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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries October 17, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Through licensing and collaborative work, Energy Department-sponsored research can yield great economic benefits and help bring important new products to market. The Energy Department funds cutting-edge research on a broad range of topics ranging from advanced battery construction to the modeling of industrial processes and supercomputer simulation of supernovae. But this research is not only about furthering our understanding of the world around

2

Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery  

SciTech Connect

A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

Knosp, Bernard (Neuilly-sur-Seine, FR); Bouet, Jacques (Paris, FR); Jordy, Christian (Dourdan, FR); Mimoun, Michel (Neuilly-sur-Marne, FR); Gicquel, Daniel (Lanorville, FR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

Paxton, B.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nickel-metal hydride battery development. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable batteries are used as the power source for a broad range of portable equipment. Key battery selection criteria typically are weight, volume, first cost, life cycle cost, and environmental impact. Rechargeable batteries are favored from a life cycle cost and environmental impact standpoint over primary batteries. The nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery system has emerged as the battery of choice for many applications based on its superior characteristics when judged on the above criteria against other battery types. In most cases commercial Ni-MH batteries are constructed with coiled electrodes in cylindrical metal containers. Electro Energy, Inc. (EEI) has been developing a novel flat bipolar configuration of the Ni-MH system that offers weight, volume, and cost advantages when compared to cylindrical cells. The unique bipolar approach consists of fabricating individual flat wafer cells in conductive, carbon-filled, plastic face plates. The individual cells contain a nonconductive plastic border which is heat sealed around the perimeter to make a totally sealed unit cell. Multi-cell batteries are fabricated by stacking the individual wafer cells in such a way that the positive face of one cell contacts the negative face of the adjacent cell. The stack is then contained in an outer housing with end contacts. The purpose of this program was to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate the capabilities of the EEI Ni-MH battery system for consumer applications. The work was directed at the development and evaluation of the compact bipolar construction for its potential advantages of high power and energy density. Experimental investigations were performed on various nickel electrode types, hydride electrode formulations, and alternate separator materials. Studies were also directed at evaluating various oxygen recombination techniques for low pressure operation during charge and overcharge.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batterie--High Energy Storage for Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freedomcar & Vehicle Technologies Program Freedomcar & Vehicle Technologies Program Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batteries - High Energy Storage for Electric Vehicles Background The key to making electric vehicles (EVs) practical is the development of batteries that can provide performance comparable with that of con ventional vehicles at a similar cost. Most EV batteries have limited energy storage capabili ties, permitting only relatively short driving distances before the batteries must be recharged. In 1991, under a coopera tive agreement with The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) initiated development of nickel- metal-hydride (NiMH) battery technology and established it as a prime mid-term candidate for use in EVs. DOE funding has been instru

6

Feasibility study for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study examined three possible recycling processes for two compositions (AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5}) of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries to determine possible rotes for recovering battery materials. Analysts examined the processes, estimated the costs for capital equipment and operation, and estimated the value of the reclaimed material. They examined the following three processes: (1) a chemical process that leached battery powders using hydrochloric acid, (2) a pyrometallurical process, and (3) a physical separation/chemical process. The economic analysis revealed that the physical separation/chemical process generated the most revenue.

Sabatini, J.C.; Field, E.L.; Wu, I.C.; Cox, M.R.; Barnett, B.M.; Coleman, J.T. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Self-discharge mechanism of sealed-type nickel/metal-hydride battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting the self-discharge rate of a nickel/metal-hydride (Ni-MH) battery, generally much higher than that of nickel/cadmium (Ni-Cd) battery, are investigated, and the self-discharge mechanism is discussed. Ammonia and amine participate in the shuttle reaction like nitrate ion in the Ni-Cd battery, resulting in acceleration of the self-discharge. When nonwoven fabric made of sulfonated-polypropylene is used as a separator instead of conventional polyamide separator, the self-discharge rate of the Ni-MH battery is strongly depressed, to the same level as that of Ni-Cd battery.

Ikoma, Munehisa; Hoshina, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Isao [Matsushita Battery Industrial Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Iwakura, Chiaki [Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

9

Progress in the development of Ovonic nickel-metal hydride batteries  

SciTech Connect

Proprietary, multicomponent hydrogen storage alloys using the principles of atomic engineering form the heart of Ovonic Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni/MH) battery technology. This battery system, in development for 10 years, has been licensed to several manufacturers both for consumer cells and electric vehicle batteries. These cells have achieved a specific energy of over 80 Wh/kg, a peak power in excess of 200 W/kg, and over 1000 cycles at 100% depth of discharge. They also have an intrinsic ability to withstand overcharge and overdischarge abuse. Ovonic Ni/MH batteries are environmentally friendly and can be recycled. Performance data will be presented showing the successful scale-up of this technology for electric vehicle applications.

Venkatesan, S.; Corrigan, D.A.; Gifford, P.R.; Fetcenko, M.A.; Dhar, S.K.; Ovshinsky, S.R. (Ovonic Battery Co., Troy, MI (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable future.

Ting, J.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Characteristics of the high-rate discharge capability of a nickel/metal hydride battery electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high rate discharge capability of the negative electrode in a Ni/MH battery is mainly determined by the charge transfer process at the interface between the metal hydride (MH) alloy powder and the electrolyte, and the mass transfer process in the bulk MH alloy powder. In this study, the anodic polarization curves of a MH electrode were measured and analyzed. An alloy of nominal composition Mm{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}Ni{sub 3.85}Co{sub 0.45}Mn{sub 0.35}Al{sub 0.35} was used as the negative electrode material. With increasing number of charge/discharge cycles, the MH alloy powders microcrack into particles several micrometers in diameter. The decrease in the MH alloy particle size results in an increase in both the activation surface area and the exchange current density of the MH alloy electrode. The electrode overpotentials of the MH electrode decreases with increasing number of cycles at a large value of anodic polarization current. The decrease in electrode overpotential leads to an increase in the high rate discharge capability of the MH electrode. By using the limiting current, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the MH alloy was estimated to be 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}11}cm{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} assuming an average particle radius of 5 {micro}m.

Geng, M.; Han, J.; Feng, F.; Northwood, D.O.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced nickel-metal hydride cell development. Final report, September 1993--March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inert gas atomization using metal hydride alloys for a Ni/MH{sub x}cell was studied. Atomization of the alloys was demonstrated on a small production scale up to batch size of several kg. Relative performance of the atomized and nonatomized alloys was investigated for the electrode material in a Ni/MH{sub x} cell. The study included effects of charge-discharge rates, temperature, and particle size on cell voltage (polarization) and specific capacity. Results show that the specific capacity of the present atomized alloys was apprecialy smaller than that of the nonatomized powder, especially for initial cycles. Full activation of the atomized alloys oftentook several hundreds of cycles. However, no appreciable difference in discharge rate capability was observed with R10 and R12 alloys. Chemical compositions were indistinguishable, although the oxygen contents of the atomized alloys were always higher. Effects of Ni and Cu coating on alloy performance were studied after electroless coating; the coatings noticeably improved the electrode rate capability for all the alloys. The electrode polarization was esecially improved, but not the cycle life. Further studies are needed.

Lim, Hong S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Office of Technology Transfer Composite Electrodes for Rechargeable Lithium-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this technology. Page 6 Lithium-ion Batteries Could Hold the Key to 100-MPG Hybrids Lithium-ion batteries are a promising alternative to the nickel metal hydride batteries used in current-generation HEVs. Lithium-ion batteries pack more power and energy into a smaller battery package. But there's work to do before lithium-ion

Kemner, Ken

15

Metal hydrides: Relevant Materials for Lithium-ion Batteries ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactivity of MgH2 with lithium is a reversible conversion reaction (reversible capacity of 1500 mAh/g) generalized to many hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe- ? M + ...

16

Lithium hydride and lithium amide for hydrogen storage J. Engbk, G. Nielsen, I. Chorkendorff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium hydride and lithium amide for hydrogen storage J. Engbæk, G. Nielsen, I. Chorkendorff 1 interest. Lithium amid has a high hydrogen storage capability; 10.4wt.% hydrogen. In this study surface reactions of thin films of lithium with hydrogen and ammonia is studied under well controlled conditions

Mosegaard, Klaus

17

METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES FROM LITHIUM CARBONATE AND LITHIUM HYDRIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is descrlbed for the production of methane and for the production of methane containing isotopes of hydrogen and/or carbon. Finely divided lithium hydrlde and litldum carbonate reactants are mixed in intimate contact and subsequently compacted under pressures of from 5000 to 60,000 psl. The compacted lithium hydride and lithium carbenate reactunts are dispised in a gas collecting apparatus. Subsequently, the compact is heated to a temperature in the range 350 to 400 deg C whereupon a solid-solid reaction takes place and gaseous methane is evolved. The evolved methane is contaminated with gaseous hydrogen and a very small amount of CO/sub 2/; however, the desired methane product is separated from sald impurities by well known chemical processes, e.g., condensation in a cold trap. The product methane contalns isotopes of carbon and hydrogen, the Isotopic composition being determined by the carbon isotopes originally present In the lithium carbonate and the hydrogen isotopes originally present in the lithium hydride.

Frazer, J.W.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

18

Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing Systems Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

19

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride sink-side thermal energy storage for pulsed space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Value analysis indicates that inclusion of thermal energy storage (TES) as an element in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. A candidate design for the TES component utilizes lithium hydride (LiH) encapsulated in 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Critical concerns with this concept are the need to (1) accommodate shell stresses induced by volumetric expansion of the melting salt or surface gripping by the freezing salt and (2) minimize hydrogen loss through the shell due to LiH dissociation at high temperatures. Experimental observation of significant cracking of the LiH during cooling mitigates the first of these issues by providing a leakage path into the interior void as melting occurs at the salt-containment interface, thus allowing use of thin shells.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.; Whittaker, J.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing Systems. ...

22

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. (2008) ‘Emerging lithium-ion battery technologies forbattery chemistries: nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (battery chemistries, including nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) and several lithium-ion (

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. (2008) ‘Emerging lithium-ion battery technologies forbattery chemistries: nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (battery chemistries, including nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) and several lithium-ion (

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S.; Burke, Andrew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. , 2008. Emerging lithium-ion battery technologies forbattery chemistries: nickel- metal hydride (NiMH) and lithium-ion (battery chemistries, including nickel- metal hydride (NiMH) and several lithium-ion (

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Evolution of Sustainable Personal Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a pluggable lithium-ion battery pack capable ofbattery for all BEV, nickel metal hydride and lithium-ionlithium-ion & lithium polymer, and sodium nickel metal chloride. Each of these battery

Jungers, Bryan D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Diffusion of hydrogen isotopes in palladium hydride and deuteride in the presence of lithium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of Li incorporation into Pd on the hydrogen flow through a membrane Pd-electrode was found. It was of interest to determine the mechanism of this effect by a direct measurement of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the Pd-H{sub x} phase and in the ternary Li-PdH{sub x} phase that was formed by the cathodic polarization of Pd in the solutions of lithium salts. A study of the effect of lithium on the diffusion of deuterium in the Li-PdD{sub x} phase might also be useful in solving this problem. In this work, a method of electrochemical extraction of absorbed hydrogen is used for these measurements; this method has been developed for nonsteady-state conditions, in particular. The X-ray examination of the formed phases was performed by a DRON-3M set-up with the use of CoK{sub {alpha}} radiation.

Astakhov, I.I.; Kazarinov, V.E.; Reznikova, L.A.; Teplitskaya, G.L. [Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Raman Spectroscopy of Lithium Hydride Corrosion: Selection of an Appropriate Excitation Wavelength to Minimize Fluorescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent interest in a hydrogen-based fuel economy has renewed research into metal hydride chemistry. Many of these compounds react readily with water to release hydrogen gas and form a caustic. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFT) has been used to study the hydrolysis reaction. The LiOH stretch appears at 3670 cm{sup -1}. Raman spectroscopy is a complementary technique that employs monochromatic excitation (laser) allowing access to the low energy region of the vibrational spectrum (<600 cm{sup -1}). Weak scattering and fluorescence typically prevent Raman from being used for many compounds. The role of Li{sub 2}O in the moisture reaction has not been fully studied for LiH. Li{sub 2}O can be observed by Raman while being hidden in the Infrared spectrum.

Stowe, A. C.; Smyrl, N. R.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Batteries - EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles EnerDel lithium-ion battery The EnerDel Lithium-Ion Battery The EnerDel/Argonne lithium-ion battery is a highly reliable and extremely safe device that is lighter in weight, more compact, more powerful and longer-lasting than the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The battery is expected to meet the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium's $500 manufacturing price criterion for a 25-kilowatt battery, which is almost a sixth of the cost to make comparable Ni-MH batteries intended for use in HEVs. It is also less expensive to make than comparable Li-ion batteries. That cost reduction is expected to help make HEVs more competitive in the marketplace and enable consumers to receive an immediate payback in

29

Lithium Polymer (LiPo) Battery Usage Lithium polymer batteries are now being widely used in hobby and UAV applications. They work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Polymer (LiPo) Battery Usage 1 Lithium polymer batteries are now being widely used in hobby nickel metal and ni-cad batteries. But with this increase in battery life come potential hazards. Use batteries with a battery charger specifically designed for lithium polymer batteries. As an example, you

Langendoen, Koen

30

Strengthened lithium for x-ray blast windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium's high x-ray transparency makes it an attractive material for windows intended to protect soft x-ray diagnostics in high energy density experiments. Pure lithium is soft and weak, but lithium mixed with lithium hydride powder becomes harder and stronger, in principle without any additional x-ray absorption. A comparison with the standard material for x-ray windows, beryllium, suggests that lithium or lithium strengthened by lithium hydride may well be an excellent option for such windows.

Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse Inc., P.O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22150 (United States); Imam, M. A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Mathematical model of a NiOOH/metal hydride cell. Final report, September 15, 1993--November 14, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the objectives of work on the nickel/metal hydride cell has been to develop a mathematical model of the performance of the cell. This is a summary of work to date and is meant to be a Final Report of the BES project. Mathematical model of the nickel/metal hydride cell depends on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport properties of the metal hydride electrode. Consequently, investigations were carried out to determine: (1) the exchange current density and the equilibrium potential as a function of hydrogen content in the electrode; (2) the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the bulk of the alloy; (3) the hydrogen reaction rate order; (4) the symmetry factor for hydrogen evolution reaction and (5) to determine the reaction mechanisms of the hydrogen charge and discharge processes including overcharge and overdischarge mechanism.

White, R.E.; Popov, B.N.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

ESH100.2.ENV.21  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium. Nickel cadmium. Nickel metal hydride. Lithium ion. Silver. Mercury (i.e., button cells that contain up to 25 mg of mercury). Sealed lead acid batteries less than 2...

35

The search for better batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To handle small, power-hungry electronic systems, manufacturers of rechargeable batteries are exploring at least five technologies: nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lithium-ion, lithium-solid polymer electrolyte, and zinc-air. The author describes ...

M. J. Riezenman

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

High cycle life, cobalt free, AB{5} metal hydride electrodes [Revised 11/10/98  

SciTech Connect

Cobalt-free La(Ni,Sn)5+x alloys have been identified as low cost, corrosion resistant electrodes for nickel-metal-hydride batteries. The structure of theses alloys are similar to non-stoichiometric La(Ni,Cu)5+x compounds; i.e., they retain the P6/mmm space group while Ni dumbbells occupy La sites. Electrodes fabricated from some of these novel alloys have capacities and cycle lives equivalent to those made from commercial, battery grade, AB5 alloys with cobalt.

Vogt, Tom; Reilly, J.J.; Johnson, J.R.; Adzic, G.D.; Ticianelli, E.A.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Hydride compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

Powell, James R. (Wading River, NY); Salzano, Francis J. (Patchogue, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles. In fact, every hybrid vehicle on the market currently uses Nickel-Metal-Hydride high-voltage batteries in its battery system. Lithium ion batteries appear to be the...

39

Technological assessment and evaluation of high power batteries and their commercial values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ion (Li-ion) battery technology has the potential to compete with the more matured Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) battery technology in the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) energy storage market as it has higher specific ...

Teo, Seh Kiat

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The 1991 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings from the workshop are presented. The subjects covered include nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, silver-zinc, and lithium based technologies, as well as advanced technologies including nickel-metal hydride and sodium-sulfur.

Brewer, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Hydride Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

Motyka, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

Heung, L.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wicks, G.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

ORNL/TM-2001-266 Environmental Evaluation of New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the new batteries--the nickel metal hydride in the P2000 and Precept, and the lithium ion battery production for the lithium ion battery will generate releases of lithium, a release type that does not occur employs a lithium ion (LiIon) battery. The mass of the 3XVs' batteries has been subtracted from the "other

45

Electronic Materials Letters, Vol. 8, No. 2 (2012), pp. 91-105 DOI: 10.1007/s13391-012-2058-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be observed. New High-Capacity Lithium-ion Battery Material · Argonne has developed new cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries with an energy storage capacity of >250 mAh/g (compared with 150 m and evaluation capabilities include: · Evaluation of advanced lithium- polymer, lithium-ion, nickel-metal hydride

Park, Byungwoo

46

Transition-Metal Hydrides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics A new type of electrochromic hydride material has interesting and unusual properties. Thin Ni-Mg films, for example, are mirror-like in appearance and have very low visible transmittance. On exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films become transparent. The transition is believed to result from formation of nickel magnesium hydride, Mg2NiH4. Switchable mirrors based on rare earth hydrides were discovered in 1996 at Vrije University in the Netherlands, Rare earth-magnesium alloy films were subsequently found to be superior to the pure lanthanides in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity by Philips Laboratories. The newer transition-metal types which use less expensive and less reactive materials were discovered at LBNL. This has now become a very active area of study with a network of researchers.

47

Chemistry of intermetallic hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Certain intermetallic hydrides are safe, convenient and inexpensive hydrogen storage compounds. A particular advantage of such compounds is the ease with which their properties can be modified by small changes in alloy composition or preparation. This quality can be exploited to optimize their storage properties for particular applications, e.g. as intermetallic hydride electrodes in batteries. We will be concerned herein with the more important aspects of the thermodynamic and structural principles which regulate the behavior of intermetallic hydrogen systems and then illustrate their application using the archetype hydrides of LaNi5, FeTi and Mg alloys. The practical utility of these classes of materials will be briefly noted.

Reilly, J.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydride heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for the use of hydrides to exhaust heat from one temperature source and deliver the thermal energy extracted for use at a higher temperature, thereby acting as a heat pump. For this purpose there are employed a pair of hydridable metal compounds having different characteristics working together in a closed pressure system employing a high temperature source to upgrade the heat supplied from a low temperature source.

Cottingham, James G. (Center Moriches, NY)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Rechargeable Batteries: Basics, Pitfalls, and Safe Recharging Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This overview of charging methods and current battery technologies gives you a better understanding of the batteries used in portable devices. Nickel-cadmium (NiCd), nickel-metal-hydride (NiMH), and lithium-ion (Li+) battery chemistries are discussed. The article also describes a product that protects single-cell lithium-ion and lithium-polymer batteries.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

1986-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Bystroff, Roman I. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Dale E. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Develop improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective was to develop commercially viable metal hydrides capable of reversibly storing at least 3 wt.% hydrogen for use with PEM fuel cells and hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (HICE) applications. Such alloys are expected to result in system capacities of greater than 2 wt.%, making metal hydride storage systems (MHSS`s) a practical means of supplying hydrogen for many consumer applications. ECD`s (Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.) past work on sputtered thin films of transition metal-based alloys led to the commercialization of it`s nickel/metal hydride batteries, and similar work on thin film Mg-based alloys demonstrated potential to achieve very high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities approaching 2,500 Wh/Kg and 2,500 Wh/M{sup 3} respectively. Under this 2-year cost shared project with the DOE, the authors have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of scaling up the Mg-based hydrides from thin film to bulk production without substantial loss of storage capacity. ECD made progress in alloy development by means of compositional and process modification. Processes used include Mechanical Alloying, Melt spinning and novel Gas Phase Condensation. It was showed that the same composition when prepared by melt-spinning resulted in a more homogeneous material having a higher PCT plateau pressure as compared to mechanical alloying. It was also shown that mechanically alloyed Mg-Al-Zn results in much higher plateau pressures, which is an important step towards reducing the desorption temperature. While significant progress has been made during the past two years in alloy development and understanding the relationship between composition, structure, morphology, and processing parameters, additional R and D needs to be performed to achieve the goals of this work.

Sapru, K.

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and ...  

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of ...

56

Development of lightweight hydrides. Annual task report, August 1978-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the first years effort to develop lightweight hydrides for automotive storage of hydrogen are described. A test fixture to subject a magnesium alloy hydride to hundreds of hydriding cycles has been designed and is being constructed. Extensive testing of the magnesium lithium and magnesium aluminum alloy hydrides has been performed. Several alloys demonstrate significantly higher hydrogen dissociation pressures than the baseline alloy Mg/sub 2/Ni-Mg. No alloy has yet demonstrated one atmosphere of hydrogen pressure at the goal temperature of 200/sup 0/C. Hydrogen capacity varies greatly with alloy composition. Alloys with high dissociation pressures have hydrogen capacities up to 3.6% by weight. Plans include the reduction of aluminum content in the alloys to increase the hydrogen capacity.

Rohy, D.A.; Nachman, J.F.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Dimensionally stable metal hydrides - major problem with hydrides is resolved  

SciTech Connect

A patented innovation designed to stabilize metal hydrides and prevent breakbown is described. The innovation is a five step process: reduction of the metal hydride to a particle size less than 10 microns in size; oxidation of particle surfaces; blending of the particles with a porous component and a ballast metal; compression into pellets; calcination of the pellets.

McCarthy, K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

SciTech Connect

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

SciTech Connect

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition are described. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, L.K.

1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zircaloy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this work is to develop the means of pre-hydriding unirradiated Zircaloy cladding such that a high concentration, or rim, of hydrides is formed at the cladding outside diameter.

63

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, Leslie D. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method of producing a chemical hydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

Self-Optimization Energy Management Considering Stochastic Influences for a Hybrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric cars typically use lithium-ion (Li-ion) or nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) bat- teries as sole energy. A further important field for electric vehicles are secondary cars used for commuting or short distance of an Electric Road Vehicle Christoph Romaus, Dominik Wimmelbücker, Karl Stephan Stille, Joachim Böcker Abstract--Electric

Noé, Reinhold

66

Optimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

}@lea.uni-paderborn.de Abstract--For electric and hybrid electric cars, commonly nickel-metal hydride and lithium-ion batteries. The BMW Mini-E is an all electric powered car field-tested in the United States, United KingdomOptimal Energy Management for a Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles Based

Noé, Reinhold

67

NREL's emulation tool helps manufacturers ensure the safety and reliability of electric vehicle batteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbonate Separator Cathode:Anode: e-e- Li++e-+C6LiC6 Li+ Lithium-ion battery e- Binder Conductive additives to as lithium batteries and the various chemistries that are the most promising for these applications. While Li-ion. The figure shows that lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are superior to nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries

68

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries  

The materials can be added at low cost without changing current scalable cathode ... Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries ...

69

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrides for Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage George Thomas, Consultant Sandia National Laboratories G. J. Thomas Efficient onboard hydrogen storage is a critical enabling technology for the use of hydrogen in vehicles * The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which densifies the fuel. - This is particularly true for hydrogen because of its lower energy density relative to hydrocarbon fuels. * Storage methods result in additional weight and volume above that of the fuel. How do we achieve adequate stored energy in an efficient, safe and cost-effective system? G. J. Thomas However, the storage media must meet certain requirements: - reversible hydrogen uptake/release - lightweight - low cost - cyclic stability - rapid kinetic properties - equilibrium properties (P,T) consistent

70

Interaction of Lithium Hydride and Ammonia Borane in THF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-step reaction between LiH and NH3BH3 in THF leads to the production of more than 14 wt% of hydrogen at 40 °C.In the present study we investigate the reactivity of AB dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (THF) with a suspension of LiH and observe the formation of LiNH2BH3 and enhanced reaction kinetics with an interesting dependence on AB concentration.

Xiong, Zhitao; Chua, Yong Shen; Wu, Guotao; Xu, W. L.; Chen, Ping; Shaw, Wendy J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Linehan, John C.; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Autrey, Thomas

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Kinetic and Prediction of Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In most industrial or device applications, LiH is placed in either an initially dry or a vacuum environment with other materials that may release moisture slowly over many months, years, or even decades. In such instances, the rate of hydrogen outgassing from the reaction of LiH with H{sub 2}O can be reasonably approximated by the rate at which H{sub 2}O is released from the moisture containing materials. In a vacuum or dry environment, LiOH decomposes slowly with time into Li{sub 2}O even at room temperature according to: 2LiOH(s) {yields} Li{sub 2}O(s) + H{sub 2}O(g) (1). The kinetics of the decomposition of LiOH depends on the dryness/vacuum level and temperature. It was discovered by different workers that vacuum thermal decomposition of bulk LiOH powder (grain sizes on the order of tens to hundreds of micrometers) into Li{sub 2}O follows a reaction front moving from the surface inward. Due to stress at the LiOH/vacuum interface and defective and missing crystalline bonding at surface sites, lattice vibrations at the surfaces/interfaces of most materials are at frequencies different than those in the bulk, a phenomenon observed in most solids. The chemical reactivity and electronic properties at surfaces and interfaces of materials are also different than those in the bulk. It is, therefore, expected that the amount of energy required to break bonds at the LiOH/vacuum interface is not as large as in the bulk. In addition, in an environment where there is a moisture sink or in the case of a continuously pumped vacuum chamber, H{sub 2}O vapor is continuously removed and LiOH decomposes into Li{sub 2}O from the LiOH/vacuum interface (where it is thermally less stable) inward according to reaction (1) in an effort to maintain the equilibrium H{sub 2}O vapor pressure at the sample/vacuum interface. In a closed system containing both LiH and LiOH, the H{sub 2}O released from the decomposition of LiOH reacts with LiH to form hydrogen gas according to the following reaction: 2LiH(s) + H{sub 2}O(g) {yields} Li{sub 2}O(s) +2H{sub 2}(g) + heat (2). Such is the case of vacuum thermal decomposition of a corrosion layer previously grown on top of a LiH substrate. Here, the huge H{sub 2}O concentration gradient across the Li{sub 2}O buffer layer in between the hydrophilic LiH substrate and LiOH, coupled with the defective nature of LiOH at surfaces/interfaces as discussed above, effectively lowers the energy barrier for LiOH decomposition here in comparison with bulk LiOH and turns the LiH substrate into an effective moisture pump. As a result, in the case of vacuum thermal decomposition of LiOH on top of a LiH substrate, the LiOH decomposition front starts at the LiH/Li{sub 2}O/LiOH interface. As a function of increasing time and temperature, the Li{sub 2}O layer in between LiH and LiOH gets thicker, causing the energy barrier for the LiOH decomposition at the LiOH/Li{sub 2}O/LiH interface to increase, and eventually LiOH at the LiOH/vacuum interface also starts to decompose into Li{sub 2}O for reasons described in the previous paragraph. Thereafter, the Li{sub 2}O fronts keep moving inward from all directions until all the LiOH is gone. This vacuum thermal decomposition process of LiOH previously grown on top of a LiH substrate is illustrated in the cartoon of figure 1.

Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs, B; McLean II, W

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, L.D.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

73

Activated Aluminum Hydride Hydrogen Storage Compositions ...  

Aluminum hydride is the best known alane and has been known for over 60 years. It is potentially a very attractive medium for onboard automotive hydrogen storage ...

74

Phase Field Modeling of Coherent Zirconium Hydrides ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Mechanical properties of hydrided Zircaloy claddings under external load lie in the center of nuclear reactor safety. Numerous experimental ...

75

Experimental studies of processing conditions for liquid lithium and solid lithium alloy fusion blankets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 50-gallon-capacity liquid lithium loop (Lithium Processing Test Loop, LPTL) has been constructed and brought into operation at the Argonne National Laboratory. This system contains experimental assemblies to study (a) lithium processing technology based on molten salt extraction, cold trapping, and getting trapping and (b) on-line hydrogen monitoring. An efficient electrolytic method, employing a porous sparged electrode, has been developed to recover hydrogen isotopes from the types of molten salts (e.g., LiF-LiCl-LiBr) selected for use in the salt-processing system on the LPTL. This method, when tested under realistic conditions, has demonstrated the potential for recovering tritium (from lithium) at the sub-wppm level. Results of cold-trap tests on the LPTL and of getter-trap tests on both the LPTL and a much smaller lithium loop have provided some evidence that these types of processing methods can be used to control oxygen and nitrogen levels in lithium. Studies of the hydridation of solid Li-Al and Li-Pb alloys have provided data on activity coefficients and phase boundary locations for these binary systems as functions of temperature and composition. The Sieverts' constants for dilute hydrogen solutions in LiAl (in wppm/Torr/sup 1/2/) were found to be 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ times smaller than those for hydrogen in pure lithium at the same temperature.

Weston, J. R.; Calaway, W. F.; Yonco, R. M.; Veleckis, E.; Maroni, V. A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogen Storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride naoparticle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride naoparticle thin film Title Hydrogen Storage property of sandwiched magnesium hydride naoparticle thin film Publication Type...

77

Hydrogen storage technology for metal hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The advantages of using hydrogen as a secondary energy carrier are stated, and numerous factors pertinent to the technology of hydrogen storage via metal hydrides are briefly described. The technology is centered on iron-titanium hydride, FeTiH/sub x/, as the most practical choice for the safe and compact storage of hydrogen. Uses of hydride hydrogen as a fuel or energy carrier are given. The features of hydride reservoir designs are explained, and some performance data are given for two reservoirs constructed at BNL. Results of tests on the long-term behavior of FeTiH/sub x/ are presented along with information on pressure drop in a hydride bed. Two methods of accommodating hydride expansion are described. Other topics include: container materials selection, safety testing of FeTiH/sub x/, hydride materials development, storage systems work at BNL, the proposed Hydrogen-Halogen Energy Storage System, a proposed technique of storing hydrogen in hollow glass microspheres at very high pressure, and information on the commercial availability of materials and equipment for hydride hydrogen. Current development needs are included in the various sections.

Strickland, G

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hydrogenation using hydrides and acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a very rapid, non-catalytic process for hydrogenating unsaturated organic compounds that can be carried out at temperatures generally lower than previously utilized. In this process organic compounds which contain at least one reducible functional group are hydrogenated non-catalytically by reacting them with a hydride complex and a strong acid. The reducible functional group may be, for example, C=C, C-OH, C-O-C, or a strained cyclic structure. If the reactants are not mutually soluble, they are dissolved in an appropriate inert solvent. 3 tabs.

Bullock, R.M.

1989-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method to predict relative hydriding within a group of zirconium alloys under nuclear irradiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An out-of-reactor method for screening to predict relative in-reactor hydriding behavior of zirconium-based materials is disclosed. Samples of zirconium-based materials having different compositions and/or fabrication methods are autoclaved in a relatively concentrated (0.3 to 1.0M) aqueous lithium hydroxide solution at constant temperatures within the water reactor coolant temperature range (280 to 316 C). Samples tested by this out-of-reactor procedure, when compared on the basis of the ratio of hydrogen weight gain to oxide weight gain, accurately predict the relative rate of hydriding for the same materials when subject to in-reactor (irradiated) corrosion. 1 figure.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Levy, I.S.; Trimble, D.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Gerber, F.S.

1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Myths Regarding Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demand by Light-Duty Vehicle Fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unlikely). For electric vehicles the primary safety concernsand safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles.

Nesbitt, Kevin; Sperling, Daniel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Wire Wrapped Hexagonal Pin Arrays for Hydride Fueled PWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT

Diller, Peter

83

Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

SciTech Connect

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S. (Tampa, FL); Niemann, Michael U. (Venice, FL); Goswami, D. Yogi (Tampa, FL); Stefanakos, Elias K. (Tampa, FL)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

?\tDuring the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Computational Modeling of Uranium Hydriding and Complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uranium hydriding is one of the most important processes that has received considerable attention over many years. Although many experimental and modeling studies have been carried out concerning thermochemistry, diffusion kinetics and mechanisms of U-hydriding, very little is known about the electronic structure and electronic features that govern the U-hydriding process. Yet it is the electronic feature that controls the activation barrier and thus the rate of hydriding. Moreover the role of impurities and the role of the product UH{sub 3} on hydriding rating are not fully understood. An early study by Condon and Larson concerns with the kinetics of U-hydrogen system and a mathematical model for the U-hydriding process. They proposed that diffusion in the reactant phase by hydrogen before nucleation to form hydride phase and that the reaction is first order for hydriding and zero order for dehydriding. Condon has also calculated and measures the reaction rates of U-hydriding and proposed a diffusion model for the U-hydriding. This model was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental reaction rates. From the slopes of the Arrhenius plot the activation energy was calculated as 6.35 kcal/mole. In a subsequent study Kirkpatrick formulated a close-form for approximate solution to Condon's equation. Bloch and Mintz have proposed the kinetics and mechanism for the U-H reaction over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. They have discussed their results through two models, one, which considers hydrogen diffusion through a protective UH{sub 3} product layer, and the second where hydride growth occurs at the hydride-metal interface. These authors obtained two-dimensional fits of experimental data to the pressure-temperature reactions. Kirkpatrick and Condon have obtained a linear solution to hydriding of uranium. These authors showed that the calculated reaction rates compared quite well with the experimental data at a hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Powell et al. have studied U-hydriding in ultrahigh vacuum and obtained the linear rate data over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. They found reversible hydrogen sorption on the UH{sub 3} reaction product from kinetic effects at 21 C. This demonstrates restarting of the hydriding process in the presence of UH{sub 3} reaction product. DeMint and Leckey have shown that Si impurities dramatically accelerate the U-hydriding rates. We report our recent results of relativistic computations that vary from complete active space multi-configuration interaction (CAS-MCSCF) followed by multi-reference configuration interaction (MRSDCI) computations that included up to 50 million configurations for modeling of uranium-hydriding with cluster models will be presented.

Balasubramanian, K; Siekhaus, W J; McLean, W

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Local Pseudopotential Using DFT Sergio Orozco Student Advisor: Chen Huang Faculty Mentor Lithium LPS Test Lithium LPS #12;Density Functional Theory (DFT) Successful quantum mechanical approach (1979) #12;Building LPS for Lithium Create a LPS using NLPS density for Lithium Test LPS by comparing

Petta, Jason

88

Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

Shuffler, Carter Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fuels in BWR's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project being completed by UC Berkeley and MIT to assess the possible benefits of using hydride fuel in light water nuclear reactors (LWR's). More specifically, this ...

Creighton, John Everett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Using Metal Hydride to Store Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is the lightest element. At ambient conditions on a volume basis it stores the least amount of energy compared to other fuel carriers such as natural gas and gasoline. For hydrogen to become a practical fuel carrier, a way must be found to increase its volumetric energy density to a practical level. Present techniques being developed include compressed gas, cryogenic liquid and absorbed solid. Each of these techniques has its advantages and disadvantages. And none of them appears to be satisfactory for use in a hydrogen economy. In the interim all of them are used for demonstration purposes. Metal hydrides store hydrogen in a solid form under moderate temperature and pressure that gives them a safety advantage. They require the least amount of energy to operate. Their stored hydrogen density is nearing that of liquid hydrogen. But they are heavy and the weight is their main disadvantage. Current usable metal hydrides can hold no more than about 1.8 percent hydrogen by weight. However much effort is underway to find lighter materials. These include other solid materials other than the traditional metal hydrides. Their operation is expected to be similar to that of metal hydride and can use the technology developed for metal hydrides.

Heung, L.K.

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lithium Balance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name Lithium Balance Place Copenhagen, Denmark Product Lithium ion battery developer. References Lithium Balance1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

92

Advanced Battery Testing for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sprinter van is a Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (PHEV) developed by EPRI and Daimler for use in delivering cargo, carrying passengers, or fulfilling a variety of specialty applications. This report provides details of testing conducted on two different types of batteries used in these vehicles: VARTA nickel-metal hydride batteries and SAFT lithium ion batteries. Testing focused on long-term battery durability, using a test profile developed to simulate the battery duty cycle of a PHEV Sprinter

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced Batteries for PHEVs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes testing conducted on two different types of batteriesVARTA nickel-metal hydride and SAFT lithium ionused in the Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Sprinter program. EPRI and DaimlerChrysler developed a PHEV concept for the Sprinter Van to reduce the vehicle's emissions, fuel consumption, and operating costs while maintaining equivalent or superior functionality and performance. The PHEV Sprinter was designed to operate in both a pure electric mode and a charge-sustaining hybrid ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hydrogen isotope exchange in metal hydride columns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several metal hydrides were shown to act as chromatographic media for hydrogen isotopes. The procedure was to equilibrate a column of hydride with flowing hydrogen, inject a small quantity of tritium tracer, and observe its elution behavior. Characteristic retention times were found. From these and the extent of widening of the tritium band, the heights equivalent to a theoretical plate could be calculated. Values of around 1 cm were obtained. The following are the metals whose hydrides were studied, together with the temperature ranges in which chromatographic behavior was observed: vanadium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C; zirconium, 500 to 600/sup 0/C; LaNi/sub 5/, -78 to +30/sup 0/C; Mg/sub 2/Ni, 300 to 375/sup 0/C; palladium, 0 to 70/sup 0/C. A dual-temperature isotope separation process based on hydride chromatography was demonstrated. In this, a column was caused to cycle between two temperatures while being supplied with a constant stream of tritium-traced hydrogen. Each half-cycle was continued until ''breakthrough,'' i.e., until the tritium concentration in the effluent was the same as that in the feed. Up to that point, the effluent was enriched or depleted in tritium, by up to 20%.

Wiswall, R; Reilly, J; Bloch, F; Wirsing, E

1977-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

97

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 2: Assessment of health impacts; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The task 2 report compares the relative health and hazard impacts of EV battery recycling technologies. Task 2 compared the relative impact of recycling EV batteries in terms of cancer, toxicity, and ecotoxicological potential, as well as leachability, flammability, and corrosivity/reactivity hazards. Impacts were evaluated for lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron sulfide and disulfide, lithium-polymer, lithium-ion, and zinc-air batteries. Health/hazard impacts were evaluated for recycling methods including smelting, electrowinning, and other appropriate techniques that apply to different battery technologies.

Unnasch, S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab; Ciovati, G.; / /Jefferson Lab; Wu, G.; /Argonne

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Recovering hydrogen from gas stream using metal hydride  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved adiabatic process for separating hydrogen from mixed gas streams using hydridable materials as the absorbing medium. The improvement comprises utilizing a composite comprising a thermal ballast in admixture with the hydride material to absorb the heat of reaction and to aid in desorption. By virtue of the intimate contact of the ballast with the hydridable material rapid cycle times plus good bed utilization are achieved.

Cheng, G.C.; Eisenberg, F.G.; Huston, E.L.; Sandrock, G.D.; Sheridan, J.J.; Snape, E.; Stickles, R.P.

1982-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof - Energy ...  

Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel ...

104

Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

Clark, E.A.

1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

Clark, E.A.

1992-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of a Passively Cooled, Electrically Heated Hydride (PACE) Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydride and Storage / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

J. E. Klein; J. R. Brenner; E. F. Dyer

107

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nano-engineering of magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The destabilization of magnesium hydride (MgH"2) by solid-state reaction with Si in a nanoscale under vacuum was studied. The nanostructured Si films were deposited on the nanocrystalline MgH"2/Mg composite substrate by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD). ... Keywords: Destabilization, Magnesium hydride, Microstructure, Nano-engineering, Silicon

J. Bystrzycki; T. P?oci?ski; W. Zieli?ski; Z. Winiewski; M. Polanski; W. Mróz; Z. Bojar; K. J. Kurzd?owski

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

Sullivan, Richard W. (Denver, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Modular hydride beds for mobile applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Irradiation is known to have a significant impact on the properties and performance of Zircaloy cladding and structural materials (material degradation processes, e.g., effects of hydriding). This UFD study examines the behavior and performance of unirradiated cladding and actual irradiated cladding through testing and simulation. Three capsules containing hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-4 cladding material have been placed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Irradiation of the capsules was conducted for post-irradiation examination (PIE) metallography. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of

113

Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Olsen, Clayton E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

1980-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through diborane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a diborane intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

Filby, Evan E. (Rigby, ID)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Retention/Diffusivity Studies in Free-Surface Flowing Liquid Lithium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FLIRE was designed to measure the hydrogen and helium retention and diffusivity in a flowing stream of liquid lithium, and it has accomplished these goals. Retention coefficients for helium in the flowing liquid stream were 0.1-2% for flow speeds of 44 cm/s and implantation energies between 500 and 2000 eV. The energy dependence of retention is linear for the energy range considered, as expected, and the dependence of retention on flow velocity fits the expected square-root of flow speed dependence. Estimates of the helium diffusion coefficient in the flowing lithium stream were {approx} 4 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, and are independent of implantation energy. This value is much lower than expected, which could be due to several factors, such as mixing, bubble formation or surface film formation. In the case of hydrogen, long term retention and release mechanisms are of greatest importance, since this relates to tritium inventory in flowing lithium PFCs for fusion applications. The amount of hydride formation was measured for flowing lithium exposed to neutral deuterium gas. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements indicate that the hydride concentration was between 0.1 and 0.2% over a wide range of pressures (6.5 x 10{sup -5} to 1 Torr). This result implies that the deuterium absorption rate is limited by the surface dissociation rate, since deuterium (hydrogen/tritium) is absorbed in its atomic form, not its molecular form.

R.A. Stubbers; G.H. Miley; M. Nieto; W. Olczak; D.N. Ruzic; A. Hassanein

2004-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Optimization of Lithium Titanate Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimization of Lithium Titanate Electrodes Title Optimization of Lithium Titanate Electrodes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Christensen, John,...

118

Lithium-Based Electrochromic Mirrors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Based Electrochromic Mirrors Title Lithium-Based Electrochromic Mirrors Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-52870 Year of Publication 2003 Authors...

119

Lithium purification technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

Keough, R.F.; Meadows, G.E.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lithium purification technique  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying liquid lithium to remove unwanted quantities of nitrogen or aluminum. The method involves precipitation of aluminum nitride by adding a reagent to the liquid lithium. The reagent will be either nitrogen or aluminum in a quantity adequate to react with the unwanted quantity of the impurity to form insoluble aluminum nitride. The aluminum nitride can be mechanically separated from the molten liquid lithium.

Keough, Robert F. (Richland, WA); Meadows, George E. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced batteries for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

A technology assessment is given for electric batteries with potential for use in electric powered vehicles. Parameters considered include: specific energy, specific power, energy density, power density, cycle life, service life, recharge time, and selling price. Near term batteries include: nickel/cadmium and lead-acid batteries. Mid term batteries include: sodium/sulfur, sodium/nickel chloride, nickel/metal hydride, zinc/air, zinc/bromine, and nickel/iron systems. Long term batteries include: lithium/iron disulfide and lithium- polymer systems. Performance and life testing data for these systems are discussed. (GHH)

Henriksen, G.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

Powell, G. L.

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiations: Lithium Chloride Catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiations: Lithium Chloride Catalysis Lekha Gupta, 2008 Ortholithiations of a range of arenes mediated by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in THF at -78 °C protocols with unpurified commercial samples of n-butyl- lithium to prepare LDA or commercially available

Collum, David B.

125

Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide: A View of Lithium Ion Solvation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide: A View of Lithium Ion Solvation through a Glass-Bottom Boat BRETT L and reactivities, we were drawn to lithium hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS; (Me3Si)2NLi) by its promi- nence principles of lithium ion coordination chemistry.2 Understanding how solvation influences organolithium

Collum, David B.

126

aqueous and electrochemical processing ii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Dynamic LCA Model For Assessing The Impact Of Lead Free Solder [pp. .... For Recycling Of Spent Nickel-Metal Hydride Secondary Battery (Invited) [pp.

127

An Ultracapacitor - Battery Energy Storage System for Hybrid Electric Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries used in most hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) provide satisfactory performance but are quite expensive. In spite of their lower… (more)

Stienecker, Adam W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

research in both the private and public sectors led to battery technology that made electric cars possible. October 17, 2011 Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride...

129

PowerPoint Presentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bipolar Nickel Metal Hydride Battery Development and Testing DOE ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM ANNUAL PEER REVIEW November 2 - 3, 2006, Washington, D.C. James Landi...

130

table of contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrometallurgical Treatment of Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Electrodes J.W. Lyman ... Recycling Process of Used Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries T. Yoshida ...

131

FY 2001 Budget Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... automatically shifted manual transmissions, nickel-metal-hydride batteries for energy ... inaugurated NIST F-1, a laser-cooled atomic fountain clock ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

A new phase in palladium hydride technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two plateaux are observed in both the absorption and desorption isotherms of palladium hydride. For the absorption isotherm, a change in plateau pressure is observed at a hydrogen-to-metal (H/M) ratio of about 0.35 for all temperatures studied. For the desorption isotherm, the change in plateau pressure appears to be a function of temperature, ranging from an H/M ratio of 0.18 at 80{degrees}C to 0.3 at 140{degrees}C. These data are interpreted as being experimentally observed boundaries to an equilibrium phase line located in the miscibility gap of the palladium/hydrogen phase diagram. This new phase does not appear to be a stoichiometric compounds, but rather its composition seems to vary with temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Walters, R.T.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

A new phase in palladium hydride technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two plateaux are observed in both the absorption and desorption isotherms of palladium hydride. For the absorption isotherm, a change in plateau pressure is observed at a hydrogen-to-metal (H/M) ratio of about 0.35 for all temperatures studied. For the desorption isotherm, the change in plateau pressure appears to be a function of temperature, ranging from an H/M ratio of 0.18 at 80{degrees}C to 0.3 at 140{degrees}C. These data are interpreted as being experimentally observed boundaries to an equilibrium phase line located in the miscibility gap of the palladium/hydrogen phase diagram. This new phase does not appear to be a stoichiometric compounds, but rather its composition seems to vary with temperature. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Walters, R.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

AN ABUNDANCE OF LITHIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keith Evans, a geologist by profession, first became involved in the lithium business in the early 1970’s when, on behalf of Selection Trust Ltd., was asked to evaluate the future potential of Bikita Minerals in what, at that time, was Southern Rhodesia (later Zimbabwe). Selection Trust was the majority owner of the operation which, prior to the imposition of United Nations sanctions, had been the dominant producer of lithium ores for direct usage in the glass and ceramics industry. Subsequently, he joined Lithium Corporation of America, the then leading lithium chemical producer and later moved to Amax Exploration. On behalf of Amax and a Chilean partner he negotiated with Corfo, a Chilean government entity, the rights to evaluate and develop that part of the Salar de Atacama that had not been leased to the Foote Mineral Company. He was responsible for all aspects of the evaluation but when Amax decided not to proceed with the project it was acquired by Sociedad Quimica y Minera (SQM) and the company is now the world’s largest lithium chemicals producer. Throughout his career in the lithium industry it was his responsibility to monitor industry developments particularly in respect of new resources and he has continued as a consultant in a In 1976 a National Research Council Panel estimated that Western World lithium reserves and resources totaled 10.6 million tonnes as elemental lithium. Subsequent discoveries, particularly in brines in the southern Andes and the plateaus of western China and Tibet have increased the tonnages significantly. Geothermal brines and lithium bearing clays add to the total. This current estimate totals 28.4 million tonnes Li equivalent to more than 150.0 million tonnes of lithium carbonate of which nearly 14.0 million tonnes lithium (about 74.0 million tonnes of carbonate) are at active or proposed operations. This can be compared with current demand for lithium chemicals which approximates to 84,000 tonnes as lithium carbonate equivalents (16,000 tonnes Li). Concerns regarding lithium availability for hybrid or electric vehicle batteries or other foreseeable applications are unfounded.

R. Keith Evans

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

Crisler, L.R.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

138

Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

Trant, Jarrod Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Batteries Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials when shipped by air. Notify Shipping for any shipments that include lithium batteries. Note: If you need to...

140

Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes Thomas J.94720 USA Abstract Lithium-magnesium solid solution alloysHeating mixtures of lithium nitride and magnesium provides a

Richardson, Thomas J.; Chen, Guoying

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethylene Carbonate for Lithium Ion Battery Use. Journal oflithium atoms in lithium-ion battery electrolyte. Chemicalcapacity fading of a lithium-ion battery cycled at elevated

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uncycled electrode for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell including a lithium metal oxide having the formula Li.sub.(2+2x)/(2+x)M'.sub.2x/(2+x)M.sub.(2-2x)/(2+x)O.sub.2-.delta., in which 0.ltoreq.x<1 and .delta. is less than 0.2, and in which M is a non-lithium metal ion with an average trivalent oxidation state selected from two or more of the first row transition metals or lighter metal elements in the periodic table, and M' is one or more ions with an average tetravalent oxidation state selected from the first and second row transition metal elements and Sn. Methods of preconditioning the electrodes are disclosed as are electrochemical cells and batteries containing the electrodes.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d < 5) tend to strongly chemisorb electrophilic molecules; this is a consequence of the manner in which new bonding states are introduced. More electronegative metals (d >> 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems.

Ward, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Lithium Ion Accomplishments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium ion Battery Commercialization Lithium ion Battery Commercialization Johnson Controls-Saft Advanced Power Solutions, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Johnson Controls-Saft (JCS) will supply lithium-ion batteries to Mercedes for their S Class Hybrid to be introduced in October 2009. Technology developed with DOE support (the VL6P cell) will be used in the S Class battery. In May 2006, the Johnson Controls-Saft Joint Venture was awarded a 24 month $14.4 million contract by the DOE/USABC to develop a 40kW Li ion HEV battery system offering improved safety, low temperature performance, and cost. JCS has reported a 40% cost reduction of the 40kW system being developed in their DOE/USABC contract while maintaining performance. Lithium Ion Battery Material Commercialization Argonne National Laboratory has licensed cathode materials and associated processing

148

Printable lithium batteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Printable lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) cathodes and porous aerogel / polymer separators have been designed, constructed, and tested. The cathodes consist of LiFePO4, PVDF binder,… (more)

Fenton, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

APPARATUS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF LITHIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for the production of high-purity lithium from lithium halides are described. The apparatus is provided for continuously contacting a molten lithium halide with molten barium, thereby forming lithium metal and a barium halide, establishing separate layers of these reaction products and unreacted barium and lithium halide, and continuously withdrawing lithium and barium halide from the reaction zone. (AEC)

Baker, P.S.; Duncan, F.R.; Greene, H.B.

1961-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

Jeppson, D.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Lithium battery management system  

SciTech Connect

Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

Dougherty, Thomas J. (Waukesha, WI)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Synthesis and characterization of metal hydride/carbon aerogel composites for hydrogen storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two materials currently of interest for onboard lightweight hydrogen storage applications are sodium aluminum hydride (NaAlH4), a complex metal hydride, and carbon aerogels (CAs), a light porous material connected by several spherical nanoparticles. ...

Kuen-Song Lin; Yao-Jen Mai; Su-Wei Chiu; Jing-How Yang; Sammy L. I. Chan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Synthesis and small molecule chemistry of the niobaziridine-hydride functional group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Synthesis and Divergent Reactivity of the Niobaziridine-Hydride Functional Group The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of the niobaziridine-hydride complex Nb(H)([eta]˛-t- ]Bu(H)C=NAr)(N[Np]Ar)? (la-H; ...

Figueroa, Joshua S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Lithium Methyl Carbonate as a Reaction Product of Metallic Lithium and Dimethyl Carbonate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemically synthesized lithium methylcarbonate (CH 3 OCOmolecular structures of lithium methyl carbonate (CH 3 OCO 2FTIR study also suggests that lithium methyl carbonate has

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Yang, Hui; Ross Jr., Philip N.; Xu, Kang; Jow, T. Richard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

HEDL-TME 78-15 HEDL-TME 78-15 uc-20 LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS Hanf ord Engineering Development Laboratory -~ - - , . .. . D.W. Jeppson J.L. Ballif W.W. Yuan B.E. Chou - - - . - . - -- r - N O T l C E n ~ h u mpon w prepared as an account of work iponrored by the United States Government. Neither the Unitcd States nor the United Stater Department of Energy. nor any of their employees, nor any of then contractor^, subcontractors. or their employees, maker any warranty, cxprcu or Implied. or anumcs any legal liability or rcrponabllity for the accuracy. cornplctcncs or uvfulnes of any information. apparatus, product or p r o a s ditclorcd. or rcpments that its u s would not infringe pnvatcly owned nghts. April 1978 HANFORD ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY

156

It's Elemental - The Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Helium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium The Element Lithium Click for Isotope Data 3 Li Lithium 6.941 Atomic Number: 3 Atomic Weight: 6.941...

157

Phostech Lithium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phostech Lithium Jump to: navigation, search Name Phostech Lithium Place St-Bruno-de-Montarville, Quebec, Canada Zip J3V 6B7 Sector Hydro Product String representation "Exclusive...

158

Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SANDIA REPORT SANDIA REPORT SAND2012-0786 Unlimited Release Printed February 2012 Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Lennie Klebanoff Director, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Jay Keller Deputy Director, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

159

A REVIEW OF THE RARE-EARTH HYDRIDES  

SciTech Connect

Some of the properties of rare earth hydrides are reviewed. Information on the hydrides of Tm, Lu, Tb, and Ho is not included because no work has been done on these elements. Eu and Yb are different from other rare earths in that MH/sub 2/ is their highest hydride and the crystal structures of EuH/sub 2/ and YbH/sub 2/ are orthorhombic. ra, Ce, Pr, and Nd form a dihydride which will take hydrogen into solid solution up to MH/sub 3/ without a change in crystal structure. The heavy rare earths form the same type of dihydride as the light, but as the hydrogen content increases from MH/sub 2/ the cubic structure becomes unstable and is replaced by a hexagonal structare. With increasing atomic number, thermal stability and hydrogen deusity increase. (J.R.D.)

Mulford, R.N.R.

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Heat-actuated metal hydride hydrogen compressor testing  

SciTech Connect

Electric utilities use hydrogen for cooling turbine generators. The majority of the utilities purchase the gas from industrial gas markets. On-site electrolytic hydrogen production may prove advantageous both logistically and economically. In order to demonstrate this concept, Public Service Electric and Gas Co. (PSE and G) and EPRI installed an electrolyzer at the Sewaren (NJ) station. To compress the gas, PSE and G purchased a heat-activated metal hydride compressor from Ergenics, Inc. This report describes closed- and open-cycle tests conducted on this metal hydride hydrogen compressor. Test systems, plans, methodologies, and results are presented. A brief discussion evaluates these performance results, addresses some of the practical problems involved with electrolyzer-compressor interface, and compares the costs and benefits of metal hydride versus mechanical hydrogen compression for utility generator cooling.

Piraino, M.; Metz, P.D.; Nienke, J.L.; Freitelberg, A.S.; Rahaman, R.S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Models for Metal Hydride Particle Shape, Packing, and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multiphysics modeling approach for heat conduction in metal hydride powders is presented, including particle shape distribution, size distribution, granular packing structure, and effective thermal conductivity. A statistical geometric model is presented that replicates features of particle size and shape distributions observed experimentally that result from cyclic hydride decreptitation. The quasi-static dense packing of a sample set of these particles is simulated via energy-based structural optimization methods. These particles jam (i.e., solidify) at a density (solid volume fraction) of 0.665+/-0.015 - higher than prior experimental estimates. Effective thermal conductivity of the jammed system is simulated and found to follow the behavior predicted by granular effective medium theory. Finally, a theory is presented that links the properties of bi-porous cohesive powders to the present systems based on recent experimental observations of jammed packings of fine powder. This theory produces quantitative experimental agreement with metal hydride powders of various compositions.

Kyle C. Smith; Timothy S. Fisher

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University] [Yale University

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

METHOD OF PREPARING SINTERED ZIRCONIUM METAL FROM ITS HYDRIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to the preparation of metal shapes from zirconium hydride by powder metallurgical techniques. The zirconium hydride powder which is to be used for this purpose can be prepared by rendering massive pieces of crystal bar zirconium friable by heat treatment in purified hydrogen. This any then be ground into powder and powder can be handled in the air without danger of it igniting. It may then be compacted in the normal manner by being piaced in a die. The compact is sintered under vacuum conditions preferably at a temperature ranging from 1200 to 1300 deg C and for periods of one to three hours.

Angier, R.P.

1958-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

OBSERVATION AND MECHANISM OF HYDRIDE IN ZIRCALOY-4 AND LOCAL HYDRIDE RE-ORIENTATION INDUCED BY HIGH PRESSURE AT HIGH TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

Hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were produced by a gas charging method to desired amounts of hydrogen. For low hydrogen content samples, the hydrided platelets appear elongated and needle-like, orientated in the circumferential direction. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression method at various temperatures. Samples with higher hydrogen concentration resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. The trend between temperature and ductility was also very clear: increasing temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the hydrided cladding. A single through-wall crack was observed for a hydrided sample having very high hydrogen concentration under ring compression testing. For samples having lower hydrogen concentrations, the fracture surfaces traversed both circumferential and radial directions, and for which voids were observed near the hydrides. Mechanical tests to study hydride reorientation in these samples are under way, and the results will be reported in the near future.

Yan, Yong [ORNL; Blackwell, Andrew S [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate David A. Scrymgeour and Venkatraman Gopalan Department of Materials Science, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. The contributions to the domain- wall energy from polarization

Gopalan, Venkatraman

166

Synthesis and Electrochemical Performance of a Lithium Titanium Phosphate Anode for Aqueous Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis and Electrochemical Performance of a Lithium Titanium Phosphate Anode for Aqueous Lithium** Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA Lithium cells that use organic electrolytes. The equilibrium reaction potential of lithium titanium phosphate

Cui, Yi

167

Lithium K(1s) synchrotron NEXAFS spectra of lithium-ion battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium K(1s) synchrotron NEXAFS spectra of lithium-ion battery cathode, anode and electrolyte materials Title Lithium K(1s) synchrotron NEXAFS spectra of lithium-ion battery...

168

The Role of Ate Complexes in the Lithium-Sulfur, Lithium-Selenium and Lithium-Tellurium Exchange Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Ate Complexes in the Lithium-Sulfur, Lithium-Selenium and Lithium-Tellurium Exchange/Se exchange was substantially faster than exchange of the lithium reagents with the ate complex. Therefore, these ate complexes are not on the actual Li/Se exchange pathway. Introduction. ± The lithium

Reich, Hans J.

169

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lithium Nearly everybody knows about lithium Nearly everybody knows about lithium - a light, silvery alkali metal - used in rechargeable batteries powering everything from laptops to hybrid cars. What may not be so well known is the fact that researchers hoping to harness the energy released in fusion reactions also have used lithium to coat the walls of donut-shaped tokamak reactors. Lithium, it turns out, may help the plasmas fueling fusion reactions to retain heat for longer periods of time. This could improve the chances of producing useful energy from fusion. en COLLOQUIUM: The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) http://www.pppl.gov/events/colloquium-lithium-tokamak-experiment-ltx

170

Micro-and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro- and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate Vladimir Ya. Shur investigation of the domain evolution in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate during backswitched electric sources based on quasi-phase matching.11 Lithium niobate LiNbO3 (LN) and lithium tantalate LiTaO3 (LT

Byer, Robert L.

171

Lithium disulfide battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a negative electrode-limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS/sub 2/ positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole % LiCl, 38 mole % LiBr and 37 mole % KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

Kaun, T.D.

1986-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Lithium ion conducting electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

Angell, C. Austen (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tempe, AZ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Lithium disulfide battery  

SciTech Connect

A negative electrode limited secondary electrochemical cell having dense FeS.sub.2 positive electrode operating exclusively on the upper plateau, a Li alloy negative electrode and a suitable lithium-containing electrolyte. The electrolyte preferably is 25 mole percent LiCl, 38 mole percent LiBr and 37 mole percent KBr. The cell may be operated isothermally.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the performance testing of two configurations of the Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Sprinter van developed by EPRI and Daimler for use in delivering cargo, carrying passengers, or fulfilling a variety of specialty applications. One configuration, California 1 (CA-1) has a Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) battery pack. The other, California 2 (CA-2) has a Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) battery pack. California 2 showed better fuel and energy economy in all aspects of testing.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

LITHIUM LENS (I)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Technical/Engineering aspects of Lithium Lens (LL) considered. LL dimensions and parameters adopted for undulator based positron source for International Linear Collider. Sealing technique for windows represented in this publication also. This publication is a part of preparation work for numerical modeling of LL. OVERVIEW Usage of Lithium Lens (LL) for positron collection was suggested years ago [1]-[4]. Lithium lens with solid Lithium is in exploitation for decades now. Usage of LL for antiproton collection is also a well developed topic [5]-[11]. Naturally, usage of LL for positron collection in a scheme with undulator [13], developed in Novosibirsk, included LL from the very beginning [14]-[15]. From the other hand usage of LL for positron collection still not a widely accepted idea, so Novosibirsk lens remains the only one in operation. In resent times we applied some efforts to implement LL into ILC positron source [16]-[21]. Development of positron source for ILC as it is now in baseline design described in [22]. Latest results on practical test undulator-based positron source demonstrated positron polarization ~ 80 % and electron polarization ~90% respectively obtained with Tungsten target [23]. Also interesting looks a possibility for implementation of LL for muon collider [24]-[25]. System with Liquid Lithium is under consideration for Fusion Materials Irradiation studies [26]. Current publication is the first one in series dedicated to demonstration of benefits from potential usage of LL in International Linear Collider. Support for this investigation obtained from ILC GDE Regional Directorship of America.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Side Reactions in Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model for Aging of Lithium-Ion Battery Cells. Journal of TheSalts Formed on the Lithium-Ion Battery Negative Electrodeion batteries In a lithium ion battery, positively charged

Tang, Maureen Han-Mei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Advances in lithium-ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current reviews of the lithium ion battery literature byof view of the lithium ion battery scientist and engineer,lithium ion batteries. The chapter on aging summarizes the effects of the chemistry on the battery

Kerr, John B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Design and Simulation of Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LiNiOiCarbon Lithium-Ion Battery," S. S. lonics, 69,238-the mid-1980's, the lithium-ion battery based on a carboncommercialization of the lithium-ion battery, several other

Doyle, C.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

UNDERSTANDING DEGRADATION AND LITHIUM DIFFUSION IN LITHIUM ION BATTERY ELECTRODES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lithium-ion batteries with higher capacity and longer cycle life than that available today are required as secondary energy sources for a wide range of emerging… (more)

Li, Juchuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Title Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009...

182

American Lithium Energy Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Marcos, California Zip 92069 Product California-based developer of lithium ion battery technology. References American Lithium Energy Corp1 LinkedIn Connections...

183

Block copolymer electrolytes for lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the energy equation, battery capacity, is defined as theperformance and capacity fading of a lithium-ion batteryof large-capacity lithium- ion battery systems. With new

Hudson, William Rodgers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH ? LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255oC; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (?Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (?Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly stored in the material after the first desorption. The activation energy was found to be 51 kJ/mol, as compared to 81 kJ/mol for pure lithium alanate. It is proposed that based on the data obtained and CALPHAD modeling that the improvement in cycling is due to the formation of pure lithium (liquid at 255oC), which is able to react with nitrogen specifically forming Li3N. The presence of nitrogen in the 80/20 molar mixtures in a hydride bed along with hydrogen causes Li to form Li3N rather than LiH, and subsequently regenerates the Li2NH phase and yields a ~10 wt.%H reversibly.

Chandra, Dhanesh (Primary Contact); Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

185

Lithium-Ion Battery Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Battery Issues IEA Workshop on Battery Recycling Hoboken, Belgium September 26-27, 2011 Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory...

186

Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume 1 Start Page 1176 Issue 8 Pagination 1176-1180 Keywords anode, diffusion, graphene, lithium ion battery, transport Abstract Graphitic carbon is currently considered the...

187

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Composition and function in AB{sub 5} hydride electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multicomponent AB, hydrides are attractive replacements for the cadmium electrode in nickel - cadmium batteries. This paper is concerned with the differential effects of Ni substitution by cobalt, Mn and Al upon electrode corrosion and capacity, using alloys having the generic composition of Al(NiCoMnAl){sub 5} and similar to those used for the preparation of commercial battery electrodes. The corrosion of metal hydride electrodes is determined by two factors, surface passivation due to the presence of surface oxides or hydroxides and crystal lattice expansion - contraction the charge - discharge process. Thus, in addition to determining the effects of Ni substitution we will also address the question of whether an observed change is due to a change lattice expansion or to a change in surface passivation, e.g. the formation a corrosion resistant oxide layer.

Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.; Reilly, J.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamically consistent mathematical model for hydrogen adsorption in metal hydrides is proposed. Beside hydrogen diffusion, the model accounts for phase transformation accompanied by hysteresis, swelling, temperature and heat transfer, strain, and stress. We prove existence of solutions of the ensuing system of partial differential equations by a carefully-designed, semi-implicit approximation scheme. A generalization for a drift-diffusion of multi-component ionized "gas" is outlined, too.

Tomas Roubicek; Giuseppe Tomassetti

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

Postirradiation examination of pressure tubes 2954 and 3053: Corrosion, hydriding and fluence measurements  

SciTech Connect

Pressure Tubes 2954 and 3053 were removed from N Reactor in March 1987 for postirradiation examinations (PIE) including hydriding, corrosion, fluence and mechanical property measurements. The results of the corrosion, hydriding, and fluence measurements are the subject of this report. These data will be used to evaluate the trends in corrosion and hydriding behavior which are important to the structural integrity of the tubes. The trend evaluations as well as the mechanical property data are or will be reported elsewhere.

Chastain, S.A.; Trimble, D.J.; Boyd, S.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lithium Rechargeable Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to obviate the deficiencies of currently used electrolytes in lithium rechargeable batteries, there is a compelling need for the development of solvent-free, highly conducting solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs). The problem will be addressed by synthesizing a new class of block copolymers and plasticizers, which will be used in the formulation of highly conducting electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. The main objective of this Phase-I effort is to determine the efficacy and commercial prospects of new specifically designed SPEs for use in electric and hybrid electric vehicle (EV/HEV) batteries. This goal will be achieved by preparing the SPEs on a small scale with thorough analyses of their physical, chemical, thermal, mechanical and electrochemical properties. SPEs will play a key role in the formulation of next generation lithium-ion batteries and will have a major impact on the future development of EVs/HEVs and a broad range of consumer products, e.g., computers, camcorders, cell phones, cameras, and power tools.

Robert Filler, Zhong Shi and Braja Mandal

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

193

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Title Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1089E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Anders, André, Jonathan L. Slack, and Thomas J. Richardson Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 1 Date Published 08/2003 Call Number LBNL-1089E Abstract Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have been investigated. In contrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogen is stored (at low concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination of a solid state ion storage layer simplifies the layer stack, enhances overall transmission, and reduces cost. The cyclic switching properties were demonstrated and system durability improved with the incorporation a thin Zr barrier layer between the MnNiMg layer and the Pd catalyst. Addition of 9% silver to the palladium catalyst further improved system durability. About 100 full cycles have been demonstrated before devices slow considerably. Degradation of device performance appears to be related to Pd catalyst mobility, rather than delamination or metal layer oxidation issues originally presumed likely to present significant challenges.

194

Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R. (Queens)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermodynamics of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications using first principles calculations .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Metal hydrides are promising candidates for H2 storage, but high stability and poor kinetics are the important challenges which have to be solved for vehicular… (more)

Kim, Ki Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Composition dependence of lithium diffusivity in lithium niobate at high temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composition dependence of lithium diffusivity in lithium niobate at high temperature D. H. Jundt on the diffusivity of lithium in lithium niobate at 1100 "C in the crystallographic z direction over the composition range from 48.38 to 49.85 mol % L&O. A vapor transport technique was applied to produce a lithium

Fejer, Martin M.

198

Solid lithium-ion electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li.sub.2 O--CeO.sub.2 --SiO.sub.2 system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications.

Zhang, Ji-Guang (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Solid lithium-ion electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the composition of a solid lithium-ion electrolyte based on the Li{sub 2}O--CeO{sub 2}--SiO{sub 2} system having good transparent characteristics and high ion conductivity suitable for uses in lithium batteries, electrochromic devices and other electrochemical applications. 12 figs.

Zhang, J.G.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

ELLIPSOMETRY OF SURFACE LAYERS ON LEAD AND LITHIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface Layers on Lead and Lithium By Richard Dudley Peterssulfuric acid and and lithium to water, Acid concentrationsbeen observed in the reaction of lithium with water vapor. i

Peters, Richard Dudley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Lithium electric dipole polarizability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric dipole polarizability of the lithium atom in the ground state is calculated including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The obtained result {alpha}{sub E}=164.0740(5) a.u. is in good agreement with the less accurate experimental value of 164.19(1.08) a.u. The small uncertainty of about 3 parts per 10{sup 6} comes from the approximate treatment of quantum electrodynamics corrections. Our theoretical result can be considered as a benchmark for more general atomic structure methods and may serve as a reference value for the relative measurement of polarizabilities of the other alkali-metal atoms.

Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, PL-60-780 Poznan (Poland); Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, PL-87-100 Torun (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method of recycling lithium borate to lithium borohydride through methyl borate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method for the recycling of lithium borate to lithium borohydride which can be reacted with water to generate hydrogen for utilization as a fuel. The lithium borate by-product of the hydrogen generation reaction is reacted with hydrogen chloride and water to produce boric acid and lithium chloride. The boric acid and lithium chloride are converted to lithium borohydride through a methyl borate intermediate to complete the recycle scheme.

Filby, Evan E. (Rigby, ID)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hydride production in zircaloy-4 as a function of time and temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experiments performed for this thesis were designed to define the primary process variables of time, temperature, and atmosphere for an engineering system that will produce metal powder from recycled nuclear fuel cladding. The proposed system will hydride and mill Zircaloy cladding tubes to produce fine hydride powder and then dehydride the powder to produce metal; this thesis is focused on the hydride formation reaction. These experiments were performed by hydriding nuclear grade Zircaloy-4 tubes under flowing argon-5% hydrogen for various times and temperatures. The result of these experiments is a correlation which relates the rate of zirconium hydride formation to the process temperature. This correlation may now be used to design a method to efficiently produce zirconium hydride powder. It was observed that it is much more effective to hydride the Zircaloy-4 tubes at temperatures below the a-B-d eutectoid temperature of 540°C. These samples tended to readily disassemble during the hydride formation reaction and were easily ground to powder. Hydrogen pickup was faster above this temperature but the samples were generally tougher and it was difficult to pulverize them into powder.

Parkison, Adam Joseph

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Mathematical Modelling of a Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage System Brendan David MacDonald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Member Abstract In order for metal hydride hydrogen storage systems to compete with existing energyMathematical Modelling of a Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage System by Brendan David MacDonald B Hydrogen Storage System by Brendan David MacDonald B.A.Sc., University of Waterloo, 2004 Supervisory

Victoria, University of

206

Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

HYDRIDES AND METAL-HYDROGEN SYSTEMS. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work reported deals with the preparation and physical properties, especially thermal dissociation pressures, and densities of hydrides, hydrogen- metal systems, and mixtures of hydrides with other substances. Possible applicatlons as moderators, high-temperature neutron shields, and low-temperature shields are cited and design problems discussed. Most of the data on dissociation pressures cover ranges and compounds not hltherto explored because of experimental difficulties and the basic knowledge of the thermal behavior of hydrides was substantially increased. New hydrldes were prepared and several reported in the literature were shown not to exist. The following compounds, mixtures, and systems were studled: Tl-H, U-H, Ll-H, Na-H, Ca-H, Ba-H, Th-H, Sr- H; NaH-NaF, NaH-NaOH, NaH-CaH/, LlH-LiF, CaH/sub 2/-CaF/sub 2/, CaH/sub 2/-CaC/ sub 2/,CaH/sub 2/-Ca/sub 3/N/sub 2/; FeH/sub 3/ (alleged), NiH/sub 2/ (alleged), Ti(BH/sub 4/)/sub 3/, Th(BH/sub 4/)/sub 4/, WH/sub 4/ (attempted), W(BH/sub 4/)/ sub 4/ (attempted), /sub 4/NBH/sub 4/, (CH , and ydrides are ing an N/sub H/ comparable to water yet stable at red heat, compounds giving a neutron shield weight less than half that of water, and compounds suitable for use as hightemperature moderators containing large amounts of hydrogen. (auth)

Gibb, T.R.P. Jr.

1951-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 1: Assessment of recycling technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Approximately ten different candidate EV battery technologies were examined based on their performance and recyclability, and were ranked based on these examinations. The batteries evaluated were lead-acid (all types), nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron disulfide, lithium-ion, lithium polymer, and zinc (zinc-air and zinc-bromine). Locations of present recycling facilities were identified. Markets for recycled products were assessed: the value of recycled materials were found too unstable to fully support recycling efforts. All these batteries exhibit the characteristic of hazardous waste in California, and are therefore subject to strict regulations (finalization of the new EPA Universal Waste Rule could change this).

Unnasch, S.; Montano, M.; Franklin, P.; Nowell, G.; Martin, C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal.

Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Engineering Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

T: T: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly, MA; Bridgeport Brass, Adrian, MI and Seymour, Chicago, IL CT; National Guard Armory, 0: Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the attached radiological survey data (Attachments 1 through 3) and an appropriate authority review, the following properties are being authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes only and that Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) should conduct appropriate comprehensive characterization studies to determine the extent'and magnitude of contamination on properties. Site Location Priority Former Bridgeport Brass Co. (General Motors) Adrian, MI Low Former Bridgeport Brass Co.

213

Metal hydride based isotope separation: Large-scale operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation process began at the Savannah River Laboratory in 1980. This semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process will be used in new tritium facilities at the Savannah River Site. A tritium production unit is scheduled to start operation in 1993. An experimental, large-scale unit is currently being tested using protium and deuterium. Operation of the large-scale unit has demonstrated separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes (55% protium and 45% deuterium), resulting in protium and deuterium product streams with purities better than 99.5%. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Horen, A.S.; Lee, Myung W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Metal hydride based isotope separation: Large-scale operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to develop a metal hydride based hydrogen isotope separation process began at the Savannah River Laboratory in 1980. This semi-continuous gas chromatographic separation process will be used in new tritium facilities at the Savannah River Site. A tritium production unit is scheduled to start operation in 1993. An experimental, large-scale unit is currently being tested using protium and deuterium. Operation of the large-scale unit has demonstrated separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes (55% protium and 45% deuterium), resulting in protium and deuterium product streams with purities better than 99.5%. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Horen, A.S.; Lee, Myung W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sintering of sponge and hydride-dehydride titanium powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sintering behavior of compacts produced from sponge and hydride-dehydride (HDH) Ti powders was examined. Compacts were vacuum sintered at 1200 or 1300 deg C for 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 or 960 minutes. The porosity decreased with sintering time and/or temperature in compacts produced from the HDH powders. Compacts produced from these powders could be sintered to essentially full density. However, the sintering condition did not influence the amount of porosity present in compacts produced from the sponge powders. These samples could only be sintered to a density of 97% theoretical. The sintering behavior was attributed to the chemical impurities in the powders.

Alman, David E.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides  

SciTech Connect

A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

Zidan, Ragaiy

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

Angell, C. Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Kang (Tempe, AZ); Liu, Changle (Tulsa, OK)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Lithium Superionic Sulfide Cathode for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

This work presents a facile synthesis approach for core-shell structured Li2S nanoparticles, which have Li2S as the core and Li3PS4 as the shell. This material functions as lithium superionic sulfide (LSS) cathode for long-lasting, energy-efficient lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The LSS has an ionic conductivity of 10-7 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high lithium-ion conductivity of LSS imparts an excellent cycling performance to all-solid Li-S batteries, which also promises safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

Lin, Zhan [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cyanoethylated Compounds as Additives in Lithium/Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Feature - Lithium-air Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develop Lithium-Air Battery Li-air Li-air batteries hold the promise of increasing the energy density of Li-ion batteries by as much as five to 10 times. But that potential will...

223

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lithium Technology Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Lithium Technology Corporation Place Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania Zip PA 19462 Sector Vehicles Product Pennsylvania-based lithium secondary battery company manufacturing rechargeable batteries for plug-in and hybrid vehicles and for custom military and industrial applications. References Lithium Technology Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lithium Technology Corporation is a company located in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Lithium Technology Corporation" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lithium_Technology_Corporation&oldid=348412"

226

A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs.

Stout, R.B.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

STUDIES ON TWO CLASSES OF POSITIVE ELECTRODE MATERIALS FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cathode materials for lithium ion battery. ElectrochimicaCapacity, High Rate Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Utilizinghours. 1.4 Lithium Ion Batteries Lithium battery technology

Wilcox, James D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam August 2011; accepted 29 August 2011; published online 22 September 2011) Formation of lithium dendrite to observe the real-time nucleation and growth of the lithium fibers inside a nanoscale Li-ion battery. Our

Endres. William J.

229

Lithium Ion Solvation: Amine and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Solvates of Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ion Solvation: Amine and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Solvates of Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide, and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of 6Li-15N labeled lithium hexamethyldisilazide ([6Li,15N]- Li ligand structure and lithium amide aggregation state is a complex and sensitive function of amine alkyl

Collum, David B.

230

THE PREPARATION OF PLUTONIUM POWDER BY A HYDRIDING PROCESS-INITIAL STUDIES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micron-sized plutonium powder was produced by hydriding massive metal, then grinding and decomposing the hydride. An apparatus containing clean plutonium metal was evacuated to a pressure of 10 mu . Dry oxygen-free hydrogen was introduced and the apparatus placed in a furnace. After the reaction started, the apparatus was removed from the furnace and hydrogen added until the reaction was complete. The hydride was decomposed by heating to 400 deg C. Plutonium metal produced in this manner was porous. (C.J.G.)

Stiffler, G.L.; Curtis, M.H.

1960-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method  

SciTech Connect

A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Primary and secondary ambient temperature lithium batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings collect papers on the subject of batteries. Topics include: lithium-oxygen batteries, lithium-sulphur batteries, metal-metal oxide batteries, metal-nonmetal batteries, spacecraft power supplies, electrochemistry, and battery containment materials.

Gabano, J.P.; Takehara, Z.; Bro, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Recent advances in lithium ion technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium ion technology is based on the use of lithium intercalating electrodes. Carbon is the most commonly used anode material, while the cathode materials of choice have been layered lithium metal chalcogenides (LiMX{sub 2}) and lithium spinel-type compounds. Electrolytes may be either organic liquids or polymers. Although the first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds as battery anodes was reported in 1981 for molten salt cells (1) and in 1983 for ambient temperature systems (2) it was not until Sony Energytech announced a new lithium ion rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode in 1990, that interest peaked. The reason for this heightened interest is that these cells have the high energy density, high voltage and fight weight of metallic lithium systems plus a very long cycle life, but without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium.

Levy, S.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were dried in air at 40 C. The granules were heated to 230 C for 30 minutes in argon to remove the remaining water and organic materials. The resulting product was spherical composite granules (100 to 2000 micron diameter) with a porous silica matrix containing small agglomerates of metal hydride particles. Open porosity in the silica matrix allows hydrogen to permeate rapidly through the matrix but the pores are small enough to contain the metal hydride particles. Additional porosity around the metal hydride particles, induced using abietic acid as a pore former, allows the particles to freely expand and contract without fracturing the brittle sol-gel matrix. It was demonstrated that the granules readily absorb and desorb hydrogen while remaining integral and dimensionally stable. Microcracking was observed after the granules were cycled in hydrogen five times. The strength of the granules was improved by coating them with a thin layer of a micro-porous polymer sol-gel that would allow hydrogen to freely pass through the coating but would filter out metal hydride poisons such as water and carbon monoxide. It was demonstrated that if a thin sol-gel coating was applied after the granules were cycled, the coating not only improved the strength of the granules but the coated granules retained their strength after additional hydrogen cycling tests. This additional strength is needed to extend the lifetime of the granules and to survive the compressive load in a large column of granules. Additional hydrogen adsorption tests are planned to evaluate the performance of coated granules after one hundred cycles. Tests will also be performed to determine the effects of metal hydride poisons on the granules. The results of these tests will be documented in a separate report. The process that was developed to form these granules could be scaled to a production process. The process to form granules from a mixture of metal hydride particles and pore former such as abietic acid can be scaled up using commercial granulators. The current laboratory-scale external gelation column produc

Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

235

Intermetallic electrodes for lithium batteries - Energy ...  

This invention relates to intermetallic negative electrode compounds for non-aqueous, electrochemical lithium cells and batteries. More specifically, ...

236

Graphene Fabrication and Lithium Ion Batteries Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for Supercapacitors.

237

Solid Lithium Ion Conducting Electrolytes Suitable for ...  

Batteries with solid lithium ion conducting electrolytes would ... The invention is cost-effective and suitable for manufacturing solid electrolyte ...

238

Dendrite Growth Prevention Technology for Lithium Metal ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Dendrite Growth Prevention Technology for Lithium Metal Batteries. ...

239

Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Mesoscale Computational Materials Science of Energy Materials. Presentation Title, Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials. Author(s) ...

240

Morphological Evolution of Lithium Iron Phosphate Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Modeling of Point Defects in Materials: Coupling Ab Initio and Elasticity Approaches ... Electrochemical Shock of Lithium Battery Materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass.

242

Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Armand, “Room temperature molten salts as lithium batteryZ. Suarez, “Ionic liquid (molten salt) phase organometallic

Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz, John; Newman, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

245

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001lithium phosphate that can intercalate lithium or hydrogen. The compound can be used in an electrochemical device including electrodes and storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Magnetism in Lithium–Oxygen Discharge Product  

SciTech Connect

Nonaqueous lithium–oxygen batteries have a much superior theoretical gravimetric energy density compared to conventional lithium-ion batteries, and thus could render long-range electric vehicles a reality. A molecular-level understanding of the reversible formation of lithium peroxide in these batteries, the properties of major/minor discharge products, and the stability of the nonaqueous electrolytes is required to achieve successful lithium–oxygen batteries. We demonstrate that the major discharge product formed in the lithium–oxygen cell, lithium peroxide, exhibits a magnetic moment. These results are based on dc-magnetization measurements and a lithium– oxygen cell containing an ether-based electrolyte. The results are unexpected because bulk lithium peroxide has a significant band gap. Density functional calculations predict that superoxide- type surface oxygen groups with unpaired electrons exist on stoichiometric lithium peroxide crystalline surfaces and on nanoparticle surfaces; these computational results are consistent with the magnetic measurement of the discharged lithium peroxide product as well as EPR measurements on commercial lithium peroxide. The presence of superoxide-type surface oxygen groups with spin can play a role in the reversible formation and decomposition of lithium peroxide as well as the reversible formation and decomposition of electrolyte molecules.

Lu, Jun; Jung, Hun-Ji; Lau, Kah Chun; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Schlueter, John A.; Du, Peng; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Ferguson, Glen A.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Hassoun, Jusef; Iddir, Hakim; Zhou, Jigang; Zuin, Lucia; Hu, Yongfeng; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

247

Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a ceramic-ceramic composite electrolyte is provided containing lithium nitride and lithium phosphate. The ceramic-ceramic composite is also preferably annealed and exhibits an activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

Kumar, Binod (Dayton, OH); Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G. (Fairborn, OH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wall pressure exerted by hydrogenation of sodium aluminum hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wall pressure exerted by the bulk expansion of a sodium aluminum hydride bed was measured as a function of hydrogen content. A custom apparatus was designed and loaded with sodium alanates at densities of 1.0, 1.1, and 1.16 g/cc. Four complete cycles were performed to identify variations in measured pressure. Results indicated poor correlation between exerted pressure and hydrogen capacity of the sodium alanate beds. Mechanical pressure due to the hydrogenation of sodium alanates does not influence full-scale system designs as it falls within common design factors of safety. Gas pressure gradients within the porous solid were identified and may limit reaction rates, especially for high aspect ratio beds.

Perras, Yon E.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Zimmerman, Mark D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Model for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel Claddings: A Status Report on Current Model Capabilities Model for Simulation of Hydride Precipitation in Zr-Based Used Fuel Claddings: A Status Report on Current Model Capabilities The report demonstrates a meso-scale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride precipitation in the cladding of used fuels during long-term dry-storage. While the Zr-based claddings (regarded as a barrier for containment of radioactive fission products and fuel) are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service in the reactor. The amount of hydrogen that the cladding picks up is primarily a function of the exact chemistry and microstructure of the claddings and reactor operating conditions, time-temperature history, and

251

Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art tritium Hydride Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilized unique fast-cycling 5.63 mole uranium beds (50.9 g to T/sub 2/ at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops.

Nasise, J.E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art tritium Hydriding Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilizes unique fast-cycling 7.9 mole uranium beds (47.5g of T at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops. 12 refs., 7 figs.

Nasise, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A non-isothermal model of a nickelmetal hydride cell , M. Mohammedb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation during over- charge. Since the metal hydride material gradually loses capacity through usage due KOH solution, which has good electric conductivity for a wide range of temperatures. Some Li

254

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

2009-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team’s innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

None

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thin-film Lithium Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin-Film Battery with Lithium Anode Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division Thin-Film Lithium Batteries Resources with Additional Information The Department of Energy's 'Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed high-performance thin-film lithium batteries for a variety of technological applications. These batteries have high energy densities, can be recharged thousands of times, and are only 10 microns thick. They can be made in essentially any size and shape. Recently, Teledyne licensed this technology from ORNL to make batteries for medical devices including electrocardiographs. In addition, new "textured" cathodes have been developed which have greatly increased the peak current capability of the batteries. This greatly expands the potential medical uses of the batteries, including transdermal applications for heart regulation.'

258

Lithium ion rechargeable systems studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium ion systems, although relatively new, have attracted much interest worldwide. Their high energy density, long cycle life and relative safety, compared with metallic lithium rechargeable systems, make them prime candidates for powering portable electronic equipment. Although lithium ion cells are presently used in a few consumer devices, e.g., portable phones, camcorders, and laptop computers, there is room for considerable improvement in their performance. Specific areas that need to be addressed include: (1) carbon anode--increase reversible capacity, and minimize passivation; (2) cathode--extend cycle life, improve rate capability, and increase capacity. There are several programs ongoing at Sandia National Laboratories which are investigating means of achieving the stated objectives in these specific areas. This paper will review these programs.

Levy, S.C.; Lasasse, R.R.; Cygan, R.T.; Voigt, J.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Composite electrodes for lithium batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stability of composite positive and negative electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries is discussed. Positive electrodes with spinel-type structures that are derived from orthorhombic-LiMnO{sub 2} and layered-MnO{sub 2} are significantly more stable than standard spinel Li[Mn{sub 2}]O{sub 4} electrodes when cycled electrochemically over both the 4-V and 3-V plateaus in lithium cells. Transmission electron microscope data of cycled electrodes have indicated that a composite domain structure accounts for this greater electrochemical stability. The performance of composite Cu{sub x}Sn materials as alternative negative electrodes to amorphous SnO{sub x} electrodes for lithium-ion batteries is discussed in terms of the importance of the concentration of the electrochemically inactive copper component in the electrode.

Hackney, S. A.; Johnson, C. S.; Kahaian, A. J.; Kepler, K. D.; Shao-Horn, Y.; Thackeray, M. M.; Vaughey, J. T.

1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Thin film rechargeable lithium batteries using ceramic electrolyte and cathode materials have been fabricated by physical deposition techniques. The lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte has exceptional electrochemical stability and a good lithium conductivity. The lithium insertion reaction of several different intercalation materials, amorphous V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, amorphous LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} films, have been investigated using the completed cathode/electrolyte/lithium thin film battery.

Dudney, N. J.; Bates, J. B.; Lubben, D.

1995-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries using ceramic electrolyte and cathode materials have been fabricated by physical deposition techniques. The lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte has exceptional electrochemical stability and a good lithium conductivity. The lithium insertion reaction of several different intercalation materials, amorphous V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, amorphous LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and crystalline LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} films, have been investigated using the completed cathode/electrolyte/lithium thin-film battery.

Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Lubben, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Imaging Lithium Air Electrodes | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Imaging Reveals Lithium Distribution in Lithium-Air Electrodes Neutron Imaging Reveals Lithium Distribution in Lithium-Air Electrodes Agatha Bardoel - January 01, 2013 Image produced by neutron-computed tomography. The next step in revolutionizing electric vehicle capacity Research Contacts: Hassina Bilheux, Jagjit Nanda, and S. Pannala Using neutron-computed tomography, researchers at the CG-1D neutron imaging instrument at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have successfully mapped the three-dimensional spatial distribution of lithium products in electrochemically discharged lithium-air cathodes. Lithium-air chemistry promises very high-energy density that, if successful, would revolutionize the world of electric vehicles by extending their range to 500 miles or more. The high-energy density comes from

263

Solid solution lithium alloy cermet anodes  

SciTech Connect

A metal-ceramic composite ("cermet") has been produced by a chemical reaction between a lithium compound and another metal. The cermet has advantageous physical properties, high surface area relative to lithium metal or its alloys, and is easily formed into a desired shape. An example is the formation of a lithium-magnesium nitride cermet by reaction of lithium nitride with magnesium. The reaction results in magnesium nitride grains coated with a layer of lithium. The nitride is inert when used in a battery. It supports the metal in a high surface area form, while stabilizing the electrode with respect to dendrite formation. By using an excess of magnesium metal in the reaction process, a cermet of magnesium nitride is produced, coated with a lithium-magnesium alloy of any desired composition. This alloy inhibits dendrite formation by causing lithium deposited on its surface to diffuse under a chemical potential into the bulk of the alloy.

Richardson, Thomas J.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lithium-endohedral C{sub 60} complexes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High capacity, reversible, lithium intercalated carbon anodes have been prepared, 855 m.Ah/g, which exceed the capacity for stage 1 lithium intercalated carbon anodes, 372 mAh/g. Since there is very little hydrogen content in the high capacity anode, the fullerene C{sub 60} lattice is used to investigate the nature of lithium ion bonding and spacing between lithiums in endohedral lithium complexes of C{sub 60}. Three lithium-endohedral complexes have been investigated using ab initio molecular orbital calculations involving 2,3 and 5 lithium. The calculated results suggest that lithium cluster formation may be important for achieving the high capacity lithium carbon anodes.

Scanlon, L. G.

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

265

Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150°C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development of a lithium hydride powered hydrogen generator for use in long life, low power PEM fuel cell power supplies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies a hybrid PEM fuel cell system for use in low power, long life sensor networks. PEM fuel cells offer high efficiency and environmental friendliness but have not been widely adopted due to cost, reliability, ...

Strawser, Daniel DeWitt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Evaluation of Lithium Hydride for Use in a Space Nuclear Reactor Shield, Including a Historical Perspective  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiH was one of the five primary shield materials the NRPCT intended to develop (along with beryllium, boron carbide, tungsten, and water) for potential Prometheus application. It was also anticipated that {sup 10}B metal would be investigated for feasibility at a low level of effort. LiH historically has been selected as a low mass, neutron absorption material for space shields (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP), Topaz, SP-100). Initial NRPCT investigations did not produce convincing evidence that LiH was desirable or feasible for a Prometheus mission due to material property issues (primarily swelling and hydrogen cover gas containment), and related thermal design complexity. Furthermore, if mass limits allowed, an option to avoid use of LiH was being contemplated to lower development costs and associated risks. However, LiH remains theoretically the most efficient neutron shield material per unit mass, and, with sufficient testing and development, could be an optimal material choice for future flights.

D. Poeth

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

Advanced batteries for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The idea of battery-powered vehicles is an old one that took on new importance during the oil crisis of 1973 and after California passed laws requiring vehicles that would produce no emissions (so-called zero-emission vehicles). In this overview of battery technologies, the authors review the major existing or near-term systems as well as advanced systems being developed for electric vehicle (EV) applications. However, this overview does not cover all the advanced batteries being developed currently throughout the world. Comparative characteristics for the following batteries are given: lead-acid; nickel/cadmium; nickel/iron; nickel/metal hydride; zinc/bromine; sodium/sulfur; sodium/nickel chloride; zinc/air; lithium/iron sulfide; and lithium-polymer.

Henriksen, G.L.; DeLuca, W.H.; Vissers, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Postirradiation examination of Pressure Tubes 2755 and 1054 Part 1: Dimensional, hydride, inner surface defects, and corrosion measurements: Addendum 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This addendum is issued to document additional postirradiation examinations that were conducted on Pressure Tubes 2755 and 1054 for evaluation of inner surface defects, corrosion and hydride measurements.

Chastain, S.A.; Trimble, D.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lithium Ephedrate-Mediated Addition of a Lithium Acetylide to a Ketone: Solution Structures and Relative Reactivities of Mixed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Ephedrate-Mediated Addition of a Lithium Acetylide to a Ketone: Solution Structures-1301 ReceiVed April 30, 1997. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 26, 1997 Abstract: Addition of lithiumLi and 13C NMR spectroscopies reveal lithium cyclopropylacetylide in THF to be a dimer

Collum, David B.

271

Anode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

Belharouak, Ilias (Bolingbrook, IL); Amine, Khalil (Oak Brook, IL)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Kesanli, Banu (Mersin, TR); Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Anode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell systems. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plasticized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

Belharouak, Ilias (Westmont, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Anode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Primary and secondary Li-ion and lithium-metal based electrochemical cell system. The suppression of gas generation is achieved through the addition of an additive or additives to the electrolyte system of respective cell, or to the cell itself whether it be a liquid, a solid- or plastized polymer electrolyte system. The gas suppression additives are primarily based on unsaturated hydrocarbons.

Belharouak, Ilias (Bolingbrook, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

Commercial Aluminum-Lithium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Typical physical properties of selected aluminum-lithium alloys...-742 Elastic modulus, GPa (10 6 psi) 76 (11.0) 75 (10.9) 77 (11.2) Poisson's ratio 0.34 � � (a) Measured per ASTM G 60

276

Synthesis and characterization of metal hydride electrodes. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to elucidate the compositional and structural parameters that affect the thermodynamics, kinetics and stability of alloy hydride electrodes and to use this information in the development of new high capacity long life hydride electrodes for rechargeable batteries. The work focuses on the development of AB{sub 5} alloys and the application of in situ methods, at NSLS, such as x-ray absorption (XAS), to elucidate the role of the alloying elements in hydrogen storage and corrosion inhibition. The most significant results to date are: The decay of electrode capacity on cycling was directly related to alloy corrosion. The rate of corrosion depended in part on both the alloy composition and the partial molar volume of hydrogen, V{sub H}. The corrosion rate depended on the composition of the A component in AB{sub 5} (LaNi{sub 5} type) alloys. Partial substitution of La with Ce in AB{sub 5} alloys substantially inhibits electrode corrosion on cycling. Recent results indicate that Co also greatly inhibits electrode corrosion, possibly by minimizing V{sub H}. The AB{sub 5} alloys investigated included LaNi{sub 5}, ternary alloys (e.g. LaN{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 0.2} and La{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0.2}Ni{sub 5}), alloys with various substitutions for both La and Ni (e.g. La{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0.2}Ni{sub 4.8}Sn{sub 0.2}) and mischmetal (Mm) alloys of the type normally used in batteries, such as MmB{sub 5} (B = Ni{sub 3.55}Mn{sub 0.4}A1{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.75}). A major effort was devoted to the effects of La substitution in the A component. Both in situ and ex situ XAS measurements are used to study the electronic effects that occur on the addition of various metal substitutions and on the ingress of hydrogen.

McBreen, J.; Reilly, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

HEV Fleet Testing - Honda Civic Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total miles driven: 161,532 Cumulative MPG: 37.23 Engine: 4-cylinder, 70 kW @ 5700 rpm Electric Motor: 10 kW Battery: Nickel Metal Hydride Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 882...

278

TEAM HEV ARC HITECTURE ENGIN E FU EL TRANS MISSION EN ERGY STOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi State University Through-the-road Parallel 1.9-L GM Direct Injection Turbo Diesel Bio Diesel (B20) GM F40 6-speed Manual Johnson Controls, Nickel Metal Hydride - 330V...

279

INSTITUT NATIONAL POLYTECHNIQUE DE GRENOBLE N attribu par la bibliothque  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage via an input regulator. . . . . 98 4.8 Efficiency curves of a MPPT input regulator [141] versus MPPT Maximum Power POint Tracking NiMH Nickel Metal Hydride NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

280

TransForum v8n1 - Argonne/Toda Kogyo Partner on Li-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and nickel-metal hydride battery markets. The company recently acquired a plant in the Detroit area that will help serve U.S. automobile manufacturers. Todas plant in Ontario,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

In a mining accident, first responders are working against  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Nickel Metal Hydride (w 4hr minimum battery life) * 4ft x 2ft footprint * 2ft tall at tower * Integrated fiber optic interface Contact Information robotics@sandia.gov...

282

Argonne TTRDC - D3 (Downloadable Dynamometer Database) - 2010...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

charge-sustaining hybrid-electric sedan 2.5L Atkinson-cycle engine with VVT 275-Volt Nickel-Metal-Hydride (NiMH) Features enhanced EV operation, as high as 47 MPH in EV...

283

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Sanyo Electric Co. Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: NA Nominal Pack Voltage: 330.0 VDC Nominal Cell...

284

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifications Manufacturer: Cobasys Type: Nickel-Metal Hydride Number of Modules: 240 Weight of Pack: 145 lbs Module Weight: 0.55 lbs Nominal Module Voltage: 1.2 V Nominal...

285

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Sanyo Electric Co. Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 330.0 VDC...

286

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Sanyo Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 6.0 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 144.0 VDC Nominal Cell...

287

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

288

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifications Manufacturer: Sanyo Type: Nickel-Metal Hydride Number of Modules: 204 Nominal Module Voltage: 1.35 V Nominal System Voltage: 275 V Nominal Pack Capacity: 5.5...

289

Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

290

An Electrolytic Method to Form Zirconium Hydride Phases in Zirconium Alloys with Morphologies Similar to Hydrides Formed in Used Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell was designed, built, and tested with several proof-of-concept experiments in which Zircaloy material was charged with hydrogen in order to generate zirconium hydride formations. The Electrolytic Charging with Hydrogen and a Thermal Gradient (ECH-TG) system has the ability to generate static 20°C to 120°C temperatures for a H2SO4 and H2O bath for isothermal experiment conditions. This system was designed to accommodate a molten salt bath in future experiments to achieve higher isothermal temperatures. Additionally, the design accommodates a cartridge heater, which when placed on the inside of the sample tube, can be set at temperatures up to 350 °C and create a thermal gradient across the sample. Finally, a custom LABVIEW VI, L2.vi, was developed to control components and record data during experimentation. This program, along with web cameras and the commercial StirPC software package, enables remote operation for extended periods of time with only minor maintenance during an experiment. While proving the concept for this design, 19 experiments where performed, which form the basis for a future parametric study. Initial results indicate formations of zirconium hydrides which formed rim structures between 8.690 +/- 0.982 ?m and 12.365 +/- 0.635 ?m thick. These electrolytically produced rims were compared with hydrides formed under a previous vapor diffusion experiment via Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) imaging and Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. While the existing vapor diffusion method formed gradients of zirconium hydride, it failed to produce the gradient in the correct direction and also failed to create a hydride rim. The successful use of the ECH-TG system to create said rim, and some of the methods used to direct that rim to the OD of the tube can be used for future work with the vapor diffusion method in order to create zirconium hydrides of the correct geometry. The procedures and apparatus created for this project represent a reliable method for creating zirconium hydride rim structures.

Kuhr, Samuel Houston

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

110] orientation for LiCoO 2 without lithium atoms ( upper)and with lithium atoms (lower). Images are simulated at 0.9ĹHorn LBNL-56646 resolution of lithium ions in LiCoO 2 . Fall

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Lithium Diisopropylamide: Oligomer Structures at Low Ligand Concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide: Oligomer Structures at Low Ligand Concentrations Jennifer L. Rutherford-dimensional 6Li and 15N NMR spectroscopic studies of lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) solvated ligand concentrations are discussed. Introduction Spectroscopic studies of lithium amides at low ligand

Collum, David B.

293

DEFECTS, PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF LITHIUM FERRITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crystal Fine-Structure: . Lithium Ferrite (Li 20.Fe 0 )1I,J. Dih, Electrical Conductivity in Lithium Ferrite and LeadMagnetic Properties of Lithium Ferrite Raja Kishore Mishra

Mishra, Raja Kishore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Femtosecond second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Femtosecond second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides poled lithium niobate waveguides under large conversion conditions. Strong saturation of the SHG detailed experi- mental data on femtosecond SHG in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguides

Purdue University

295

The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miller, M. , Emerging Lithium-ion Battery Technologies forSymposium on Large Lithium-ion Battery Technology andAltairnano EIG Lithium-ion battery modules available for

Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Visualization of Charge Distribution in a Lithium Battery Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Lithium-Polymer Battery. J. Power Sources 2006, 163,of a Lithium-Polymer Battery. J. Power Sources 2008, 180,Up of a Lithium-Ion Polymer Battery. J. Power Sources 2009,

Liu, Jun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Assessment of Response to Lithium Maintenance Treatment in Bipolar Disorder: A Consortium on Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Response to Lithium Maintenance Treatment in Bipolar Disorder: A Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) Report Mirko Manchia1 , Mazda Adli2 , Nirmala Akula3 , Raffaella Ardau4 , Jean

Recanati, Catherine

298

Ab initio screening of lithium diffusion rates in transition metal oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A screening metric for diffusion limitations in lithium ion battery cathodes is derived using transition state theory and common materials properties. The metric relies on net activation barrier for lithium diffusion. ...

Moore, Charles J. (Charles Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

On-board hydrogen storage system using metal hydride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen powered hybrid electric bus has been developed for demonstration in normal city bus service in the City of Augusta, Georgia, USA. The development team, called H2Fuel Bus Team, consists of representatives from government, industry and research institutions. The bus uses hydrogen to fuel an internal combustion engine which drives an electric generator. The generator charges a set of batteries which runs the electric bus. The hydrogen fuel and the hybrid concept combine to achieve the goal of near-zero emission and high fuel efficiency. The hydrogen fuel is stored in a solid form using an on-board metal hydride storage system. The system was designed for a hydrogen capacity of 25 kg. It uses the engine coolant for heat to generate a discharge pressure higher than 6 atm. The operation conditions are temperature from ambient to 70 degrees C, hydrogen discharge rate to 6 kg/hr, and refueling time 1.5 hours. Preliminary tests showed that the performance of the on-board storage system exceeded the design requirements. Long term tests have been planned to begin in 2 months. This paper discusses the design and performance of the on-board hydrogen storage system.

Heung, L.K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Alternatives for metal hydride storage bed heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of hydrogen isotopes with the storage bed hydride material is exothermic during absorption and endothermic during desorption. Therefore, storage bed operation requires a cooling system to remove heat during absorption, and a heating system to add the heat needed for desorption. Three storage bed designs and their associated methods of heating and cooling and accountability are presented within. The first design is the current RTF (Replacement Tritium Facility) nitrogen heating and cooling system. The second design uses natural convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. This design is referred to as the Naturally Cooled/Electrically Heated (NCEH) design. The third design uses forced convection cooling with ambient glove box nitrogen and electrical resistance for heating. The design is referred to as the Forced Convection Cooled/Electrically Heated (FCCEH) design. In this report the operation, storage bed design, and equipment required for heating, cooling, and accountability of each design are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each design are listed and discussed. Based on the information presented within, it is recommended that the NCEH design be selected for further development.

Fisher, I.A.; Ramirez, F.B.; Koonce, J.E.; Ward, D.E.; Heung, L.K.; Weimer, M.; Berkebile, W.; French, S.T.

1991-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lithium borate cluster salts as novel redox shuttles for overcharge protection of lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redox shuttle is a promising mechanism for intrinsic overcharge protection in lithium-ion cells and batteries. Two lithium borate cluster salts are reported to function as both the main salt for a nonaqueous electrolyte and the redox shuttle for overcharge protection. Lithium borate cluster salts with a tunable redox potential are promising candidates for overcharge protection for most positive electrodes in state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells.

Chen, Z.; Liu, J.; Jansen, A. N.; Casteel, B.; Amine, K.; GirishKumar, G.; Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lithium Research Status and PlansLithium Research Status and Plans Charles H. Skinner, PPPL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retention with lithium results (FY09 Joule Milestone) · Plans for LLD commissioning · LLD pumping · Impurity

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

303

Lithium-aluminum-iron electrode composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode composition is presented for use in a secondary electrochemical cell. The cell also includes an electrolyte with lithium ions such as a molten salt of alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides that can be used in high-temperature cells. The cell's positive electrode contains a a chalcogen or a metal chalcogenide as the active electrode material. The negative electrode composition includes up to 50 atom percent lithium as the active electrode constituent in an alloy of aluminum-iron. Various binary and ternary intermetallic phases of lithium, aluminum and iron are formed. The lithium within the intermetallic phase of Al.sub.5 Fe.sub.2 exhibits increased activity over that of lithium within a lithium-aluminum alloy to provide an increased cell potential of up to about 0.25 volt.

Kaun, Thomas D. (Mokena, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Kim, Jaekook (Naperville, IL)

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Oakbrook, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Title X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50574 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Baker Farangis, Jonathan L. Slack, Ponnusamy Nachimuthu, Rupert C. C. Perera, Nobumichi Tamura, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Journal of Alloys and Compounds Volume 356-357 Start Page 204 Pagination 204-207 Date Published 08/2003 Keywords A. hydrogen storage materials, NEXAFS, thin film s; C. EXAFS, x-ray diffraction Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mg K-edge and Ni, Co, and Ti L-edge spectra reflect both reversible and irreversible changes in the metal environments. A significant shift in the nickel L absorption edge shows it to be an active participant in hydride formation. The effect on cobalt and titanium is much less dramatic, suggesting that these metals act primarily as catalysts for formation of magnesium hydride.

307

HYCSOS: a chemical heat pump and energy conversion system based on metal hydrides. 1979 status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status of the HYCSOS chemical heat pump and energy conversion system based on metal hydrides is described. Heat transfer fluid loops were insulated and modified for isothermal operation. Software development for HYCSOS manual mode operation was completed. Routines to handle data acquisition, logging, compression, correction and plotting, using a Tektronix Graphics system with flexible disk data storage, provide a rapid and versatile means of presenting HYCSOS data for analysis. Advanced concept heat exchangers to improve the heat transfer of the hydride bed with the heat transfer fluid are discussed. Preliminary tests made with a LaNi/sub 5/ loaded aluminum foam test unit showed that heat transfer properties are very markedly improved. Thermodynamic expressions are applied to the selection of alloys for use in HYCSOS. The substitution of aluminum for nickel in AB/sub 5/ type alloys is shown to reduce hysteresis and permits the use of potentially lower cost materials with added flexibility for the optimization of engineering design and performance characteristics of the hydride heat pump system. Transient thermal measurements on hydride beds of CaNi/sub 5/ and LaNi/sub 5/ show no deterioration with cycling. Relatively slow heat transfer between the hydride beds and heat transfer fluid in the coiled tube heat exchangers is indicated by temperature lag of the bed and heat transfer fluid. Improved heat transfer is anticipated with aluminum foam heat exchangers.

Sheft, I.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) produced its first plasma in September, 2008. The new device will continue the promising, innovative work...

309

Optimizing the Performance of Lithium Titanate Spinal Paired...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Performance of Lithium Titanate Spinal Paired with Activated Carbon or Iron Phosphate Title Optimizing the Performance of Lithium Titanate Spinal Paired with...

310

Itochu Takes Equity Stake in Lithium Resources Development Company ...  

California is unique because of its high content of lithium. Simbol has made . tremendous progress in developing a technology to extract lithium from this

311

Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for ... to control capacity loss and enhance energy efficiency of lithium-ion batteries.

312

Calorimetric Investigation of the Lithium–Manganese–Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Calorimetric Investigation of the Lithium–Manganese–Oxygen Cathode Material System for Lithium Ion Batteries. Author(s), Damian M. Cupid, ...

313

Studies On Electrode Materials For Lithium-Ion Batteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the early 1970s, research carried out on rechargeable lithium batteries at the Exxon Laboratories in the US established that lithium ions can be intercalated… (more)

Palale, Suresh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Secretary Chu Celebrates Expansion of Lithium-Ion Battery Production...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrates Expansion of Lithium-Ion Battery Production in North Carolina Secretary Chu Celebrates Expansion of Lithium-Ion Battery Production in North Carolina July 26, 2011 -...

315

Expanded North Carolina Lithium Facility Opens, Boosting U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expanded North Carolina Lithium Facility Opens, Boosting U.S. Production of a Key Manufacturing Material Expanded North Carolina Lithium Facility Opens, Boosting U.S. Production of...

316

Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage...

317

Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries Technology available for licensing: Layered lithium metal oxide compounds for ultra-high-capacity, rechargeable cathodes...

318

Electrode Structures and Surfaces for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrode Structures and Surfaces for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: lithium-metal-oxide electrode materials with modified surfaces to protect the materials...

319

Modeling the Performance of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Capacitors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Performance of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Capacitors during Hybird Electric-Vehicle Operation Title Modeling the Performance of Lithium-Ion Batteries and Capacitors...

320

High-rate capable organic radical cathodes for lithium rechargeable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-rate capable organic radical cathodes for lithium rechargeable batteries Title High-rate capable organic radical cathodes for lithium rechargeable batteries Publication Type...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NANOTUBE COMPOSITE ANODE MATERIALS SUITABLE FOR LITHIUM ION ...  

The present invention provides a composite material suitable for use in an anode for a lithium ion battery, the composite material comprising a layer of a lithium ...

322

Nanocomposite Carbon/Tin Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

Ceramic-Metal Composites for Electrodes of Lithium Ion Batteries, IB-2253; Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries from Aluminum Substituted Cathode ...

323

Electrolyte additive for lithium rechargeable organic electrolyte battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large excess of lithium iodide in solution is used as an electrolyte adive to provide overcharge protection for a lithium rechargeable organic electrolyte battery.

Behl, Wishvender K. (Ocean, NJ); Chin, Der-Tau (Winthrop, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Lithium-Ion Batteries: Examining Material Demand and Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Use of vehicles with electric drive, which could reduce our oil dependence, will depend on lithium–ion batteries. But is there enough lithium?

325

Understanding Diffusion-Induced-Stresses in Lithium Ion Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Lithium insertion and removal in lithium ion battery electrodes can result in large volume expansion and contraction which may cause fracture ...

326

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and Low Temperature Title Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium Batteries at High Rates and Low Temperature...

327

ABAA - 6th International Conference on Advanced Lithium Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of lithium batteries for transportation applications, organizers from U.S.A., Japan and Korea jointly initiated the International Conference on Advanced Lithium Batteries for...

328

Available Technologies: Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries from ...  

Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries from ... Although lithium ion batteries are the most promising candidates for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, the u ...

329

Electrode materials and lithium battery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material comprising a lithium titanate comprising a plurality of primary particles and secondary particles, wherein the average primary particle size is about 1 nm to about 500 nm and the average secondary particle size is about 1 .mu.m to about 4 .mu.m. In some embodiments the lithium titanate is carbon-coated. Also provided are methods of preparing lithium titanates, and devices using such materials.

Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Belharouak, Ilias (Westmont, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Materials Down-selection Decisions Made within the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) - September-October 2007  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Reports on which hydrogen storage materials offer potential for further research as decided by DOE's Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

331

Self-Regulating, Nonflamable Rechargeable Lithium Batteries ...  

Rechargeable lithium batteries are superior to other rechargeable batteries due to their ability to store more energy per unit size and weight and to operate at ...

332

Simplified Electrode Formation using Stabilized Lithium Metal ...  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers led by Gao Liu has developed a doping process for lithium ion battery electrode formation that can boost a cell’s ...

333

Review of lithium-ion technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds (GIC) as battery anodes was reported in a 1981 patent by Basu in which a molten salt cell was described having a negative electrode that consisted of lithium intercalated in graphite. A second patent by Basu, issued in 1983, described an ambient temperature rechargeable system which also utilized lithium intercalated in graphite as the anode. Work in this area progressed at a low level, however, until interest was sparked in 1990 when Sony Corporation announced a new ``lithium-ion`` rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode. These cells have the advantages of metallic lithium systems; i.e., high energy density, high voltage, and light weight, without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium. Materials other than carbon have been studied as intercalation anodes. Examples are Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, WO{sub 2} and TiS{sub 2}. Although these alternate anode materials are of interest academically and for specialty applications, they do not hold much promise for widespread general use due to their increased weight and lower cell voltage. Studies of cathode materials for lithium-ion systems have centered on the transition metal chalcogenides. A number of these materials are capable of reversibly intercalating lithium ions at a useful potential versus lithium. Both organic liquids and polymers are candidate electrolytes for this technology.

Levy, S.C.; Cieslak, W.R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nanopower: Avoiding Electrolyte Failure in Nanoscale Lithium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... most of which is the battery itself—which ... wide—solid-state lithium ion batteries to see just ... cathode material, electrolyte, and anode materials with ...

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Surface Modification Agents for Lithium Batteries  

Increased safety and life of lithium-ion batteries, ... Electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles; Portable electronic devices; Medical devices; and

336

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Godshall, Ned A. (Stanford, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

High Energy Density Secondary Lithium Batteries  

High Energy Density Secondary Lithium Batteries Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

339

Cycling Degradation of Lithium Iron Phosphate Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Significant improvement of electronic conductivity of lithium iron ... commercialization in many applications especially in plug-in electric vehicles.

340

Lithium-Ion Batteries: Possible Materials Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne, IL Abstract The transition to plug-in hybrid vehicles and possibly pure battery electric vehicles will depend on the successful development of lithium-ion batteries....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Layered Electrodes for Lithium Cells and Batteries  

AV AILABLE FOR LICENSING Layered lithium metal oxide compounds for ultra-high capacity, rechargeable cathodes. The Invention High-capacity, rechargeable cathodes made ...

342

LITHIUM-BASED ELECTROCHROMIC MIRRORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

870 870 rd Presented at the 203 Meeting of the Electrochemical Society, April 28-30, 2003 in Paris, France and published in the Proceedings. Lithium-Based Electrochromic Mirrors Thomas J. Richardson and Jonathan L. Slack Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory April 2003 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs, Office of Building Research and Standards of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. LITHIUM-BASED ELECTROCHROMIC MIRRORS Thomas J. Richardson* and Jonathan L. Slack Building Technologies Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720, USA

343

electrodes in lithium ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nickel oxide (NiO) nanotubes have been produced for the first time via a template processing method. The synthesis involved a two step chemical reaction in which nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)2) nanotubes were firstly formed within the walls of an anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) template. The template was then dissolved away using concentrated NaOH, and the freed nanotubes were converted to NiO by heat treatment in air at 350 ? C. Individual nanotubes measured 60 ?m in length with a 200 nm outer diameter and a wall thickness of 20–30 nm. The NiO nanotube powder was used in Li-ion cells for assessment of the lithium storage ability. Preliminary testing indicates that the cells demonstrate controlled and sustainable lithium diffusion after the formation of an SEI. Reversible capacities in the 300 mAh g ?1 range were typical.

S. A. Needham; G. X. Wang; H. K. Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride).

Alamgir, Mohamed (Dedham, MA); Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Solid polymer electrolyte lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to Lithium batteries using Li ion (Li[sup +]) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to Li batteries using solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing solvates formed between a Li salt and an aprotic organic solvent (or mixture of such solvents) in poly(vinyl chloride). 3 figures.

Alamgir, M.; Abraham, K.M.

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lithium battery safety and reliability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium batteries have been used in a variety of applications for a number of years. As their use continues to grow, particularly in the consumer market, a greater emphasis needs to be placed on safety and reliability. There is a useful technique which can help to design cells and batteries having a greater degree of safety and higher reliability. This technique, known as fault tree analysis, can also be useful in determining the cause of unsafe behavior and poor reliability in existing designs.

Levy, S.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom (Savannah River National Labs, Aiken, SC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

349

Lithium batteries for pulse power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New designs of lithium batteries having bipolar construction and thin cell components possess the very low impedance that is necessary to deliver high-intensity current pulses. The R D and understanding of the fundamental properties of these pulse batteries have reached an advanced level. Ranges of 50--300 kW/kg specific power and 80--130 Wh/kg specific energy have been demonstrated with experimental high-temperature lithium alloy/transition-metal disulfide rechargeable bipolar batteries in repeated 1- to 100-ms long pulses. Other versions are designed for repetitive power bursts that may last up to 20 or 30 s and yet may attain high specific power (1--10 kW/kg). Primary high-temperature Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} pulse batteries (thermal batteries) are already commercially available. Other high-temperature lithium systems may use chlorine or metal-oxide positive electrodes. Also under development are low-temperature pulse batteries: a 50-kW Li/SOCl{sub 2} primary batter and an all solid-state, polymer-electrolyte secondary battery. Such pulse batteries could find use in commercial and military applications in the near future. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Redey, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Automotive storage of hydrogen using modified magnesium hydrides. Final report, March 1976-March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal hydrides can store more hydrogen per unit volume than normal high pressure or cryogenic techniques. Little energy is required to store the hydrogen in the hydride, and high stability at room temperature ensures low losses over long storage periods. Safety features of metal hydride storage are favorable. Because of its low weight and high hydrogen storage densities, modified magnesium hydride offers the greatest potential for automotive storage of hydrogen. Experimental and analytical work in this program has been directed toward the optimization of this storage system. Due to the relative stability of MgH/sub 2/, modifications of the MgMH/sub x/ (M = metal ion) have been made to decrease the dissociation temperature while retaining high hydrogen capacity. This parameter is crucial since vehicle exhaust will supply the thermal energy to dissociate the hydride in an automobile. System studies indicate that hydride dissociation temperature (T/sub D/) should be 200/sup 0/C to ensure uninterrupted fuel flow at all driving and idle conditions. From experimental data developed in this four task study, we conclude that alloys comprised of Mg, Cu and Ni have come closest to meeting the dissociation temperature goal. Small additions of rare-earth elements to the basic alloy also contribute to a reduction of T/sub D/. The best alloy developed in this program exhibits a T/sub D/ = 223/sup 0/C and a hydrogen capacity near four weight percent compared to a theoretical 7.65 percent for MgH/sub 2/. That alloy has been characterized for dissociation temperature, hydrogen capacity, kinetics, and P-C-T relationships. Dissociation temperature, hydrogen capacity and material cost are reported for each alloy tested in this program.

Rohy, D. A.; Nachman, J. F.; Hammer, A. N.; Duffy, T. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design of an Integrated System to Recycle Zircaloy Cladding Using a Hydride-Milling-Dehydride Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A process for recycling spent nuclear fuel cladding, a zirconium alloy (Zircaloy), into a metal powder that may be used for advanced nuclear fuel applications, was investigated to determine if it is a viable strategy. The process begins with hydriding the Zircaloy cladding hulls after the spent nuclear fuel has been dissolved from the cladding. The addition of hydrogen atoms to the zirconium matrix stresses the lattice and forms brittle zirconium hydride, which is easily pulverized into a powder. The dehydriding process removes hydrogen by heating the powder in a vacuum, resulting in a zirconium metal powder. The two main objectives of this research are to investigate the dehydriding process and to design, build and demonstrate a specialized piece of equipment to process the zirconium from cladding hulls to metal powder without intermediate handling. The hydriding process (known from literature) took place in a 95 percent argon - 5 percent hydrogen atmosphere at 500 degrees C while the dehydriding process conditions were researched with a Thermogavimetric Analyzer (TGA). Data from the TGA showed the dehydriding process requires vacuum conditions (~0.001 bar) and 800 degrees C environment to decompose the zirconium hydride. Zirconium metal powder was created in two separate experiments with different milling times, 45 minutes (coarse powder) and 12 hours (fine powder). Both powders were analyzed by three separate analytical methods, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), size characterization and digital micrographs. XRD analysis proved that the process produced a zirconium metal. Additionally, visual observations of the samples silvery color confirmed the presence of zirconium metal. The presence on zirconium metal in the two samples confirmed the operation of the hydriding / milling / hydriding machine. Further refining of the hydride / milling / dehydride machine could make this process commercially favorable when compared to the high cost of storing nuclear waste and its components. An additional important point is that this process can easily be used on other metals that are subject to hydrogen embrittlement, knowing the relevant temperatures and pressures associated with the hydriding / dehydriding of that particular metal.

Kelley, Randy Dean

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Transparent lithium-ion batteries , Sangmoo Jeongb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparent lithium-ion batteries Yuan Yanga , Sangmoo Jeongb , Liangbing Hua , Hui Wua , Seok Woo in capillaries. Adv Mater 8:245­247. 24. Kim DK, et al. (2008) Spinel LiMn2O4 nanorods as lithium ion battery voltage window. For example, LiCoO2 and graphite, the most common cathode and anode in Li-ion batteries

Cui, Yi

354

Current status of the liquid lithium target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle Flexible tubes Oil pump Heat exchanger Oil chamber Inside the lab Outside the lab #12;Elect irradiations), Internal Report DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, CEA Saclay (Dec 2003) 10 #12;Liquid lithium loop EM pump loop Water direction #12;15 Be Trap Heat Exchanger Cross Section Design to remove ~12 kW Lithium tank #12;Oil

McDonald, Kirk

355

Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intense Lithium Streams in Tokamaks 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University, Princeton Plasma. Temperature of the streams. 2. Lithium jets. 3. Injection into vacuum chamber. 4. Propulsion inside the vacuum chamber. 5. Stability of the lithium streams. 6. Expulsion of the lithium. 7. Summary. PRINCETON PLASMA

Zakharov, Leonid E.

356

Lithium Reagents DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603038  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Reagents DOI: 10.1002/anie.200603038 Lithium Diisopropylamide: Solution Kinetics Keywords: kinetics · lithium diisopropylamide · metalation · solvent effects · synthesis design D. B: lithium diiso- propylamide (LDA). LDA has played a profound role in organic synthesis, serving as the base

Collum, David B.

357

NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) Design Status and Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) Design Status and Plans Office of Science H. W. Kugel, PPPL Design Status and Plans (Kugel) 2July 28, 2008 Motivation for NSTX Lithium Research · NSTX research with solid lithium is aimed initially towards using liquid lithium to control density, edge collisionality

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

358

Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerator Thruster (LiLFA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerator Thruster (LiLFA) Adam Coulon Princeton University Electric #12;LiLFA Thruster · Lithium vapor ionizes in the electric field · A current evolves in the plasma and Control System Position Sensing Detector #12;Lithium Reservoir Argon Flow Copper Water Flow Piston/Lithium

Petta, Jason

359

Lithium-Assisted Electrochemical Welding in Silicon Nanowire Battery Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-healing, interfacial lithium diffusivity, in situ TEM, lithium-ion battery Silicon is an auspicious candidate to replace today's widely utilized graphitic anodes in lithium ion batteries because its specific energy evidence of facile transport of lithium ions, which are both desirable properties for enhanced battery

Li, Teng

360

Surface-Modified Active Materials for Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes  

lithium ion battery electrodes that lowers binder cost without sacrificing performance and reliability.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Impact of Lithium Availability on Vehicle Electrification (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the relationship between electric drive vehicles and the availability of lithium.

Neubauer, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Under Various Cycling Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA 94720 Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphitesevaluated (in coin cells with lithium counter electrodes) asanode materials for lithium-ion cells intended for use in

Ridgway, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

FILM FORMATION ON LITHIUM IN PROPYLENE CARBONATE SOLUTIONS UNDER OPEN CIRCUIT CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ambient Temperature Lithium Batteries, B. B. Owens and1 Soci ety FILM FORMATION ON LITHIUM IN PROPYLENE CARBONATECalifornia. Film Formation on Lithium 1n Propylene Carbonate

Geronov, Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Structural Integration of Silicon Solar Cells and Lithium-ion Batteries Using Printed Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium-Ion Polymer Battery ..Performance of Lithium-Ion Polymer Battery Introduction Assolid state lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery were adhesively

Kang, Jin Sung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

J. Am. Chem. SOC.1991, 113,9575-9585 9575 Mixed Aggregation of Lithium Enolates and Lithium Halides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Am. Chem. SOC.1991, 113,9575-9585 9575 Mixed Aggregation of Lithium Enolates and Lithium Halides with Lithium 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidide(LiTMP) Patricia L. Hall, James H. Gilchrist, Aidan T. Harrison]-lithiumdi-tert-butylamide and conformationally locked [6Li]-lithium2,2,4,6,6-pentamethylpiperidide shed further light

Collum, David B.

366

Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini- Grid TIAX, LLC Acorn Park Cambridge_MERIT_REVIEW_MAY2003 2 Introduction Hydrogen Mini-Grid Concept Distributed FCPS utilizing a H2 Mini-Grid can provide waste heat can be used for hot water or space heating in buildings (i.e. "cogen") Distributed FCPS

367

Internal hydriding in irradiated defected Zircaloy fuel rods: A review (LWBR Development Program)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although not a problem in recent commercial power reactors, including the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor, internal hydriding of Zircaloy cladding was a persistent cause of gross cladding failures during the 1960s. It occurred in the fuel rods of water-cooled nuclear power reactors that had a small cladding defect. This report summarizes the experimental findings, causes, mechanisms, and methods of minimizing internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. Irradiation test data on the different types of defected fuel rods, intentionally fabricated defected and in-pile operationally defected rods, are compared. Significant factors affecting internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods (defect hole size, internal and external sources of hydrogen, Zircaloy cladding surface properties, nickel alloy contamination of Zircaloy, the effect of heat flux and fluence) are discussed. Pertinent in-pile and out-of-pile test results from Bettis and other laboratories are used as a data base in constructing a qualitative model which explains hydrogen generation and distribution in Zircaloy cladding of defected water-cooled reactor fuel rods. Techniques for minimizing internal hydride failures in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods are evaluated.

Clayton, J C

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Model for the Prediction of the Hydriding Thermodynamics of Pd-Rh-Co Ternary Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A dilute solution model (with respect to the substitutional alloying elements) has been developed, which accurately predicts the hydride formation and decomposition thermodynamics and the storage capacities of dilute ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The effect of varying the rhodium and cobalt compositions on the thermodynamics of hydride formation and decomposition and hydrogen capacity of several palladium-rhodium-cobalt ternary alloys has been investigated using pressure-composition (PC) isotherms. Alloying in the dilute regime (<10 at.%) causes the enthalpy for hydride formation to linearly decrease with increasing alloying content. Cobalt has a stronger effect on the reduction in enthalpy than rhodium for equivalent alloying amounts. Also, cobalt reduces the hydrogen storage capacity with increasing alloying content. The plateau thermodynamics are strongly linked to the lattice parameters of the alloys. A near-linear dependence of the enthalpy of hydride formation on the lattice parameter was observed for both the binary Pd-Rh and Pd-Co alloys, as well as for the ternary Pd-Rh-Co alloys. The Pd-5Rh-3Co (at. %) alloy was found to have similar plateau thermodynamics as a Pd-10Rh alloy, however, this ternary alloy had a diminished hydrogen storage capacity relative to Pd-10Rh.

Teter, D.F.; Thoma, D.J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

STANDARDIZED TESTING PROGRAM FOR EMERGENT CHEMICAL HYDRIDE AND CARBON STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydride/carbon hydrogen storage systems. The development of a standardized protocol and testing system to an urgent need for accelerated development of hydrogen storage systems. In vehicular applications, hydrogen storage and distribution presents the greatest challenge in creating the hydrogen fuel infrastructure

370

Preparation of Prototypic Irradiated Hydrided-Zircaloy Cladding for UFDC Programs  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) has tasked ORNL to investigate the behavior of light-water-reactor fuel cladding material performance related to extended storage and transportation of used fuel. Fast neutron irradiation of pre-hydrided zirconium-alloy cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at elevated temperatures has been used to simulate the effects of high burnup on used fuel cladding for use in understanding the materials properties relevant to very long-term storage (VLTS) and subsequent transportation. The irradiated pre-hydrided metallic materials will generate baseline data to benchmark hot-cell testing of high-burnup used fuel cladding; and, more importantly, samples free of alpha contamination can be provided to the researchers who do not have hot cell facilities to handle highly contaminated high-burnup used fuel cladding to support their research projects for the UFDC. In order to accomplish this research, ORNL has produced unirradiated zirconium-based cladding tubes with a certain hydrogen concentration. Two capsules (HYCD-1 and HYCD-2) containing hydrided zirconium-based samples, 9.50 mm (0.374 in) in diameter, were inserted in HFIR for neutron irradiation. HYCD-1 was removed after Cycle 440B and HYCD-2 after Cycle 442. This paper will describe the general HYCD experiment configuration, achieved temperatures, and temperature gradients within the cladding, and current results of the PIE of the irradiated hydrided cladding samples.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL] [ORNL; Howard, Richard H [ORNL] [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL] [ORNL; Yan, Yong [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Intermetallic insertion anodes for lithium batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Binary intermetallic compounds containing lithium, or lithium alloys, such as Li{sub x}Al, Li{sub x}Si and Li{sub x}Sn have been investigated in detail in the past as negative electrode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. It is generally acknowledged that the major limitation of these systems is the large volumetric expansion that occurs when lithium reacts with the host metal. Such large increases in volume limit the practical use of lithium-tin electrodes in electrochemical cells. It is generally recognized that metal oxide electrodes, MO{sub y}, in lithium-ion cells operate during charge and discharge by means of a reversible lithium insertion/extraction process, and that the cells offer excellent cycling behavior when the crystallographic changes to the unit cell parameters and unit cell volume of the Li{sub x}MO{sub y} electrode are kept to a minimum. An excellent example of such an electrode is the spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which maintains its cubic symmetry without any significant change to the lattice parameter (and hence unit cell volume) during lithium insertion to the rock-salt composition Li{sub 7}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. This spinel electrode is an example of a ternary Li{sub x}MO{sub y} system in which a binary MO{sub y} framework provides a stable host structure for lithium. With this approach, the authors have turned their attention to exploring ternary intermetallic systems Li{sub x}MM{prime} in the hope of finding a system that is not subject to the high volumetric expansion that typifies many binary systems. In this paper, the authors present recent data of their investigations of lithium-copper-tin and lithium-indium-antimonide electrodes in lithium cells. The data show that lithium can be inserted reversibly into selected intermetallic compounds with relatively small expansion of the lithiated intermetallic structures.

Thackeray, M. M.; Vaughey, J.; Johnson, C. S.; Kepler, K. D.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Tritium storage development. Progress report No. 10, October--December 1976. [In metal hydride; polymer-impregnated tritiated concrete  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory and engineering scale work has been initiated on the storage of tritium in a metal hydride. Laboratory hydriding apparatus has been assembled and a preliminary series of experiments was carried out on zirconium. Several engineering design concepts for the reaction and storage of tritium in a metal hydride are presented. The design of a three 3-in.-diam. bench scale reaction system is in progress. Developmental work is continuing on the injector technique for the fixation of tritium in polymer-impregnated concrete.

Colombo, P; Steinberg, M

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Materials Processing for Lithium-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Extensive efforts have been undertaken to develop and optimize new materials for lithium-ion batteries to address power and energy demands of mobile electronics and electric vehicles. However, the introduction of large-format lithium-ion batteries is hampered by high cost, safety concerns, and deficiencies in energy density and calendar life. Advanced materials-processing techniques can contribute solutions to such issues. From that perspective, this work summarizes the materials-processing techniques used to fabricate the cathodes, anodes, and separators used in lithium-ion batteries.

Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Lithium abundances in exoplanet-hosts stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present surface chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The overmetallicity of EHS may be studied in the framework of two different scenarii. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses, metallicities and accretion rates. The results show different profiles for the lithium destruction according to the scenario. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium.

M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiation and Anionic Fries Rearrangement of Aryl Carbamates: Role of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiation and Anionic Fries Rearrangement of Aryl of the lithium diisopropylamide (LDA)-mediated anionic Fries rearrangements of aryl carbamates are described, an LDA-lithium phenolate mixed dimer, and homoaggregated lithium phenolates. The highly insoluble

Collum, David B.

377

Simplified Electrode Formation using Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder (SLMP) Doping of Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes  

lithium ion battery electrode formation that can boost a cell’s charge capacity and lower its cost while improving reliability and safety.

378

Electrolytic method for the production of lithium using a lithium-amalgam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering lithium from its molten amalgam by electrolysis of the amalgam in an electrolytic cell containing as a molten electrolyte a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of two or more alkali metal halides, preferably alkali metal halides selected from lithium iodide, lithium chloride, potassium iodide and potassium chloride. A particularly suitable molten electrolyte is a fused-salt consisting essentially of a mixture of at least three components obtained by modifying an eutectic mixture of LiI-KI by the addition of a minor amount of one or more alkali metal halides. The lithium-amalgam fused-salt cell may be used in an electrolytic system for recovering lithium from an aqueous solution of a lithium compound, wherein electrolysis of the aqueous solution in an aqueous cell in the presence of a mercury cathode produces a lithium amalgam. The present method is particularly useful for the regeneration of lithium from the aqueous reaction products of a lithium-water-air battery.

Cooper, John F. (Castro Valley, CA); Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Homsy, Robert V. (Oakland, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A rapid method for the determination of lithium transference numbers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium ion-conducting polymer electrolytes are of increasing interest for use in lithium-polymer batteries. Lithium transference numbers, the net fraction of current carried by lithium in a cell, are key figures of merit for potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe the Electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) method for the determination of lithium ion transference numbers (T{sub Li}). The work presented is a proof-of-concept of the application of the ENMR method to lithium ion transference measurements for several different lithium salts in gelled electrolytes. The NMR method allows accurate determination of T{sub Li} values, as indicated by the similarity of T{sub Li} in the gelled electrolytes to those in aqueous electrolyte solutions at low salt concentration. Based on calculated tradeoffs of various experimental parameters, they also discuss some conclusions concerning the range of applicability of the method to other electrolytes with lower lithium mobility.

Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Electronics Materials and Device Research Group

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America A Material Change: Bringing Lithium Production Back to America June 29, 2012 - 5:34pm Addthis The Rockwood Lithium manufacturing facility in Kings Mountain, North Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Rockwood Lithium. The Rockwood Lithium manufacturing facility in Kings Mountain, North Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Rockwood Lithium. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Between 1980 and 2009, the global demand for lithium has tripled. This metal is a key material in a number of growing industries -- including advanced vehicle batteries and consumer electronics. But more specifically, lithium-ion batteries are a vital component in electric vehicles and other rechargeable batteries for consumer electronics, and are used to produce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Passivation of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytes with LiBOB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytes with LiBOBin commercially available lithium-ion battery electrolytes,

Zhang, Xueyuan; Devine, Thomas M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

Jeppson, D.W.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nanostructured lithium nickel manganese oxides for lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanostructured lithium nickel manganese oxides were investigated as advanced positive electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries designated to power plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and all-electric vehicles. The investigation included material characterization and electrochemical testing. In cell tests, the Li{sub 1.375}Ni{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 0.75}O{sub 2.4375} composition achieved high capacity (210 mAh g{sup -1}) at an elevated rate (230 mA g{sup -1}), which makes this material a promising candidate for high energy density Li-ion batteries, as does its being cobalt-free and uncoated. The material has spherical morphology with nanoprimary particles embedded in micrometer-sized secondary particles, possesses a multiphase character (spinel and layered), and exhibits a high packing density (over 2 g cm{sup -3}) that is essential for the design of high energy density positive electrodes. When combined with the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} stable anode, the cell showed a capacity of 225 mAh g{sup -1} at the C/3 rate (73 mA g{sup -1}) with no capacity fading for 200 cycles. Other chemical compositions, Li{sub (1+x)}Ni{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 0.75}O{sub (2.25+x/2)} (0.32 {le} x {le} 0.65), were also studied, and the relationships among their structural, morphological, and electrochemical properties are reported.

Deng, H.; Belharouak, I.; Cook, R. E.; Wu, H.; Sun, Y.-K.; Amine, K.; Hanyang Univ.

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermal analysis of uranium zirconium hydride fuel using a lead-bismuth gap at LWR operating temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Next generation nuclear technology calls for more advanced fuels to maximize the effectiveness of new designs. A fuel currently being studied for use in advanced light water reactors (LWRs) is uranium zirconium hydride ...

Ensor, Brendan M. (Brendan Melvin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Role of electronic, geometric, and surface properties on the mechanism of the electrochemical hydriding/dehydriding reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1990 there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors to investigate the role of individual elements on the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydriding/dehydriding reactions. This review article presents the electrochemical and physicochemical characteristics of hydriding/dehydriding reactions from the point of view of their dependence on electronic, geometric and surface properties of the hydride materials. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) studies were based on AB{sub 5} type alloys, partially substituted by other elements. Expansion of the unit cell volume and a larger Ni d band vacancy are beneficial for increasing the amount of the hydrogen storage. XAS and SVET showed that the Ce substitution for La in an AB{sub 5} alloy enhances the lifetime of hydride electrode.

Srinivasan, S.; Zhang, W.; Kumar, M.P.S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Texas Engineering Experiment Station] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

387

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

388

Argonne Transportation - Lithium Battery Technology Patents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awarded Lithium Battery Technology Patents Awarded Lithium Battery Technology Patents "Composite-structure" material is a promising battery electrode for electric vehicles Argonne National Laboratory has been granted two U.S. patents (U.S. Pat. 6,677,082 and U.S. Pat. 6,680,143) on new "composite-structure" electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Electrode compositions of this type are receiving worldwide attention. Such electrodes offer superior cost and safety features over state-of-the-art LiCoO2 electrodes that power conventional lithium-ion batteries. Moreover, they demonstrate outstanding cycling stability and can be charged and discharged at high rates, making them excellent candidates to replace LiCoO2 for consumer electronic applications and hybrid electric vehicles.

389

Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries Towards Safer Lithium-Ion Batteries Speaker(s): Guoying Chen Date: October 25, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Venkat Srinivasan Safety problems associated with rechargeable lithium batteries are now well recognized. Recent spectacular fires involving cell phones, laptops, and (here at LBNL) AA cells have made the news. These events are generally caused by overcharging and subsequent development of internal shorts. Before these batteries can be used in vehicle applications, improvement in cell safety is a must. We have been active in the area of lithium battery safety for many years. For example, a versatile, inexpensive overcharge protection approach developed in our laboratory, uses an electroactive polymer to act as a reversible, self-actuating, low resistance internal

390

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Beryllium) Beryllium Isotopes of the Element Lithium Click for Main Data Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from...

391

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

SciTech Connect

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lithium-ion batteries : an unexpected advance.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discovery that the electronic conductivity of LiFePO{sub 4} can be increased by eight orders of magnitude may have a profound impact on the next generation of lithium-ion batteries.

Thackeray, M. M.; Chemical Engineering

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Solid State Thin Film Lithium Microbatteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid state thin film lithium microbatteries fabricated by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) are suggested. During deposition the following process parameters must be considered, which are laser energy and fluence, laser pulse ...

Shi, Z.

394

NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

395

Lithium Droplet Injector......Inventors ..--..Lane Roquemore...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of edge-localized plasma modes, and replenishing lithium coatings of plasma facing components during a plasma operations of a fusion reactor. No.: M-848 Inventor(s): A. L Roquemore...

396

Investigation of Interactions between Lithium Iron Phosphate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this talk, we present an application of a particle-level model to simulate experiments that involve two isotopes of lithium, 6Li and 7Li. By measuring the 6Li and ...

397

Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Kahaian, Arthur J. (Chicago, IL); Kim, Jeom-Soo (Naperville, IL)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

399

California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California Lithium Battery, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 626 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+) si-graphene LI-ion battery is scheduled to start in California in 2014. Plans are to produce the initial batteries for CALBattery JV partner Ionex Energy Storage Systems for use in 1-100MW grid scale energy storage

400

Lithium Hectorite Clay as the Ionic Conductor in LiCoO2 Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Hectorite Clay as the Ionic Conductor in LiCoO2 Cathodes Michael W. Riley,* Peter S. Fedkiw Carolina 27695-7905, USA Cathodes based on LiCoO2 that contain various lithium-conducting species lithium hectorite, lithium Laponite, and lithium- exchanged Nafion are studied in conjunction with lithium metal

Khan, Saad A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOI: 10.1002/chem.200((......)) Deprotonative Metalation of Functionalized Aromatics using Mixed Lithium-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Mixed Lithium- Cadmium, Lithium-Indium, and Lithium-Zinc Species Katia Snégaroff,[a] Jean similarly dideprotonated at room temperature. The aromatic lithium cadmates thus obtained were involved · cadmium · lithium · cross-coupling · ab initio calculations Introduction Lithium bases

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

402

Design and simulation of lithium rechargeable batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium -based rechargeable batteries that utilize insertion electrodes are being considered for electric-vehicle applications because of their high energy density and inherent reversibility. General mathematical models are developed that apply to a wide range of lithium-based systems, including the recently commercialized lithium-ion cell. The modeling approach is macroscopic, using porous electrode theory to treat the composite insertion electrodes and concentrated solution theory to describe the transport processes in the solution phase. The insertion process itself is treated with a charge-transfer process at the surface obeying Butler-Volmer kinetics, followed by diffusion of the lithium ion into the host structure. These models are used to explore the phenomena that occur inside of lithium cells under conditions of discharge, charge, and during periods of relaxation. Also, in order to understand the phenomena that limit the high-rate discharge of these systems, we focus on the modeling of a particular system with well-characterized material properties and system parameters. The system chosen is a lithium-ion cell produced by Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ, consisting of a lithium-carbon negative electrode, a plasticized polymer electrolyte, and a lithium-manganese-oxide spinel positive electrode. This battery is being marketed for consumer electronic applications. The system is characterized experimentally in terms of its transport and thermodynamic properties, followed by detailed comparisons of simulation results with experimental discharge curves. Next, the optimization of this system for particular applications is explored based on Ragone plots of the specific energy versus average specific power provided by various designs.

Doyle, C.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electrochemical modeling of lithium polymer batteries.  

SciTech Connect

An electrochemical model for lithium polymer cells was developed and a parameter set for the model was measured using a series of laboratory experiments. Examples are supplied to demonstrate the capabilities of the electrochemical model to obtain the concentration, current, and potential distributions in lithium polymer cells under complex cycling protocols. The modeling results are used to identify processes that limit cell performance and for optimizing cell design. Extension of the electrochemical model to examine two-dimensional studies is also described.

Dees, D. W.; Battaglia, V. S.; Belanger, A.; Chemical Engineering; Inst. de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Recent News from the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2011 17, 2011 An illustration of the 2011 Chevy Volt, whose lithium-ion battery is based on technology developed at Argonne National Laboratory. | Image courtesy of General Motors. From the Lab to the Showroom: How the Electric Car Came to Life In the U.S., businesses tend to invest in research that will pay off in the short term. National laboratories are filling a gap by conducting the essential research that will change the game 10 to 20 years down the road. Learn more about how years of conducting advanced research in both the private and public sectors led to battery technology that made electric cars possible. October 17, 2011 Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries The Energy Department funds cutting-edge research on a broad range of

405

Argonne Transportation - 2008 Features Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Features Archive 8 Features Archive Battery Test Facility Since 1976, researchers have used Argonne's Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory to study advanced battery systems for applications such as hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and utility load-leveling during peak demand periods. The facility houses a computer-operated test laboratory, where individual cells and multicell modules of battery systems are subjected to performance and lifetime tests under simulated real-world conditions. (More...) EnerDel/Argonne Advanced High-Power Battery for Hybrid Electric Vehicles The EnerDel/Argonne lithium-ion battery is a highly reliable and extremely safe device that is lighter in weight, more compact, more powerful and longer-lasting than the nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries in today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). (More...)

406

Modeling & Simulation - Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Production of Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles battery assessment graph Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are currently being implemented in hybrid electric (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV), and electric (EV) vehicles. While nickel metal-hydride will continue to be the battery chemistry of choice for some HEV models, Li-ion will be the dominate battery chemistry of the remaining market share for the near-future. Large government incentives are currently necessary for customer acceptance of the vehicles such as the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf. Understanding the parameters that control the cost of Li-ion will help researchers and policy makers understand the potential of Li-ion batteries to meet battery energy density and cost goals, thus enabling widespread adoption without incentives.

407

Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.  

SciTech Connect

Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Rechargeable lithium-ion cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a rechargeable lithium-ion cell, a method for its manufacture, and its application. The cell is distinguished by the fact that it has a metallic housing (21) which is electrically insulated internally by two half shells (15), which cover electrode plates (8) and main output tabs (7) and are composed of a non-conductive material, where the metallic housing is electrically insulated externally by means of an insulation coating. The cell also has a bursting membrane (4) which, in its normal position, is located above the electrolyte level of the cell (1). In addition, the cell has a twisting protection (6) which extends over the entire surface of the cover (2) and provides centering and assembly functions for the electrode package, which comprises the electrode plates (8).

Bechtold, Dieter (Bad Vilbel, DE); Bartke, Dietrich (Kelkheim, DE); Kramer, Peter (Konigstein, DE); Kretzschmar, Reiner (Kelkheim, DE); Vollbert, Jurgen (Hattersheim, DE)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Electrode for a lithium cell  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Vaughey, John T. (Elmhurst, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Light-Metal Hydrides as Novel Conversion Mateirals for Li-ion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the phase diagram as a function of lithium chemical potential and ... 3D Nanostructured Bicontinuous Electrodes: Path to Ultra-High Power and Energy ... The Electrochemical Flow Capacitor for Efficient Grid-Scale Energy Storage.

412

Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickelemetal hydride batteries during fast charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from handheld electronics to hybrid and electric vehicles [2,3]. Recently, lithium-ion (Li o Article history: Received 23 February 2013 Received in revised form 13 June 2013 Accepted 14 June

Bahrami, Majid

413

SOLID STATE NMR STUDY SUPPORTING THE LITHIUM VACANCY DEFECT MODEL IN CONGRUENT LITHIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@ Pergamon SOLID STATE NMR STUDY SUPPORTING THE LITHIUM VACANCY DEFECT MODEL IN CONGRUENT LITHIUM Nouember 1993; accepted I March 1994) Abstract-e3Nb and 7Li wideline- as well as MAS-NMR measurements were could be reduced to 0.6kHz by using MAS-NMR with a rotational lrequency of 4000Hz, thsre was no second 7

Bluemel, Janet

414

Aluminum Hydride - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jason Graetz (Primary Contact), James Wegrzyn Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Building 815 Upton, NY 11973 Phone: (631) 344-3242 Email: graetz@bnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop onboard vehicle storage systems using aluminum hydride that meets all of DOE's targets for proton exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles. Produce aluminum hydride material with a hydrogen * storage capacity greater than 9.7% gravimetric (kg-H 2 /kg) and 0.13 kg-H 2 /L volumetric. Develop practical and economical processes for *

415

Pressure Acceleration of Hydride Formation on a Cobalt(I) Macrocycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Acceleration of Hydride Formation via Pressure Acceleration of Hydride Formation via Proton Binding to a Cobalt(I) Macrocycle Etsuko Fujita, James F. Wishart, and Rudi van Eldik Inorg. Chem. 41, 1579-1583 (2002) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The effect of pressure on proton binding to the racemic isomer of the cobalt(I) macrocycle, CoL+ (L = 5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-4,11-diene), has been studied for a series of proton donors using pulse radiolysis techniques. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of CoL+ with proton donors decrease with increasing pKa of the donor acid, consistent with a reaction occurring via proton transfer. Whereas the corresponding volumes of activation (DVĂ˝) are rather small and negative for all acids (proton donors) with pKa values below 8.5, significantly larger negative

416

Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the discharged hydride fuel is more proliferation resistant. Preliminary feasibility assessment indicates that by replacing some of the ZrH1.6 by ThH2 it will be possible to further improve the plutonium incineration capability of PWR’s. Other possibly promising applications of hydride fuel were identified but not evaluated in this work. A number of promising oxide fueled PWR core designs were also found as spin-offs of this study: (1) The optimal oxide fueled PWR core design features smaller fuel rod diameter of D=6.5 mm and a larger pitch-to-diameter ratio of P/D=1.39 than presently practiced by industry – 9.5mm and 1.326. This optimal design can provide a 30% increase in the power density and a 24% reduction in the cost of electricity (COE) provided the PWR could be designed to have the coolant pressure drop across the core increased from the reference 29 psia to 60 psia. (2) Using wire wrapped oxide fuel rods in hexagonal fuel assemblies it is possible to design PWR cores to operate at 54% higher power density than the reference PWR design that uses grid spacers and a square lattice, provided 60 psia coolant pressure drop across the core could be accommodated. Uprating existing PWR’s to use such cores could result in 40% reduction in the COE. The optimal lattice geometry is D = 8.08 mm and P/D = 1.41. The most notable advantages of wire wraps over grid spacers are their significant lower pressure drop, higher critical heat flux and improved vibrations characteristics.

Greenspan, E

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reducing Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine Kerry Klein 1 , Linda Gaines 2 1 New West Technologies LLC, Washington, DC, USA 2 Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA KEYWORDS Mineral extraction, zinc, silica, strategic metals, Imperial Valley, lithium ion batteries, electric- drive vehicles, battery recycling ABSTRACT Following a 2009 investment of $32.9 billion in renewable energy and energy efficiency research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Obama in his January 2011 State of the Union address promised deployment of one million electric vehicles by 2015 and 80% clean energy by 2035. The United States seems poised to usher in its bright energy future,

418

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF METAL HYDRIDES. Summary Report for October 1, 1958-September 30, 1960  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study of the fundamental relations in the zirconium -- hydrogen system was made in order to clarify the many points of dispute and to evolve a complete picture describing all phases of this system. An engineering evaluation was made of means for utillzing the various high cross-section metal hydrides in shielding or control applications. These materials would combine the processes of thermalization and absorption. Consequently, they are of considerable interest for use in shielding or controlling epithermal reactors. (auth)

Beck, R.L.

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Method for the prediction of the hydriding thermodynamics of ternary PD-based alloys.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method has been developed to calculate the hydriding thermodynamics of ternary Pd-X-Y systems, where X and Y are substitutional alloying elements, by using the properties of the binary Pd-X and Pd-Y systems. Experimental data was collected on the Pd-Rh-Co system to test the validity of this method. Hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms of several binary Pd-Rh and Pd-Co alloys and Pd-Rh-Co ternary alloys were measured to determine the thermodynamics of hydrogen absorption, hydride formation and decomposition, and hydrogen capacity. Good agreement between the calculated and measured values for the ternary Pd-Rh-Co system, in the dilute alloying regime (< 10 at.% total alloying additions), was obtained using our method. Examining literature results on other ternary Pd-X-Y systems checked the universality of this method. Again, the method succeeds in predicting the hydriding thermodynamics for both lattice contracted and lattice expanded alloy systems, Pd-Ni-Rh and Pd-Ag-Y respectively.

Teter, D. F. (David F.); Mauro, M. E. (Michael Ernest)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

OPTIMIZATION OF INTERNAL HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE TANKS UTILIZING METAL HYDRIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two detailed, unit-cell models, a transverse fin design and a longitudinal fin design, of a combined hydride bed and heat exchanger are developed in COMSOL{reg_sign} Multiphysics incorporating and accounting for heat transfer and reaction kinetic limitations. MatLab{reg_sign} scripts for autonomous model generation are developed and incorporated into (1) a grid-based and (2) a systematic optimization routine based on the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method to determine the geometrical parameters that lead to the optimal structure for each fin design that maximizes the hydrogen stored within the hydride. The optimal designs for both the transverse and longitudinal fin designs point toward closely-spaced, small cooling fluid tubes. Under the hydrogen feed conditions studied (50 bar), a 25 times improvement or better in the hydrogen storage kinetics will be required to simultaneously meet the Department of Energy technical targets for gravimetric capacity and fill time. These models and methodology can be rapidly applied to other hydrogen storage materials, such as other metal hydrides or to cryoadsorbents, in future work.

Garrison, S.; Tamburello, D.; Hardy, B.; Anton, D.; Gorbounov, M.; Cognale, C.; van Hassel, B.; Mosher, D.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

Systems Modeling, Simulation and Material Operating Requirements for Chemical Hydride Based Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has shown it to be a promising material for chemical hydride based hydrogen storage. AB was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. A new systems concept based on augers, ballast tank, hydrogen heat exchanger and H2 burner was designed and implemented in simulation. In this design, the chemical hydride material was assumed to produce H2 on the augers itself, thus minimizing the size of ballast tank and reactor. One dimensional models based on conservation of mass, species and energy were used to predict important state variables such as reactant and product concentrations, temperatures of various components, flow rates, along with pressure, in various components of the storage system. Various subsystem components in the models were coded as C language S-functions and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. The control variable AB (or alane) flow rate was determined through a simple expression based on the ballast tank pressure, H2 demand from the fuel cell and hydrogen production from AB (or alane) in the reactor. System simulation results for solid AB, liquid AB and alane for both steady state and transient drive cycle cases indicate the usefulness of the model for further analysis and prototype development.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Lithium Getter Pump System ---- nventors Richard Majeski, Eugene...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Lithium Getter Pump System ---- nventors Richard Majeski, Eugene Kearns, and John Schmitt This invention is a device to pump volatile gases that bond to lithium in a high vacuum...

423

Low hole polaron migration barrier in lithium peroxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present computational evidence of polaronic hole trapping and migration in lithium peroxide (Li[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]), a material of interest in lithium-air batteries. We find that the hole forms in the ?* antibonding ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

424

Materials Challenges and Opportunities of Lithium Ion Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lithium ion batteries have revolutionized the portable electronics market, ... Cost, safety, and energy and power densities are some of the major issues in ... Analysis of Cycling Induced Fatigue in Electrode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries.

425

Chemical Lithium Intercalation into Nano-Structured Anatase and  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of lithium intercalation into nano-structured TiO2 is studied by 6Li NMR, XRD and TEM studies. The intercalation of lithium into rutile  ...

426

Ceramic-Metal Composites for Electrodes of Lithium Ion ...  

Ceramic-Metal Composites for Electrodes of Lithium Ion Batteries ... Applications and Industries. Anodes for primary and secondary (rechargeable) ...

427

High Rate Performing lithium-ion Batteries - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Rechargeable Batteries and for Supercapacitors, II. Presentation Title, High Rate Performing lithium-ion Batteries.

428

Negative Electrodes Improve Safety in Lithium Cells and Batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Negative Electrodes Improve Safety in Lithium Cells and Batteries Technology available for licensing: Enhanced stability at a lower cost negativeelectrodes...

429

Advanced Lithium Ion Battery Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

The Berkeley Lab technology contributes to improved battery safety by circumventing lithium metal dendrite formation. Benefits. ... hybrid electric vehicles;

430

Multilayer Graphene-Silicon Structures for Lithium Ion Battery ...  

Automotive industry: electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles; High performance lithium ion battery manufacturers; Aerospace industry, for lightweight power storage;

431

Methods for making lithium vanadium oxide electrode materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making vanadium oxide formulations is presented. In one method of preparing lithium vanadium oxide for use as an electrode material, the method involves: admixing a particulate form of a lithium compound and a particulate form of a vanadium compound; jet milling the particulate admixture of the lithium and vanadium compounds; and heating the jet milled particulate admixture at a temperature below the melting temperature of the admixture to form lithium vanadium oxide.

Schutts, Scott M. (Menomonie, WI); Kinney, Robert J. (Woodbury, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Conductive Binder for Lithium Ion Battery Electrode - IB-2643 ...  

The Berkeley Lab electrode technology contributes to improved battery safety by circumventing lithium metal dendrite ... Scalable manufacturing using ...

433

Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries From Aluminum Substituted ...  

Lower Cost Lithium Ion Batteries From Aluminum Substituted Cathode Materials Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

434

Lithium based electrochemical cell systems having a degassing agent  

SciTech Connect

A lithium based electrochemical cell system includes a positive electrode; a negative electrode; an electrolyte; and a degassing agent.

Hyung, Yoo-Eup (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Non-Cross-Linked Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Ion ...  

Rechargeable lithium ion batteries for cellular phones, laptop computers and other consumer electronics; Batteries for electrically-powered vehicles;

436

Thin liquid lithium targets for high power density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin liquid lithium targets for high power density applications: heavy ion beam strippers and beta Hilton Malmö City #12;Outline Liquid Lithium Stripper idea for FRIB Brief theory of film stability Thickness measurement results Next Steps Beta-beams 2 #12;Liquid Lithium Stripper for FRIB: Advantages

McDonald, Kirk

437

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Enolization: Catalysis by Hemilabile Ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Enolization: Catalysis by Hemilabile Ligands Antonio Ramirez of a lithium diisopropylamide (LDA)-mediated ester enolization. Hemilabile amino ether MeOCH2CH2NMe2, binding-based catalysis are thwarted by the occlusion of the catalyst on the lithium salt products and byproducts (eq 1

Collum, David B.

438

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

Zakharov, Leonid E.

439

Lithium intercalated graphite : experimental Compton profile for stage one  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-301 Lithium intercalated graphite : experimental Compton profile for stage one G. Loupias, J différence des profils Compton est compatible avec un transfert total de l'électron de conduction du lithium électronique due à l'insertion. Abstract. 2014 Electron momentum distribution of the first stage lithium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of lithium niobate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature dependence of the dielectric response of lithium niobate D. Xue, K. Betzler*, H. Hesse The dielectric response of lithium niobate is quantitatively calculated for different temperatures. Using of lithium niobate at 1.064 mm increases remarkably with increasing temperature. q 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd

Osnabrück, Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Lithium acetate transformation of yeast Maitreya Dunham August 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium acetate transformation of yeast Maitreya Dunham August 2004 Original protocol from Katja until the OD600 is around 0.7-0.8 (~7 hours). Spin down the cells. Resuspend in 5 ml lithium acetate mix. Spin. Resuspend in 0.5 ml lithium acetate mix. Transfer to an eppendorf tube. Incubate 60 minutes

Dunham, Maitreya

442

The Lithium-Ion Cell: Model, State Of Charge Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lithium-Ion Cell: Model, State Of Charge Estimation and Battery Management System Tutor degradation mechanisms of a Li-ion cell based on LiCoO2", Journal of Power Sources #12;Lithium ions and e and Y. Fuentes. Computer simulations of a lithium-ion polymer battery and implications for higher

Schenato, Luca

443

Lithium Diisopropylamide Solvated by Hexamethylphosphoramide: Substrate-Dependent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Diisopropylamide Solvated by Hexamethylphosphoramide: Substrate-Dependent Mechanisms-1301 Received February 9, 2006; E-mail: dbc6@cornell.edu Abstract: Lithium diisopropylamide of lithium-ion solvation at a molecular level of resolution.5 Our interest in HMPA stems from studies

Collum, David B.

444

Lithium Insertion In Silicon Nanowires: An ab Initio Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Insertion In Silicon Nanowires: An ab Initio Study Qianfan Zhang, Wenxing Zhang, Wenhui Wan, and § School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China ABSTRACT The ultrahigh specific lithium ion opportunities for energy storage. However, a systematic theoretical study on lithium insertion in SiNWs remains

Cui, Yi

445

RECOVERY AND SEPARATION OF LITHIUM VALUES FROM SALVAGE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium values can be recovered from an aqueous basic solution by reacting the values with a phosphate salt soluble in the solution, forming an aqueous slurry of the resultant aqueous insoluble lithium phosphate, contacting the slurry with an organic cation exchange resin in the acid form until the slurry has been clarified, and thereafter recovering lithium values from the resin. (AEC)

Hansford, D.L.; Raabe, E.W.

1963-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESONANT FARADAY ROTATION IN A HOT LITHIUM VAPOR By SCOTT RUSSELL WAITUKAITIS A Thesis Submitted: #12;Abstract I describe a study of Faraday rotation in a hot lithium vapor. I begin by dis- cussing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3 The Lithium Oven and Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Theoretical Framework

Cronin, Alex D.

447

Use of Lithium Hexafluoroisopropoxide as a Mild Base for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of Lithium Hexafluoroisopropoxide as a Mild Base for Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Olefination The weak base lithium 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropoxide (LiHFI) is shown to be highly effective of base-sensitive substrates, leading to the discovery that lithium 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropoxide (Li

448

Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Majeski,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U R. Kaita, a R. Majeski, a S. Luckhardt, b R. Doerner, b M ABSTRACT The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used

449

Development of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators in Lithium Niobate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators in Lithium Niobate A thesis submitted in partial for the production of lithium niobate Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators (WGMRs) to be used in the generation in the form of a disk with a rounded edge. I have fabricated a lithium niobate WGMR with surface imperfections

Novikova, Irina

450

Version 1.0 Lithium hyper ne splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.0 Lithium hyper#12;ne splitting Krzysztof Pachucki #3; Institute of Theoretical Physics approach for the calculation of relativistic m#11; 6 corrections to the lithium ground state hyper#12;ne problem. We will concentrate on lithium as the simplest alkali-metal atom, for which several precise

Pachucki, Krzysztof

451

Tracking the lithium isotopic evolution of the mantle using carbonatites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking the lithium isotopic evolution of the mantle using carbonatites Ralf Halama a,, William F. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: lithium isotopes; carbonatites; mantle geochemistry 1. Introduction Lithium (Li) is an incompatible element that is typi- cally enriched 10 to 50-fold in crustal

Mcdonough, William F.

452

The Inside Story of the Lithium Ion Battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Inside Story of the Lithium Ion Battery John Dunning, Research Scholar in Residence Daniel. #12;Separator Cathode:Anode: e-e- Li++e-+C6LiC6 Li+ Lithium-ion battery e- Binder Conductive additives with charging and discharging a lithium ion battery · Research available devices · Test device to verify

Sze, Lawrence

453

Accelerated Degradation Assessment of 18650 Lithium-Ion Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power fade of lithium cells due to accelerated factors of temperature and charging-discharging rate was assessed. A lithium-ion battery aging model for predicting the power fade of 18650-size cells was applied, and then statistically accelerated degradation ... Keywords: accelerated degradation test, lithium-ion battery aging, power fade, state of charge (SOC)

Kuan-Jung Chung; Chueh-Chien Hsiao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virus-Enabled Silicon Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries Xilin Chen, Konstantinos Gerasopoulos emerged as one of the most promising next-generation anode materials for lithium-ion batteries due to its with remarkable cycling stability. KEYWORDS: silicon anode · lithium-ion battery · Tobacco mosaic virus · physical

Ghodssi, Reza

455

Microstructural Modeling and Design of Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The cathode architectures and materials have a large influence on the performance of lithium-ion batteries battery design. The cathode of a lithium-ion battery is a large contributor to its overall performance power density and energy density of lithium-ion batteries. 1.3 Basic Ideal Cathode Structure

GarcĂ­a, R. Edwin

456

Mechanical Properties of Lithium-Ion Battery Separator Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facing Li-ion batteries · Increase energy & power density · Decrease cost · Increase operating lifeMechanical Properties of Lithium-Ion Battery Separator Materials Patrick Sinko B.S. Materials and motivation ­ Why study lithium-ion batteries? ­ Lithium-ion battery fundamentals ­ Why study the mechanical

Petta, Jason

457

Internal Rotation, Mixing and Lithium Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium is an excellent tracer of mixing in stars as it is destroyed (by nuclear reactions) at a temperature around $\\sim 2.5\\times 10^6$ K. The lithium destruction zone is typically located in the radiative region of a star. If the radiative regions are stable, the observed surface value of lithium should remain constant with time. However, comparison of the meteoritic and photospheric Li abundances in the Sun indicate that the surface abundance of Li in the Sun has been depleted by more than two orders of magnitude. This is not predicted by solar models and is a long standing problem. Observations of Li in open clusters indicate that Li depletion is occurring on the main sequence. Furthermore, there is now compelling observational evidence that a spread of lithium abundances is present in nearly identical stars. This suggests that some transport process is occurring in stellar radiative regions. Helioseismic inversions support this conclusion, for they suggest that standard solar models need to be modified below the base of the convection zone. There are a number of possible theoretical explanations for this transport process. The relation between Li abundances, rotation rates and the presence of a tidally locked companion along with the observed internal rotation in the Sun indicate that the mixing is most likely induced by rotation. The current status of non-standard (particularly rotational) stellar models which attempt to account for the lithium observations are reviewed.

Brian Chaboyer

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

458

Device for packaging a lithium battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battery packing construction is described for packaging at least one lithium battery, the lithium battery including a solid polymer electrolyte in electrical contact with an anode of lithium or a lithium alloy and a cathode containing at least one metallic salt, the device comprising a first metallic foil having a first continuous band of plastic film bonded thereto by means of a thermoset adhesive along entire peripheral edges of the first metallic foil, a second metallic foil having a second continuous band of plastic film bonded thereto by means of a thermoset adhesive along entire peripheral edges of the second metallic foil, the first and second metallic foils disposed over one another with the first and second plastic films arranged adjacent one another in facing relationship, the lithium battery being sandwiched between the first and the second metallic foils in space inside the first and the second continuous bands of plastic film with the anode in contact with one metallic foil and the cathode in contact with the other metallic foil, the first and second continuous bands of plastic film being imperviously heat-sealed together to prevent any outside substance to contact the battery.

Duval, M.; Giguere, Y.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

459

Evaporated lithium surface coatings in NSTX.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two lithium evaporators were used to evaporate more than 100 g of lithium on to the NSTX lower divertor region. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators were withdrawn behind shutters, where they also remained during the subsequent HeGDC applied for periods up to 9.5 min. After the HeGDC, the shutters were opened and the LITERs were reinserted to deposit lithium on the lower divertor target for 10 min, at rates of 10-70 mg/min, prior to the next discharge. The major improvements in plasma performance from these lithium depositions include: (1) plasma density reduction as a result of lithium deposition; (2) suppression of ELMs; (3) improvement of energy confinement in a low-triangularity shape; (4) improvement in plasma performance for standard, high-triangularity discharges; (5) reduction of the required HeGDC time between discharges; (6) increased pedestal electron and ion temperature; (7) reduced SOL plasma density; and (8) reduced edge neutral density.

Zakharov, L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Gates, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Menard, J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Maingi, R. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Schneider, H. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Mueller, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Wampler, William R.; Roquemore, A. L. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kallman, Jeffrey K. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Sabbagh, S. (Columbia University, New York, NY); LeBlanc, B. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Raman, R. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Ono, M. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Wilgren, J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Allain, J.P. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Timberlake, J. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Stevenson, T. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Ross, P. W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Majeski, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kugel, Henry W. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Skinner, C. H. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Gerhardt, S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Paul, S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Bell, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kaye, S. M. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Kaita, R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Soukhanovskii, V. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Bell, Michael G. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ); Mansfield, D. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Characterization of lithium phosphorous oxynitride thin films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrical and electrochemical properties of an amorphous thin-film lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorous oxynitride (Lipon), have been studied with emphasis on the stability window vs Li metal and the behavior of the Li/Lipon interface. Ion conductivity of Lipon exhibits Arrhenius behavior at {minus}26 to +140 C, with a conductivity of 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}S/cm at 25 C and an activity energy of 0.50 {plus_minus} 0.01 eV. A stability window of 5.5 V was observed with respect to a Li{sup +}/Li reference, and no detectable reaction or degradation was evident at the Li/Lipon interface upon lithium cycling.

Yu, Xiaohua; Bates, J.B.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Spinel electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper gives a historical account of the development of spinel electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries. Research in the late 1970's and early 1980's on high-temperature . Li/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cells led to the evaluation of lithium spinels Li[B{sub 2}]X{sub 4} at room temperature (B = metal cation). This work highlighted the importance of the [B{sub 2}]X{sub 4}spinel framework as a host electrode structure and the ability to tailor the cell voltage by selection of different B cations. Examples of lithium-ion cells that operate with spinel anode/spinel cathode couples are provided. Particular attention is paid to spinels within the solid solution system Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (0 {le} x {le} 0.33).

Thackeray, M. M.

1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Rechargeable thin-film lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable thin-film batteries consisting of lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have recently been developed. The batteries, which are typically less than 6-{mu}m thick, can be fabricated to any specified size, large or small, onto a variety of substrates including ceramics, semiconductors, and plastics. The cells that have been investigated include Li-TiS{sub 2}, Li-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Li-Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5, 3.6, and 4.2, respectively. The development of these batteries would not have been possible without the discovery of a new thin-film lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride, that is stable in contact with metallic lithium at these potentials. Deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in N{sub 2}, this material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25{degrees}C of 2 {mu}S/cm. The maximum practical current density obtained from the thin-film cells is limited to about 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} due to a low diffusivity of Li{sup +} ions in the cathodes. In this work, the authors present a short review of their work on rechargeable thin-film lithium batteries.

Bates, J.B.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Dudney, N.J.; Luck, C.F.; Yu, Xiaohua

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Lithium intercalation in porous carbon anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon foams derived from the phase separation of polyacrylonitrile/solvent mixtures were investigated as lithium intercalation anodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The carbon foams have a bulk density of 0.35--0.5 g/cm{sup 3}, low surface area (< 50 m{sup 2}/g), and an average cell size of 5--10 {mu}m. Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon foams doped with phosphoric acid had capacity as high as 450 mAh/g. Carbon capacity increased with increasing phosphoric acid concentration in the doping solution. The doped porous carbon anodes exhibited good cyclability and excellent coulombic efficiency.

Tran, T.D.; Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.; Mayer, S.T. [Polystor Corp., Livermore, CA (United States)

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

465

Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

Angell, Charles Austen (Mesa, AZ); Xu, Wu (Tempe, AZ)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new type of highly conductive Li{sup +} polymer electrolyte, referred to as the Innovision polymer electrolyte, is completely amorphous at room temperature and has an ionic conductivity in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm. This report discusses the electrochemical characteristics (lithium oxidation and reduction), conductivity, and physical properties of Innovision electrolytes containing various dissolved salts. These electrolytes are particularly interesting since they appear to have some of the highest room-temperature lithium ion conductivities yet observed among polymer electrolytes. 13 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Farrington, G.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid composite electrolytes are provided for use in lithium batteries which exhibit moderate to high ionic conductivity at ambient temperatures and low activation energies. In one embodiment, a polymer-ceramic composite electrolyte containing poly(ethylene oxide), lithium tetrafluoroborate and titanium dioxide is provided in the form of an annealed film having a room temperature conductivity of from 10.sup.-5 S cm.sup.-1 to 10.sup.-3 S cm.sup.-1 and an activation energy of about 0.5 eV.

Kumar, Binod (Dayton, OH); Scanlon, Jr., Lawrence G. (Fairborn, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lithium-based Technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-based Technologies Lithium-based Technologies Lithium-based Technologies Y-12's 60 years of rich lithium operational history and expertise make it the clear choice for deployment of new lithium-based technologies and capabilities. There is no other U.S. site, government or commercial, that comes close to the breadth of Y-12's lithium expertise and capabilities. The Y-12 National Security Complex supplies lithium, in unclassified forms, to customers worldwide through the DOE Office of Science, Isotope Business Office. Historically, the typical order of 6Li was only gram quantities used in research and development. However, over the past three years demand has increased steadily with typical orders of around 10-20 kg each. Such increase in demand is a direct result of the use of

469

Lithium pellet production (LiPP): A device for the production of small spheres of lithium  

SciTech Connect

With lithium as a fusion material gaining popularity, a method for producing lithium pellets relatively quickly has been developed for NSTX. The Lithium Pellet Production device is based on an injector with a sub-millimeter diameter orifice and relies on a jet of liquid lithium breaking apart into small spheres via the Plateau-Rayleigh instability. A prototype device is presented in this paper and for a pressure difference of {Delta}P= 5 Torr, spheres with diameters between 0.91 < D < 1.37 mm have been produced with an average diameter of D= 1.14 mm, which agrees with the developed theory. Successive tests performed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory with Wood's metal have confirmed the dependence of sphere diameter on pressure difference as predicted.

Fiflis, P.; Andrucyzk, D.; McGuire, M.; Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D. N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nanostructured lithium-aluminum alloy electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrodeposited aluminum films and template-synthesized aluminum nanorods are examined as negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-aluminum alloying reaction is observed electrochemically with cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling in lithium half-cells. The electrodeposition reaction is shown to have high faradaic efficiency, and electrodeposited aluminum films reach theoretical capacity for the formation of LiAl (1 Ah/g). The performance of electrodeposited aluminum films is dependent on film thickness, with thicker films exhibiting better cycling behavior. The same trend is shown for electron-beam deposited aluminum films, suggesting that aluminum film thickness is the major determinant in electrochemical performance regardless of deposition technique. Synthesis of aluminum nanorod arrays on stainless steel substrates is demonstrated using electrodeposition into anodic aluminum oxide templates followed by template dissolution. Unlike nanostructures of other lithium-alloying materials, the electrochemical performance of these aluminum nanorod arrays is worse than that of bulk aluminum.

Hudak, Nicholas S.; Huber, Dale L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Lithium Polysulfidophosphates: A Family of Lithium-Conducting Sulfur-Rich Compounds for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Given the great potential for improving the energy density of state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries by a factor of 5, a breakthrough in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries will have a dramatic impact in a broad scope of energy related fields. Conventional Li-S batteries that use liquid electrolytes are intrinsically short-lived with low energy efficiency. The challenges stem from the poor electronic and ionic conductivities of elemental sulfur and its discharge products. We report herein lithium polysulfidophosphates (LPSP), a family of sulfur-rich compounds, as the enabler of long-lasting and energy-efficient Li-S batteries. LPSP have ionic conductivities of 3.0 10-5 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 8 orders of magnitude higher than that of Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high Li-ion conductivity of LPSP is the salient characteristic of these compounds that impart the excellent cycling performance to Li-S batteries. In addition, the batteries are configured in an all-solid state that promises the safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

Lin, Zhan [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL; Fu, Wujun [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

24 JOM May 1998 The lightest of all metals, lithium is used  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 JOM · May 1998 Overview Lithium The lightest of all metals, lithium is used in a variety- nesium, and as the anode in rechargeable lithium ion batteries. All of the world's pri- mary lithium is produced by molten salt electrolysis. This article reviews the current technology for lithium extraction

Sadoway, Donald Robert

473

NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Mixed Aggregates Underlying Highly Enantioselective 1,2-Additions of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2-Additions of Lithium Cyclopropylacetylide to Quinazolinones Rodney L. Parsons, Jr.,*, Joseph M. Fortunak Abstract: The solution structures of mixed aggregates derived from lithium alkoxides and lithium acetylides that mixtures of lithium cyclopropylacetylide (RCCLi), a (+)-carene-derived amino alkoxide (R*OLi), and lithium

Collum, David B.

474

REACTIVE FLOW IN LARGE-DEFORMATION ELECTRODES OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8/3/2012 1 REACTIVE FLOW IN LARGE-DEFORMATION ELECTRODES OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES LAURENCE BRASSART;8/3/2012 2 1. Introduction In a lithium-ion battery, each electrode is a host of lithium. When the battery to 4.4 lithium atoms. By comparison, in the commonly used anodes in lithium-ion batteries made

Suo, Zhigang

475

Guidance on the use of Lithium Batteries in NERC Version 1.0 8th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a lithium or lithium ion battery fire. · Use plenty of water as a fine spray to swamp and wash away spiltGuidance on the use of Lithium Batteries in NERC Version 1.0 8th March 2007 1. Introduction Lithium. There are several types of lithium batteries but they are all high energy power sources and all are potentially

Edinburgh, University of

476

Postirradiation examination of pressure tubes 2954 and 3053: Corrosion, hydriding and fluence measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure Tubes 2954 and 3053 were removed from N Reactor in March 1987 for postirradiation examinations (PIE) including hydriding, corrosion, fluence and mechanical property measurements. The results of the corrosion, hydriding, and fluence measurements are the subject of this report. These data will be used to evaluate the trends in corrosion and hydriding behavior which are important to the structural integrity of these tubes. The trend evaluations as well as the mechanical property data are or will be reported elsewhere. Both tubes operated at high power accumulating 101,800 hours of service since reactor startup in 1964. Fabricated by the Harvey Aluminum Company, Tube 2954 was cold drawn to 30% reduction of area as were 86% of the reactor tubes. Tube 3053 was also a Harvey Tube but was cold worked 18% representing 2.5% of the reactor tubes. Corrosion measurements were made from metallographic sections. The inner surface oxide thickness peaks at 2 to 5 ft downstream of the center of the fueled zone. This profile is typical of previous examined N Reactor pressure tubes. The maximum measured oxide thickness on tube 2954 was 64 microns, 17% greater than for tubes removed in 1984. The corrosion product hydrogen that is absorbed by the tube has distribution gradients in the azimuthal, axial, and radial directions. Radical surveys confirmed previous observations that most of the hydrogen is concentrated near the tube ID surfaces. For Tubes 2954 and 3053, 50% to 80% of the hydrogen is found in 20% of the tube wall. The radial as well as the azimuthal gradients are caused by thermal gradients in the tubes, with the hydrogen redistributing to the cooler parts of the tube wall. 6 refs., 50 figs., 2 tabs.

Chastain, S.A.; Trimble, D.J.; Boyd, S.M.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

Argabright, T.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermodynamic guidelines for the prediction of hydrogen Thermodynamic guidelines for the prediction of hydrogen storage reactions and their application to destabilized hydride mixtures Hydrogen Storage & Nanoscale Modeling Group Ford Motor Company Don Siegel dsiegel2@ford.com Phys. Rev. B 76, 134102 (2007) 1 Acknowledgements C. Wolverton V. Ozolins Computation Northwestern UCLA J. Yang A. Sudik Experiments Ford Ford 2 Computational Methodology * Atomistic computer simulations based on quantum mechanics (Density Functional Theory) * First-principles approach: - Only empirical input are crystal structure and fundamental physical constants - VASP code - PAW potentials - PW91 GGA - Temperature-dependent thermodynamic contributions evaluated within harmonic approximation * "Direct method" for construction of dynamical matrix

479

Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable thin-films batteries with lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. The cathodes include TiS{sub 2}, the {omega} phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and the cubic spinel Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The development of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. Thin-film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 2 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. The polarization resistance of the cells is due to the slow insertion rate of Li{sup +} ions into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients for Li{sup +} ions in the three types of cathodes have been estimated from the analysis of ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J.B.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Dudney, N.J.; Luck, C.F.; Yu, X.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Rechargeable thin-film lithium batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rechargeable thin-film batteries consisting of lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. These include Li-TiS{sub 2}, Li-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Li-Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The realization of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46}and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. The thin-film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 5 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. Over most of the charge-discharge range, the internal resistance appears to be dominated by the cathode, and the major source of the resistance is the diffusion of Li{sup +} ions from the electrolyte into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients were determined from ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J.B.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Dudney, N.J.; Luck, C.F.; Yu, X.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nickel-metal hydride lithium" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Electrothermal Analysis of Lithium Ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the electrothermal analysis and testing of lithium ion battery performance. The objectives of this report are to: (1) develop an electrothermal process/model for predicting thermal performance of real battery cells and modules; and (2) use the electrothermal model to evaluate various designs to improve battery thermal performance.

Pesaran, A.; Vlahinos, A.; Bharathan, D.; Duong, T.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Lithium in LP 944-20  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new estimate of the lithium abundance in the atmosphere of the brown dwarf LP 944-20. Our analysis is based on a self-consistent analysis of low, intermediate and high resolution optical and near-infrared spectra. We obtain log N(Li) = 3.25 +/-0.25 using fits of our synthetic spectra to the Li I resonance line doublet profiles observed with VLT/UVES and AAT/SPIRAL. This lithium abundance is over two orders of magnitude larger than previous estimates in the literature. In order to obtain good fits of the resonance lines of K I and Rb I and better fits to the TiO molecular absorption around the Li I resonance line, we invoke a semi-empirical model atmosphere with the dusty clouds located above the photosphere. The lithium abundance, however, is not changed by the effects of the dusty clouds. We discuss the implications of our estimate of the lithium abundance in LP 944-20 for the understanding of the properties of this benchmark brown dwarf.

Ya. V. Pavlenko; H. R. A. Jones; E. L. Martin; E. Guenther; M. A. Kenworthy; M. R. Zapatero Osorio

2007-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

483

THE DIFFUSION OF LITHIUM IN ALUMINUM  

SciTech Connect

The diffusion of lithium in aluminum was measured at various temperatures with diffusion couples of aluminum-LiAl. The activation energy, E, is 33.3 kcal/mol, and the diffusion factor, Do, is 4.5 cm{sup2}/sec. (auth)

Costas, L. P.

1963-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Rechargeable thin films batteries with lithium metal anodes, an amorphous inorganic electrolyte, and cathodes of lithium intercalation compounds have been fabricated and characterized. The cathodes include TiS{sub 2}, the {omega} phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and the cubic spinel Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} with open circuit voltages at full charge of about 2.5 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V, respectively. The development of these robust cells, which can be cycled thousands of times, was possible because of the stability of the amorphous lithium electrolyte, lithium phosphorus oxynitride. This material has a typical composition of Li{sub 2.9}PO{sub 3.3}N{sub 0.46} and a conductivity at 25 C of 2 {mu}S/cm. Thin film cells have been cycled at 100% depth of discharge using current densities of 2 to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}. The polarization resistance of the cells is due to the slow insertion rate of Li{sup +} ions into the cathode. Chemical diffusion coefficients for Li{sup +} ions in the three types of cathodes have been estimated from the analysis of ac impedance measurements.

Bates, J. B.; Gruzalski, G. R.; Dudney, N. J.; Luck, C. F.; Yu, X.

1993-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

485

Ionic liquids for rechargeable lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated possible anticipated advantages of ionic-liquid electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries. Thermal stabilities and phase behavior were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazoliumTFSI systems, pyrrolidiniumTFSI, BMIMPF{sub 6}, BMIMBF{sub 4}, and BMIMTf. Thermal stabilities were measured for neat ionic liquids and for BMIMBF{sub 4}-LiBF{sub 4}, BMIMTf-LiTf, BMIMTFSI-LiTFSI mixtures. Conductivities have been measured for various ionic-liquid lithium-salt systems. We show the development of interfacial impedance in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell and we report results from cycling experiments for a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + 1 mol/kg LIBF{sub 4}|C cell. The interfacial resistance increases with time and the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode. As expected, imidazolium-based ionic liquids react with lithium electrodes. We seek new ionic liquids that have better chemical stabilities.

Salminen, Justin; Papaiconomou, Nicolas; Kerr, John; Prausnitz,John; Newman, John

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

486

Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

487

Lithium Depletion of Nearby Young Stellar Associations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate cluster ages from lithium depletion in five pre-main-sequence groups found within 100 pc of the Sun: TW Hydrae Association, Eta Chamaeleontis Cluster, Beta Pictoris Moving Group, Tucanae-Horologium Association and AB Doradus Moving Group. We determine surface gravities, effective temperatures and lithium abundances for over 900 spectra through least squares fitting to model-atmosphere spectra. For each group, we compare the dependence of lithium abundance on temperature with isochrones from pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to obtain model dependent ages. We find that the Eta Chamaelontis Cluster and the TW Hydrae Association are the youngest, with ages of 12+/-6 Myr and 12+/-8 Myr, respectively, followed by the Beta Pictoris Moving Group at 21+/-9 Myr, the Tucanae-Horologium Association at 27+/-11 Myr, and the AB Doradus Moving Group at an age of at least 45 Myr (where we can only set a lower limit since the models -- unlike real stars -- do not show much lithium depletion beyond this age). Here, the ordering is robust, but the precise ages depend on our choice of both atmospheric and evolutionary models. As a result, while our ages are consistent with estimates based on Hertzsprung-Russell isochrone fitting and dynamical expansion, they are not yet more precise. Our observations do show that with improved models, much stronger constraints should be feasible: the intrinsic uncertainties, as measured from the scatter between measurements from different spectra of the same star, are very low: around 10 K in effective temperature, 0.05 dex in surface gravity, and 0.03 dex in lithium abundance.

Erin Mentuch; Alexis Brandeker; Marten H. van Kerkwijk; Ray Jayawardhana; Peter H. Hauschildt

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

488

Better Lithium-Ion Batteries Are On The Way From Berkeley Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Batteries A Better Lithium-ion Battery on the Way Simulations Reveal How New Polymer Absorbs Eight Times the Lithium of Current Designs September 23, 2011 Paul Preuss,...

489

Synthesis and Characterization of Simultaneous Electronic and Ionic Conducting Block Copolymers for Lithium Battery Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9 Figure 1.9. Schematic of a traditional lithium-ion batterythan traditional lithium-ion battery batteries. OrganicBattery Design A lithium-ion battery consists of a negative

Patel, Shrayesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Performance Characteristics of Lithium-ion Batteries of Various Chemistries for Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for vehicle applications. 2 Lithium-ion battery chemistriesThe lithium-ion battery technology used for consumerfrom EIG Figure 4: Lithium-ion battery modules for testing

Burke, Andrew; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Performance, Charging, and Second-use Considerations for Lithium Batteries for Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miller, M. , Emerging Lithium-ion Battery Technologies forMid-size Full (1) Lithium-ion battery with an energy densitypresent study. The lithium-ion battery technology used for

Burke, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Solid state thin film battery having a high temperature lithium alloy anode  

SciTech Connect

An improved rechargeable thin-film lithium battery involves the provision of a higher melting temperature lithium anode. Lithium is alloyed with a suitable solute element to elevate the melting point of the anode to withstand moderately elevated temperatures.

Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FOR THE ISOTOPIC EXCHANGE OF A 1600 LITER TITANIUM HYDRIDE STORAGE VESSEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Titanium is used as a low pressure tritium storage material. The absorption/desorption rates and temperature rise during air passivation have been reported previously for a 4400 gram prototype titanium hydride storage vessel (HSV). A desorption limit of roughly 0.25 Q/M was obtained when heating to 700 C which represents a significant residual tritium process vessel inventory. To prepare an HSV for disposal, batchwise isotopic exchange has been proposed to reduce the tritium content to acceptable levels. A prototype HSV was loaded with deuterium and exchanged with protium to determine the effectiveness of a batch-wise isotopic exchange process. A total of seven exchange cycles were performed. Gas samples were taken nominally at the beginning, middle, and end of each desorption cycle. Sample analyses showed the isotopic exchange process does not follow the standard dilution model commonly reported. Samples taken at the start of the desorption process were lower in deuterium (the gas to be removed) than those taken later in the desorption cycle. The results are explained in terms of incomplete mixing of the exchange gas in the low pressure hydride.

Klein, J.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

494

REACTION KINETICS AND X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES OF YTTRIUM CONTAINING METAL HYDRIDE ELECTRODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This was a study of electrode degradation mechanisms and the reaction kinetics of LaNi{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3}, La{sub (1{minus}x)}, (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) and La{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 4.6}Sn{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.1} metal hydride electrodes. Alloy characterization included x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption (XAS), hydrogen absorption in a Sieverts apparatus, and electrochemical cycling of alloy electrodes. The atomic volume of H was determined for two of the alloys. Electrochemical kinetic measurements were made using steady state galvanostatic measurements, galvanodynamic sweep, and electrochemical impedance techniques. XAS was used to examine the degree of corrosion of the alloys with cycling. Alloying with Y decreased the corrosion rate. The results are consistent with corrosion inhibition by a Y containing passive film. The increase in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with increasing depth of discharge was much greater on the Y containing alloys. This may be due to the dehydriding of the catalytic species on the surface of the metal hydride particles.

TICIANELLI,E.A.; MUKERJEE,S.; MCBREEN,J.; ADZIC,G.D.; JOHNSON,J.R.; REILLY,J.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

A Novel Zr-1Nb Alloy and a New Look at Hydriding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel Zr-1Nb has begun development based on a working model that takes into account the hydrogen permeabilities for zirconium and niobium metals. The beta-Nb secondary phase particles (SPPs) in Zr-1Nb are believed to promote more rapid hydrogen dynamics in the alloy in comparison to other zirconium alloys. Furthermore, some hydrogen release is expected at the lower temperatures corresponding to outages when the partial pressure of H2 in the coolant is less. These characteristics lessen the negative synergism between corrosion and hydriding that is otherwise observed in cladding alloys without niobium. In accord with the working model, development of nanoscale precursors was initiated to enhance the performance of existing Zr-1Nb alloys. Their characteristics and properties can be compared to oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys, and material additions have been proposed to zirconium-based LWR cladding to guard further against hydriding and to fix the size of the SPPs for microstructure stability enhancements. A preparative route is being investigated that does not require mechanical alloying, and 10 nanometer molybdenum particles have been prepared which are part of the nanoscale precursors. If successful, the approach has implications for long term dry storage of used fuel and for new routes to nanoferritic and ODS alloys.

Robert D. Mariani; James I. Cole; Assel Aitkaliyeva

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

ALUMINUM HYDRIDE, A1H3, AS A HYDROGEN STORAGE COMPOUND.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aluminum hydride is a covalent, binary hydride that has been known for more than 60 years and is an attractive medium for on-board automotive hydrogen storage, since it contains 10.1% by wt. hydrogen with a density of 1.48 g/ml. There are at least 7 non-solvated AlH{sub 3} phases, namely {alpha}, {alpha}{prime}, {beta}, {gamma}, {var_epsilon} and {zeta}. The properties of {alpha}-AlH{sub 3}, obtained from the Dow Chemical Co. in 1980, have been previously reported. Here we present a description of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of freshly prepared {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} phases of AlH{sub 3}. In all cases the decomposition kinetics are appreciable below 100 C and all will meet the DOE 2010 gravimetric and volumetric vehicular system targets (6 wt% H{sub 2} and 0.045 kg/L). However, further research will be required to develop an efficient and economical process to regenerate AlH{sub 3} from the spent Al powder.

GRAETZ, J.; REILLY, J.; SANDROCK, G.; JOHNSON, J.; ZHOU, W.M.; WEGRZYN, J.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

497

Hydride transfer made easy in the oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by choline oxidase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Choline oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.17) catalyzes the two-step, four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as enzyme-associated intermediate and molecular oxygen as final electron acceptor (Scheme 1). The gem-diol, hydrated species of the aldehyde intermediate of the reaction acts as substrate for aldehyde oxidation, suggesting that the enzyme may use similar strategies for the oxidation of the alcohol substrate and aldehyde intermediate. The determination of the chemical mechanism for alcohol oxidation has emerged from biochemical, mechanistic, mutagenetic, and structural studies. As illustrated in the mechanism of Scheme 2, the alcohol substrate is initially activated in the active site of the enzyme by removal of the hydroxyl proton. The resulting alkoxide intermediate is then stabilized in the enzyme-substrate complex via electrostatic interactions with active site amino acid residues. Alcohol oxidation then occurs quantum mechanically via the transfer of the hydride ion from the activated substrate to the N(5) flavin locus. An essential requisite for this mechanism of alcohol oxidation is the high degree of preorganization of the activated enzyme-substrate complex, which is achieved through an internal equilibrium of the Michaelis complex occurring prior to, and independently from, the subsequent hydride transfer reaction. The experimental evidence that support the mechanism for alcohol oxidation shown in Scheme 2 is briefly summarized in the Results and Discussion section.

Gadda, G.; Orville, A.; Pennati, A.; Francis, K.; Quaye, O.; Yuan, H.; Rungsrisuriyachai, K.; Finnegan, S.; Mijatovic, S.; Nguyen, T.

2008-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

498

First-Principles Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to complement experimental efforts of MHoCE partners by using state-of-the-art theory and modeling to study the structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. Specific goals include prediction of the heats of formation and other thermodynamic properties of alloys from first principles methods, identification of new alloys that can be tested experimentally, calculation of surface and energetic properties of nanoparticles, and calculation of kinetics involved with hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. Discovery of new metal hydrides with enhanced properties compared with existing materials is a critical need for the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. New materials discovery can be aided by the use of first principles (ab initio) computational modeling in two ways: (1) The properties, including mechanisms, of existing materials can be better elucidated through a combined modeling/experimental approach. (2) The thermodynamic properties of novel materials that have not been made can, in many cases, be quickly screened with ab initio methods. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to explore millions of possible reaction conditions consisting of different element spaces, compositions, and temperatures. We have identified potentially promising single- and multi-step reactions that can be explored experimentally.

J. Karl Johnson

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

499

THE EFFECT OF 3HE ON LOW PRESSURE HYDRIDE ABSORPTION MEASUREMENTS WITH TRITIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Absorption isotherm data exists for a wide variety of hydrogen-metal systems. When working with high purity gases, appropriately sized equipment, and hydrides with equilibrium pressures above several hundred Pa, data collection is relatively straightforward. Special consideration must be given to experiments involving low equilibrium pressure hydrides, as even sub-ppm levels of gas impurities can generate partial pressures many times greater than the equilibrium pressures to be measured. Tritium absorption experiments are further complicated by the continuous generation of helium-3. The time required to transfer and absorb a known quantity of tritium onto a sample ultimately limits the minimum pressure range that can be studied using the standard technique. Equations are presented which show the pressure of helium-3 in a sample cell based on the amount of tritium to be absorbed, the sample cell volume and temperature, and the decay time of tritium. Sample calculations for zirconium show that at 300 C, the estimated helium-3 pressure in the cell will be equal to the hydrogen absorption pressure after only milliseconds of tritium decay. An alternate method is presented that permits the collection of equilibrium data at pressures orders of magnitude lower than possible using a direct approach.

Staack, G.; Klein, J.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z