warheads, rather than whole delivery systems.

  4. Bibliography for Verification and Validation in Computational Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.

    1998-10-01

    A bibliography has been compiled dealing with the verification and validation of computational simulations. The references listed in this bibliography are concentrated in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, references from the following fields are also included: operations research, heat transfer, solid dynamics, software quality assurance, software accreditation, military systems, and nuclear reactor safety. This bibliography, containing 221 references, is not meant to be comprehensive. It was compiled during the last ten years in response to the author's interest and research in the methodology for verification and validation. The emphasis in the bibliography is in the following areas: philosophy of science underpinnings, development of terminology and methodology, high accuracy solutions for CFD verification, experimental datasets for CFD validation, and the statistical quantification of model validation. This bibliography should provide a starting point for individual researchers in many fields of computational simulation in science and engineering.

  5. MACCS2 development and verification efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M.; Chanin, D.

    1997-03-01

    MACCS2 represents a major enhancement of the capabilities of its predecessor MACCS, the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System. MACCS, released in 1987, was developed to estimate the potential impacts to the surrounding public of severe accidents at nuclear power plants. The principal phenomena considered in MACCS/MACCS2 are atmospheric transport and deposition under time-variant meteorology, short-term and long-term mitigative actions and exposure pathways, deterministic and stochastic health effects, and economic costs. MACCS2 was developed as a general-purpose analytical tool applicable to diverse reactor and nonreactor facilities. The MACCS2 package includes three primary enhancements: (1) a more flexible emergency response model, (2) an expanded library of radionuclides, and (3) a semidynamic food-chain model. In addition, errors that had been identified in MACCS version1.5.11.1 were corrected, including an error that prevented the code from providing intermediate-phase results. MACCS2 version 1.10 beta test was released to the beta-test group in May, 1995. In addition, the University of New Mexico (UNM) has completed an independent verification study of the code package. Since the beta-test release of MACCS2 version 1.10, a number of minor errors have been identified and corrected, and a number of enhancements have been added to the code package. The code enhancements added since the beta-test release of version 1.10 include: (1) an option to allow the user to input the {sigma}{sub y} and {sigma}{sub z} plume expansion parameters in a table-lookup form for incremental downwind distances, (2) an option to define different initial dimensions for up to four segments of a release, (3) an enhancement to the COMIDA2 food-chain model preprocessor to allow the user to supply externally calculated tables of tritium food-chain dose per unit deposition on farmland to support analyses of tritium releases, and (4) the capability to calculate direction-dependent doses.

  6. International comparison of product certification and verification methods for appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Romankiewicz, John; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2012-06-01

    Enforcement of appliance standards and consumer trust in appliance labeling are important foundations of growing a more energy efficient economy. Product certification and verification increase compliance rates which in turn increase both energy savings and consumer trust. This paper will serve two purposes: 1) to review international practices for product certification and verification as they relate to the enforcement of standards and labeling programs in the U.S., E.U., Australia, Japan, Canada, and China; and 2) to make recommendations for China to implement improved certification processes related to their mandatory standards and labeling program such as to increase compliance rates and energy savings potential.

  7. International Comparison of Product Certification and Verification Methods for Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Romankiewicz, John; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2012-06-01

    Enforcement of appliance standards and consumer trust in appliance labeling are important foundations of growing a more energy efficient economy. Product certification and verification increase compliance rates which in turn increase both energy savings and consumer trust. This paper will serve two purposes: 1) to review international practices for product certification and verification as they relate to the enforcement of standards and labeling programs in the U.S., E.U., Australia, Japan, Canada, and China; and 2) to make recommendations for China to implement improved certification processes related to their mandatory standards and labeling program such as to increase compliance rates and energy savings potential.

  8. A golden anniversary for space-based treaty verification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A golden anniversary for space-based treaty verification A golden anniversary for space-based treaty verification Fifty years ago this month, LANL sensor technology lifted off into space to help verify that world Superpowers were abiding by the newly signed Limited Test Ban Treaty. October 22, 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Richard Belian performs a final check of the Vela V-B satellite prior to its launch in April 1970. Vela V-B was the last of the Vela twin satellites launched

  9. Employment Verification at Savannah River Site, INS-O-09-05 ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Employment Verification at Savannah River Site, INS-O-09-05 Employment Verification at Savannah River Site, INS-O-09-05 The Department of Energy's Savannah River Operations Office ...

  10. Comment submitted by A. O. Smith Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by A. O. Smith Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  11. Comment submitted by United Lighting, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by United Lighting, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  12. Comment submitted by InterMetro Industries Corp. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by InterMetro Industries Corp. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  13. EECLP Webinar #2: Quality Assurance and Evaluation Monitoring Verification-- Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the EECLP Webinar 2: Quality Assurance and Evaluation Monitoring Verification, presented in December 2014.

  14. Supplement No. 2 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol – Verification and Certification Protocol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supplement No. 2 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol – Verification and Certification Protocol (November 1985, Rev. 1)

  15. Comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  16. Comment submitted by Energizer Battery Manufacturing, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Energizer Battery Manufacturing, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  17. Comment submitted by BSH Home Appliances Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by BSH Home Appliances Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  18. Measurement and Verification Activities Required in the Energy Savings Performance Contract Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are four major measurement and verification (M&V) activities in the energy savings performance contract (ESPC) procurement process.

  19. ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations Office | Department of Energy Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office PDF icon ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office More Documents & Publications ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor

  20. Comment submitted by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  1. Comment submitted by Ingersoll Rand Residential Solutions regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Ingersoll Rand Residential Solutions regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  2. Comment submitted by Hoshizaki America, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Hoshizaki America, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  3. DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22, 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22, 2011 DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR, April 22, 2011 This document describes ENERGY STAR verificaion testing process, dated April 22, 2011 PDF icon estar_verification_process.pdf More Documents & Publications Comment submitted by Hoshizaki America, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program Comment submitted by the North American Association of Food Equipment Manufacturers

  4. Comment submitted by CertainTeed Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by CertainTeed Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  5. Comment submitted by the Bradford White Corporation (BWC) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Bradford White Corporation (BWC) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  6. Comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  7. NMSSUP Phase 2 Transition/Readiness Verification Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Material Safeguards and Security Upgrade Project (NMSSUP) Phase II Transition/Readiness Verification Workshop Tuesday, April 30, 2013 Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder, Santa Fe, New Mexico Room reservation info Tewa Bay Meeting Room 1 Hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and NA-00-LA Field Office nmssup aerial Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  9. Project W-030 flammable gas verification monitoring test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARKER, S.A.

    1999-02-24

    This document describes the verification monitoring campaign used to document the ability of the new ventilation system to mitigate flammable gas accumulation under steady state tank conditions. This document reports the results of the monitoring campaign. The ventilation system configuration, process data, and data analysis are presented.

  10. Superior Energy Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Measurement and Verification Protocol for Industry defines the procedures that will be used to confirm conformance with the energy performance level requirements of the Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) Program. The Program has two paths. This document is structured to reflect those different paths.

  11. SRS Software Verification Pre Operational and Startup Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HILL, L.F.

    2000-10-18

    This document defines testing for the software used to control the Sodium Removal System (SRS). The testing is conducted off-line from the. physical plant by using a simulator built-in to the software. This provides verification of proper software operation prior to performing the operational acceptance tests with the actual plant hardware.

  12. Multi-canister overpack project -- verification and validation, MCNP 4A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1997-11-10

    This supporting document contains the software verification and validation (V and V) package used for Phase 2 design of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack. V and V packages for both ANSYS and MCNP are included. Description of Verification Run(s): This software requires that it be compiled specifically for the machine it is to be used on. Therefore to facilitate ease in the verification process the software automatically runs 25 sample problems to ensure proper installation and compilation. Once the runs are completed the software checks for verification by performing a file comparison on the new output file and the old output file. Any differences between any of the files will cause a verification error. Due to the manner in which the verification is completed a verification error does not necessarily indicate a problem. This indicates that a closer look at the output files is needed to determine the cause of the error.

  13. An Experimental Study of Shear-Dominated Failure in the 2013 Sandia Fracture Challenge Specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Reedlunn, Benjamin; Ingraham, Mathew Duffy; Williams, Shelley

    2015-04-01

    This report presents an experimental study motivated by results obtained during the 2013 Sandia Fracture Challenge. The challenge involved A286 steel, shear-dominated compression specimens whose load-deflection response contained a load maximum fol- lowed by significant displacement under decreasing load, ending with a catastrophic fracture. Blind numerical simulations deviated from the experiments well before the maximum load and did not predict the failure displacement. A series of new tests were conducted on specimens machined from the original A286 steel stock to learn more about the deformation and failure processes in the specimen and potentially improve future numerical simulations. The study consisted of several uniaxial tension tests to explore anisotropy in the material, and a set of new tests on the compression speci- men. In some compression specimen tests, stereo digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure the surface strain fields local to the region of interest. In others, the compression specimen was loaded to a given displacement prior to failure, unloaded, sectioned, and imaged under the microscope to determine when material damage first appeared and how it spread. The experiments brought the following observations to light. The tensile tests revealed that the plastic response of the material is anisotropic. DIC during the shear- dominated compression tests showed that all three in-plane surface strain components had maxima in the order of 50% at the maximum load. Sectioning of the specimens revealed no signs of material damage at the point where simulations deviated from the experiments. Cracks and other damage did start to form approximately when the max- imum load was reached, and they grew as the load decreased, eventually culminating in catastrophic failure of the specimens. In addition to the steel specimens, a similar study was carried out for aluminum 7075-T651 specimens. These specimens achieved much lower loads and displacements, and failure occurred very close to the maximum in the load-deflection response. No material damage was observed in these specimens, even when failure was imminent. In the future, we plan to use these experimental results to improve numerical simu- lations of the A286 steel experiments, and to improve plasticity and failure models for the Al 7075 stock. The ultimate goal of our efforts is to increase our confidence in the results of numerical simulations of elastic-plastic structural behavior and failure.

  14. Retrospective analysis of 2D patient-specific IMRT verifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, Nathan L.; White, R. Allen; Bloch, Charles; Salehpour, Mohammad; Dong, Lei; Rosen, Isaac I.

    2005-04-01

    We performed 858 two-dimensional (2D) patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy verifications over a period of 18 months. Multifield, composite treatment plans were measured in phantom using calibrated Kodak EDR2 film and compared with the calculated dose extracted from two treatment planning systems. This research summarizes our findings using the normalized agreement test (NAT) index and the percent of pixels failing the gamma index as metrics to represent the agreement between measured and computed dose distributions. An in-house dose comparison software package was used to register and compare all verifications. We found it was important to use an automatic positioning algorithm to achieve maximum registration accuracy, and that our automatic algorithm agreed well with anticipated results from known phantom geometries. We also measured absolute dose for each case using an ion chamber. Because the computed distributions agreed with ion chamber measurements better than the EDR2 film doses, we normalized EDR2 data to the computed distributions. The distributions of both the NAT indices and the percentage of pixels failing the gamma index were found to be exponential distributions. We continue to use both the NAT index and percent of pixels failing gamma with 5%/3 mm criteria to evaluate future verifications, as these two metrics were found to be complementary. Our data showed that using 2%/2 mm or 3%/3 mm criteria produces results similar to those using 5%/3 mm criteria. Normalized comparisons that have a NAT index greater than 45 and/or more than 20% of the pixels failing gamma for 5%/3 mm criteria represent outliers from our clinical data set and require further analysis. Because our QA verification results were exponentially distributed, rather than a tight grouping of similar results, we continue to perform patient-specific QA in order to identify and correct outliers in our verifications. The data from this work could be useful as a reference for other clinics to indicate anticipated trends in 2D verifications under various conditions.

  15. Renewable Energy and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, A.; Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Kats, G. H.

    1999-04-14

    The Renewables Subcommittee for the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) is developing a section of the IPMVP treating the special issues related to performance measurement of renewable energy systems. An industry consensus framework for measuring project benefits is important in realizing the promise of renewable energy. This work represents a voluntary, consensus-building process among sponsoring organizations from 21 countries and several disciplines. Measurement and Verification (M&V) can provide a common tool for standardization to support performance-based contracting, financing, and emissions trading. M&V can ensure that savings and generation requirements in energy projects will be achieved accurately and objectively. The protocol defines procedures that are consistently applicable to similar projects, internationally accepted, and reliable. Actual M&V project results can demonstrate success and provide developers, investors, lenders, and customers with more confidence in the value of future projects.

  16. Renewable energy and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, A.; Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Kats, G.H.

    1999-07-01

    The Renewables Subcommittee for the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) is developing a section of the IPMVP treating the special issues related to performance measurement of renewable energy systems. An industry consensus framework for measuring project benefits is important in realizing the promise of renewable energy. This work represents a voluntary, consensus-building process among sponsoring organizations from 21 countries and several disciplines. Measurement and Verification (M and V) can provide a common tool for standardization to support performance-based contracting, financing, and emissions trading. M and V can ensure that savings and generation requirements in energy projects will be achieved accurately and objectively. The protocol defines procedures that are consistently applicable to similar projects, internationally accepted, and reliable. Actual M and V project results can demonstrate success and provide developers, investors, lenders, and customers with more confidence in the value of future projects.

  17. The 2014 Sandia Verification and Validation Challenge: Problem statement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Kenneth; Orient, George

    2016-01-18

    This paper presents a case study in utilizing information from experiments, models, and verification and validation (V&V) to support a decision. It consists of a simple system with data and models provided, plus a safety requirement to assess. The goal is to pose a problem that is flexible enough to allow challengers to demonstrate a variety of approaches, but constrained enough to focus attention on a theme. This was accomplished by providing a good deal of background information in addition to the data, models, and code, but directing the participants' activities with specific deliverables. In this challenge, the theme ismore » how to gather and present evidence about the quality of model predictions, in order to support a decision. This case study formed the basis of the 2014 Sandia V&V Challenge Workshop and this resulting special edition of the ASME Journal of Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification.« less

  18. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-3 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2006-09-12

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-3 Solid Waste Burial Ground, also referred to as Burial Ground Number 3 and the Dry Waste Burial Ground Number 3. During its period of operation, the 618-3 site was used to dispose of uranium-contaminated construction debris from the 311 Building and construction/demolition debris from remodeling of the 313, 303-J and 303-K Buildings.

  20. A comparison of adjoint and data-centric verification techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wildey, Timothy Michael; Cyr, Eric Christopher; Shadid, John Nicolas; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Smith, Thomas Michael

    2013-03-01

    This document summarizes the results from a level 3 milestone study within the CASL VUQ effort. We compare the adjoint-based a posteriori error estimation approach with a recent variant of a data-centric verification technique. We provide a brief overview of each technique and then we discuss their relative advantages and disadvantages. We use Drekar::CFD to produce numerical results for steady-state Navier Stokes and SARANS approximations. 3

  1. Strain rate and inertial effects on impact loaded single-edge notch bend specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, P.M.; Dodds, R.H. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Many problems in fracture mechanics of ductile metals involve surface breaking defects located in structures subjected to impact or blast. When the severity of impact loads is sufficient to produce large inelastic deformations, the assessment of crack-tip conditions must include the effects of plasticity, strain rate and inertia. This work examines the interaction of impact loading, inelastic material deformation and rate sensitivity with the goal of improving the interpretation of ductile fracture toughness values measured under dynamic loading. The authors focus on shallow and deeply notched bend test specimens, SE(B)s, employed routinely to measure the static fracture toughness of a material. A thorough understanding of the test specimen`s dynamic behavior is a prerequisite to the application of measured fracture properties in structural applications. Three-dimensional, nonlinear dynamic analyses are performed for SE(B) fracture specimens subjected to impact loading. Loading rates obtained in conventional drop tower tests are applied in the analyses. An explicit time integration procedure coupled with an efficient (one-point) element integration scheme is employed to compute the dynamic response of the specimen. Strain-rate sensitivity is introduced via a new, efficient implementation of the Bodner-Partom viscoplastic constitutive model. Material properties for A533B steel are used in the analyses. Static analyses of the SE(B) specimens provide baseline responses for assessment of inertial effects. Similarly, dynamic analyses using a strain-rate insensitive material provide reference responses for the assessment of strain rate effects. Strains at key locations on the specimens and the support reactions are extracted from the analyses to assess the accuracy of static formulas commonly used to estimate applied J values. Inertial effects on the applied J are quantified by examining the acceleration component of J evaluated through a domain integral procedure.

  2. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Adams, J.G.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-08-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF{sub 6}. This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date.

  3. AUTOMATED, HIGHLY ACCURATE VERIFICATION OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George L Mesina; David Aumiller; Francis Buschman

    2014-07-01

    Computer programs that analyze light water reactor safety solve complex systems of governing, closure and special process equations to model the underlying physics. In addition, these programs incorporate many other features and are quite large. RELAP5-3D[1] has over 300,000 lines of coding for physics, input, output, data management, user-interaction, and post-processing. For software quality assurance, the code must be verified and validated before being released to users. Verification ensures that a program is built right by checking that it meets its design specifications. Recently, there has been an increased importance on the development of automated verification processes that compare coding against its documented algorithms and equations and compares its calculations against analytical solutions and the method of manufactured solutions[2]. For the first time, the ability exists to ensure that the data transfer operations associated with timestep advancement/repeating and writing/reading a solution to a file have no unintended consequences. To ensure that the code performs as intended over its extensive list of applications, an automated and highly accurate verification method has been modified and applied to RELAP5-3D. Furthermore, mathematical analysis of the adequacy of the checks used in the comparisons is provided.

  4. Enrichment Assay Methods Development for the Integrated Cylinder Verification System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2009-10-22

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility's entire product-cylinder inventory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100 percent product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The three main objectives of this FY09 project are summarized here and described in more detail in the report: (1) Develop a preliminary design for a prototype NDA system, (2) Refine PNNL's MCNP models of the NDA system, and (3) Procure and test key pulse-processing components. Progress against these tasks to date, and next steps, are discussed.

  5. Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Jiang, Wei

    2008-03-31

    This document provides the algorithms for CHP system performance monitoring and commissioning verification (CxV). It starts by presenting system-level and component-level performance metrics, followed by descriptions of algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, using the metric presented earlier. Verification of commissioning is accomplished essentially by comparing actual measured performance to benchmarks for performance provided by the system integrator and/or component manufacturers. The results of these comparisons are then automatically interpreted to provide conclusions regarding whether the CHP system and its components have been properly commissioned and where problems are found, guidance is provided for corrections. A discussion of uncertainty handling is then provided, which is followed by a description of how simulations models can be used to generate data for testing the algorithms. A model is described for simulating a CHP system consisting of a micro-turbine, an exhaust-gas heat recovery unit that produces hot water, a absorption chiller and a cooling tower. The process for using this model for generating data for testing the algorithms for a selected set of faults is described. The next section applies the algorithms developed to CHP laboratory and field data to illustrate their use. The report then concludes with a discussion of the need for laboratory testing of the algorithms on a physical CHP systems and identification of the recommended next steps.

  6. Modeling and Testing Miniature Torsion Specimens for SiC Joining Development Studies for Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-08-19

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. Miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with CVD-SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many of these miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the CVD-SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated joint strengths to determine the effects of the irradiation. Finite element elastic damage and elastic-plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated joint test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti3SiC2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. The implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.

  7. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  8. Analysis of stress intensity factors for a new mechanical-corrosion specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassineux, B.; Crouzet, D.; Le Hong, S.

    1996-12-01

    Electricite de France is conducting a research program to determine stress corrosion cracking rates (CSC) in the Alloy 600 steam generators tubes of the PWR primary system. The objective is to correlate the cracking rates with the specimen stress intensity factor K{sub I}. One of the samples selected for the purpose of this study is the longitudinal notched specimen (TEL). This paper presents the analysis of the stress intensity factor and its experimental validation. The stress intensity factor has been evaluated for different loads using 3D finite element calculations with the Hellen-Parks and G(q) methods. Only crack propagation are considered. As an assessment of the method, the numerical simulations are in good agreement with the fatigue crack growth rates measured experimentally for TEL and compact tension (CT) specimens.

  9. Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water-Saving Projects | Department of Energy Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects Using Measurement and Verification to Manage Risk in Federal Energy- and Water-Saving Projects "Risk," in the context of measurement and verification (M&V), refers to the uncertainty that expected savings will be realized. Assumption of risk implies acceptance of the potential monetary consequences. Energy service companies (ESCOs) and

  10. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists. PDF icon iap_verification_checklist_rev_1.pdf More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (R

  11. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contracts (Version 4.0) | Department of Energy M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0) M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts (Version 4.0) Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers. PDF icon Download the M&V Guideli

  12. INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SIZE/TYPE ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF FIVE IRRADIATED RPV MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Lucon, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 1011 n/cm2/s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 1019 n/cm2 and at 288 C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes >1013 n/cm2/s and subsequent testing by SCK CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 1013 n/cm2/s with irradiation temperature between 295 C and 300 C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and10 1019 n/cm2. The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, T0, for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, T0, 25 C to 53 C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, T0, were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  13. Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, David P.; Huff, Edmund A.; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.

    1994-05-03

    A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

  14. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  15. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conditions. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions. Abstract not provided. Authors: Lu, Ping ; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary ; Xiong, Jie ; Jia, Quanxi Publication Date: 2013-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1145386 Report Number(s): SAND2013-1068C 445629 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource

  16. Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, David P. (Orland Park, IL); Huff, Edmund A. (Lemont, IL); Bhattacharyya, Maryka H. (Naperville, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

  17. PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent ...

  18. Round-Robin Verification and Final Development of the IEC 62788...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Verification and Final Development of the IEC 62788-1-5 Encapsulation Size Change Test; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  19. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  20. High Impact Technology Hub- Resources for Evaluators- General Measurement and Verification Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The HIT Catalyst conducts technology demonstrations in three main phases govern demonstrations: Site Evaluation, Selection and Project Kick-Off, Measurement and Verification Scoping and Plan...

  1. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2010-05-24

    INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-02-0

  2. State and Local Energy Savings Performance Contracting: Savings Measurement and Verification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Feb. 24, 2011, covers background and benefits of measurement and verification and highlights activities for state and local energy savings performance contracting.

  3. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2010-07-21

    INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE OPERABLE UNIT-1 LANDFILL TRENCHES, MIAMISBURG CLOSURE PROJECT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO DCN: 0468-SR-03-0

  4. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-02

    Document outlines the Federal Energy Management Program's standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  5. Development of a portal monitor for UF6 cylinder verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Curtis, Michael M.; Shaver, Mark W.; Benz, Jacob M.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Jordan, David V.; Noss, Daniel; Ford, Herbert

    2009-10-06

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s operations. As additional enrichment plans come online to support the expansion of nuclear power, reducing person-days of inspection will take on greater importance. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100% product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Automated Cylinder Enrichment Verification System (ACEVS) would be located at key measurement points and will positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. Given the potential for reduced inspector presence, the operational and manpower-reduction benefits of the portal concept are clear. However, it is necessary to assess whether the cylinder portal concept can meet, or potentially improve upon, today’s U-235 enrichment assay performance. PNNL’s ACEVS concept utilizes sensors that could be operated in an unattended mode: moderated He-3 neutron detectors and large NaI(Tl) scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy. The medium-resolution NaI(Tl) scintillators are a sacrifice in energy resolution but do provide high collection efficiency for signatures above 1 MeV. The He-3/NaI sensor combination allows the exploitation of additional, more-penetrating signatures than those currently utilized: Neutrons produced from F-19(μ,n) reactions (spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) and high-energy gamma rays (extending up to 10 MeV) induced by neutrons interacting in the steel cylinder. These signatures are indirect measures of U-235 that require a relatively stable U-234/U-235 ratio in the product material in order to be useful. The hypothesis of this work is that the U-234/U-235 ratio is sufficiently constant, for the specific facility where the automated system is installed, to rely on neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures for indirect measurement of U-235. Further, these highly penetrating signatures can be combined with a modified form of NaI-based 185-keV enrichment measurements to meet target uncertainties for the verification of product cylinders, with the additional benefits of full-volume assay of the cylinder and 100% product-cylinder verification (as opposed to today’s sampling-based approach). This paper focuses on the enrichment measurement aspects of the ACEVS concept: neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures, the radiation sensors designed to collect those signatures, and proof-of-principle cylinder measurements and analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates that an automated cylinder verification approach has the potential to meet target uncertainty values for 30B products cylinders (5%), assuming ore-based enrichment feed and a facility-specific calibration. Also described is the additional work needed to more definitively assess the concept’s viability, particularly through a better understanding of the U-234/U-235 ratio variability in modern enrichment plants.

  6. A Runtime Verification Framework for Control System Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Fuller, Jason C.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Callahan, Charles D.

    2014-08-02

    n a standard workflow for the validation of a control system, the control system is implemented as an extension to a simulator. Such simulators are complex software systems, and engineers may unknowingly violate constraints a simulator places on extensions. As such, errors may be introduced in the implementation of either the control system or the simulator leading to invalid simulation results. This paper presents a novel runtime verification approach for verifying control system implementations within simulators. The major contribution of the approach is the two-tier specification process. In the first tier, engineers model constraints using a domain-specific language tailored to modeling a controllers response to changes in its input. The language is high-level and effectively hides the implementation details of the simulator, allowing engineers to specify design-level constraints independent of low-level simulator interfaces. In the second tier, simulator developers provide mapping rules for mapping design-level constraints to the implementation of the simulator. Using the rules, an automated tool transforms the design-level specifications into simulator-specific runtime verification specifications and generates monitoring code which is injected into the implementation of the simulator. During simulation, these monitors observe the input and output variables of the control system and report changes to the verifier. The verifier checks whether these changes follow the constraints of the control system. We describe application of this approach to the verification of the constraints of an HVAC control system implemented with the power grid simulator GridLAB-D.

  7. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  8. Verification of RESRAD-RDD. (Version 2.01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jing-Jy; Flood, Paul E.; LePoire, David; Kamboj, Sunita; Yu, Charley

    2015-09-01

    In this report, the results generated by RESRAD-RDD version 2.01 are compared with those produced by RESRAD-RDD version 1.7 for different scenarios with different sets of input parameters. RESRAD-RDD version 1.7 is spreadsheet-driven, performing calculations with Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. RESRAD-RDD version 2.01 revamped version 1.7 by using command-driven programs designed with Visual Basic.NET to direct calculations with data saved in Microsoft Access database, and re-facing the graphical user interface (GUI) to provide more flexibility and choices in guideline derivation. Because version 1.7 and version 2.01 perform the same calculations, the comparison of their results serves as verification of both versions. The verification covered calculation results for 11 radionuclides included in both versions: Am-241, Cf-252, Cm-244, Co-60, Cs-137, Ir-192, Po-210, Pu-238, Pu-239, Ra-226, and Sr-90. At first, all nuclidespecific data used in both versions were compared to ensure that they are identical. Then generic operational guidelines and measurement-based radiation doses or stay times associated with a specific operational guideline group were calculated with both versions using different sets of input parameters, and the results obtained with the same set of input parameters were compared. A total of 12 sets of input parameters were used for the verification, and the comparison was performed for each operational guideline group, from A to G, sequentially. The verification shows that RESRAD-RDD version 1.7 and RESRAD-RDD version 2.01 generate almost identical results; the slight differences could be attributed to differences in numerical precision with Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic.NET. RESRAD-RDD version 2.01 allows the selection of different units for use in reporting calculation results. The results of SI units were obtained and compared with the base results (in traditional units) used for comparison with version 1.7. The comparison shows that RESRAD-RDD version 2.01 correctly reports calculation results in the unit specified in the GUI.

  9. Digital data storage systems, computers, and data verification methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groeneveld, Bennett J.; Austad, Wayne E.; Walsh, Stuart C.; Herring, Catherine A.

    2005-12-27

    Digital data storage systems, computers, and data verification methods are provided. According to a first aspect of the invention, a computer includes an interface adapted to couple with a dynamic database; and processing circuitry configured to provide a first hash from digital data stored within a portion of the dynamic database at an initial moment in time, to provide a second hash from digital data stored within the portion of the dynamic database at a subsequent moment in time, and to compare the first hash and the second hash.

  10. ICDF Complex Waste Profile and Verification Sample Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-10-01

    This guidance document will assist waste generators who characterize waste streams destined for disposal at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The purpose of this document is to develop a conservative but appropriate way to (1) characterize waste for entry into the ICDF; (2) ensure compliance with the waste acceptance criteria; and (3) facilitate disposal at the ICDF landfill or evaporation pond. In addition, this document will establish the waste verification process used by ICDF personnel to ensure that untreated waste meets applicable ICDF acceptance limits

  11. Microsoft Word - beam characterization and verification.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Characterization and Verification Detector Components and Arrangement The beam uniformity and flux are determined using an array of five particle detectors. Each detector consists of Bicron BC-400 scintillator, a Bicron BC-634A optical coupling pad, a Hamamatsu R1635 photomultiplier tube, and a Hamamatsu E1761-04 tube base. Four of the detectors are fixed in position as show in Figure 1 and set up to measure beam particle counting rates continuously at four characteristic points, each 1.64

  12. Microsoft Word - S0191800 - Gunnison Verification Monitoring Report 0906.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1305-2006 -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy S0191800 DOE-LM/1305-2006 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2006 Work Performed by S.M.

  13. Validation Specimen for Contour Method Extension to Multiple Residual Stress Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pagliaro, Pierluigi; Prime, Michael B; Zuccarello, B; Clausen, Bjorn; Watkins, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    A new theoretical development of the contour method, that allow the user to measure the three normal residual stress components on cross sections of a generic mechanical part, is presented. To validate such a theoretical development, a residual stress test specimen was properly designed, fabricated and then tested with different experimental techniques.

  14. Electrochemical polishing of thread fastener test specimens of nickel-chromium iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kephart, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical polishing device and method for selective anodic dissolution of the surface of test specimens comprised, for example, of nickel-chromium-iron alloys, which provides for uniform dissolution at the localized sites to remove metal through the use of a coiled wire electrode (cathode) placed in the immediate proximity of the working, surface resulting in a polished and uniform grain boundary.

  15. Fracture toughness determination using spiral-grooved cylindrical specimen and pure torsional loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jy-An; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2003-07-08

    A method for determining fracture toughness K.sub.IC of materials ranging from metallic alloys, brittle ceramics and their composites, and weldments. A cylindrical specimen having a helical V-groove with a 45.degree. pitch is subjected to pure torsion. This loading configuration creates a uniform tensile-stress crack-opening mode, and a transverse plane-strain state along the helical groove. The full length of the spiral groove is equivalent to the thickness of a conventional compact-type specimen. K.sub.IC values are determined from the fracture torque and crack length measured from the test specimen using a 3-D finite element program (TOR3D-KIC) developed for the purpose. In addition, a mixed mode (combined tensile and shear stress mode) fracture toughness value can be determined by varying the pitch of the helical groove. Since the key information needed for determining the K.sub.IC value is condensed in the vicinity of the crack tip, the specimen can be significantly miniaturized without the loss of generality.

  16. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures.

  17. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented.

  18. Material Open Test Assembly Specimen Retrieval from Hanford's Shielded Material Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdez, Patrick LJ; Rinker, Michael W.

    2009-06-14

    Hanford’s 324 Building, the Shielded Material Facility (SMF), was developed to provide containment for research and fabrication development studies on highly radioactive metallic and ceramic nuclear reactor fuels and structural materials. Between 1983 and 1992, the SMF was used in support of the Department of Energy (DOE)-funded Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) program. In this program, metallurgical specimens were irradiated in FFTF and then sent to SMF for processing and storage in two cabinets. This effort was abruptly ended in early 1990s due to programmatic shifts within the DOE, leaving many specimens unexamined. In recent years, these specimens have become of high value to new DOE programs. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with retrieving specimens from one of the cabinets in support of fuel clad and duct development for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. Cesium contamination of the cell and failure of the overhead crane system utilized for opening the cabinets prevented PNNL from using the built-in hot cell equipment to gain access to the cabinets. PNNL designed and tested a lifting device to fit through a standard 10 inch diameter mechanical manipulator port in the SMF South Cell wall. The tool was successfully deployed in June 2008 with the support of Washington Closure Hanford.

  19. This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program.

  20. Apparatus for pre-stress-straining rod-type specimens in tension for in-situ passive fracture testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John Jy-an; Liu, Ken C.; Feng, Zhili

    2013-07-31

    A stress-strain testing apparatus imposes a stress-strain on a specimen while disposed in a controlled environment. Each end of the specimen is fastened to an end cap and a strain gage is attached to the specimen. An adjusting mechanism and a compression element are disposed between the end caps forming a frame for applying forces to the end caps and thereby stress-straining the specimen. The adjusting mechanism may be extended or retracted to increase or decrease the imposed stress-strain on the specimen, and the stress-strain is measured by the strain gage on the specimen while the apparatus is exposed to an environment such as high pressure hydrogen. Strain gages may be placed on the frame to measure stress-strains in the frame that may be caused by the environment.

  1. Verification of operating software for cooperative monitoring applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolk, K.M.; Rembold, R.K.

    1997-08-01

    Monitoring agencies often use computer based equipment to control instruments and to collect data at sites that are being monitored under international safeguards or other cooperative monitoring agreements. In order for this data to be used as an independent verification of data supplied by the host at the facility, the software used must be trusted by the monitoring agency. The monitoring party must be sure that the software has not be altered to give results that could lead to erroneous conclusions about nuclear materials inventories or other operating conditions at the site. The host might also want to verify that the software being used is the software that has been previously inspected in order to be assured that only data that is allowed under the agreement is being collected. A description of a method to provide this verification using keyed has functions and how the proposed method overcomes possible vulnerabilities in methods currently in use such as loading the software from trusted disks is presented. The use of public key data authentication for this purpose is also discussed.

  2. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principalmore » component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.« less

  3. An evaluation of the management system verification pilot at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRIGGS, C.R.

    1998-11-12

    The Chemical Management System (CMS), currently under development at Hanford, was used as the ''test program'' for pilot testing the value added aspects of the Chemical Manufacturers Association's (CMA) Management Systems Verification (MSV) process. The MSV process, which was developed by CMA's member chemical companies specifically as a tool to assist in the continuous improvement of environment, safety and health (ESH) performance, represents a commercial sector ''best practice'' for evaluating ESH management systems. The primary purpose of Hanford's MSV Pilot was to evaluate the applicability and utility of the MSV process in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment. However, because the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is the framework for ESH management at Hanford and at all DOE sites, the pilot specifically considered the MSV process in the context of a possible future adjunct to Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) efforts at Hanford and elsewhere within the DOE complex. The pilot involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with four separate panels of individuals with functional responsibilities related to the CMS including the Department of Energy Richland Operations (DOE-RL), Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and FDH's major subcontractors (MSCS). A semi-structured interview process was employed by the team of three ''verifiers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels regarding the development, integration and effectiveness of management systems necessary to ensure the sustainability of the CMS effort. An ''MSV Pilot Effectiveness Survey'' also was completed by each panel participant immediately following the interview.

  4. Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance, Inc. Now Available as Accredited SEP Verification Body

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy is pleased to announce that Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance, Inc. (LRQA) is now a fully accredited Verification Body for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™). This ANSI-ANAB accreditation enables LRQA to provide third-party verification for industrial facilities that wish to demonstrate energy management excellence and sustained energy savings to earn SEP certification.

  5. Comments for A Conference on Verification in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, James E.

    2012-06-12

    The author offers 5 points for the discussion of Verification and Technology: (1) Experience with the implementation of arms limitation and arms reduction agreements confirms that technology alone has never been relied upon to provide effective verification. (2) The historical practice of verification of arms control treaties between Cold War rivals may constrain the cooperative and innovative use of technology for transparency, veification and confidence building in the future. (3) An area that has been identified by many, including the US State Department and NNSA as being rich for exploration for potential uses of technology for transparency and verification is information and communications technology (ICT). This includes social media, crowd-sourcing, the internet of things, and the concept of societal verification, but there are issues. (4) On the issue of the extent to which verification technologies are keeping pace with the demands of future protocols and agrements I think the more direct question is ''are they effective in supporting the objectives of the treaty or agreement?'' In this regard it is important to acknowledge that there is a verification grand challenge at our doorstep. That is ''how does one verify limitations on nuclear warheads in national stockpiles?'' (5) Finally, while recognizing the daunting political and security challenges of such an approach, multilateral engagement and cooperation at the conceptual and technical levels provides benefits for addressing future verification challenges.

  6. Validation and verification plan for safety and PRA codes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ades, M.J.; Crowe, R.D.; Toffer, H.

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses a verification and validation (V&V) plan for computer codes used for safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment calculations. The present plan fulfills the commitments by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to the Department of Energy Savannah River Office (DOE-SRO) to bring the essential safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment codes in compliance with verification and validation requirements.

  7. Microsoft Word - S05773_2009 VerifMonRpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    September 2009 LMS/DUP/S05773 This page intentionally left blank LMS/DUP/S05773 Office of Legacy Management Verification Monitoring Report for the Durango, Colorado, Processing Site September 2009 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Verification Monitoring Report-Durango, Colorado, Processing Site September 2009 Doc. No. S05773 Page i Contents

  8. FINAL REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY BUILDING 330 PROJECT FOOTPRINT, ARGONNE, ILLINOIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERIKA N. BAILEY

    2012-02-29

    ORISE conducted onsite verification activities of the Building 330 project footprint during the period of June 6 through June 7, 2011. The verification activities included technical reviews of project documents, visual inspections, radiation surface scans, and sampling and analysis. The draft verification report was issued in July 2011 with findings and recommendations. The contractor performed additional evaluations and remediation.

  9. Nuclear Proliferation Using Laser Isotope Separation -- Verification Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, S A

    2001-10-15

    Two levels of nonproliferation verification exist. Signatories of the basic agreements under the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT) agree to open their nuclear sites to inspection by the IAEA. A more detailed and intrusive level was developed following the determination that Iraq had begun a nuclear weapons development program that was not detected by the original level of verification methods. This level, referred to as 93+2 and detailed in model protocol INFCIRC/540, allows the IAEA to do environmental monitoring of non-declared facilities that are suspected of containing proliferation activity, and possibly further inspections, as well as allowing more detailed inspections of declared sites. 56 countries have signed a Strengthened Safeguards Systems Additional Protocol as of 16 July 2001. These additional inspections can be done on the instigation of the IAEA itself, or after requests by other parties to the NPT, based on information that they have collected. Since information able to cause suspicion of proliferation could arrive at any country, it is important that countries have procedures in place that will assist them in making decisions related to these inspections. Furthermore, IAEA inspection resources are limited, and therefore care needs to be taken to make best use of these resources. Most of the nonproliferation verification inspections may be concentrated on establishing that diversion of nuclear materials is not occurring, but some fraction will be related to determining if undeclared sites have nuclear materials production taking place within them. Of these, most suspicions will likely be related to the major existing technologies for uranium enrichment and reprocessing for plutonium extraction, as it would seem most likely that nations attempting proliferation would use tested means of producing nuclear materials. However, as technology continues to advance and new methods of enrichment and reprocessing are developed, inspection-related procedures will need to be adapted to keep up with them. In order to make 93+2 inspections more useful, a systematic way of finding clues to nuclear proliferation would be useful. Also, to cope with the possible use of newer technology for proliferation, the list of clues might need to be expanded. This paper discusses the development and recognition of such clues. It concentrates on laser isotope separation (LIS) as a new proliferation technology, and uses Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) as an example of LIS that is well known.

  10. Exploring the Possible Use of Information Barriers for future Biological Weapons Verification Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, S J

    2011-12-20

    This report describes a path forward for implementing information barriers in a future generic biological arms-control verification regime. Information barriers have become a staple of discussion in the area of arms control verification approaches for nuclear weapons and components. Information barriers when used with a measurement system allow for the determination that an item has sensitive characteristics without releasing any of the sensitive information. Over the last 15 years the United States (with the Russian Federation) has led on the development of information barriers in the area of the verification of nuclear weapons and nuclear components. The work of the US and the Russian Federation has prompted other states (e.g., UK and Norway) to consider the merits of information barriers for possible verification regimes. In the context of a biological weapons control verification regime, the dual-use nature of the biotechnology will require protection of sensitive information while allowing for the verification of treaty commitments. A major question that has arisen is whether - in a biological weapons verification regime - the presence or absence of a weapon pathogen can be determined without revealing any information about possible sensitive or proprietary information contained in the genetic materials being declared under a verification regime. This study indicates that a verification regime could be constructed using a small number of pathogens that spans the range of known biological weapons agents. Since the number of possible pathogens is small it is possible and prudent to treat these pathogens as analogies to attributes in a nuclear verification regime. This study has determined that there may be some information that needs to be protected in a biological weapons control verification regime. To protect this information, the study concludes that the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array may be a suitable technology for the detection of the genetic information associated with the various pathogens. In addition, it has been determined that a suitable information barrier could be applied to this technology when the verification regime has been defined. Finally, the report posits a path forward for additional development of information barriers in a biological weapons verification regime. This path forward has shown that a new analysis approach coined as Information Loss Analysis might need to be pursued so that a numerical understanding of how information can be lost in specific measurement systems can be achieved.

  11. Microstructural and micromechanical characterization of IN718 theta shaped specimens built with electron beam melting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cakmak, Ercan; Kirka, Michael M.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Cooper, Ryan C.; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Wu, Wei; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-02-23

    Theta-shaped specimens were additively manufactured out of Inconel 718 powders using an electron beam melting technique, as a model complex load bearing structure. We employed two different build strategies; producing two sets of specimens. Microstructural and micro-mechanical characterizations were performed using electron back-scatter, synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction techniques. In particular, the cross-members of the specimens were the focus of the synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The build strategies employed resulted in the formation of distinct microstructures and crystallographic textures, signifying the importance of build-parameter manipulation for microstructural optimization. Large strain anisotropy of the different lattice planesmore » was observed during in-situ loading. Texture was concluded to have a distinct effect upon both the axial and transverse strain responses of the cross-members. In particular, the (200), (220) and (420) transverse lattice strains all showed unexpected overlapping trends in both builds. This was related to the strong {200} textures along the build/loading direction, providing agreement between the experimental and calculated results.« less

  12. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buescher, B.J. Jr.; Lloyd, W.R.; Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.

    1997-02-04

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: (a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; (b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; (c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and (d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen. 6 figs.

  13. Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buescher, Jr., Brent J.; Lloyd, W. Randolph; Ward, Michael B.; Epstein, Jonathan S.

    1997-01-01

    A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen.

  14. Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J.; Stulen, Richard H.; Toly, Norman F.

    1985-01-01

    A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

  15. Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, S.J.; Stulen, R.H.; Toly, N.F.

    1983-05-03

    A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

  16. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore,more » the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.« less

  17. Battery Technology Life Verification Test Manual Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this Technology Life Verification Test (TLVT) Manual is to help guide developers in their effort to successfully commercialize advanced energy storage devices such as battery and ultracapacitor technologies. The experimental design and data analysis discussed herein are focused on automotive applications based on the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) electric vehicle, hybrid electric vehicle, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (EV, HEV, and PHEV, respectively) performance targets. However, the methodology can be equally applied to other applications as well. This manual supersedes the February 2005 version of the TLVT Manual (Reference 1). It includes criteria for statistically-based life test matrix designs as well as requirements for test data analysis and reporting. Calendar life modeling and estimation techniques, including a user’s guide to the corresponding software tool is now provided in the Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual (Reference 2).

  18. The DES Science Verification Weak Lensing Shear Catalogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvis, M.

    2015-07-20

    We present weak lensing shear catalogs for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogs of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies respectively. We also detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. Furthermore, we discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogs for the full 5-year DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  19. Scope and verification of a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hippel, Frank N. von

    2014-05-09

    A Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT) would ban the production of fissile material - in practice highly-enriched uranium and separated plutonium - for weapons. It has been supported by strong majorities in the United Nations. After it comes into force, newly produced fissile materials could only be produced under international - most likely International Atomic Energy Agency - monitoring. Many non-weapon states argue that the treaty should also place under safeguards pre-existing stocks of fissile material in civilian use or declared excess for weapons so as to make nuclear-weapons reductions irreversible. This paper discusses the scope of the FMCT, the ability to detect clandestine production and verification challenges in the nuclear-weapons states.

  20. Shell Element Verification & Regression Problems for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zywicz, E

    2008-02-01

    A series of quasi-static regression/verification problems were developed for the triangular and quadrilateral shell element formulations contained in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's explicit finite element program DYNA3D. Each regression problem imposes both displacement- and force-type boundary conditions to probe the five independent nodal degrees of freedom employed in the targeted formulation. When applicable, the finite element results are compared with small-strain linear-elastic closed-form reference solutions to verify select aspects of the formulations implementation. Although all problems in the suite depict the same geometry, material behavior, and loading conditions, each problem represents a unique combination of shell formulation, stabilization method, and integration rule. Collectively, the thirty-six new regression problems in the test suite cover nine different shell formulations, three hourglass stabilization methods, and three families of through-thickness integration rules.

  1. Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Waked, R. Ryan; Granzow, Howard N.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Moreover, plutonium gloveboxes present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials; these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. Several studies have been conducted to determine the robustness of selfcontained fire extinguishers in plutonium gloveboxes in a nuclear facility, verification tests must be performed. These tests include activation and mass loss calorimeter tests. In addition, compatibility issues with chemical components of the self-contained fire extinguishers need to be addressed. Our study presents activation and mass loss calorimeter test results. After extensive studies, no critical areas of concern have been identified for the plutonium glovebox application of Fire Foe™, except for glovebox operations that use large quantities of bulk plutonium or uranium metal such as metal casting and pyro-chemistry operations.

  2. ON THE VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION OF GEOSPATIAL IMAGE ANALYSIS ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Trucano, Timothy G.; Pope, Paul A.; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Jiang , Ming; Wei, Thomas; Chilton, Lawrence; Bakel, A. J.

    2010-07-25

    Verification and validation (V&V) of geospatial image analysis algorithms is a difficult task and is becoming increasingly important. While there are many types of image analysis algorithms, we focus on developing V&V methodologies for algorithms designed to provide textual descriptions of geospatial imagery. In this paper, we present a novel methodological basis for V&V that employs a domain-specific ontology, which provides a naming convention for a domain-bounded set of objects and a set of named relationship between these objects. We describe a validation process that proceeds through objectively comparing benchmark imagery, produced using the ontology, with algorithm results. As an example, we describe how the proposed V&V methodology would be applied to algorithms designed to provide textual descriptions of facilities

  3. The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank Vincent

    2010-09-16

    This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

  4. Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets,Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Miller, Martin C.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2004-09-29

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington's 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. This Metals Verification Study was conducted to address the 303(d) segments that are listed for metal contaminants in marine sediment, because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the Inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected. The study was designed to obtain present-day sediment metals concentrations throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, with stations spatially distributed to support 303(d) listing updates and also watershed-level water quality and contaminant transport modeling efforts. A total of 160 surface sediment samples from Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage were screened for copper, lead, and zinc using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). 40 samples (25%) were selected for confirmatory metals analysis by ICP-MS for cadmium, silver, and arsenic in addition to copper, lead, and zinc. Regression relationships between the ICP-MS and XRF datasets were developed to estimate copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in all samples. The XRF results for copper, lead, and zinc correlated well with ICP-MS results, and predicted concentrations were calculated for all samples. The results of the Metals Verification Study show that sediment quality in Sinclair Inlet has improved markedly since implementation of cleanup and source control actions, and that the distribution of residual contaminants is limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Superfund Site where further source control actions and monitoring are under way. Outside of Sinclair Inlet, the target metals met state sediment quality standards.

  5. Coupled reactive mass transport and fluid flow: Issues in model verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Ibaraki, Motomu

    2003-01-03

    Model verification and validation are both important steps in the development of reactive transport models. In this paper, a distinction is made between verification and validation, and the focus is on codifying the issues of verification for a numerical, reactive transport flow model. First, the conceptual basis of model verification is reviewed, which shows that verification should be understood as a first step in model development, and be followed by a protocol that assures that the model accurately represents system behavior. Second, commonly used procedures and methods of model verification are presented. In the third part of this paper, an intercomparison of models is used to demonstrate that model verification can be performed despite differences in hydrogeochemical transport code formulations. Results of an example simulation of transport are presented in which the numerical model is tested against other hydrogeochemical codes. Different kinetic formulations between solid and aqueous phases used among numerical models complicates model verification. This test problem involves uranium transport under conditions of varying pH and oxidation potential, with reversible precipitation of calcium uranate and coffinite. Results between the different hydrogeochemical transport codes show differences in oxidation potentials, but similarities in mineral assemblages and aqueous transport patterns. Because model verification can be further complicated by differences in the approach for solving redox problems, a comparison of a fugacity approach to both the external approach (based on hypothetical electron activity) and effective internal approach (based on conservation of electrons) is performed. The comparison demonstrates that the oxygen fugacity approach produces different redox potentials and mineral assemblages than both the effective internal and external approaches.

  6. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-05-08

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

  7. System maintenance verification and validation plan for the TWRS controlled baseline database system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, S.G.

    1998-09-23

    TWRS Controlled Baseline Database, formally known as the Performance Measurement Control System, is used to track and monitor TWRS project management baseline information. This document contains the verification and validation approach for system documentation changes within the database system.

  8. Comments on DOE's Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR® Draft Process Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 22, 2011, The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released a draft of DOE's Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR Process Plan for 2011. DOE accepted comments through May 9, 2011 and...

  9. Method and computer product to increase accuracy of time-based software verification for sensor networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foo Kune, Denis; Mahadevan, Karthikeyan

    2011-01-25

    A recursive verification protocol to reduce the time variance due to delays in the network by putting the subject node at most one hop from the verifier node provides for an efficient manner to test wireless sensor nodes. Since the software signatures are time based, recursive testing will give a much cleaner signal for positive verification of the software running on any one node in the sensor network. In this protocol, the main verifier checks its neighbor, who in turn checks its neighbor, and continuing this process until all nodes have been verified. This ensures minimum time delays for the software verification. Should a node fail the test, the software verification downstream is halted until an alternative path (one not including the failed node) is found. Utilizing techniques well known in the art, having a node tested twice, or not at all, can be avoided.

  10. Independent Verification Survey Report for the Operable Unit-1 Miamisburg Closure Project, Miamisburg, OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, P.

    2008-03-17

    The objectives of the independent verification survey were to confirm that remedial actions have been effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately describes the current radiological and chemical conditions of the MCP site.

  11. Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: Rooftop Unit Measurement and Verification (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This document provides facility managers and building owners an introduction to measurement and verification (M&V) methods to estimate energy and cost savings of rooftop units replacement or retrofit projects to estimate paybacks or to justify future projects.

  12. Draft M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 4.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal, state, and local government energy managers and procurement officials and utility and energy service providers.

  13. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects (Version 3.0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes the Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) standard procedures and guidelines for measurement and verification (M&V) for federal energy managers, procurement officials, and energy service providers.

  14. NIST cooperative laboratory for OSI routing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, D.

    1994-05-23

    This document is one of two reports on the Integrated ISIS protocol. Required by the IAB/IESG in order for an Internet routing protocol to advance to Draft Standard Status. Integrated ISIS is an Interior Gateway Protocol and is designed to carry both IP and ISO CLNP routing information. Integrated ISIS is currently designated as a Proposed Standard. The protocol was first published in RFC 1195. Internet Draft was published subsequently to RFC 1195 and documents the current version of the protocol. This report documents experience with Integrated ISIS. This includes reports on interoperability testing, field experience and the current state of Integrated ISIS implementations. It also presents a summary of the Integrated ISIS Management Information Base (MIB), and a summary of the Integrated ISIS authentication mechanism.

  15. Verification and Validation of Digitally Upgraded Control Rooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Ronald; Lau, Nathan

    2015-09-01

    As nuclear power plants undertake main control room modernization, a challenge is the lack of a clearly defined human factors process to follow. Verification and validation (V&V) as applied in the nuclear power community has tended to involve efforts such as integrated system validation, which comes at the tail end of the design stage. To fill in guidance gaps and create a step-by-step process for control room modernization, we have developed the Guideline for Operational Nuclear Usability and Knowledge Elicitation (GONUKE). This approach builds on best practices in the software industry, which prescribe an iterative user-centered approach featuring multiple cycles of design and evaluation. Nuclear regulatory guidance for control room design emphasizes summative evaluation—which occurs after the design is complete. In the GONUKE approach, evaluation is also performed at the formative stage of design—early in the design cycle using mockups and prototypes for evaluation. The evaluation may involve expert review (e.g., software heuristic evaluation at the formative stage and design verification against human factors standards like NUREG-0700 at the summative stage). The evaluation may also involve user testing (e.g., usability testing at the formative stage and integrated system validation at the summative stage). An additional, often overlooked component of evaluation is knowledge elicitation, which captures operator insights into the system. In this report we outline these evaluation types across design phases that support the overall modernization process. The objective is to provide industry-suitable guidance for steps to be taken in support of the design and evaluation of a new human-machine interface (HMI) in the control room. We suggest the value of early-stage V&V and highlight how this early-stage V&V can help improve the design process for control room modernization. We argue that there is a need to overcome two shortcomings of V&V in current practice—the propensity for late-stage V&V and the use of increasingly complex psychological assessment measures for V&V.

  16. US and UK discuss efforts to improve technical verification of nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    disarmament | National Nuclear Security Administration US and UK discuss efforts to improve technical verification of nuclear disarmament Tuesday, May 6, 2014 - 5:06pm Reaching President Obama's goal of a world without nuclear weapons requires overcoming technical challenges in verifying disarmament. For more than a decade, the U.S. and U.K. have worked together to improve technical verification-an endeavor that balances the need to protect classified and sensitive information with the need

  17. Hanford Site Assessment & Characterization/Verification of Structures & Conex Boxes Procedure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Revision 1 Hanford Site Assessment & Characterization/Verification of Structures & Conex Boxes Procedure Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited DOE-0342-004, Rev. 1 Hanford Site Wide Assessment & Characterization/Verification of Structures & Conex Boxes Procedure Published Date: 09/08/15 Effective Date: 09/25/15 ii CHANGE SUMMARY Rev # Date - Section Changed Change

  18. Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) Assessment of Advanced Measurement and Verification Methods (M&V 2.0) Automated M&V from Noesis Automated M&V from Noesis Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) - Berkeley, CA Project Partners: -- Quantum Energy Services & Technology -- Pacific Gas & Electric -- Consortium for Energy Efficiency FY16 DOE Funding: $410,000 Project Term: November 1, 2013 -

  19. Code verification and confidence-building (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Code verification and confidence-building Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Code verification and confidence-building Authors: Keating, Elizabeth H. [1] ; Sun, Yunwei [2] ; Dai, Zhenxue [1] ; Zheng, Liange [3] ; Bacon, Diana [4] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Lawrence LIvermore National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-07-11 OSTI Identifier: 1087614 Report Number(s):

  20. Code verification for the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM): the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    compound cohesionless impact problem. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Code verification for the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM): the compound cohesionless impact problem. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Code verification for the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM): the compound cohesionless impact problem. Abstract not provided. Authors: Niederhaus, John Henry ; Voth, Thomas Eugene ; Mosso, Stewart John ; Kipp, Marlin E. Publication Date: 2011-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1120302

  1. Verification of Anderson superexchange in MnO via magnetic pair

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    distribution function analysis and ab initio theory (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Verification of Anderson superexchange in MnO via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 11, 2017 Title: Verification of Anderson superexchange in MnO via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory Here, we present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair

  2. Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    based fuel core using experimental data (Conference) | SciTech Connect Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data Considering the importance of thorium data and concerning about the accuracy of Th-232 cross section library, a series of experiments of thorium critical

  3. Mechanical characterization of an additively manufactured Inconel 718 theta-shaped specimen

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cakmak, Ercan; Watkins, Thomas R.; Bunn, Jeffrey R.; Cornwell, Paris A.; Wang, Yanli; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Sochalski-Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-11-20

    Two sets of “theta”-shaped specimens were additively manufactured with Inconel 718 powders using an electron beam melting technique with two distinct scan strategies. Light optical microscopy, mechanical testing coupled with a digital image correlation (DIC) technique, finite element modeling, and neutron diffraction with in situ loading characterizations were conducted. The cross-members of the specimens were the focus. Light optical micrographs revealed that different microstructures were formed with different scan strategies. Ex situ mechanical testing revealed each build to be stable under load until ductility was observed on the cross-members before failure. The elastic moduli were determined by forming a correlationmore » between the elastic tensile stresses determined from FEM, and the elastic strains obtained from DIC. The lattice strains were mapped with neutron diffraction during in situ elastic loading; and a good correlation between the average axial lattice strains on the cross-member and those determined from the DIC analysis was found. Lastly, the spatially resolved stresses in the elastic deformation regime are derived from the lattice strains and increased with applied load, showing a consistent distribution along the cross-member.« less

  4. A system for combined three-dimensional morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Jones, Arthur; Garcia-Rodriguez, Enrique; Yuan Chen, Ping; Idica, Adam; Lockett, Stephen J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2002-04-25

    We present a new system for simultaneous morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue samples. The system is composed of a computer assisted microscope and a JAVA-based image display, analysis and visualization program that allows acquisition, annotation, meaningful storage, three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structures of interest in thick sectioned tissue specimens. We describe the system in detail and illustrate its use by imaging, reconstructing and analyzing two complete tissue blocks which were differently processed and stained. One block was obtained from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lumpectomy specimen and stained alternatively with Hematoxilyn and Eosin (H&E), and with a counterstain and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ERB-B2 gene. The second block contained a fully sectioned mammary gland of a mouse, stained for Histology with H&E. We show how the system greatly reduces the amount of interaction required for the acquisition and analysis and is therefore suitable for studies that require morphologically driven, wide scale (e.g., whole gland) analysis of complex tissue samples or cultures.

  5. Fracture toughness results and preliminary analysis for International Cooperative Test Program on specimens containing surface cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, W.G.; Elfer, N.C.; Hull, D.A.; Newman, J.C. Jr.; Munz, D.; Panontin, T.L.

    1997-12-31

    Specimens containing surface cracks were tested in either tension or bending to compare the stress intensity factor at failure with plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}) in an International Cooperative Test Program. The material was heat treated to {sigma}{sub ys} = 1 587 MPa and K{sub Ic} = 54 MPa m{sub 1/2}. Because substantial stable crack growth occurred for some specimens, the test plan was modified to include detecting the onset of crack growth. It is shown that P{sub max} and the original fatigue precrack size cannot be employed to calculate K{sub max} for comparison with K{sub Ic} when significant stable crack growth occurs. However, using P{sub init} (load at which stable crack growth is initiated) and the original fatigue precrack size to calculate K{sub max} or K{sub {phi}=30{degree}} provides a very useful comparison with K{sub Ic}. The influence of variations in fatigue precrack configuration on test results are also discussed.

  6. Mechanical characterization of an additively manufactured Inconel 718 theta-shaped specimen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cakmak, Ercan; Watkins, Thomas R.; Bunn, Jeffrey R.; Cornwell, Paris A.; Wang, Yanli; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Sochalski-Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-11-20

    Two sets of “theta”-shaped specimens were additively manufactured with Inconel 718 powders using an electron beam melting technique with two distinct scan strategies. Light optical microscopy, mechanical testing coupled with a digital image correlation (DIC) technique, finite element modeling, and neutron diffraction with in situ loading characterizations were conducted. The cross-members of the specimens were the focus. Light optical micrographs revealed that different microstructures were formed with different scan strategies. Ex situ mechanical testing revealed each build to be stable under load until ductility was observed on the cross-members before failure. The elastic moduli were determined by forming a correlation between the elastic tensile stresses determined from FEM, and the elastic strains obtained from DIC. The lattice strains were mapped with neutron diffraction during in situ elastic loading; and a good correlation between the average axial lattice strains on the cross-member and those determined from the DIC analysis was found. Lastly, the spatially resolved stresses in the elastic deformation regime are derived from the lattice strains and increased with applied load, showing a consistent distribution along the cross-member.

  7. CMB lensing tomography with the DES Science Verification galaxies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giannantonio, T.

    2016-01-07

    We measure the cross-correlation between the galaxy density in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as reconstructed with the Planck satellite and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). When using the DES main galaxy sample over the full redshift range 0.2 < zphot < 1.2, a cross-correlation signal is detected at 6σ and 4σ with SPT and Planck respectively. We then divide the DES galaxies into five photometric redshift bins, finding significant (>2σ) detections in all bins. Comparing to the fiducial Planck cosmology, we find the redshift evolution of themore » signal matches expectations, although the amplitude is consistently lower than predicted across redshift bins. We test for possible systematics that could affect our result and find no evidence for significant contamination. Finally, we demonstrate how these measurements can be used to constrain the growth of structure across cosmic time. We find the data are fit by a model in which the amplitude of structure in the z < 1.2 universe is 0.73 ± 0.16 times as large as predicted in the LCDM Planck cosmology, a 1.7σ deviation.« less

  8. Cosmology from Cosmic Shear with DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, T.

    2015-07-20

    We present the first constraints on cosmology from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using weak lensing measurements from the preliminary Science Verification (SV) data. We use 139 square degrees of SV data, which is less than 3% of the full DES survey area. Using cosmic shear 2-point measurements over three redshift bins we find ?8(m=0.3)0.5 = 0:81 0:06 (68% confidence), after marginalising over 7 systematics parameters and 3 other cosmological parameters. Furthermore, we examine the robustness of our results to the choice of data vector and systematics assumed, and find them to be stable. About 20% of our error bar comes from marginalising over shear and photometric redshift calibration uncertainties. The current state-of-the-art cosmic shear measurements from CFHTLenS are mildly discrepant with the cosmological constraints from Planck CMB data. Our results are consistent with both datasets. Our uncertainties are ~30% larger than those from CFHTLenS when we carry out a comparable analysis of the two datasets, which we attribute largely to the lower number density of our shear catalogue. We investigate constraints on dark energy and find that, with this small fraction of the full survey, the DES SV constraints make negligible impact on the Planck constraints. The moderate disagreement between the CFHTLenS and Planck values of ?8(?m=0.3)0.5 is present regardless of the value of w.

  9. Cosmic Shear Measurements with DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, M. R.

    2015-07-20

    We present measurements of weak gravitational lensing cosmic shear two-point statistics using Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. We demonstrate that our results are robust to the choice of shear measurement pipeline, either ngmix or im3shape, and robust to the choice of two-point statistic, including both real and Fourier-space statistics. Our results pass a suite of null tests including tests for B-mode contamination and direct tests for any dependence of the two-point functions on a set of 16 observing conditions and galaxy properties, such as seeing, airmass, galaxy color, galaxy magnitude, etc. We use a large suite of simulations to compute the covariance matrix of the cosmic shear measurements and assign statistical significance to our null tests. We find that our covariance matrix is consistent with the halo model prediction, indicating that it has the appropriate level of halo sample variance. We also compare the same jackknife procedure applied to the data and the simulations in order to search for additional sources of noise not captured by the simulations. We find no statistically significant extra sources of noise in the data. The overall detection significance with tomography for our highest source density catalog is 9.7σ. Cosmological constraints from the measurements in this work are presented in a companion paper (DES et al. 2015).

  10. Weak lensing by galaxy troughs in DES Science Verification data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gruen, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Bonnett, C.; Hartley, W.; Jain, B.; M. Jarvis; Kavprzak, T.; Krause, E.; et al

    2015-11-29

    In this study, we measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10σ–15σ for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ϵ [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin…1°. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers ofmore » the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial Λ cold dark matter model. The prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. The lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.« less

  11. Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2014-05-14

    Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the literature is inadequate quantification of the uncertainty in baseline energy use predictions. However, estimation of uncertainty is essential for weighing the risks of investing in retrofits. Most commercial buildings have, or soon will have, electricity meters capable of providing data at short time intervals. These data provide new opportunities to quantify uncertainty in baseline predictions, and to do so after shorter measurement durations than are traditionally used. In this paper, we show that uncertainty estimation provides greater measurement and verification (M&V) information and helps to overcome some of the difficulties with deciding how much data is needed to develop baseline models and to confirm energy savings. We also show that cross-validation is an effective method for computing uncertainty. In so doing, we extend a simple regression-based method of predicting energy use using short-interval meter data. We demonstrate the methods by predicting energy use in 17 real commercial buildings. We discuss the benefits of uncertainty estimates which can provide actionable decision making information for investing in energy conservation measures.

  12. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  13. Verification of gyrokinetic microstability codes ?with an LHD configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T. -H.; Sugama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-11-01

    We extend previous benchmarks of the GS2 and GKV-X codes to verify their algorithms for solving the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations for plasma microturbulence. Code benchmarks are the most complete way of verifying the correctness of implementations for the solution of mathematical models for complex physical processes such as those studied here. The linear stability calculations reported here are based on the plasma conditions of an ion-ITB plasma in the LHD configuration. The plasma parameters and the magnetic geometry differ from previous benchmarks involving these codes. We find excellent agreement between the independently written pre-processors that calculate the geometrical coefficients used in the gyrokinetic equations. Grid convergence tests are used to establish the resolution and domain size needed to obtain converged linear stability results. The agreement of the frequencies, growth rates and eigenfunctions in the benchmarks reported here provides additional verification that the algorithms used by the GS2 and GKV-X codes are correctly finding the linear eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations.

  14. Weak Lensing by Galaxy Troughs in DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, D.

    2015-09-29

    We measure the weak lensing shear around galaxy troughs, i.e. the radial alignment of background galaxies relative to underdensities in projections of the foreground galaxy field over a wide range of redshift in Science Verification data from the Dark Energy Survey. Our detection of the shear signal is highly significant (10?15? for the smallest angular scales) for troughs with the redshift range z ? [0.2, 0.5] of the projected galaxy field and angular diameters of 10 arcmin1. These measurements probe the connection between the galaxy, matter density, and convergence fields. By assuming galaxies are biased tracers of the matter density with Poissonian noise, we find agreement of our measurements with predictions in a fiducial ? cold dark matter model. Furthermore, the prediction for the lensing signal on large trough scales is virtually independent of the details of the underlying model for the connection of galaxies and matter. Our comparison of the shear around troughs with that around cylinders with large galaxy counts is consistent with a symmetry between galaxy and matter over- and underdensities. In addition, we measure the two-point angular correlation of troughs with galaxies which, in contrast to the lensing signal, is sensitive to galaxy bias on all scales. Finally, the lensing signal of troughs and their clustering with galaxies is therefore a promising probe of the statistical properties of matter underdensities and their connection to the galaxy field.

  15. Verification of constitutive models using the Asay Impact Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberman, K.S.; Bennett, J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Accurate analysis and the ability to predict the complete response of particulate composite materials requires accurate inelastic constitutive models. However, to be of maximum utility, these inelastic models must be validated using quantifiable experimental results. The Asay Impact Test is an impact experiment that provides the evolution of the two dimensional in-plane displacement field in a specimen undergoing dynamic inelastic deformation. The experimental displacement field may be directed compared with the predicted displacement field from a candidate inelastic constitutive model. In this paper, the authors report comparisons between experimental and predicted displacement fields in the energetic particulate composite material PBX-9501 during dynamic deformation, and describe the experiment and the constitutive modeling approach.

  16. COMPARISON OF SHEAR STRENGTH OF CERAMIC JOINTS DETERMINED BY VARIOUS TEST METHODS WITH SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kiggans Jr, James O; Khalifa, Hesham; Back, Christina A.; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ferraris, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Four different shear test methods i.e. doubled notched shear test, asymmetrical four point bend test, Iosipescu test, and torsion test, were investigated for their ability to evaluate one standard SiC to SiC ceramic brittle joint while using small size specimens. Double notched shear test showed higher stress concentration at the notch base and a lower nominal shear strength. Both asymmetrical four point bend test and Iosipescu test utilized epoxy jointed metal extensors, which failed during test and caused misalignment and tensile type of failure. Torsion test can deliver true shear loading. However, base material failure was observed for the torsion joint samples in this study. None of the tests can successfully induce true shear failure of the joint because the joint is stronger and tougher than the SiC substrate. Torsion test appears to be promising because of the pure shear loading, less stress concentration, and easy alignment.

  17. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A.

    2012-08-16

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

  18. Apparatuses for prestressing rod-type specimens in torsion for in-situ passive fracture toughness testing in an extremely high-pressure environment of hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jy-an; Liu, Ken C.; Feng, Zhili

    2012-05-15

    An in-situ specimen fixture particularly adapted for prestressing rod-type SNTT-type specimens comprising a tube and end cap wherein the specimen is secured at one end to the tube, and at the opposite end to the end cap. The end cap is rotatable relative to the tube, and may be fixedly secured for creating a torsional force prestressing the specimen enclosed within the tube.

  19. Comment submitted by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  20. Comment submitted by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  1. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    Provides an overview of evaluation, measurement, and verification approaches used to estimate the load impacts and effectiveness of energy efficiency programs.

  2. Comment submitted by the North American Association of Food Equipment Manufacturers (NAFEM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the North American Association of Food Equipment Manufacturers (NAFEM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  3. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-12-15

    5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  4. LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-10-22

    5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  5. Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.; Orton, Christopher R.

    2010-11-30

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These enrichment assay methods interrogate only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume, and are time-consuming and expensive to execute for inspectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended measurement system capable of automated enrichment measurements over the full volume of Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders. This Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The focus of this paper is the development of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods that combine “traditional” enrichment signatures (e.g. 185-keV emission from U-235) and more-penetrating “non-traditional” signatures (e.g. high-energy neutron-induced gamma rays spawned primarily from U-234 alpha emission) collected by medium-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers (i.e. sodium iodide or lanthanum bromide). The potential of these NDA methods for the automated assay of feed, tail and product cylinders is explored through MCNP modeling and with field measurements on a cylinder population ranging from 0.2% to 5% in U-235 enrichment.

  6. March 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 946 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 855 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 846 Automotive vehicle sensors Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J. (1995) 726 Pressure and flow characteristics of

  7. March 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Materials The influence of grain size on the mechanical properties ofsteel Morris Jr., J.W. (2001) 1234 Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 981 Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 946 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 855 Mechanical properties and

  8. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials Science Subject Feed Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 554 /> Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 534 /> Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 488 /> The influence of grain size on the mechanical

  9. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 776 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 546 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 527 Automotive vehicle sensors Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J. (1995)

  10. Approach to IAEA material-balance verification at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.; Younkin, J.M.; DeVito, V.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). The strategy makes use of the attributes and variables measurement verification approach, whereby the IAEA would perform independent measurements on a randomly selected subset of the items comprising the U-235 flows and inventories at the plant. In addition, the MUF-D statistic is used as the test statistic for the detection of diversion. The paper includes descriptions of the potential verification activities, as well as calculations of: (1) attributes and variables sample sizes for the various strata, (2) standard deviations of the relevant test statistics, and (3) the detection sensitivity which the IAEA might achieve by this verification strategy at GCEP.

  11. Systematic approach to verification and validation: High explosive burn models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph; Scovel, Christina A.

    2012-04-16

    Most material models used in numerical simulations are based on heuristics and empirically calibrated to experimental data. For a specific model, key questions are determining its domain of applicability and assessing its relative merits compared to other models. Answering these questions should be a part of model verification and validation (V and V). Here, we focus on V and V of high explosive models. Typically, model developers implemented their model in their own hydro code and use different sets of experiments to calibrate model parameters. Rarely can one find in the literature simulation results for different models of the same experiment. Consequently, it is difficult to assess objectively the relative merits of different models. This situation results in part from the fact that experimental data is scattered through the literature (articles in journals and conference proceedings) and that the printed literature does not allow the reader to obtain data from a figure in electronic form needed to make detailed comparisons among experiments and simulations. In addition, it is very time consuming to set up and run simulations to compare different models over sufficiently many experiments to cover the range of phenomena of interest. The first difficulty could be overcome if the research community were to support an online web based database. The second difficulty can be greatly reduced by automating procedures to set up and run simulations of similar types of experiments. Moreover, automated testing would be greatly facilitated if the data files obtained from a database were in a standard format that contained key experimental parameters as meta-data in a header to the data file. To illustrate our approach to V and V, we have developed a high explosive database (HED) at LANL. It now contains a large number of shock initiation experiments. Utilizing the header information in a data file from HED, we have written scripts to generate an input file for a hydro code, run a simulation, and generate a comparison plot showing simulated and experimental velocity gauge data. These scripts are then applied to several series of experiments and to several HE burn models. The same systematic approach is applicable to other types of material models; for example, equations of state models and material strength models.

  12. Radionuclide Inventory Distribution Project Data Evaluation and Verification White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-17

    Testing of nuclear explosives caused widespread contamination of surface soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Atmospheric tests produced the majority of this contamination. The Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) was developed to determine distribution and total inventory of radionuclides in surface soils at the NTS to evaluate areas that may present long-term health hazards. The RIDP achieved this objective with aerial radiological surveys, soil sample results, and in situ gamma spectroscopy. This white paper presents the justification to support the use of RIDP data as a guide for future evaluation and to support closure of Soils Sub-Project sites under the purview of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Use of the RIDP data as part of the Data Quality Objective process is expected to provide considerable cost savings and accelerate site closures. The following steps were completed: - Summarize the RIDP data set and evaluate the quality of the data. - Determine the current uses of the RIDP data and cautions associated with its use. - Provide recommendations for enhancing data use through field verification or other methods. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates.

  13. Capillary test specimen, system, and methods for in-situ visualization of capillary flow and fillet formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Aaron C.; Hosking, F. Michael ,; Reece, Mark

    2003-06-24

    A capillary test specimen, method, and system for visualizing and quantifying capillary flow of liquids under realistic conditions, including polymer underfilling, injection molding, soldering, brazing, and casting. The capillary test specimen simulates complex joint geometries and has an open cross-section to permit easy visual access from the side. A high-speed, high-magnification camera system records the location and shape of the moving liquid front in real-time, in-situ as it flows out of a source cavity, through an open capillary channel between two surfaces having a controlled capillary gap, and into an open fillet cavity, where it subsequently forms a fillet on free surfaces that have been configured to simulate realistic joint geometries. Electric resistance heating rapidly heats the test specimen, without using a furnace. Image-processing software analyzes the recorded images and calculates the velocity of the moving liquid front, fillet contact angles, and shape of the fillet's meniscus, among other parameters.

  14. Machining Test Specimens from Harvested Zion RPV Segments for Through Wall Attenuation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Nanstad, Randy K

    2015-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Zion Units 1 and 2 Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) in Zion, Illinois presents a special opportunity for developing a better understanding of materials degradation and other issues associated with extending the lifetime of existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years of service. In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor fleet, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating and contracting with Zion Solutions, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Solutions, the selective procurement of materials, structures, and components from the decommissioned reactors. In this paper, we will discuss the acquisition of segments of the Zion Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), the cutting of these segments into sections and blocks from the beltline and upper vertical welds and plate material, the current status of machining those blocks into mechanical (Charpy, compact tension, and tensile) test specimens and coupons for chemical and microstructural (TEM, APT, SANS, and nano indention) characterization, as well as the current test plans and possible collaborative projects. Access to service-irradiated RPV welds and plate sections will allow through wall attenuation studies to be performed, which will be used to assess current radiation damage models (Rosseel et al. (2012) and Rosseel et al. (2015)).

  15. Guidelines for Sandia ASCI Verification and Validation Plans - Content and Format: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRUCANO,TIMOTHY G.; MOYA,JAIME L.

    1999-12-01

    This report summarizes general guidelines for the development of Verification and Validation (V and V) plans for ASCI code projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The main content categories recommended by these guidelines for explicit treatment in Sandia V and V plans are (1) stockpile drivers influencing the code development project (2) the key phenomena to be modeled by the individual code; (3) software verification strategy and test plan; and (4) code validation strategy and test plans. The authors of this document anticipate that the needed content of the V and V plans for the Sandia ASCI codes will evolve as time passes. These needs will be reflected by future versions of this document.

  16. Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Francisco, August 2007 | Department of Energy Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007 Field Scale Test and Verification of CHP System at the Ritz Carlton, San Francisco, August 2007 DOE, the Gas Technology Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and UTC Power partnered with Host Hotels and Resorts to install and operate a PureComfort® 240M Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) System at the Ritz-Carlton in San Francisco. This National

  17. PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies (Conference) | SciTech Connect PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies Authors: Ham, Y ; Sitaraman, S ; Swan, R ; Lorenzana, H Publication Date: 2010-09-13 OSTI Identifier: 1245703 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-455513 DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource

  18. PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies (Conference) | SciTech Connect PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDET-A New Tool for Partial Defect Verification of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a

  19. DOE handbook: Integrated safety management systems (ISMS) verification team leader`s handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The primary purpose of this handbook is to provide guidance to the ISMS verification Team Leader and the verification team in conducting ISMS verifications. The handbook describes methods and approaches for the review of the ISMS documentation (Phase I) and ISMS implementation (Phase II) and provides information useful to the Team Leader in preparing the review plan, selecting and training the team, coordinating the conduct of the verification, and documenting the results. The process and techniques described are based on the results of several pilot ISMS verifications that have been conducted across the DOE complex. A secondary purpose of this handbook is to provide information useful in developing DOE personnel to conduct these reviews. Specifically, this handbook describes methods and approaches to: (1) Develop the scope of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 review processes to be consistent with the history, hazards, and complexity of the site, facility, or activity; (2) Develop procedures for the conduct of the Phase 1 review, validating that the ISMS documentation satisfies the DEAR clause as amplified in DOE Policies 450.4, 450.5, 450.6 and associated guidance and that DOE can effectively execute responsibilities as described in the Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual (FRAM); (3) Develop procedures for the conduct of the Phase 2 review, validating that the description approved by the Approval Authority, following or concurrent with the Phase 1 review, has been implemented; and (4) Describe a methodology by which the DOE ISMS verification teams will be advised, trained, and/or mentored to conduct subsequent ISMS verifications. The handbook provides proven methods and approaches for verifying that commitments related to the DEAR, the FRAM, and associated amplifying guidance are in place and implemented in nuclear and high risk facilities. This handbook also contains useful guidance to line managers when preparing for a review of ISMS for radiological facilities, non-nuclear, or non-Defense Programs facilities. DOE line managers are encouraged to tailor the procedures described in this handbook for ISMS verifications for low risk facilities.

  20. RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE PROBE SPECIMENS REMOVED FROM TANK 241-AN-107 JUNE 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOKE GA; WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

    2010-11-11

    An Integrated Multi-function Corrosion Probe (IMCP) was installed in Tank 241-AN-107 on September 20, 2006. A portion of the probe was retrieved on June 8, 2010 and the sections holding the detectors were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for analysis. The examination and disassembly of the probe sections encountered a number of challenges. However, disassembly and relevant analyses were successfully completed. The following summarizes our observations. Brittle failure of the fiberglass probe in the middle of detector 2 resulted in the recovery of only three vapor space C-rings and six supernatant bullet specimens. The design of the bullets and how they were attached to the probe made the recovery of the components more difficult. The use of glue/epoxy on the bullets and the attachment of the flat bottom of the bullets to the curved surface of the fiberglass probe body meant that weight loss on cleaning and surface area of the specimens could not be determined with acceptable accuracy. Macrophotography of all specimens reveals that corrosion was slight in the vapor space and extremely slight in the supernatant. The one pre-cracked C-ring recovered from the vapor space still had the stress bulge visible on the polished surface, indicating that crack propagation had not occurred in the tank. No photographs were taken of the C-ring before deployment. No further analysis was conducted on this specimen. A detailed discussion and photographic documentation are provided in this report.

  1. Verification/acceptance test report for the Acromag Calibration System for TMACS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fordham, C.R.

    1995-04-25

    This document provides the Verification/Acceptance Test Report for the Acromag Calibration System (ACS) for the Tank Monitor and Control System. ACS will be implemented to check the calibration of the thermocouple input modules. Purpose of this document is to show that the ACS satisfies the system requirements in WHC-SD-WM-CSRS-009 (WHC 1993b).

  2. Verification of a VRF Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigusse, Bereket; Raustad, Richard

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides verification results of the EnergyPlus variable refrigerant flow (VRF) heat pump computer model using manufacturer's performance data. The paper provides an overview of the VRF model, presents the verification methodology, and discusses the results. The verification provides quantitative comparison of full and part-load performance to manufacturer's data in cooling-only and heating-only modes of operation. The VRF heat pump computer model uses dual range bi-quadratic performance curves to represent capacity and Energy Input Ratio (EIR) as a function of indoor and outdoor air temperatures, and dual range quadratic performance curves as a function of part-load-ratio for modeling part-load performance. These performance curves are generated directly from manufacturer's published performance data. The verification compared the simulation output directly to manufacturer's performance data, and found that the dual range equation fit VRF heat pump computer model predicts the manufacturer's performance data very well over a wide range of indoor and outdoor temperatures and part-load conditions. The predicted capacity and electric power deviations are comparbale to equation-fit HVAC computer models commonly used for packaged and split unitary HVAC equipment.

  3. North Korea's nuclear weapons program:verification priorities and new challenges.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Duk-ho

    2003-12-01

    A comprehensive settlement of the North Korean nuclear issue may involve military, economic, political, and diplomatic components, many of which will require verification to ensure reciprocal implementation. This paper sets out potential verification methodologies that might address a wide range of objectives. The inspection requirements set by the International Atomic Energy Agency form the foundation, first as defined at the time of the Agreed Framework in 1994, and now as modified by the events since revelation of the North Korean uranium enrichment program in October 2002. In addition, refreezing the reprocessing facility and 5 MWe reactor, taking possession of possible weapons components and destroying weaponization capabilities add many new verification tasks. The paper also considers several measures for the short-term freezing of the North's nuclear weapon program during the process of negotiations, should that process be protracted. New inspection technologies and monitoring tools are applicable to North Korean facilities and may offer improved approaches over those envisioned just a few years ago. These are noted, and potential bilateral and regional verification regimes are examined.

  4. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  5. Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Bibliography. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.A.; Hayes, J.E.; Mirsky, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    This volume contains all of the technical references found in Volumes 1-7 concerning the development of guidelines for the verification and validation of expert systems, knowledge-based systems, other AI systems, object-oriented systems, and conventional systems.

  6. Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3145 dpa at 380503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180200 MPa*m^.5 at 350450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

  7. Passive Tomography for Spent Fuel Verification: Analysis Framework and Instrument Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Timothy A.; Svard, Staffan J.; Smith, Leon E.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Jansson, Peter; Davour, Anna; Grape, Sophie; Trellue, H.; Deshmukh, Nikhil S.; Wittman, Richard S.; Honkamaa, Tapani; Vaccaro, Stefano; Ely, James

    2015-05-18

    The potential for gamma emission tomography (GET) to detect partial defects within a spent nuclear fuel assembly is being assessed through a collaboration of Support Programs to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In the first phase of this study, two safeguards verification objectives have been identified. The first is the independent determination of the number of active pins that are present in the assembly, in the absence of a priori information. The second objective is to provide quantitative measures of pin-by-pin properties, e.g. activity of key isotopes or pin attributes such as cooling time and relative burnup, for the detection of anomalies and/or verification of operator-declared data. The efficacy of GET to meet these two verification objectives will be evaluated across a range of fuel types, burnups, and cooling times, and with a target interrogation time of less than 60 minutes. The evaluation of GET viability for safeguards applications is founded on a modelling and analysis framework applied to existing and emerging GET instrument designs. Monte Carlo models of different fuel types are used to produce simulated tomographer responses to large populations of virtual fuel assemblies. Instrument response data are processed by a variety of tomographic-reconstruction and image-processing methods, and scoring metrics specific to each of the verification objectives are defined and used to evaluate the performance of the methods. This paper will provide a description of the analysis framework and evaluation metrics, example performance-prediction results, and describe the design of a universal GET instrument intended to support the full range of verification scenarios envisioned by the IAEA.

  8. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-05-25

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory’s Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007).

  9. The Challenge for Arms Control Verification in the Post-New START World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuest, C R

    2012-05-24

    Nuclear weapon arms control treaty verification is a key aspect of any agreement between signatories to establish that the terms and conditions spelled out in the treaty are being met. Historically, arms control negotiations have focused more on the rules and protocols for reducing the numbers of warheads and delivery systems - sometimes resorting to complex and arcane procedures for counting forces - in an attempt to address perceived or real imbalances in a nation's strategic posture that could lead to instability. Verification procedures are generally defined in arms control treaties and supporting documents and tend to focus on technical means and measures designed to ensure that a country is following the terms of the treaty and that it is not liable to engage in deception or outright cheating in an attempt to circumvent the spirit and the letter of the agreement. As the Obama Administration implements the articles, terms, and conditions of the recently ratified and entered-into-force New START treaty, there are already efforts within and outside of government to move well below the specified New START levels of 1550 warheads, 700 deployed strategic delivery vehicles, and 800 deployed and nondeployed strategic launchers (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) silos, Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) tubes on submarines, and bombers). A number of articles and opinion pieces have appeared that advocate for significantly deeper cuts in the U.S. nuclear stockpile, with some suggesting that unilateral reductions on the part of the U.S. would help coax Russia and others to follow our lead. Papers and studies prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense and at the U.S. Air War College have also been published, suggesting that nuclear forces totaling no more than about 300 warheads would be sufficient to meet U.S. national security and deterrence needs. (Davis 2011, Schaub and Forsyth 2010) Recent articles by James M. Acton and others suggest that the prospects for maintaining U.S. security and minimizing the chances of nuclear war, while deliberately reducing stockpiles to a few hundred weapons, is possible but not without risk. While the question of the appropriate level of cuts to U.S. nuclear forces is being actively debated, a key issue continues to be whether verification procedures are strong enough to ensure that both the U.S. and Russia are fulfilling their obligations under the current New Start treaty and any future arms reduction treaties. A recent opinion piece by Henry Kissinger and Brent Scowcroft (2012) raised a number of issues with respect to governing a policy to enhance strategic stability, including: in deciding on force levels and lower numbers, verification is crucial. Particularly important is a determination of what level of uncertainty threatens the calculation of stability. At present, that level is well within the capabilities of the existing verification systems. We must be certain that projected levels maintain - and when possible, reinforce - that confidence. The strengths and weaknesses of the New START verification regime should inform and give rise to stronger regimes for future arms control agreements. These future arms control agreements will likely need to include other nuclear weapons states and so any verification regime will need to be acceptable to all parties. Currently, China is considered the most challenging party to include in any future arms control agreement and China's willingness to enter into verification regimes such as those implemented in New START may only be possible when it feels it has reached nuclear parity with the U.S. and Russia. Similarly, in keeping with its goals of reaching peer status with the U.S. and Russia, Frieman (2004) suggests that China would be more willing to accept internationally accepted and applied verification regimes rather than bilateral ones. The current verification protocols specified in the New START treaty are considered as the baseline case and are contrasted with possible alternative verification protocols that could be effective in a post-New START era of significant reductions in U.S. and other countries nuclear stockpiles. Of particular concern is the possibility of deception and breakout when declared and observed numbers of weapons are below the level considered to pose an existential threat to the U.S. In a regime of very low stockpile numbers, 'traditional' verification protocols as currently embodied in the New START treaty might prove less than adequate. I introduce and discuss a number of issues that need to be considered in future verification protocols, many of which do not have immediate solutions and so require further study. I also discuss alternatives and enhancements to traditional verification protocols, for example, confidence building measures such as burden sharing against the common threat of weapon of mass destruction (WMD) terrorism, joint research and development.

  10. Thermal spray and cold spray analysis of density, porosity, and tensile Specimens for use with LIGA applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DECKER,MERLIN K.; SMITH,MARK F.

    2000-02-01

    This analysis provides a preliminary investigation into using Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray and Cold Spray as material deposition processes for LIGA applications. These spray material processes were studied to make an initial determination of their potential as alternatives to producing mechanical parts via the electroplating process. Three materials, UltraMachinable{reg_sign} Stainless Steel, BondArc{reg_sign}, and aluminum, were sprayed using Thermal Spray. Only aluminum was sprayed using the Cold Spray process. Following the spray procedure, the test specimens were released from a copper mold and then tested. Three tests, density, tensile strength, and porosity, were performed on the specimens to determine the spray effect on material properties. Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray did not demonstrate adequate deposition properties and does not appear to be a good process candidate for LIGA. However, Cold Spray yielded better density results and warrants further investigation to analyze the minimum feature size produced by the process.

  11. Identifying, Visualizing, and Fusing Social Media Data to Support Nonproliferation and Arms Control Treaty Verification: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Benz, Jacob M.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Henry, Michael J.; Corley, Courtney D.; Whattam, Kevin M.

    2013-07-11

    While international nonproliferation and arms control verification capabilities have their foundations in physical and chemical sensors, state declarations, and on-site inspections, verification experts are beginning to consider the importance of open source data to complement and support traditional means of verification. One of those new, and increasingly expanding, sources of open source information is social media, which can be ingested and understood through social media analytics (SMA). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting research to further our ability to identify, visualize, and fuse social media data to support nonproliferation and arms control treaty verification efforts. This paper will describe our preliminary research to examine social media signatures of nonproliferation or arms control proxy events. We will describe the development of our preliminary nonproliferation and arms control proxy events, outline our initial findings, and propose ideas for future work.

  12. Verification and validation of the decision analysis model for assessment of tank waste remediation system waste treatment strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awadalla, N.G.; Eaton, S.C.F.

    1996-09-04

    This document is the verification and validation final report for the Decision Analysis Model for Assessment of Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Treatment Strategies. This model is also known as the INSIGHT Model.

  13. TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-07-09

    5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  14. Verification of EPA's ''Preliminary Remediation Goals for radionuclides'' (PRG) electronic calculator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, Tim; Stagich, Brooke

    2015-08-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requested an external, independent verification study of their updated “Preliminary Remediation Goals for Radionuclides” (PRG) electronic calculator. The calculator provides PRGs for radionuclides that are used as a screening tool at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) sites. These risk-based PRGs establish concentration limits under specific exposure scenarios. The purpose of this verification study is to determine that the calculator has no inherit numerical problems with obtaining solutions as well as to ensure that the equations are programmed correctly. There are 167 equations used in the calculator. To verify the calculator, all equations for each of seven receptor types (resident, construction worker, outdoor and indoor worker, recreator, farmer, and composite worker) were hand calculated using the default parameters. The same four radionuclides (Am-241, Co-60, H-3, and Pu-238) were used for each calculation for consistency throughout.

  15. Fluor Hanford Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Vol 1 & Vol 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARSONS, J.E.

    2000-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting work efficiently and in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, public, and environment. DOE policy mandates that safety management systems be used to systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels while accomplishing mission goals in an effective and efficient manner. The purpose of the Fluor Hanford (FH) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) verification was to determine whether FH's ISM system and processes are sufficiently implemented to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of the DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) verification was to determine whether RL has established processes that adequately describe RL's role in safety management and if those processes are sufficiently implemented.

  16. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL CAMPUS AND SOUTHEAST LABORATORY COMPLEX BUILDING SLABS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-07-24

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Central Campus and Southeast Lab Complex Building Slabs. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey was to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by SEC, and to independently assess whether the final radiological condition of the slabs met the release guidelines.

  17. Microsoft Word - L3 THM ITM P3 01 (Rev 2) - Solution Verification report (2-1-12)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solution Verification Applied to TransAT Large Eddy Simulations for Smooth Wall Channel Flow With Periodic Boundary Conditions, Revision 1 D. Chatzikyriakou, J. Buongiorno, Massachusetts Institute of Technology C. Narayanan, ASCOMP GmbH February 28, 2012 CASL-U-2011-0184-001 Solution Verification Applied to TransAT Large Eddy Simulations for Smooth Wall Channel Flow With Periodic Boundary Conditions REVISION 1 D. Chatzikyriakou 1 , J. Buongiorno 1* , C. Narayanan 2 1 Massachusetts Institute of

  18. H–J–B Equations of Optimal Consumption-Investment and Verification Theorems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Hideo

    2015-04-15

    We consider a consumption-investment problem on infinite time horizon maximizing discounted expected HARA utility for a general incomplete market model. Based on dynamic programming approach we derive the relevant H–J–B equation and study the existence and uniqueness of the solution to the nonlinear partial differential equation. By using the smooth solution we construct the optimal consumption rate and portfolio strategy and then prove the verification theorems under certain general settings.

  19. Guide to Government Witnessing and Review of Measurement and Verification Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides guidance pertaining to government witnessing of measurement and verification (M&V) activities in Federal energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects. Witnessing of M&V activities is a part of the process of reviewing and approving M&V deliverables and the on-site inspections, spot measurements, short-term monitoring, and performance tests described in the M&V plan.

  20. Certainty in Stockpile Computing: Recommending a Verification and Validation Program for Scientific Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.R.

    1998-11-01

    As computing assumes a more central role in managing the nuclear stockpile, the consequences of an erroneous computer simulation could be severe. Computational failures are common in other endeavors and have caused project failures, significant economic loss, and loss of life. This report examines the causes of software failure and proposes steps to mitigate them. A formal verification and validation program for scientific software is recommended and described.

  1. M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Federal Energy Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M&V Guidelines: Measurement and Verification for Performance-Based Contracts Version 4.0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program November 2015 FEMP M&V Guidelines 4.0 i ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Contributors to this document include Lia Webster, James Bradford, Dale Sartor, John Shonder, Erica Atkin, Steve Dunnivant, David Frank, Ellen Franconi, David Jump, Steve Schiller, Mark Stetz, Bob Slattery and members of the various industry-government working groups

  2. Final Report for "Verification and Validation of Radiation Hydrodynamics for Astrophysical Applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zingale, M; Howell, L H

    2010-03-17

    The motivation for this work is to gain experience in the methodology of verification and validation (V&V) of astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes. In the first period of this work, we focused on building the infrastructure to test a single astrophysical application code, Castro, developed in collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). We delivered several hydrodynamic test problems, in the form of coded initial conditions and documentation for verification, routines to perform data analysis, and a generalized regression test suite to allow for continued automated testing. Astrophysical simulation codes aim to model phenomena that elude direct experimentation. Our only direct information about these systems comes from what we observe, and may be transient. Simulation can help further our understanding by allowing virtual experimentation of these systems. However, to have confidence in our simulations requires us to have confidence in the tools we use. Verification and Validation is a process by which we work to build confidence that a simulation code is accurately representing reality. V&V is a multistep process, and is never really complete. Once a single test problem is working as desired (i.e. that problem is verified), one wants to ensure that subsequent code changes do not break that test. At the same time, one must also search for new verification problems that test the code in a new way. It can be rather tedious to manually retest each of the problems, so before going too far with V&V, it is desirable to have an automated test suite. Our project aims to provide these basic tools for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes.

  3. Verification of Sulfate Attack Penetration Rates for Saltstone Disposal Unit Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G. P.

    2015-05-12

    Recent Special Analysis modeling of Saltstone Disposal Units consider sulfate attack on concrete and utilize degradation rates estimated from Cementitious Barriers Partnership software simulations. This study provides an independent verification of those simulation results using an alternative analysis method and an independent characterization data source. The sulfate penetration depths estimated herein are similar to the best-estimate values in SRNL-STI-2013-00118 Rev. 2 and well below the nominal values subsequently used to define Saltstone Special Analysis base cases.

  4. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground waste site. This site was an open field covered with cobbles, with no vegetation growing on the surface. The site received irradiated reactor parts that were removed during conversion of the 105-F Reactor from the Liquid 3X to the Ball 3X Project safety systems and received mostly vertical safety rod thimbles and step plugs.

  5. California ARB Verification Testing of the CBSTM Soot Filter for Stationary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Diesel Applications | Department of Energy 5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_newburry1.pdf More Documents & Publications MobiCleanTM Soot Filter for Diesel Locomotiive Applications Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction CARB Verification of Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filters for Emergency Generator Sets

  6. A method for online verification of adapted fields using an independent dose monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Jina; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Jaffray, David A.; Cho, Young-Bin; Islam, Mohammad K.; Mahon, Robert

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Clinical implementation of online adaptive radiotherapy requires generation of modified fields and a method of dosimetric verification in a short time. We present a method of treatment field modification to account for patient setup error, and an online method of verification using an independent monitoring system.Methods: The fields are modified by translating each multileaf collimator (MLC) defined aperture in the direction of the patient setup error, and magnifying to account for distance variation to the marked isocentre. A modified version of a previously reported online beam monitoring system, the integral quality monitoring (IQM) system, was investigated for validation of adapted fields. The system consists of a large area ion-chamber with a spatial gradient in electrode separation to provide a spatially sensitive signal for each beam segment, mounted below the MLC, and a calculation algorithm to predict the signal. IMRT plans of ten prostate patients have been modified in response to six randomly chosen setup errors in three orthogonal directions.Results: A total of approximately 49 beams for the modified fields were verified by the IQM system, of which 97% of measured IQM signal agree with the predicted value to within 2%.Conclusions: The modified IQM system was found to be suitable for online verification of adapted treatment fields.

  7. Evaluation of GafChromic EBT prototype B for external beam dose verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorovic, M.; Fischer, M.; Cremers, F.; Thom, E.; Schmidt, R.

    2006-05-15

    The capability of the new GafChromic EBT prototype B for external beam dose verification is investigated in this paper. First the general characteristics of this film (dose response, postirradiation coloration, influence of calibration field size) were derived using a flat-bed scanner. In the dose range from 0.1 to 8 Gy, the sensitivity of the EBT prototype B film is ten times higher than the response of the GafChromic HS, which so far was the GafChromic film with the highest sensitivity. Compared with the Kodak EDR2 film, the response of the EBT is higher by a factor of 3 in the dose range from 0.1 to 8 Gy. The GafChromic EBT almost does not show a temporal growth of the optical density and there is no influence of the chosen calibration field size on the dose response curve obtained from this data. A MatLab program was written to evaluate the two-dimensional dose distributions from treatment planning systems and GafChromic EBT film measurements. Verification of external beam therapy (SRT, IMRT) using the above-mentioned approach resulted in very small differences between the planned and the applied dose. The GafChromic EBT prototype B together with the flat-bed scanner and MatLab is a successful approach for making the advantages of the GafChromic films applicable for verification of external beam therapy.

  8. NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF THE RELAP-7 CORE CHANNEL SINGLE-PHASE MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Richard Martineau

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation of nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). All the physics in RELAP-7 are fully coupled and the errors resulted from the traditional operator-splitting approach are eliminated. By using 2nd order methods in both time and space and eliminating operator-splitting errors, the numerical error of RELAP-7 can be minimized. Numerical verification is the process to verify the orders of numerical methods. It is an important part of modern verification and validation process. The core channel component in RELAP-7 is designed to simulate coolant flow as well as the conjugated heat transfer between coolant flow and the fuel rod. A special treatment at fuel centerline to avoid numerical singularity for the cylindrical heat conduction in the continuous finite element mesh is discussed. One steady state test case and one fast power up transient test case are utilized for the verification of the core channel model with single-phase flow. Analytical solution for the fuel pin temperature and figures of merit such as peak clad temperature and peak fuel temperature are used to define numerical errors. These cases prove that the mass and energy are well conserved and 2nd order convergence rates for both time and space are achieved in the core channel model.

  9. Measurement and verification protocols -- Facts and fiction, news from the field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiller, S.R.; Kromer, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper provides descriptions of the 1997 International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP), the 1996 Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Measurement Verification Guidelines, and the draft ASHRAE 13-P Measurement of Energy and Demand Savings Guideline. These protocols and guidelines are establishing a framework for measurement and verification (M and V) activities throughout the world. The M and V protocols are also being used by the energy performance contracting industry as an educational tool and as the starting point for program specific M and V guidelines. Beyond descriptions of the documents the paper covers how the documents are being sued and the perspective of various user groups--such as government entities, utilities, private companies, and energy services companies. The protocols were designed around four main M and V options to allow flexibility in their application to different types of projects. However, this intentional flexibility has caused confusion among some users who are now required to select the appropriate option, method, level or rigor, and accuracy for their projects. Eventually though, as the protocols are more widely used and more documentation is available on M and V costs and accuracy the industry will become more comfortable selecting the best option and applying the M and V protocols in a more consistent manner for different types of projects and programs.

  10. LLNL`s partnership with selected US mines, for CTBT verification: A pictorial and some reflections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    The verification of an upcoming Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will involve seismic monitoring and will provide for on-site inspections which may include drilling. Because of the fact that mining operations can send out strong seismic signals, many mining districts in the US and abroad may come under special scrutiny. The seismic signals can be generated by the use of large quantities of conventional explosives, by the collapse of underground workings, or by sudden energy release in the ground such as in rock bursts and coal bumps. These mining activities may be the cause of false alarms, but may also offer opportunities for evasive nuclear testing. So in preparing for future verification of a CTBT it becomes important to address the mining-related questions. For the United States, these are questions to be answered with respect to foreign mines. But there is a good amount of commonality in mining methods worldwide. Studies conducted at US mine sites can provide good analogs of activities that may be carried out for overseas CTBT verification, save for the expected logistical impediments.

  11. 2015 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on the fracture toughness of stainless steels. Fracture toughness variability was investigated for Type 21-6-9 stainless steel using the 7K0004 forging. Fracture toughness specimens were cut from the forging in two different geometric configurations: arc shape and disc shape. The fracture toughness properties were measured at ambient temperature before and after exposure to hydrogen gas and compared to prior studies. There are three main conclusions that can be drawn from the results. First, the fracture toughness properties of actual reservoir forgings and contemporary heats of steel are much higher than those measured in earlier studies that used heats of steel from the 1980s and 1990s and forward extruded forgings which were designed to simulate reservoir microstructures. This is true for as-forged heats as well as forged heats exposed to hydrogen gas. Secondly, the study confirms the well-known observation that cracks oriented parallel to the forging grain flow will propagate easier than those oriented perpendicular to the grain flow. However, what was not known, but is shown here, is that this effect is more pronounced, particularly after hydrogen exposures, when the forging is given a larger upset. In brick forgings, which have a relatively low amount of upset, the fracture toughness variation with specimen orientation is less than 5%; whereas, in cup forgings, the fracture toughness is about 20% lower than that forging to show how specimen geometry affects fracture toughness values. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specifies minimum specimen section sizes for valid fracture toughness values. However, sub-size specimens have long been used to study tritium effects because of the physical limitation of diffusing hydrogen isotopes into stainless steel at mild temperatures so as to not disturb the underlying forged microstructure. This study shows that fracture toughness values of larger specimens are higher and more representative of the material’s fracture behavior in a fully constrained tritium reservoir. The toughness properties measured for sub-size specimens were about 65-75% of the values for larger specimens. While the data from sub-size specimens are conservative, they may be overly so. The fracture toughness properties from sub-size specimens are valuable in that they can be used for tritium effects studies and show the same trends and alloy differences as those seen from larger specimen data. Additional work is planned, including finite element modeling, to see if sub-size specimen data could be adjusted in some way to be more closely aligned with the actual material behavior in a fully constrained pressure vessel.

  12. Impact of Dynamic Specimen Shape Evolution on the Atom Probe Tomography Results of Doped Epitaxial Oxide Multilayers: Comparison of Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madaan, Nitesh; Bao, Jie; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Devaraj, Arun

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and side-ways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was correlated with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-theory correlation explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the need and importance of correlating experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using atom probe tomography for studying oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  13. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-12-15

    5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  14. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-11-03

    5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  15. Hybrid Enrichment Assay Methods for a UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: FY10 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Leon E.; Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Misner, Alex C.; Mace, Emily K.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing the concept of an automated UF6 cylinder verification station that would be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until the arrival of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors. At the center of this unattended system is a hybrid enrichment assay technique that combines the traditional enrichment-meter method (based on the 186 keV peak from 235U) with non-traditional neutron-induced high-energy gamma-ray signatures (spawned primarily by 234U alpha emissions and 19F(alpha, neutron) reactions). Previous work by PNNL provided proof-of-principle for the non-traditional signatures to support accurate, full-volume interrogation of the cylinder enrichment, thereby reducing the systematic uncertainties in enrichment assay due to UF6 heterogeneity and providing greater sensitivity to material substitution scenarios. The work described here builds on that preliminary evaluation of the non-traditional signatures, but focuses on a prototype field system utilizing NaI(Tl) and LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers, and enrichment analysis algorithms that integrate the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Results for the assay of Type-30B cylinders ranging from 0.2 to 4.95 wt% 235U, at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant in Richland, WA, are described for the following enrichment analysis methods: 1) traditional enrichment meter signature (186 keV peak) as calculated using a square-wave convolute (SWC) algorithm; 2) non-traditional high-energy gamma-ray signature that provides neutron detection without neutron detectors and 3) hybrid algorithm that merges the traditional and non-traditional signatures. Uncertainties for each method, relative to the declared enrichment for each cylinder, are calculated and compared to the uncertainties from an attended HPGe verification station at AREVA, and the IAEA’s uncertainty target values for feed, tail and product cylinders. A summary of the major findings from the field measurements and subsequent analysis follows: • Traditional enrichment-meter assay using specially collimated NaI spectrometers and a Square-Wave-Convolute algorithm can achieve uncertainties comparable to HPGe and LaBr for product, natural and depleted cylinders. • Non-traditional signatures measured using NaI spectrometers enable interrogation of the entire cylinder volume and accurate measurement of absolute 235U mass in product, natural and depleted cylinders. • A hybrid enrichment assay method can achieve lower uncertainties than either the traditional or non-traditional methods acting independently because there is a low degree of correlation in the systematic errors of the two individual methods (wall thickness variation and 234U/235U variation, respectively). This work has indicated that the hybrid NDA method has the potential to serve as the foundation for an unattended cylinder verification station. When compared to today’s handheld cylinder-verification approach, such a station would have the following advantages: 1) improved enrichment assay accuracy for product, tail and feed cylinders; 2) full-volume assay of absolute 235U mass; 3) assay of minor isotopes (234U and 232U) important to verification of feedstock origin; single instrumentation design for both Type 30B and Type 48 cylinders; and 4) substantial reduction in the inspector manpower associated with cylinder verification.

  16. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  17. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001; Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 ; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of 0.1, 0.5, and 2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The difference between measured and planned dose is less than 2% for 98.0% of pixels in a two-dimensional plane at an SDD of 100 mm.Conclusions: Our application of EPID dosimetry to HDR brachytherapy provides a quality assurance measure of the geometrical distribution of the delivered dose as well as the source positions, which is not possible with any current HDR brachytherapy verification system.

  18. Standard Measurement and Verification Plan for Lighting Retrofit Projects for Buildings and Building Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2012-10-31

    This document provides a framework for standard measurement and verification (M&V) of lighting retrofit and replacement projects. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. It includes details on all aspects of effectively measuring light levels of existing and post-retrofit projects, conducting power measurement, and developing cost-effectiveness analysis. This framework M&V plan also enables consistent comparison among similar lighting projects, and may be used to develop M&V plans for non--lighting-technology retrofits and new installations.

  19. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, K.; Al-Ayat, R.; Walter, W. R.

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  20. Demand-side management program evaluation and the EPA Conservation Verification Protocols. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willems, P.; Ciraulo, J.; Smith, B.

    1993-11-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conservation Verification Protocols (CVPs) are a set of step-by-step procedures for impact monitoring and evaluation of electric utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. The EPA developed these protocols as part of its mission to implement the Acid Rain Program authorized by Title IV of the Clean Air Amendments of 1990. This report provides an overview of the CVPs and how they can be used by electric utilities in DSM program monitoring and evaluation. Both the CVPs Monitoring Path and Stipulated Path procedures are summarized and reviewed. Several examples are provided to illustrate how to calculate DSM program energy savings using the CVPSs.

  1. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

  2. Specification of Selected Performance Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2006-10-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Energy (DE) Program by developing advanced control algorithms that would lead to development of tools to enhance performance and reliability, and reduce emissions of distributed energy technologies, including combined heat and power technologies. This report documents phase 2 of the program, providing a detailed functional specification for algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, scheduled for development in FY 2006. The report identifies the systems for which algorithms will be developed, the specific functions of each algorithm, metrics which the algorithms will output, and inputs required by each algorithm.

  3. Surface harmonics method equations for solving the time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Finite-difference time-dependent equations of Surface Harmonics method have been obtained for plane geometry. Verification of these equations has been carried out by calculations of tasks from 'Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416'. The capacity and efficiency of the Surface Harmonics method have been demonstrated by solution of the time-dependent neutron transport equation in diffusion approximation. The results of studies showed that implementation of Surface Harmonics method for full-scale calculations will lead to a significant progress in the efficient solution of the time-dependent neutron transport problems in nuclear reactors. (authors)

  4. Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2005-12-14

    This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

  5. Verification of Multiphysics software: Space and time convergence studies for nonlinearly coupled applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean C. Ragusa; Vijay Mahadevan; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2009-05-01

    High-fidelity modeling of nuclear reactors requires the solution of a nonlinear coupled multi-physics stiff problem with widely varying time and length scales that need to be resolved correctly. A numerical method that converges the implicit nonlinear terms to a small tolerance is often referred to as nonlinearly consistent (or tightly coupled). This nonlinear consistency is still lacking in the vast majority of coupling techniques today. We present a tightly coupled multiphysics framework that tackles this issue and present code-verification and convergence analyses in space and time for several models of nonlinear coupled physics.

  6. Verification and Validation of the PLTEMP/ANL Code for Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Experimental and Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalimullah, M.; Olson, Arne P.; Feldman, E. E.; Hanan, N.; Dionne, B.

    2015-04-07

    The document compiles in a single volume several verification and validation works done for the PLTEMP/ANL code during the years of its development and improvement. Some works that are available in the open literature are simply referenced at the outset, and are not included in the document. PLTEMP has been used in conversion safety analysis reports of several US and foreign research reactors that have been licensed and converted. A list of such reactors is given. Each chapter of the document deals with the verification or validation of a specific model. The model verification is usually done by comparing the code with hand calculation, Microsoft spreadsheet calculation, or Mathematica calculation. The model validation is done by comparing the code with experimental data or a more validated code like the RELAP5 code.

  7. The Mailbox Computer System for the IAEA verification experiment on HEU downlending at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, A.L.; Gordon, D.M.

    2000-07-31

    IN APRIL 1996, THE UNITED STATES (US) ADDED THE PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT TO THE LIST OF FACILITIES ELIGIBLE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS. AT THAT TIME, THE US PROPOSED THAT THE IAEA CARRY OUT A ''VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT'' AT THE PLANT WITH RESPECT TO DOOWNBLENDING OF ABOUT 13 METRIC TONS OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) IN THE FORM OF URANIUM HEXAFLUROIDE (UF6). DURING THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1997 THROUGH JULY 1998, THE IAEA CARRIED OUT THE REQUESTED VERIFICATION EXPERIMENT. THE VERIFICATION APPROACH USED FOR THIS EXPERIMENT INCLUDED, AMONG OTHER MEASURES, THE ENTRY OF PROCESS-OPERATIONAL DATA BY THE FACILITY OPERATOR ON A NEAR-REAL-TIME BASIS INTO A ''MAILBOX'' COMPUTER LOCATED WITHIN A TAMPER-INDICATING ENCLOSURE SEALED BY THE IAEA.

  8. Approach to IAEA verification of the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.; Younkin, J.M.; DeVito, V.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP), should that plant be placed under IAEA safeguards. The strategy makes use of the attributes and variables measurement verification approach, whereby the IAEA would perform independent measurements on a randomly selected subset of the items comprising the U-235 flows and inventories at the plant. In addition, the MUF-D statistic is used as the test statistics for the detection of diversion. The paper includes descriptions of the potential verification activities, as well as calculations of (a) attributes and variables sample sizes for the various strata, (b) standard deviations of the relevant test statistics, and (c) the sensitivity for detection of diversion which the IAEA might achieve by this verification strategy at GCEP.

  9. treaty verification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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    Page Name:
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  10. Neutron spectrometry for UF6 enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.

  11. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  12. Neutron spectrometry for ${\\rm UF}_6$ enrichment verification in storage cylinders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mengesha, Wondwosen; Kiff, Scott D.

    2015-01-29

    Verification of declared UF6 enrichment and mass in storage cylinders is of great interest in nuclear material nonproliferation. Nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are commonly used for safeguards inspections to ensure accountancy of declared nuclear materials. Common NDA techniques used include gamma-ray spectrometry and both passive and active neutron measurements. In the present study, neutron spectrometry was investigated for verification of UF6 enrichment in 30B storage cylinders based on an unattended and passive measurement approach. MCNP5 and Geant4 simulated neutron spectra, for selected UF6 enrichments and filling profiles, were used in the investigation. The simulated neutron spectra were analyzed using principalmorecomponent analysis (PCA). The PCA technique is a well-established technique and has a wide area of application including feature analysis, outlier detection, and gamma-ray spectral analysis. Results obtained demonstrate that neutron spectrometry supported by spectral feature analysis has potential for assaying UF6 enrichment in storage cylinders. The results from the present study also showed that difficulties associated with the UF6 filling profile and observed in other unattended passive neutron measurements can possibly be overcome using the approach presented.less

  13. Double-Difference Tomography for Sequestration MVA [monitoring, verification, and accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westman, Erik

    2012-12-31

    Analysis of synthetic data was performed to determine the most cost-effective tomographic monitoring system for a geologic carbon sequestration injection site. Double-difference tomographic inversion was performed on 125 synthetic data sets: five stages of CO2 plume growth, five seismic event regions, and five geophone arrays. Each resulting velocity model was compared quantitatively to its respective synthetic velocity model to determine an accuracy value. The results were examined to determine a relationship between cost and accuracy in monitoring, verification, and accounting applications using double-difference tomography. The geophone arrays with widely-varying geophone locations, both laterally and vertically, performed best. Additionally, double difference seismic tomography was performed using travel time data from a carbon sequestration site at the Aneth oil field in southeast Utah as part of a Department of Energy initiative on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) of sequestered CO2. A total of 1,211 seismic events were recorded from a borehole array consisting of 22 geophones. Artificial velocity models were created to determine the ease with which different CO2 plume locations and sizes can be detected. Most likely because of the poor geophone arrangement, a low velocity zone in the Desert Creek reservoir can only be detected when regions of test site containing the highest ray path coverage are considered. MVA accuracy and precision may be improved through the use of a receiver array that provides more comprehensive ray path coverage.

  14. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  15. LABORATORY DEMONSTRATION OF A MULTISENSOR UNATTENDED CYLINDER VERIFICATION STATION FOR URANIUM ENRICHMENT PLANT SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, David I; Rowland, Kelly L; Smith, Sheriden; Miller, Karen A.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2014-01-10

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of the diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear materials, and safeguarding uranium enrichment plants is especially important in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA’s proposed Unattended Cylinder Verification Station (UCVS) for UF6 cylinder verification would combine the operator’s accountancy scale with a nondestructive assay system such as the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) and cylinder identification and surveillance systems. In this project, we built a laboratory-scale UCVS and demonstrated its capabilities using mock UF6 cylinders. We developed a signal processing algorithm to automate the data collection and processing from four continuous, unattended sensors. The laboratory demonstration of the system showed that the software could successfully identify cylinders, snip sensor data at the appropriate points in time, determine the relevant characteristics of the cylinder contents, check for consistency among sensors, and output the cylinder data to a file. This paper describes the equipment, algorithm and software development, laboratory demonstration, and recommendations for a full-scale UCVS.

  16. Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur

    2014-10-01

    Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

  17. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labeling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andre

    2010-08-01

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer's production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  18. Compliance and Verification of Standards and Labelling Programs in China: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saheb, Yamina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Pierrot, Andr

    2010-06-11

    After implementing several energy efficiency standards and labels (30 products covered by MEPS, 50 products covered by voluntary labels and 19 products by mandatory labels), the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is now implementing verification and compliance mechanism to ensure that the energy information of labeled products comply with the requirements of their labels. CNIS is doing so by organizing check testing on a random basis for room air-conditioners, refrigerators, motors, heaters, computer displays, ovens, and self -ballasted lamps. The purpose of the check testing is to understand the implementation of the Chinese labeling scheme and help local authorities establishing effective compliance mechanisms. In addition, to ensure robustness and consistency of testing results, CNIS has coordinated a round robin testing for room air conditioners. Eight laboratories (Chinese (6), Australian (1) and Japanese (1)) have been involved in the round robin testing and tests were performed on four sets of samples selected from manufacturer?s production line. This paper describes the methodology used in undertaking both check and round robin testing, provides analysis of testing results and reports on the findings. The analysis of both check and round robin testing demonstrated the benefits of a regularized verification and monitoring system for both laboratories and products such as (i) identifying the possible deviations between laboratories to correct them, (ii) improving the quality of testing facilities, (iii) ensuring the accuracy and reliability of energy label information in order to strength the social credibility of the labeling program and the enforcement mechanism in place.

  19. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Requirements Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE requirements definition is to assess the activities that results in the specification, documentation, and review of the requirements that the software product must satisfy, including functionality, performance, design constraints, attributes and external interfaces. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP).

  20. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Requirements Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE requirements definition is to assess the activities that results in the specification, documentation, and review of the requirements that the software product must satisfy, including functionality, performance, design constraints, attributes and external interfaces. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP).

  1. EXAMINING THE ROLE AND RESEARCH CHALLENGES OF SOCIAL MEDIA AS A TOOL FOR NONPROLIFERATION AND ARMS CONTROL TREATY VERIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, Michael J.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Benz, Jacob M.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Kreyling, Sean J.; West, Curtis L.

    2014-05-13

    Traditional arms control treaty verification activities typically involve a combination of technical measurements via physical and chemical sensors, state declarations, political agreements, and on-site inspections involving international subject matter experts. However, the ubiquity of the internet, and the electronic sharing of data that it enables, has made available a wealth of open source information with the potential to benefit verification efforts. Open source information is already being used by organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency to support the verification of state-declared information, prepare inspectors for in-field activities, and to maintain situational awareness . The recent explosion in social media use has opened new doors to exploring the attitudes, moods, and activities around a given topic. Social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, offer an opportunity for individuals, as well as institutions, to participate in a global conversation at minimal cost. Social media data can also provide a more data-rich environment, with text data being augmented with images, videos, and location data. The research described in this paper investigates the utility of applying social media signatures as potential arms control and nonproliferation treaty verification tools and technologies, as determined through a series of case studies. The treaty relevant events that these case studies touch upon include detection of undeclared facilities or activities, determination of unknown events recorded by the International Monitoring System (IMS), and the global media response to the occurrence of an Indian missile launch. The case studies examine how social media can be used to fill an information gap and provide additional confidence to a verification activity. The case studies represent, either directly or through a proxy, instances where social media information may be available that could potentially augment the evaluation of an event. The goal of this paper is to instigate a discussion within the verification community as to where and how social media can be effectively utilized to complement and enhance traditional treaty verification efforts. In addition, this paper seeks to identify areas of future research and development necessary to adapt social media analytic tools and techniques, and to form the seed for social media analytics to aid and inform arms control and nonproliferation policymakers and analysts. While social media analysis (as well as open source analysis as a whole) will not ever be able to replace traditional arms control verification measures, they do supply unique signatures that can augment existing analysis.

  2. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Report for the Waste Loading Area, Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-08-19

    The objective of the verification survey was to obtain evidence by means of measurements and sampling to confirm that the final radiological conditions were less than the established release criteria. This objective was achieved via multiple verification components including document reviews to determine the accuracy and adequacy of FSS documentation.

  3. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; McClintock, David A.; Garner, Frank

    2015-08-05

    In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values. Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associated with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscattering analysis (EBSD). It was also shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by necklaces of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. Moreover, the propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the larger than expected data scatter.

  4. Analysis of structure and deformation behavior of AISI 316L tensile specimens from the second operational target module at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; McClintock, David A.; Garner, Frank

    2015-08-05

    In an earlier publication, tensile testing was performed on specimens removed from the first two operational targets of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There were several anomalous features in the results. First, some specimens had very large elongations (up to 57%) while others had significantly smaller values. Second, there was a larger than the usual amount of data scatter in the elongation results. Third, the stress-strain diagrams of nominally similar specimens spanned a wide range of behavior ranging from expected irradiation-induced hardening to varying levels of force drop after yield point and indirect signs of "traveling deformation wave" behavior associatedmore » with strain-induced martensite formation. To investigate the cause(s) of such variable tensile behavior, several specimens from Target 2, spanning the range of observed tensile behavior, were chosen for detailed microstructural examination using electron backscattering analysis (EBSD). It was also shown that the steel employed in the construction of the target contained an unexpected bimodal grain size distribution, containing very large out-of-specification grains surrounded by necklaces of grains of within-specification sizes. The large grains were frequently comparable to the width of the gauge section of the tensile specimen. Moreover, the propensity to form martensite during deformation was shown to be accelerated by radiation but also to be very sensitive to the relative orientation of the grains with respect to the tensile axis. Specimens having large grains in the gauge that were most favorably oriented for production of martensite strongly exhibited the traveling deformation wave phenomenon, while those specimens with less favorably oriented grains had lesser or no degree of the wave effect, thereby accounting for the larger than expected data scatter.« less

  5. Laboratory verification of blast-induced liquefaction mechanism. Final report Jan-Jul 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragaszy, R.J.; Voss, M.E.

    1981-10-01

    A mechanism for blast-induced liquefaction was tested in a series of high pressure undrained, isotropic compression tests on saturated samples of Eniwetok beach sand and Ottawa sand. Theory, based on inelastic volume compressibility of sand, was shown to be valid for the case of quasi-static, isotropic loading. Specimens of Eniwetok sand subjected to an initial effective stress of 1 MPa were liquefied by a single cycle of loading of 34 MPa. Specimens of Ottawa sand, tested in the same manner, generated excess pore pressure but not enough to completely liquefy the soil. The errors introduced by flexibility of the testing systems were analyzed and found to be insignificant. Suggestions for future research were made.

  6. Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and documentation of expert system verification and validation methodologies. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groundwater, E.H.; Miller, L.A.; Mirsky, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report is the third volume in the final report for the Expert System Verification and Validation (V&V) project which was jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ultimate objective is the formulation of guidelines for the V&V of expert systems for use in nuclear power applications. The purpose of this activity was to survey and document techniques presently in use for expert system V&V. The survey effort included an extensive telephone interviewing program, site visits, and a thorough bibliographic search and compilation. The major finding was that V&V of expert systems is not nearly as established or prevalent as V&V of conventional software systems. When V&V was used for expert systems, it was almost always at the system validation stage after full implementation and integration usually employing the non-systematic dynamic method of {open_quotes}ad hoc testing.{close_quotes} There were few examples of employing V&V in the early phases of development and only weak sporadic mention of the possibilities in the literature. There is, however, a very active research area concerning the development of methods and tools to detect problems with, particularly, rule-based expert systems. Four such static-testing methods were identified which were not discovered in a comprehensive review of conventional V&V methods in an earlier task.

  7. Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey of 19 Grids in the Lester Flat Area, David Witherspoon Inc. 1630 Site Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-10-17

    Perform verification surveys of 19 available grids located in the Lester Flat Area at the Davod Witherspoon Site. The survey grids included E11, E12, E13, F11, F12, F13, F14, F15, G15, G16, G17, H16, H17, H18, X16, X17, X18, K16, and J16.

  8. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 System Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE System Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities associated with the SAPHIRE software product. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  9. RELAP-7 Software Verification and Validation Plan: Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM) Part 1 – Physics and numerical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Yong Joon; Yoo, Jun Soo; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-09-01

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM) on main physics and numerical method of the RELAP-7. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7.

  10. Preparation of actinide specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinby, T C; Adair, H L; Kobisk, E H

    1982-05-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was initiated about four years ago for the purpose of studying the fuel behavior of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of integral cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes (physics specimens) was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the fuel pellets and physics samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the fuel study were /sup 241/Am and /sup 244/Cm in the forms of Am/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Am/sub 6/Cm(RE)/sub 7/O/sub 21/, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. Milligram quantities of actinide oxides of /sup 248/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 243/Am, /sup 241/Am, /sup 244/Pu, /sup 242/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 231/Pa were encapsulated to obtain nuclear cross section and reaction rate data for these materials.

  11. Initial verification and validation of RAZORBACK - A research reactor transient analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talley, Darren G.

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the work and results of the initial verification and validation (V&V) of the beta release of the Razorback code. Razorback is a computer code designed to simulate the operation of a research reactor (such as the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)) by a coupled numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations, the energy conservation equation for fuel element heat transfer, and the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for the water cooling of the fuel elements. This initial V&V effort was intended to confirm that the code work to-date shows good agreement between simulation and actual ACRR operations, indicating that the subsequent V&V effort for the official release of the code will be successful.

  12. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gable, Todd J.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.

    2006-03-21

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  13. Tank waste remediation system FSAR hazard identification/facility configuration verification report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, D.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-01

    This document provides the results of the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report (TWRS FSAR) hazards identification/facility configuration activities undertaken from the period of March 7, 1996 to May 31, 1996. The purpose of this activity was to provide an independent overview of the TWRS facility specific hazards and configurations that were used in support of the TWRS FSAR hazards and accident analysis development. It was based on a review of existing published documentation and field inspections. The objective of the verification effort was to provide a `snap shot` in time of the existing TWRS facility hazards and configurations and will be used to support hazards and accident analysis activities.

  14. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from DES Science Verification Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, C.; Vikram, V.; Jain, B.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for super-clusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8? level with 20 arcminute smoothing. These measurementsmoreare consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on ?CDM Nbody simulations, suggesting low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.less

  15. Environmental technology verification report: Soil sampler. Clements Associates, Inc. JMC environmentalist`s subsoil probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The EPA`s National Exposure Research Laboratory, which demonstrates field characterization and monitoring technologies, selected Tetra Tech EM Inc. as the verification organization to assist in field testing. This document summarizes the results of a demonstration of the ESP{reg_sign}. In 1997 EPA conducted a field test of the ESP{reg_sign} sampler. The performance of this system was compared to a reference subsurface soil sampling method (hollow-stem auger drilling and split-spoon sampling) in terms of the following parameters: sample recovery, VOC concentrations in recovered samples, sample integrity, reliability and throughput, and cost. Data quality indicators for precision, accuracy, representativeness, completeness and comparability were also assessed against project-specific QA objectives to ensure usefulness of the data. A complete description of the demonstration, including a data summary and discussion of results is available in this report.

  16. Vibratory response modeling and verification of a high precision optical positioning system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    1999-06-18

    A generic vibratory-response modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. Based on multibody dynamics theory, the system is modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear elastic elements, such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Utilizing this program, the theoretical and experimental verification of the vibratory behavior of a double-multilayer monochromator support and positioning system is presented. Results of parametric design studies that investigate the influence of support floor dynamics and highlight important design issues are also presented. Overall, good matches between theory and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the program as a dynamic modeling tool.

  17. Standard Measurement & Verification Plan for Lighting Equipment Retrofit or Replacement Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2009-11-04

    This document provides a framework for a standard Measurement and Verification (M&V) plan for lighting projects. It was developed to support cost-effective retrofits (partial and complete replacements) of lighting systems and is intended to provide a foundation for an M&V plan for a lighting retrofit utilizing a "best practice" approach, and to provide guidance to site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations on what is essential for a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. This document provides examples of appropriate elements of an M&V plan, including the calculation of expected energy savings. The standard M&V plan, as provided, also allows for consistent comparison with other similar lighting projects. Although intended for lighting retrofit applications, M&V plans developed per this framework document may also be used for other non-lighting technology retrofits and new installations.

  18. Verification and large deformation analysis using the reproducing kernel particle method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckwith, Frank

    2015-09-01

    The reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM) is a meshless method used to solve general boundary value problems using the principle of virtual work. RKPM corrects the kernel approximation by introducing reproducing conditions which force the method to be complete to arbritrary order polynomials selected by the user. Effort in recent years has led to the implementation of RKPM within the Sierra/SM physics software framework. The purpose of this report is to investigate convergence of RKPM for verification and validation purposes as well as to demonstrate the large deformation capability of RKPM in problems where the finite element method is known to experience difficulty. Results from analyses using RKPM are compared against finite element analysis. A host of issues associated with RKPM are identified and a number of potential improvements are discussed for future work.

  19. Guide to verification and validation of the SCALE-4 criticality safety software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmett, M.B.; Jordan, W.C.

    1996-12-01

    Whenever a decision is made to newly install the SCALE nuclear criticality safety software on a computer system, the user should run a set of verification and validation (V&V) test cases to demonstrate that the software is properly installed and functioning correctly. This report is intended to serve as a guide for this V&V in that it specifies test cases to run and gives expected results. The report describes the V&V that has been performed for the nuclear criticality safety software in a version of SCALE-4. The verification problems specified by the code developers have been run, and the results compare favorably with those in the SCALE 4.2 baseline. The results reported in this document are from the SCALE 4.2P version which was run on an IBM RS/6000 workstation. These results verify that the SCALE-4 nuclear criticality safety software has been correctly installed and is functioning properly. A validation has been performed for KENO V.a utilizing the CSAS25 criticality sequence and the SCALE 27-group cross-section library for {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu fissile, systems in a broad range of geometries and fissile fuel forms. The experimental models used for the validation were taken from three previous validations of KENO V.a. A statistical analysis of the calculated results was used to determine the average calculational bias and a subcritical k{sub eff} criteria for each class of systems validated. Included the statistical analysis is a means of estimating the margin of subcriticality in k{sub eff}. This validation demonstrates that KENO V.a and the 27-group library may be used for nuclear criticality safety computations provided the system being analyzed falls within the range of the experiments used in the validation.

  20. SU-E-T-578: MCEBRT, A Monte Carlo Code for External Beam Treatment Plan Verifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chibani, O; Ma, C; Eldib, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Present a new Monte Carlo code (MCEBRT) for patient-specific dose calculations in external beam radiotherapy. The code MLC model is benchmarked and real patient plans are re-calculated using MCEBRT and compared with commercial TPS. Methods: MCEBRT is based on the GEPTS system (Med. Phys. 29 (2002) 835846). Phase space data generated for Varian linac photon beams (6 15 MV) are used as source term. MCEBRT uses a realistic MLC model (tongue and groove, rounded ends). Patient CT and DICOM RT files are used to generate a 3D patient phantom and simulate the treatment configuration (gantry, collimator and couch angles; jaw positions; MLC sequences; MUs). MCEBRT dose distributions and DVHs are compared with those from TPS in absolute way (Gy). Results: Calculations based on the developed MLC model closely matches transmission measurements (pin-point ionization chamber at selected positions and film for lateral dose profile). See Fig.1. Dose calculations for two clinical cases (whole brain irradiation with opposed beams and lung case with eight fields) are carried out and outcomes are compared with the Eclipse AAA algorithm. Good agreement is observed for the brain case (Figs 2-3) except at the surface where MCEBRT dose can be higher by 20%. This is due to better modeling of electron contamination by MCEBRT. For the lung case an overall good agreement (91% gamma index passing rate with 3%/3mm DTA criterion) is observed (Fig.4) but dose in lung can be over-estimated by up to 10% by AAA (Fig.5). CTV and PTV DVHs from TPS and MCEBRT are nevertheless close (Fig.6). Conclusion: A new Monte Carlo code is developed for plan verification. Contrary to phantombased QA measurements, MCEBRT simulate the exact patient geometry and tissue composition. MCEBRT can be used as extra verification layer for plans where surface dose and tissue heterogeneity are an issue.

  1. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; et al

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Sciencemore » Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. Additionally, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.« less

  2. Fast radiographic film calibration procedure for helical tomotherapy intensity modulated radiation therapy dose verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Yulong; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Weng Xuejun; Penagaricano, Jose; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2005-06-15

    Film dosimetry offers an advantageous in-phantom planar dose verification tool in terms of spatial resolution and ease of handling for quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. A critical step in the success of such a technique is that the film calibration be appropriately conducted. This paper presents a fast and efficient film calibration method for a helical tomotherapy unit using a single sheet of film. Considering the unique un-flattened cone shaped profile from a helical tomotherapy beam, a custom leaf control file (sinogram) was created, to produce a valley shaped intensity pattern. There are eleven intensity steps in the valley pattern, representing varying dose values from 38 to 265 cGy. This dose range covers the most commonly prescribed doses in fractionated IMRT treatments. An ion chamber in a solid water phantom was used to measure the dose in each of the eleven steps. For daily film calibration the whole procedure, including film exposure, processing, digitization and analysis, can be completed within 15 min, making it practical to use this technique routinely. This method is applicable to film calibration on a helical tomotherapy unit and is particularly useful in IMRT planar dose verification due to its efficiency and reproducibility. In this work, we characterized the dose response of the KODAK EDR2 ready-pack film which was used to develop the step valley dose maps and the IMRT QA planar doses. A comparison between the step valley technique and multifilm based calibration showed that both calibration methods agreed with less than 0.4% deviation in the clinically useful dose ranges.

  3. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  4. verification & Validation of High-Order Short-Characteristics-Based Deterministic Transport Methodology on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azmy, Yousry; Wang, Yaqi

    2013-12-20

    The research team has developed a practical, high-order, discrete-ordinates, short characteristics neutron transport code for three-dimensional configurations represented on unstructured tetrahedral grids that can be used for realistic reactor physics applications at both the assembly and core levels. This project will perform a comprehensive verification and validation of this new computational tool against both a continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulation (e.g. MCNP) and experimentally measured data, an essential prerequisite for its deployment in reactor core modeling. Verification is divided into three phases. The team will first conduct spatial mesh and expansion order refinement studies to monitor convergence of the numerical solution to reference solutions. This is quantified by convergence rates that are based on integral error norms computed from the cell-by-cell difference between the codes numerical solution and its reference counterpart. The latter is either analytic or very fine- mesh numerical solutions from independent computational tools. For the second phase, the team will create a suite of code-independent benchmark configurations to enable testing the theoretical order of accuracy of any particular discretization of the discrete ordinates approximation of the transport equation. For each tested case (i.e. mesh and spatial approximation order), researchers will execute the code and compare the resulting numerical solution to the exact solution on a per cell basis to determine the distribution of the numerical error. The final activity comprises a comparison to continuous-energy Monte Carlo solutions for zero-power critical configuration measurements at Idaho National Laboratorys Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Results of this comparison will allow the investigators to distinguish between modeling errors and the above- listed discretization errors introduced by the deterministic method, and to separate the sources of uncertainty.

  5. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. F.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. Additionally, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  6. Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-08-29

    A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

  7. NIST approach to Promoting US Innovation and Industrial Competitivenes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Industrial Competitiveness Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Session 1-A: Biomass and the U.S. Competitive Advantages for Manufacturing Clean Energy ...

  8. Results...National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Permeation, Diffusion, Solubility Measurements: Results and Issues Hydrogen Embrittlement Fundamentals, Modeling, and Experiment From Cleanup to ...

  9. Report to NIST on the Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Goals of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 | Department of Energy Report to Congress on the Progress of the Federal Government in Meeting the Renewable Goals of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Report to Congress on the Progress of the Federal Government in Meeting the Renewable Goals of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Document reports on the fiscal year 2008 compliance activities of federal agencies with Section 203 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. PDF icon Download this report to

  10. Reducing Cyber Risk to Critical Infrastructure: NIST Framework...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Federal Register on February 26, 2013 and a series of open public workshops. ... Framework through the electricity and oil and natural gas sector coordinating councils. ...

  11. DOE-EERE/NIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERENIST Joint Workshop on Combinatorial Materials Science for Applications in Energy ... and discussion results from breakout groups, are posted on the NCMC Web site.

  12. TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-11-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  13. Development and Verification of Tritium Analyses Code for a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-09-01

    A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in the VHTR systems including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used for development of the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and a various form of hydrogen (i.e., HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, and TI) coupled with a variety of tritium source, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of HT and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were importantly considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including both high-temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. The TPAC has unlimited flexibility for the system configurations, and provides easy drag-and-drops for making models by adopting a graphical user interface. Verification of the code has been performed by comparisons with the analytical solutions and the experimental data based on the Peach Bottom reactor design. The preliminary results calculated with a former tritium analyses code, THYTAN which was developed in Japan and adopted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency were also compared with the TPAC solutions. This report contains descriptions of the basic tritium pathways, theory, simple user guide, verifications, sensitivity studies, sample cases, and code tutorials. Tritium behaviors in a very high temperature reactor/high temperature steam electrolysis system have been analyzed by the TPAC based on the reference indirect parallel configuration proposed by Oh et al. (2007). This analysis showed that only 0.4% of tritium released from the core is transferred to the product hydrogen. The amount of tritium in the product hydrogen was estimated to be approximately an order less than the gaseous effluent limit for tritium.

  14. Development of a Consensus Standard for Verification and Validation of Nuclear System Thermal-Fluids Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

    2011-12-01

    With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, 'Transient and Accident Analysis Methods' and NUREG-0800, 'NRC Standard Review Plan'. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 'Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)'. This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes; (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of the software that should encompass the nuclear operational and accident domain to be used to study the system behavior for licensing purposes, (c) the definition of the scaled experimental data set required to provide the basis for validating the software, (d) the ensemble of experimental data sets required to populate the validation matrix for the software in question, and (e) the practices and procedures to be used when applying a validation standard. Although this initial effort will focus on software for licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, it is anticipated that the practices and procedures developed for this Standard can eventually be extended to other nuclear and non-nuclear applications.

  15. Shipper/receiver difference verification of spent fuel by use of PDET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, Y. S.; Sitaraman, S.

    2011-07-01

    Spent fuel storage pools in most countries are rapidly approaching their design limits with the discharge of over 10,000 metric tons of heavy metal from global reactors. Countries like UK, France or Japan have adopted a closed fuel cycle by reprocessing spent fuel and recycling MOX fuel while many other countries opted for above ground interim dry storage for their spent fuel management strategy. Some countries like Finland and Sweden are already well on the way to setting up a conditioning plant and a deep geological repository for spent fuel. For all these situations, shipments of spent fuel are needed and the number of these shipments is expected to increase significantly. Although shipper/receiver difference (SRD) verification measurements are needed by IAEA when the recipient facility receives spent fuel, these are not being practiced to the level that IAEA has desired due to lack of a credible measurement methodology and instrument that can reliably perform these measurements to verify non-diversion of spent fuel during shipment and confirm facility operator declarations on the spent fuel. In this paper, we describe a new safeguards method and an associated instrument, Partial Defect Tester (PDET), which can detect pin diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies in an in-situ condition. The PDET uses multiple tiny neutron and gamma detectors in the form of a cluster and a simple, yet highly precise, gravity-driven system to obtain underwater radiation measurements inside a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel assembly. The method takes advantage of the PWR fuel design which contains multiple guide tubes which can be accessed from the top. The data obtained in such a manner can provide spatial distribution of neutron and gamma flux within a spent fuel assembly. Our simulation study as well as validation measurements indicated that the ratio of the gamma signal to the thermal neutron signal at each detector location normalized to the peak ratio of all the detector locations gives a unique signature that is sensitive to missing pins. The signature is principally dependent on the geometry of the detector locations, and little sensitive to enrichment or burn-up variations. A small variation in the fuel bundle, such as a few missing pins, changes the shape of the signature to enable detection. After verification of the non-diversion of spent fuel pins, the neutron signal and gamma signal are subsequently used to verify the consistency of the operator declaration on the fuel burn-up and cooling time. (authors)

  16. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for subsequent regression testing. In section 2, the test problems are presented, and the static solution is developed for two idealized systems. Section 3 describes the finite element representation of the generic problem, including the interface combinations considered. The verification criteria and expected results are presented next in section 4. Section 5 discusses the numerical results obtained from each test problem. Finally, section 6 summarizes the observed interface behavior.

  17. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

  18. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification Enhancement Review of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRIGGS, C.R.

    2000-02-09

    The primary purpose of the verification enhancement review was for the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify contractor readiness for the independent DOE Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) on the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Secondary objectives included: (1) to reinforce the engagement of management and to gauge management commitment and accountability; (2) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct public involvement; (3) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct worker involvement; (4) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of the panel-to-panel review approach; and, (5) to evaluate the utility of the review's methodology/adaptability to periodic assessments of ISM status. The review was conducted on December 6-8, 1999, and involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with five separate panels of individuals with various management and operations responsibilities related to PFP. A semi-structured interview process was employed by a team of five ''reviewers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels which focused on: (1) evidence of management commitment, accountability, and involvement; and, (2) consideration and demonstration of stakeholder (including worker) information and involvement opportunities. The purpose of a panel-to-panel dialogue approach was to better spotlight: (1) areas of mutual reinforcement and alignment that could serve as good examples of the management commitment and accountability aspects of ISMS implementation, and, (2) areas of potential discrepancy that could provide opportunities for improvement. In summary, the Review Team found major strengths to include: (1) the use of multi-disciplinary project work teams to plan and do work; (2) the availability and broad usage of multiple tools to help with planning and integrating work; (3) senior management presence and accessibility; (4) the institutionalization of worker involvement; (5) encouragement of self-reporting and self-assessment by management; (6) the availability of multiple internal communication mechanisms; and, (7) the existence of overall facility-wide safety management goals as well as individualized project work team goals. Major opportunities for improvement identified include: (1) the enhancement of external communications relative to ISM; (2) the institutionalization of ISM-related performance agreements/incentives; (3) the strengthening of feedback loops; (4) fine-tuning the use of tools; and, (5) the formalization of good practices.

  19. REPORT OF THE WORKSHOP ON NUCLEAR FACILITY DESIGN INFORMATION EXAMINATION AND VERIFICATION FOR SAFEGUARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

    2009-10-01

    Executive Summary The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implements nuclear safeguards and verifies countries are compliant with their international nuclear safeguards agreements. One of the key provisions in the safeguards agreement is the requirement that the country provide nuclear facility design and operating information to the IAEA relevant to safeguarding the facility, and at a very early stage. , This provides the opportunity for the IAEA to verify the safeguards-relevant features of the facility and to periodically ensure that those features have not changed. The national authorities (State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material - SSAC) provide the design information for all facilities within a country to the IAEA. The design information is conveyed using the IAEAs Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ) and specifies: (1) Identification of the facilitys general character, purpose, capacity, and location; (2) Description of the facilitys layout and nuclear material form, location, and flow; (3) Description of the features relating to nuclear material accounting, containment, and surveillance; and (4) Description of existing and proposed procedures for nuclear material accounting and control, with identification of nuclear material balance areas. The DIQ is updated as required by written addendum. IAEA safeguards inspectors examine and verify this information in design information examination (DIE) and design information verification (DIV) activities to confirm that the facility has been constructed or is being operated as declared by the facility operator and national authorities, and to develop a suitable safeguards approach. Under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Office of Non-Proliferation and International Security identified the need for more effective and efficient verification of design information by the IAEA for improving international safeguards in the future. Consequently, the NNSA Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243) sponsored a team of U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory nuclear safeguards experts and technologists to conduct a workshop on methods and technologies for improving this activity, under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Approaches Project. The workshop focused on reviewing and discussing the fundamental safeguards needs, and presented technology and/or methods that could potentially address those needs more effectively and efficiently. Conclusions and Recommendations for technology to enhance the performance of DIV inspections are presented by the workshop team.

  20. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  1. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpeneau, Evan M.

    2011-06-24

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  2. Tool for Distributed Pressure Time-Histories of Marine Structures: Verification and Case Study With a WEC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tool for Distributed Pressure Time-Histories of Marine Structures: Verification and Case Study With a WEC Carlos Michelen* Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Ryan G. Coe Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM, USA Yi-Hsiang Yu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Boulder, CO, USA Qi Wang National Renewable Energy Laboratory Boulder, CO, USA * Corresponding author: cmichel@sandia.gov ABSTRACT In this paper we describe the theory and code imple- mentation of a tool to obtain

  3. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-12

    This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

  4. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut (SSC001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Rice, D.E.; Allred, J.F.; Brown, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    At the request of the USDOE, a team from ORNL conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut, from September 1992 to March 1993. Purpose of the survey was to determine whether residual levels of radioactivity inside the Ruffert Building and selected adjacent areas were rmediated to levels below DOE guidelines for FUSRAP sites. The property was contaminated with radioactive residues of {sup 238}U from uranium processing experiments conducted by Reactive Metals, Inc., from 1962 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission. A previous radiological survey did not characterize the entire floor space because equipment which could not be moved at the time made it inaccessible for radiological surveys. During the remediation process, additional areas of elevated radioactivity were discovered under stationary equipment, which required additional remediation and further verification. Results of the independent radiological verification survey confirm that, with the exception of the drain system inside the building, residual uranium contamination has been remediated to levels below DOE guidelines for unrestricted release of property at FUSRAP sites inside and outside the Ruffert Building. However, certain sections of the drain system retain uranium contamination above DOE surface guideline levels. These sections of pipe are addressed in separate, referenced documentation.

  5. Low-Intrusion Techniques and Sensitive Information Management for Warhead Counting and Verification: FY2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Gilbert, Andrew J.; Misner, Alex C.; Pitts, W. Karl; White, Timothy A.; Seifert, Allen; Miller, Erin A.

    2011-09-01

    Future arms control treaties may push nuclear weapons limits to unprecedented low levels and may entail precise counting of warheads as well as distinguishing between strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. Such advances will require assessment of form and function to confidently verify the presence or absence of nuclear warheads and/or their components. Imaging with penetrating radiation can provide such an assessment and could thus play a unique role in inspection scenarios. Yet many imaging capabilities have been viewed as too intrusive from the perspective of revealing weapon design details, and the potential for the release of sensitive information poses challenges in verification settings. A widely held perception is that verification through radiography requires images of sufficient quality that an expert (e.g., a trained inspector or an image-matching algorithm) can verify the presence or absence of components of a device. The concept of information barriers (IBs) has been established to prevent access to relevant weapon-design information by inspectors (or algorithms), and has, to date, limited the usefulness of radiographic inspection. The challenge of this project is to demonstrate that radiographic information can be used behind an IB to improve the capabilities of treaty-verification weapons-inspection systems.

  6. An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, Howard O; Lee, Sang - Yoon

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

  7. Approach to IAEA material-balance verification with intermittent inspection at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.

    1984-05-18

    This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) for the circumstance in which the IAEA inspections occur on an intermittent basis. The verification approach is a variation of the standard IAEA attributes/variables measurement-verification method. This alternative approach is useful and applicable at the Portsmouth GCEP, which will ship all its product and tails UF/sub 6/ to United States facilities not eligible for IAEA safeguards. The paper reviews some of the relevant results of the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP), describes the standard IAEA material-balance-verification approach for bulk-handling facilities, and provides the procedures to be followed in handling and processing UF/sub 6/ cylinders at the Portsmouth GCEP. The paper then discusses the assumptions made in the approach, and derives a formula for the probability with which the IAEA could detect the diversion of a significant quantity of uranium (75 kg of U-235 in depleted, normal, and low-enriched uranium) if this method were applied. The paper also provides numerical examples of IAEA detection probability should the operator divert uranium from the feed, product, or tails streams for the Portsmouth GCEP with a capacity of 1100 tonnes of separative work per year.

  8. Verification of theoretically computed spectra for a point rotating in a vertical plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical model is modified and tested that produces the power spectrum of the alongwind component of turbulence as experienced by a point rotating in a vertical plane perpendicular to the mean wind direction. The ability to generate such a power spectrum, independent of measurement, is important in wind turbine design and testing. The radius of the circle of rotation, its height above the ground, and the rate of rotation are typical for those for a MOD-OA wind turbine. Verification of this model is attempted by comparing two sets of variances that correspond to individual harmonic bands of spectra of turbulence in the rotational frame. One set of variances is calculated by integrating the theoretically generated rotational spectra; the other is calculated by integrating rotational spectra from real data analysis. The theoretical spectrum is generated by Fourier transformation of an autocorrelation function taken from von Karman and modified for the rotational frame. The autocorrelation is based on dimensionless parameters, each of which incorporates both atmospheric and wind turbine parameters. The real data time series are formed by sampling around the circle of anemometers of the Vertical Plane Array at the former MOD-OA site at Clayton, New Mexico.

  9. LLCEDATA and LLCECALC for Windows version 1.0, Volume 3: Software verification and validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFadden, J.G.

    1998-09-04

    LLCEDATA and LLCECALC for Windows are user-friendly computer software programs that work together to determine the proper waste designation, handling, and disposition requirements for Long Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE). LLCEDATA reads from a variety of data bases to produce an equipment data file(EDF) that represents a snapshot of both the LLCE and the tank from which it originates. LLCECALC reads the EDF and the gamma assay file (AV2) that is produced by the flexible Receiver Gamma Energy Analysis System. LLCECALC performs corrections to the AV2 file as it is being read and characterizes the LLCE. Both programs produce a variety of reports, including a characterization report and a status report. The status report documents each action taken by the user, LLCEDATA, and LLCECALC. Documentation for LLCEDATA and LLCECALC for Windows is available in three volumes. Volume 1 is a user`s manual, which is intended as a quick reference for both LLCEDATA and LLCECALC. Volume 2 is a technical manual, which discusses system limitations and provides recommendations to the LLCE process. Volume 3 documents LLCEDATA and LLCECALC`s verification and validation. Two of the three installation test cases, from Volume 1, are independently confirmed. Data bases used in LLCEDATA are verified and referenced. Both phases of LLCECALC process gamma and characterization, are extensively tested to verify that the methodology and algorithms used are correct.

  10. A Run-Time Verification Framework for Smart Grid Applications Implemented on Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2013-05-18

    Smart grid applications are implemented and tested with simulation frameworks as the developers usually do not have access to large sensor networks to be used as a test bed. The developers are forced to map the implementation onto these frameworks which results in a deviation between the architecture and the code. On its turn this deviation makes it hard to verify behavioral constraints that are de- scribed at the architectural level. We have developed the ConArch toolset to support the automated verification of architecture-level behavioral constraints. A key feature of ConArch is programmable mapping for architecture to the implementation. Here, developers implement queries to identify the points in the target program that correspond to architectural interactions. ConArch generates run- time observers that monitor the flow of execution between these points and verifies whether this flow conforms to the behavioral constraints. We illustrate how the programmable mappings can be exploited for verifying behavioral constraints of a smart grid appli- cation that is implemented with two simulation frameworks.

  11. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 Software Validation and Verification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, David

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve stores crude oil in caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. The CaveMan software program has been used since the late 1990s as one tool to analyze pressure mea- surements monitored at each cavern. The purpose of this monitoring is to catch potential cavern integrity issues as soon as possible. The CaveMan software was written in Microsoft Visual Basic, and embedded in a Microsoft Excel workbook; this method of running the CaveMan software is no longer sustainable. As such, a new version called CaveMan Enter- prise has been developed. CaveMan Enterprise version 1.0 does not have any changes to the CaveMan numerical models. CaveMan Enterprise represents, instead, a change from desktop-managed work- books to an enterprise framework, moving data management into coordinated databases and porting the numerical modeling codes into the Python programming language. This document provides a report of the code validation and verification testing.

  12. US-VISIT Independent Verification and Validation Project: Test Bed Establishment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, N W; Gansemer, J D

    2011-01-21

    This document describes the computational and data systems available at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use on the US-VISIT Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) project. This system - composed of data, software and hardware - is designed to be as close as a representation of the operational ADIS system as is required to verify and validate US-VISIT methodologies. It is not required to reproduce the computational capabilities of the enterprise-class operational system. During FY10, the test bed was simplified from the FY09 version by reducing the number of database host computers from three to one, significantly reducing the maintenance and overhead while simultaneously increasing system throughput. During the current performance period, a database transfer was performed as a set of Data Pump Export files. The previous RMAN backup from 2007 required the availability of an AIX system which is not required when using data pump. Due to efficiencies in the new system and process, loading of the database refresh was able to be accomplished in a much shorter time frame than was previously required. The FY10 Oracle Test Bed now consists of a single Linux platform hosting two Oracle databases including the 2007 copy as well as the October 2010 refresh.

  13. Use of Social Media to Target Information-Driven Arms Control and Nonproliferation Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; Williams, Laura S.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Whattam, Kevin M.; Corley, Courtney D.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Rose, Stuart J.; Bell, Eric B.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-07-19

    There has been considerable discussion within the national security community, including a recent workshop sponsored by the U.S. State Department, about the use of social media for extracting patterns of collective behavior and influencing public perception in areas relevant to arms control and nonproliferation. This paper seeks to explore if, and how, social media can be used to supplement nonproliferation and arms control inspection and monitoring activities on states and sites of greatest proliferation relevance. In this paper, we set the stage for how social media can be applied in this problem space and describe some of the foreseen challenges, including data validation, sources and attributes, verification, and security. Using information analytics and data visualization capabilities available at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we provide graphical examples of some social media "signatures" of potential relevance for nonproliferation and arms control purposes. We conclude by describing a proposed case study and offering recommendations both for further research and next steps by the policy community.

  14. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Sean L.; Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm ? criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm ? criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall ? pass rate was 89.1% 9.8% (average 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the ? pass rate was 95.7% 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  15. redMaGiC. Selecting Luminous Red Galaxies from the DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozo, E.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce redMaGiC, an automated algorithm for selecting Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. redMaGiC achieves this by self-training the color-cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sam- ple of constant comoving density. Additionally, we demonstrate that redMaGiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine-learning based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a redMaGiC catalog sampling the redshift range z ? [0.2,0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10-3 (h-1Mpc)-3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec zphoto) and scatter (?z=(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017 respectively.The corresponding 5? outlier fraction is 1.4%. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8) and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1% level.

  16. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. Thesemore » measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.« less

  17. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  18. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8? level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  19. Shallow Flaws Under Biaxial Loading Conditions, Part II: Application of a Weibull Stress Analysis of the Cruciform Bend Specimen Using a Hydrostatic Stress Criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    1999-08-01

    Cruciform beam fracture mechanics specimensl have been developed in the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far- field, out-of-plane biaxird bending stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear biaxial stresses resulting from pressurized-thernxd-shock or pressure-temperature loading of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shtdlow, surface flaws. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Two and three- parameter Weibull models have been calibrated using a new scheme (developed at the University of Illinois) that maps toughness data from test specimens with distinctly different levels of crack-tip constraint to a small scale yielding (SSY) Weibull stress space. These models, using the new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the OW integral definition, have been shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxiaI effect in cruciform specimens, thereby providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  20. SU-E-T-435: Development and Commissioning of a Complete System for In-Vivo Dosimetry and Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, D; Testa, M; Park, Y; Schneider, R; Moteabbed, M; Janssens, G; Prieels, D; Orban de Xivry, J; Lu, H; Bentefour, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo dose and beam range verification in proton therapy could play significant roles in proton treatment validation and improvements. Invivo beam range verification, in particular, could enable new treatment techniques one of which, for example, could be the use of anterior fields for prostate treatment instead of opposed lateral fields as in current practice. We have developed and commissioned an integrated system with hardware, software and workflow protocols, to provide a complete solution, simultaneously for both in-vivo dosimetry and range verification for proton therapy. Methods: The system uses a matrix of diodes, up to 12 in total, but separable into three groups for flexibility in application. A special amplifier was developed to capture extremely small signals from very low proton beam current. The software was developed within iMagX, a general platform for image processing in radiation therapy applications. The range determination exploits the inherent relationship between the internal range modulation clock of the proton therapy system and the radiological depth at the point of measurement. The commissioning of the system, for in-vivo dosimetry and for range verification was separately conducted using anthropomorphic phantom. EBT films and TLDs were used for dose comparisons and range scan of the beam distal fall-off was used as ground truth for range verification. Results: For in-vivo dose measurement, the results were in agreement with TLD and EBT films and were within 3% from treatment planning calculations. For range verification, a precision of 0.5mm is achieved in homogeneous phantoms, and a precision of 2mm for anthropomorphic pelvic phantom, except at points with significant range mixing. Conclusion: We completed the commissioning of our system for in-vivo dosimetry and range verification in proton therapy. The results suggest that the system is ready for clinical trials on patient.

  1. Fundamentals of successful monitoring, reporting, and verification under a cap-and-trade program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Schakenbach; Robert Vollaro; Reynaldo Forte

    2006-11-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed and implemented the Acid Rain Program (ARP), and NOx Budget Trading Programs (NBTP) using several fundamental monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) elements: (1) compliance assurance through incentives and automatic penalties; (2) strong quality assurance (QA); (3) collaborative approach with a petition process; (4) standardized electronic reporting; (5) compliance flexibility for low-emitting sources; (6) complete emissions data record required; (7) centralized administration; (8) level playing field; (9) publicly available data; (10) performance-based approach; and (11) reducing conflicts of interest. Each of these elements is discussed in the context of the authors' experience under two U.S. cap-and-trade programs and their potential application to other cap and-trade programs. The U.S. Office of Management and Budget found that the Acid Rain Program has accounted for the largest quantified human health benefits of any federal regulatory program implemented in the last 10 yr, with annual benefits exceeding costs by {gt} 40 to 1. The authors believe that the elements described in this paper greatly contributed to this success. EPA has used the ARP fundamental elements as a model for other cap-and-trade programs, including the NBTP, which went into effect in 2003, and the recently published Clean Air Interstate Rule and Clean Air Mercury Rule. The authors believe that using these fundamental elements to develop and implement the MRV portion of their cap-and-trade programs has resulted in public confidence in the programs, highly accurate and complete emissions data, and a high compliance rate. 2 refs.

  2. Galaxy Clustering, Photometric Redshifts and Diagnosis of Systematics in the DES Science Verification Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crocce, M.

    2015-12-09

    We study the clustering of galaxies detected at i < 22.5 in the Science Verification observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Two-point correlation functions are measured using 2.3 × 106 galaxies over a contiguous 116 deg2 region in five bins of photometric redshift width Δz = 0.2 in the range 0.2 < z < 1.2. The impact of photometric redshift errors is assessed by comparing results using a template-based photo-zalgorithm (BPZ) to a machine-learning algorithm (TPZ). A companion paper presents maps of several observational variables (e.g. seeing, sky brightness) which could modulate the galaxy density. Here we characterize andmore » mitigate systematic errors on the measured clustering which arise from these observational variables, in addition to others such as Galactic dust and stellar contamination. After correcting for systematic effects, we then measure galaxy bias over a broad range of linear scales relative to mass clustering predicted from the Planck Λ cold dark matter model, finding agreement with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) measurements with χ2 of 4.0 (8.7) with 5 degrees of freedom for the TPZ (BPZ) redshifts. Furthermore, we test a ‘linear bias’ model, in which the galaxy clustering is a fixed multiple of the predicted non-linear dark matter clustering. The precision of the data allows us to determine that the linear bias model describes the observed galaxy clustering to 2.5 percent accuracy down to scales at least 4–10 times smaller than those on which linear theory is expected to be sufficient.« less

  3. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  4. In vivo real-time dosimetric verification in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Erin L.; Downes, Simon J.; Fogarty, Gerald B.; Izard, Michael A.; Metcalfe, Peter

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a diode array in the routine verification of planned dose to points inside the rectum from prostate high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using a real-time planning system. Methods: A dosimetric study involving 28 patients was undertaken where measured doses received during treatment were compared to those calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). After the ultrasound imaging required for treatment planning had been recorded, the ultrasound probe was replaced with a geometric replica that contained an 8 mm diameter cylindrical cavity in which a PTW diode array type 9112 was placed. The replica probe was then positioned inside the rectum with the individual diode positions determined using fluoroscopy. Dose was then recorded during the patients' treatment and compared to associated coordinates in the planning system. Results: Factors influencing diode response and experimental uncertainty were initially investigated to estimate the overall uncertainty involved in dose measurements, which was determined to be {+-}10%. Data was acquired for 28 patients' first fractions, 11 patients' second fractions, and 13 patients' third fractions with collection dependent upon circumstances. Deviations between the diode measurements and predicted values ranged from -42% to +35% with 71% of measurements experiencing less than a 10% deviation from the predicted values. If the {+-}10% measurement uncertainty was combined with a tolerated dose discrepancy of {+-}10% then over 95% of the diode results exhibited agreement with the calculated data to within {+-}20%. It must also be noted that when large dose discrepancies were apparent they did not necessarily occur for all five diodes in the one measurement. Conclusions: This technique provided a method that could be utilized to detect gross errors in dose delivery of a real-time prostate HDR plan. Limitations in the detection system used must be well understood if meaningful results are to be achieved.

  5. MO-F-16A-01: Implementation of MPPG TPS Verification Tests On Various Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, J; Bredfeldt, J; Geurts, M; Miller, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the implementation of the Medical Physics Practice Guideline (MPPG) for dose calculation and beam parameters verification of treatment planning systems (TPS). Methods: We implemented the draft TPS MPPG for three linacs: Varian Trilogy, TomoHDA and Elekta Infinity. Static and modulated test plans were created. The static fields are different than used in commissioning. Data was collected using ion chambers and diodes in a scanning water tank, Delta4 phantom and a custom phantom. MatLab and Microsoft Excel were used to create analysis tools to compare reference DICOM dose with scan data. This custom code allowed for the interpolation, registration and gamma analysis of arbitrary dose profiles. It will be provided as open source code. IMRT fields were validated with Delta4 registration and comparison tools. The time for each task was recorded. Results: The tests confirmed the strengths, and revealed some limitations, of our TPS. The agreement between calculated and measured dose was reported for all beams. For static fields, percent depth dose and profiles were analyzed with criteria in the draft MPPG. The results reveal areas of slight mismatch with the model (MLC leaf penumbra, buildup region.) For TomoTherapy, the IMRT plan 2%/2 mm gamma analysis revealed poorest agreement in the low dose regions. For one static test plan for all 10MV Trilogy photon beams, the plan generation, scan queue creation, data collection, data analysis and report took 2 hours, excluding tank setup. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the implementation feasibility of the TPS MPPG. This exercise generated an open source tool for dose comparisons between scan data and DICOM dose data. An easily reproducible and efficient infrastructure with streamlined data collection was created for repeatable robust testing of the TPS. The tests revealed minor discrepancies in our models and areas for improvement that are being investigated.

  6. SU-GG-T-49: Real Time Dose Verification for Novel Shielded Balloon Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindarajan, Nandakarthik; Nazaryan, Vahagn; Gueye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The validation of a novel approach for reducing skindoses to an acceptable level during Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) when the balloon-to-skin distance is inadequate (less than 7 mm) is reported. The study uses a real time dose verification method for a metallic shielded balloon applicator using scintillation fiber technology. Method and Materials: Partial shielding of the radiationdose to the skin using iron or other ferrous powder could enable the extension of APBI to some patients. With small external and pre-determined magnetic fields (

  7. Pencil beam approach for correcting the energy dependence artifact in film dosimetry for IMRT verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirov, Assen S.; Caravelli, Gregory; Palm, Aasa; Chui, Chen; LoSasso, Thomas

    2006-10-15

    The higher sensitivity to low-energy scattered photons of radiographic film compared to water can lead to significant dosimetric error when the beam quality varies significantly within a field. Correcting for this artifact will provide greater accuracy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification dosimetry. A procedure is developed for correction of the film energy-dependent response by creating a pencil beam kernel within our treatment planning system to model the film response specifically. Film kernels are obtained from EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations of the dose distribution from a 1 mm diameter narrow beam in a model of the film placed at six depths from 1.5 to 40 cm in polystyrene and solid water phantoms. Kernels for different area phantoms (50x50 cm{sup 2} and 25x25 cm{sup 2} polystyrene and 30x30 cm{sup 2} solid water) are produced. The Monte Carlo calculated kernel is experimentally verified with film, ion chamber and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements in polystyrene irradiated by a narrow beam. The kernel is then used in convolution calculations to predict the film response in open and IMRT fields. A 6 MV photon beam and Kodak XV2 film in a polystyrene phantom are selected to test the method as they are often used in practice and can result in large energy-dependent artifacts. The difference in dose distributions calculated with the film kernel and the water kernel is subtracted from film measurements to obtain a practically film artifact free IMRT dose distribution for the Kodak XV2 film. For the points with dose exceeding 5 cGy (11% of the peak dose) in a large modulated field and a film measurement inside a large polystyrene phantom at depth of 10 cm, the correction reduces the fraction of pixels for which the film dose deviates from dose to water by more than 5% of the mean film dose from 44% to 6%.

  8. Wave dispersion in the hybrid-Vlasov model: Verification of Vlasiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempf, Yann; Pokhotelov, Dimitry; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki ; Alfthan, Sebastian von; Palmroth, Minna; Vaivads, Andris

    2013-11-15

    Vlasiator is a new hybrid-Vlasov plasma simulation code aimed at simulating the entire magnetosphere of the Earth. The code treats ions (protons) kinetically through Vlasov's equation in the six-dimensional phase space while electrons are a massless charge-neutralizing fluid [M. Palmroth et al., J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 99, 41 (2013); A. Sandroos et al., Parallel Comput. 39, 306 (2013)]. For first global simulations of the magnetosphere, it is critical to verify and validate the model by established methods. Here, as part of the verification of Vlasiator, we characterize the low-? plasma wave modes described by this model and compare with the solution computed by the Waves in Homogeneous, Anisotropic Multicomponent Plasmas (WHAMP) code [K. Rnnmark, Kiruna Geophysical Institute Reports No. 179, 1982], using dispersion curves and surfaces produced with both programs. The match between the two fundamentally different approaches is excellent in the low-frequency, long wavelength range which is of interest in global magnetospheric simulations. The left-hand and right-hand polarized wave modes as well as the Bernstein modes in the Vlasiator simulations agree well with the WHAMP solutions. Vlasiator allows a direct investigation of the importance of the Hall term by including it in or excluding it from Ohm's law in simulations. This is illustrated showing examples of waves obtained using the ideal Ohm's law and Ohm's law including the Hall term. Our analysis emphasizes the role of the Hall term in Ohm's law in obtaining wave modes departing from ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the hybrid-Vlasov model.

  9. Redshift Distributions of Galaxies in the DES Science Verification Shear Catalogue and Implications for Weak Lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnett, C.

    2015-07-21

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties ?z ? 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of ?8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on ?8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, ?crit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  10. Galaxy Clustering, Photometric Redshifts and Diagnosis of Systematics in the DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crocce, M.

    2015-12-09

    We study the clustering of galaxies detected at i < 22.5 in the Science Verification observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Two-point correlation functions are measured using 2.3 106 galaxies over a contiguous 116 deg2 region in five bins of photometric redshift width ?z = 0.2 in the range 0.2 < z < 1.2. The impact of photometric redshift errors is assessed by comparing results using a template-based photo-zalgorithm (BPZ) to a machine-learning algorithm (TPZ). A companion paper presents maps of several observational variables (e.g. seeing, sky brightness) which could modulate the galaxy density. Here we characterize and mitigate systematic errors on the measured clustering which arise from these observational variables, in addition to others such as Galactic dust and stellar contamination. After correcting for systematic effects, we then measure galaxy bias over a broad range of linear scales relative to mass clustering predicted from the Planck ? cold dark matter model, finding agreement with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) measurements with ?2 of 4.0 (8.7) with 5 degrees of freedom for the TPZ (BPZ) redshifts. Furthermore, we test a linear bias model, in which the galaxy clustering is a fixed multiple of the predicted non-linear dark matter clustering. The precision of the data allows us to determine that the linear bias model describes the observed galaxy clustering to 2.5 percent accuracy down to scales at least 410 times smaller than those on which linear theory is expected to be sufficient.

  11. Mapping and Simulating Systematics Due to Spatially-Varying Observing Conditions in DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leistedt, B.

    2015-07-20

    Spatially-varying depth and characteristics of observing conditions, such as seeing, airmass, or sky background, are major sources of systematic uncertainties in modern galaxy survey analyses, in particular in deep multi-epoch surveys. We present a framework to extract and project these sources of systematics onto the sky, and apply it to the Dark Energy Survey (DES) to map the observing conditions of the Science Verification (SV) data. The resulting distributions and maps of sources of systematics are used in several analyses of DES SV to perform detailed null tests with the data, and also to incorporate systematics in survey simulations. We illustrate the complementarity of these two approaches by comparing the SV data with the BCC-UFig, a synthetic sky catalogue generated by forward-modelling of the DES SV images. We then analyse the BCC-UFig simulation to construct galaxy samples mimicking those used in SV galaxy clustering studies. We show that the spatially-varying survey depth imprinted in the observed galaxy densities and the redshift distributions of the SV data are successfully reproduced by the simulation and well-captured by the maps of observing conditions. The combined use of the maps, the SV data and the BCC-UFig simulation allows us to quantify the impact of spatial systematics on N(z), the redshift distributions inferred using photometric redshifts. We conclude that spatial systematics in the SV data are mainly due to seeing fluctuations and are under control in current clustering and weak lensing analyses. However, they will need to be carefully characterised in upcoming phases of DES in order to avoid biasing the inferred cosmological results. The framework presented is relevant to all multi-epoch surveys, and will be essential for exploiting future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will require detailed null-tests and realistic end-to-end image simulations to correctly interpret the deep, high-cadence observations of the sky.

  12. SU-E-T-65: Characterization of a 2D Array for QA and Pretreatment Plan Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anvari, A; Aghamiri, S; Mahdavi, S; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The OCTAVIUS detector729 is a 2D array of 729 air vented cubic plane parallel ion chambers used for pretreatment verification and QA. In this study we investigated dosimetric characteristics of this system for clinical photon beam dosimetry. Methods: Detector performance evaluation included determination of the location of the effective point of measurement (EPM), sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility of detector response, as well as output factor, dose rate, and source to surface distance (SSD) dependence. Finally, assessment of wedge modulated fields was carried out. All the evaluations were performed five times for low and high photon energies. For reference measurements, a 0.6 cc ionization chamber was used. Data analysis and comparison of the OCTAVIUS detector with reference ion chamber data was performed using the VeriSoft patient plan verification software. Results: The reproducibility and stability of the measurements are excellent, the detector showed same signal with a maximum deviation of less than 0.5% in short and long term. Results of sensitivity test showed same signal with a maximum deviation of approximately 0.1%. As the detector 729 response is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurement at regions of high dose gradient effectively. The detector agrees with the ionization chamber measurement to within 1% for SSD range of 75 to 125 cm. Also, its measured wedge modulated profiles matched very well with ion chamber dose profiles acquired in a water tank. Conclusions: As the response of the detector 729 is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurements in the areas of dose gradients effectively. Based on the measurements and comparisons performed, this system is a reliable and accurate dosimeter for QA and pretreatment plan verification in radiotherapy.

  13. Automated UF6 Cylinder Enrichment Assay: Status of the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA) Project: POTAS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Smith, Leon E.

    2012-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intends to automate the UF6 cylinder nondestructive assay (NDA) verification currently performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at enrichment plants. PNNL is proposing the installation of a portal monitor at a key measurement point to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the data along with operator inputs in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until inspector arrival. This report summarizes the status of the research and development of an enrichment assay methodology supporting the cylinder verification concept. The enrichment assay approach exploits a hybrid of two passively-detected ionizing-radiation signatures: the traditional enrichment meter signature (186-keV photon peak area) and a non-traditional signature, manifested in the high-energy (3 to 8 MeV) gamma-ray continuum, generated by neutron emission from UF6. PNNL has designed, fabricated, and field-tested several prototype assay sensor packages in an effort to demonstrate proof-of-principle for the hybrid assay approach, quantify the expected assay precision for various categories of cylinder contents, and assess the potential for unsupervised deployment of the technology in a portal-monitor form factor. We refer to recent sensor-package prototypes as the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The report provides an overview of the assay signatures and summarizes the results of several HEVA field measurement campaigns on populations of Type 30B UF6 cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU), natural uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Approaches to performance optimization of the assay technique via radiation transport modeling are briefly described, as are spectroscopic and data-analysis algorithms.

  14. WE-D-BRF-02: Acoustic Signal From the Bragg Peak for Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhardt, S; Assmann, W; Fink, A; Thirolf, P; Parodi, K; Kellnberger, S; Omar, M; Ntziachristos, V; Gaebisch, C; Moser, M; Dollinger, G; Sergiadis, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams. Aim of this work is to study the feasibility of determining the ion range with sub-mm accuracy by use of high frequency ultrasonic (US) transducers and to image the Bragg peak by tomography. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity, length and repetition rate. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based US detectors (3.5 MHz and 10 MHz central frequencies). For tomography a 64 channel US detector array was used and moved along the ion track by a remotely controlled motor stage. Results: A clear signal of the Bragg peak was visible for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Range measurements were reproducible within +/? 20 micrometer and agreed well with Geant4 simulations. The tomographic reconstruction does not only allow to measure the ion range but also the beam spot size at the Bragg peak position. Conclusion: Range verification by acoustic means is a promising new technique for treatment modalities where the tumor can be localized by US imaging. Further improvement of sensitivity is required to account for higher attenuation of the US signal in tissue, as well as lower energy density in the Bragg peak in realistic treatment cases due to higher particle energy and larger spot sizes. Nevertheless, the acoustic range verification approach could offer the possibility of combining anatomical US imaging with Bragg Peak imaging in the near future. The work was funded by the DFG cluster of excellence Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-D4 Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-036

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-02-23

    The 1607-D4 Septic System was a septic tank and tile field that received sanitary sewage from the 115-D/DR Gas Recirculation Facility. This septic system operated from 1944 to 1968. Decommissioning took place in 1985 and 1986 when all above-grade features were demolished and the tank backfilled. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  16. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Sustainable ForestManagement: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye , Jayant; Makundi , Willy; Goldberg ,Beth; Andrasko , Ken; Sanchez , Arturo

    1997-07-01

    The International Workshop on Sustainable Forest Management: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases was held in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 29-31, 1996. The main objectives of the workshop were to: (1) assemble key practitioners of forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) or carbon offset projects, remote sensing of land cover change, guidelines development, and the forest products certification movement, to offer presentations and small group discussions on findings relevant to the crucial need for the development of guidelines for monitoring and verifying offset projects, and (2) disseminate the findings to interested carbon offset project developers and forestry and climate change policy makers, who need guidance and consistency of methods to reduce project transaction costs and increase probable reliability of carbon benefits, at appropriate venues. The workshop brought together about 45 participants from developed, developing, and transition countries. The participants included researchers, government officials, project developers, and staff from regional and international agencies. Each shared his or her perspectives based on experience in the development and use of methods for monitoring and verifying carbon flows from forest areas and projects. A shared sense among the participants was that methods for monitoring forestry projects are well established, and the techniques are known and used extensively, particularly in production forestry. Introducing climate change with its long-term perspective is often in conflict with the shorter-term perspective of most forestry projects and standard accounting principles. The resolution of these conflicts may require national and international agreements among the affected parties. The establishment of guidelines and protocols for better methods that are sensitive to regional issues will be an important first step to increase the credibility of forestry projects as viable mitigation options. The workshop deliberations led to three primary outputs: (1) a Workshop Statement in the JI Quarterly, September, 1996; (2) the publication of a series of selected peer-reviewed technical papers from the workshop in a report of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL. 40501); and (3) a special issue of the journal ''Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change'', Kluwer Academic Publishers. The outputs will be distributed to practitioners in this field and to negotiators attending the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) deliberations leading up to the Third conference of Parties in Kyoto, in December 1997.

  17. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  18. Camera selection for real-time in vivo radiation treatment verification systems using Cherenkov imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M. Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To identify achievable camera performance and hardware needs in a clinical Cherenkov imaging system for real-time, in vivo monitoring of the surface beam profile on patients, as novel visual information, documentation, and possible treatment verification for clinicians. Methods: Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS), charge-coupled device (CCD), intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), and electron multiplying-intensified charge coupled device (EM-ICCD) cameras were investigated to determine Cherenkov imaging performance in a clinical radiotherapy setting, with one emphasis on the maximum supportable frame rate. Where possible, the image intensifier was synchronized using a pulse signal from the Linac in order to image with room lighting conditions comparable to patient treatment scenarios. A solid water phantom irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam was imaged by the cameras to evaluate the maximum frame rate for adequate Cherenkov detection. Adequate detection was defined as an average electron count in the background-subtracted Cherenkov image region of interest in excess of 0.5% (327 counts) of the 16-bit maximum electron count value. Additionally, an ICCD and an EM-ICCD were each used clinically to image two patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy to compare clinical advantages and limitations of each system. Results: Intensifier-coupled cameras were required for imaging Cherenkov emission on the phantom surface with ambient room lighting; standalone CMOS and CCD cameras were not viable. The EM-ICCD was able to collect images from a single Linac pulse delivering less than 0.05 cGy of dose at 30 frames/s (fps) and pixel resolution of 512 × 512, compared to an ICCD which was limited to 4.7 fps at 1024 × 1024 resolution. An intensifier with higher quantum efficiency at the entrance photocathode in the red wavelengths [30% quantum efficiency (QE) vs previous 19%] promises at least 8.6 fps at a resolution of 1024 × 1024 and lower monetary cost than the EM-ICCD. Conclusions: The ICCD with an intensifier better optimized for red wavelengths was found to provide the best potential for real-time display (at least 8.6 fps) of radiation dose on the skin during treatment at a resolution of 1024 × 1024.

  19. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 40 cm) rotated over 2? about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 ?s pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 ?m) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly impact beam commissioning, treatment verification during particle beam therapy and image guided techniques.

  20. Investigation of the spatial resolution of an online dose verification device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asuni, G.; Rickey, D. W.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to characterize a new online dose verification device, COMPASS transmission detector array (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). The array is composed of 1600 cylindrical ionization chambers of 3.8 mm diameter, separated by 6.5 mm center-to-center spacing, in a 40 x 40 arrangement. Methods: The line spread function (LSF) of a single ion chamber in the detector was measured with a narrow slit collimator for a 6 MV photon beam. The 0.25 x 10 mm{sup 2} slit was formed by two machined lead blocks. The LSF was obtained by laterally translating the detector in 0.25 mm steps underneath the slit over a range of 24 mm and taking a measurement at each step. This measurement was validated with Monte Carlo simulation using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), the Fourier transform of the line spread function, was determined and compared to calculated (Monte Carlo and analytical) MTFs. Two head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields were measured using the device and were used to validate the LSF measurement. These fields were simulated with the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo model, and the Monte Carlo generated incident fluence was convolved with the 2D detector response function (derived from the measured LSF) to obtain calculated dose. The measured and calculated dose distributions were then quantitatively compared using {chi}-comparison criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement for in-field points (defined as those above the 10% maximum dose threshold). Results: The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the measured detector response for a single chamber is 4.3 mm, which is comparable to the chamber diameter of 3.8 mm. The pre-sampling MTF was calculated, and the resolution of one chamber was estimated as 0.25 lp/mm from the first zero crossing. For both examined IMRT fields, the {chi}-comparison between measured and calculated data show good agreement with 95.1% and 96.3% of in-field points below {chi} of 1.0 for fields 1 and 2, respectively (with an average {chi} of 0.29 for IMRT field 1 and 0.24 for IMRT field 2). Conclusions: The LSF for a new novel online detector has been measured at 6 MV using a narrow slit technique, and this measurement has been validated by Monte Carlo simulation. The detector response function derived from line spread function has been applied to recover measured IMRT fields. The results have shown that the device measures IMRT fields accurately within acceptable tolerance.

  1. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. These test problems focus on whether a particular contact algorithm properly represents the interactions along the interface. A companion report (McMichael, 2006) and test problems address the multi-contact scenario in which multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The multi-contact test problems examine whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for subsequent regression testing.

  2. Cross-correlation of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and Planck lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, D.; et al.

    2015-12-14

    We measure the cross-correlation between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg$^{2}$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of $z_{\\rm med} {\\sim} 0.7$, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at $z{\\sim}2$. The resulting cross-correlation is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at $z{\\sim}0.44$. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fit cosmology, the amplitude of the DES$\\times$SPT cross-power is found to be $A = 0.88 \\pm 0.30$ and that from DES$\\times$Planck to be $A = 0.86 \\pm 0.39$, where $A=1$ corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of $2.9 \\sigma$ and $2.2 \\sigma$ respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photometric redshift uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. Significant intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes would increase the cross-correlation signal inferred from the data; we calculate a value of $A = 1.08 \\pm 0.36$ for DES$\\times$SPT when we correct the observations with a simple IA model. With three measurements of this cross-correlation now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of cross-correlation, given the size of the statistical uncertainties and the significant impact of systematic errors, particularly IAs. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.

  3. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE SPRU LOWER LEVEL HILLSIDE AREA AT THE KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M.; Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-06-06

    During August 10, 2011 through August 19, 2011, and October 23, 2011 through November 4, 2011, ORAU/ORISE conducted verification survey activities at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) site that included in-process inspections, surface scans, and soil sampling of the Lower Level Hillside Area. According to the Type-B Investigation Report, Sr-90 was the primary contributor to the majority of the activity (60 times greater than the Cs-137 activity). The evaluation of the scan data and sample results obtained during verification activities determined that the primary radionuclide of concern, Sr-90, was well below the agreed upon soil cleanup objective (SCO) of 30 pCi/g for the site. However, the concentration of Cs-137 in the four judgmental samples collected in final status survey (FSS) Units A and B was greater than the SCO. Both ORAU and aRc surveys identified higher Cs-137 concentrations in FSS Units A and B; the greatest concentrations were indentified in FSS Unit A.

  4. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  5. Reinforcing of QA/QC programs in radiotherapy departments in Croatia: Results of treatment planning system verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurkovi?, Slaven; vabi?, Manda; Dikli?, Ana; Smilovi? Radoj?i?, ?eni; Dundara, Dea; Kasabai?, Mladen; Ivkovi?, Ana; Faj, Dario

    2013-04-01

    Implementation of advanced techniques in clinical practice can greatly improve the outcome of radiation therapy, but it also makes the process much more complex with a lot of room for errors. An important part of the quality assurance program is verification of treatment planning system (TPS). Dosimetric verifications in anthropomorphic phantom were performed in 4 centers where new systems were installed. A total of 14 tests for 2 photon energies and multigrid superposition algorithms were conducted using the CMS XiO TPS. Evaluation criteria as specified in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Reports Series (IAEA TRS) 430 were employed. Results of measurements are grouped according to the placement of the measuring point and the beam energy. The majority of differences between calculated and measured doses in the water-equivalent part of the phantom were in tolerance. Significantly more out-of-tolerance values were observed in nonwater-equivalent parts of the phantom, especially for higher-energy photon beams. This survey was done as a part of continuous effort to build up awareness of quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) importance in the Croatian radiotherapy community. Understanding the limitations of different parts of the various systems used in radiation therapy can systematically improve quality as well.

  6. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-243 Petroleum-Contaminated Soil Bioremediation Pad, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-11-07

    The 600-243 waste site consisted of a bioremediation pad for petroleum-contaminated soils resulting from the 1100 Area Underground Storage Tank (UST) upgrades in 1994. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  7. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Design and Interface Design Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE software design and interface design is to assess the activities that results in the development, documentation, and review of a software design that meets the requirements defined in the software requirements documentation. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP) design specification.

  8. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Design and Interface Design Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE software design and interface design is to assess the activities that results in the development, documentation, and review of a software design that meets the requirements defined in the software requirements documentation. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production. IV&V reviewed the requirements specified in the NRC Form 189s to verify these requirements were included in SAPHIRE’s Software Verification and Validation Plan (SVVP) design specification.

  9. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:14, 116-F-5 Influent Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-029

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-02-29

    The 100-F-26:14 waste site includes underground pipelines associated with the 116-F-5 Ball Washer Crib and remnants of process pipelines on the west side of the 105-F Building. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  10. NESC VII European project: demonstration of warm pre-stressing effect in biaxial loading conditions - Bending tests on 18MND5 cruciform specimens and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquemoud, C.; Yuritzinn, T.; Marie, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the NESC VII European project, a large experimental program has been dedicated to characterize the Warm Pre-Stressing (WPS) effect in different testing configurations. One of the CEA (France) contributions to this project is the realization of five point bending tests on large cruciform specimens considering different WPS loading cycles. The five cruciform specimens, sponsored by EDF (France) and IRSN (France), are made of 18MND5 steel. Two of them have been tested on a same LCF (Load-Cool-Fracture) loading cycle and two others on the same LCTF (Load-Cool-Transient-Fracture) loading cycle. The experimental results presented in this paper give a successful demonstration of the WPS effect in biaxial loading conditions either on a LCF or on a LCTF cycle. During the test interpretations, different models have then been tested and compared in order to evaluate their ability to predict the cleavage fracture in the case of different WPS loading cycles. They all provide very conservative predictions whatever loading cycle is concerned. (authors)

  11. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messenger, Mike; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Golemboski, Bill; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2010-04-14

    Public and private funding for end-use energy efficiency actions is expected to increase significantly in the United States over the next decade. For example, Barbose et al (2009) estimate that spending on ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in the U.S. could increase from $3.1 billion in 2008 to $7.5 and 12.4 billion by 2020 under their medium and high scenarios. This increase in spending could yield annual electric energy savings ranging from 0.58% - 0.93% of total U.S. retail sales in 2020, up from 0.34% of retail sales in 2008. Interest in and support for energy efficiency has broadened among national and state policymakers. Prominent examples include {approx}$18 billion in new funding for energy efficiency programs (e.g., State Energy Program, Weatherization, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants) in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Increased funding for energy efficiency should result in more benefits as well as more scrutiny of these results. As energy efficiency becomes a more prominent component of the U.S. national energy strategy and policies, assessing the effectiveness and energy saving impacts of energy efficiency programs is likely to become increasingly important for policymakers and private and public funders of efficiency actions. Thus, it is critical that evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is carried out effectively and efficiently, which implies that: (1) Effective program evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methodologies and tools are available to key stakeholders (e.g., regulatory agencies, program administrators, consumers, and evaluation consultants); and (2) Capacity (people and infrastructure resources) is available to conduct EM&V activities and report results in ways that support program improvement and provide data that reliably compares achieved results against goals and similar programs in other jurisdictions (benchmarking). The National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (2007) presented commonly used definitions for EM&V in the context of energy efficiency programs: (1) Evaluation (E) - The performance of studies and activities aimed at determining the effects and effectiveness of EE programs; (2) Measurement and Verification (M&V) - Data collection, monitoring, and analysis associated with the calculation of gross energy and demand savings from individual measures, sites or projects. M&V can be a subset of program evaluation; and (3) Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification (EM&V) - This term is frequently seen in evaluation literature. EM&V is a catchall acronym for determining both the effectiveness of program designs and estimates of load impacts at the portfolio, program and project level. This report is a scoping study that assesses current practices and methods in the evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs, with a focus on methods and practices currently used for determining whether projected (ex-ante) energy and demand savings have been achieved (ex-post). M&V practices for privately-funded energy efficiency projects (e.g., ESCO projects) or programs where the primary focus is greenhouse gas reductions were not part of the scope of this study. We identify and discuss key purposes and uses of current evaluations of end-use energy efficiency programs, methods used to evaluate these programs, processes used to determine those methods; and key issues that need to be addressed now and in the future, based on discussions with regulatory agencies, policymakers, program administrators, and evaluation practitioners in 14 states and national experts in the evaluation field. We also explore how EM&V may evolve in a future in which efficiency funding increases significantly, innovative mechanisms for rewarding program performance are adopted, the role of efficiency in greenhouse gas mitigation is more closely linked, and programs are increasingly funded from multiple sources often with multiple program administrators and in

  12. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boring, Laurids Ronald

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  13. Integrated Safety Management System Phase 1 and 2 Verification for the Environmental Restoration Contractor Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARTER, R.P.

    2000-04-04

    DOE Policy 450.4 mandates that safety be integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. The goal of an institutionalized Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and the federal property over the life cycle of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The purpose of this Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) ISMS Phase MI Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes were institutionalized within the ER Project, whether these programs and processes were implemented, and whether the system had promoted the development of a safety conscious work culture.

  14. Preliminary Verification and Validation of WEC-Sim, an Open-Source Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruehl, K.; Michelen, C.; Kanner, S.; Lawson, M.; Yu, Y. H.

    2014-03-01

    To promote and support the wave energy industry, a wave energy converter (WEC) design tool, WEC-Sim, is being developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, the WEC-Sim code is used to model a point absorber WEC designed by the U.S. Department of Energy's reference model project. Preliminary verification was performed by comparing results of the WEC-Sim simulation through a code-to-code comparison, utilizing the commercial codes ANSYS-AQWA, WaveDyn, and OrcaFlex. A preliminary validation of the code was also performed by comparing WEC-Sim simulation results to experimental wave tank tests.

  15. Combining Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO2 in Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swart, Peter K.; Dixon, Tim

    2014-09-30

    A series of surface geophysical and geochemical techniques are tested in order to demonstrate and validate low cost approaches for Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) of the integrity of deep reservoirs for CO2 storage. These techniques are (i) surface deformation by GPS; ii) surface deformation by InSAR; iii) passive source seismology via broad band seismometers; and iv) soil gas monitoring with a cavity ring down spectrometer for measurement of CO2 concentration and carbon isotope ratio. The techniques were tested at an active EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) site in Texas. Each approach has demonstrated utility. Assuming Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) activities become operational in the future, these techniques can be used to augment more expensive down-hole techniques.

  16. WE-F-16A-06: Using 3D Printers to Create Complex Phantoms for Dose Verification, Quality Assurance, and Treatment Planning System Commissioning in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassaee, A; Ding, X; McDonough, J; Reiche, M; Witztum, A; Teo, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To use 3D printers to design and construct complex geometrical phantoms for commissioning treatment planning systems, dose calculation algorithms, quality assurance (QA), dose delivery, and patient dose verifications. Methods: In radiotherapy, complex geometrical phantoms are often required for dose verification, dose delivery and calculation algorithm validation. Presently, fabrication of customized phantoms is limited due to time, expense and challenges in machining of complex shapes. In this work, we designed and utilized 3D printers to fabricate two phantoms for QA purposes. One phantom includes hills and valleys (HV) for verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy for photons, and protons (IMRT and IMPT). The other phantom includes cylindrical cavities (CC) of various sizes for dose verification of inhomogeneities. We evaluated the HV phantoms for an IMPT beam, and the CC phantom to study various inhomogeneity configurations using photon, electron, and proton beams. Gafcromic films were used to quantify the dose distributions delivered to the phantoms. Results: The HV phantom has dimensions of 12 cm 12 cm and consists of one row and one column of five peaks with heights ranging from 2 to 5 cm. The CC phantom has a size 10 cm 14 cm and includes 6 cylindrical cavities with length of 7.2 cm and diameters ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 cm. The IMPT evaluation using the HV phantom shows good agreement as compared to the dose distribution calculated with treatment planning system. The CC phantom also shows reasonable agreements for using different algorithms for each beam modalities. Conclusion: 3D printers with submillimiter resolutions are capable of printing complex phantoms for dose verification and QA in radiotherapy. As printing costs decrease and the technology becomes widely available, phantom design and construction will be readily available to any clinic for testing geometries that were not previously feasible.

  17. Comparison of Kodak EDR2 and Gafchromic EBT film for intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose distribution verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankar, A. . E-mail: asankar_phy@yahoo.co.in; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Nehru, R. Mothilal; Gopalakrishna Kurup, P.G.; Murali, V.; Enke, Charles A.; Velmurugan, J.

    2006-01-01

    The quantitative dose validation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans require 2-dimensional (2D) high-resolution dosimetry systems with uniform response over its sensitive region. The present work deals with clinical use of commercially available self-developing Radio Chromic Film, Gafchromic EBT film, for IMRT dose verification. Dose response curves were generated for the films using a VXR-16 film scanner. The results obtained with EBT films were compared with the results of Kodak extended dose range 2 (EDR2) films. The EBT film had a linear response between the dose range of 0 to 600 cGy. The dose-related characteristics of the EBT film, such as post irradiation color growth with time, film uniformity, and effect of scanning orientation, were studied. There was up to 8.6% increase in the color density between 2 to 40 hours after irradiation. There was a considerable variation, up to 8.5%, in the film uniformity over its sensitive region. The quantitative differences between calculated and measured dose distributions were analyzed using DTA and Gamma index with the tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3-mm distance agreement. The EDR2 films showed consistent results with the calculated dose distributions, whereas the results obtained using EBT were inconsistent. The variation in the film uniformity limits the use of EBT film for conventional large-field IMRT verification. For IMRT of smaller field sizes (4.5 x 4.5 cm), the results obtained with EBT were comparable with results of EDR2 films.

  18. SciSat AM: Stereo 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered in air and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  19. R&D for computational cognitive and social models : foundations for model evaluation through verification and validation (final LDRD report).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slepoy, Alexander; Mitchell, Scott A.; Backus, George A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2008-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investing in projects that aim to develop computational modeling and simulation applications that explore human cognitive and social phenomena. While some of these modeling and simulation projects are explicitly research oriented, others are intended to support or provide insight for people involved in high consequence decision-making. This raises the issue of how to evaluate computational modeling and simulation applications in both research and applied settings where human behavior is the focus of the model: when is a simulation 'good enough' for the goals its designers want to achieve? In this report, we discuss two years' worth of review and assessment of the ASC program's approach to computational model verification and validation, uncertainty quantification, and decision making. We present a framework that extends the principles of the ASC approach into the area of computational social and cognitive modeling and simulation. In doing so, we argue that the potential for evaluation is a function of how the modeling and simulation software will be used in a particular setting. In making this argument, we move from strict, engineering and physics oriented approaches to V&V to a broader project of model evaluation, which asserts that the systematic, rigorous, and transparent accumulation of evidence about a model's performance under conditions of uncertainty is a reasonable and necessary goal for model evaluation, regardless of discipline. How to achieve the accumulation of evidence in areas outside physics and engineering is a significant research challenge, but one that requires addressing as modeling and simulation tools move out of research laboratories and into the hands of decision makers. This report provides an assessment of our thinking on ASC Verification and Validation, and argues for further extending V&V research in the physical and engineering sciences toward a broader program of model evaluation in situations of high consequence decision-making.

  20. Verification of the New FAST v8 Capabilities for the Modeling of Fixed-Bottom Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barahona, B.; Jonkman, J.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Hayman, G.

    2014-12-01

    Coupled dynamic analysis has an important role in the design of offshore wind turbines because the systems are subject to complex operating conditions from the combined action of waves and wind. The aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool FAST v8 is framed in a novel modularization scheme that facilitates such analysis. Here, we present the verification of new capabilities of FAST v8 to model fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. We analyze a series of load cases with both wind and wave loads and compare the results against those from the previous international code comparison projects-the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23 Subtask 2 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) and the IEA Wind Task 30 OC3 Continued (OC4) projects. The verification is performed using the NREL 5-MW reference turbine supported by monopile, tripod, and jacket substructures. The substructure structural-dynamics models are built within the new SubDyn module of FAST v8, which uses a linear finite-element beam model with Craig-Bampton dynamic system reduction. This allows the modal properties of the substructure to be synthesized and coupled to hydrodynamic loads and tower dynamics. The hydrodynamic loads are calculated using a new strip theory approach for multimember substructures in the updated HydroDyn module of FAST v8. These modules are linked to the rest of FAST through the new coupling scheme involving mapping between module-independent spatial discretizations and a numerically rigorous implicit solver. The results show that the new structural dynamics, hydrodynamics, and coupled solutions compare well to the results from the previous code comparison projects.