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Sample records for niagara mohawk pwr

  1. Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Niagara Mohawk’s Standard Offer Tariff * Richard N. BoisvertRTP the retail standard offer would create opportunities forHowever, some retailers did offer service indexed to the SC-

  2. Review of integrated resource bidding at Niagara Mohawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Stoft, S.S.; Cohen, S.

    1992-05-01

    In June 1988, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered the state`s investor-owned utilities to develop competitive bidding programs that included both supply and demandside resource options. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy`s Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the integrated bidding processes of two New York utilities, Niagara Mohawk and Consolidated Edison. This interim report focuses on Niagara Mohawk (NMPC). In terms of overall approach, our analysis is intended as a critical review of a large-scale experiment in competitive resource acquisition implemented by New York utilities at the direction of their state regulators. The study is not a formal impact or process evaluation. Based on priorities established jointly with project sponsors, the report focuses on selected topics: analysis of the two-stage scoring system used by NMPC, ways that the scoring system can be improved, an in-depth review of the DSM bidding component of the solicitation including surveys of DSM bidders, relationship between DSM bidding and other utility-sponsored DSM programs, and major policy issues that arise in the design and implementation of competitive resource procurements. The major findings of this report are: NMPC`s solicitation elicited an impressive response from private power developers and energy service companies. In the initial ranking of bids, DSM projects were awarded significantly more points on price and environmental factors compared to supply-side bids. NMPC`s scoring system gave approximately twice as much weight nominally to price as to non-price factors (850 vs. 460 points).

  3. Review of integrated resource bidding at Niagara Mohawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Busch, J.F.; Kahn, E.P.; Stoft, S.S.; Cohen, S.

    1992-05-01

    In June 1988, the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) ordered the state's investor-owned utilities to develop competitive bidding programs that included both supply and demandside resource options. The New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York Department of Public Service, and the Department of Energy's Integrated Resource Planning program asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to review the integrated bidding processes of two New York utilities, Niagara Mohawk and Consolidated Edison. This interim report focuses on Niagara Mohawk (NMPC). In terms of overall approach, our analysis is intended as a critical review of a large-scale experiment in competitive resource acquisition implemented by New York utilities at the direction of their state regulators. The study is not a formal impact or process evaluation. Based on priorities established jointly with project sponsors, the report focuses on selected topics: analysis of the two-stage scoring system used by NMPC, ways that the scoring system can be improved, an in-depth review of the DSM bidding component of the solicitation including surveys of DSM bidders, relationship between DSM bidding and other utility-sponsored DSM programs, and major policy issues that arise in the design and implementation of competitive resource procurements. The major findings of this report are: NMPC's solicitation elicited an impressive response from private power developers and energy service companies. In the initial ranking of bids, DSM projects were awarded significantly more points on price and environmental factors compared to supply-side bids. NMPC's scoring system gave approximately twice as much weight nominally to price as to non-price factors (850 vs. 460 points).

  4. PP-190 Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926Families |DepartmentpermitPresidential permit authorizing

  5. SOXAL{trademark} pilot plant demonstration at Niagara Mohawk`s Dunkirk Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strangway, P.K. [Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 made it necessary to accelerate the development of scrubber systems for use by some utilities burning sulfur-containing fuels, primarily coal. While many types of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems operate based on lime and limestone scrubbing, these systems have drawbacks when considered for incorporation into long-term emissions control plans. Although the costs associated with disposal of large amounts of scrubber sludge may be manageable today, the trend is toward increased disposal costs. Many new SO{sub 2} control technologies are being pursued in the hope of developing an economical regenerable FGD system did recovers the SO{sub 2} as a saleable commercial product, thus minimizing the formation of disposal waste. Some new technologies include the use of exotic chemical absorbents which are alien to the utility industry and utilities` waste treatment facilities. These systems present utilities with new environmental issues. The SOXAL{trademark} process has been developed so as to eliminate such issues.

  6. Mohawk Municipal Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH JumpLLCMohave Electric Cooperative, IncMohawk

  7. Customer Response to RTP in Competitive Markets: A Study of Niagara Mohawk's Standard Offer Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Richard N.; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie; Hopper, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    for large end users in retail markets with customer choicecompetitive and regulated retail markets. To address thesenewly established retail market. Option Two was comprised of

  8. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 documentation. #12;This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report i Battelle

  9. Wellton-Mohawk Irr & Drain Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)Vossloh KiepeWebel Micro PowerRuralWellton-Mohawk

  10. EIS-0153: Niagara Import Point Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of the proposed Niagara Import Point project that would construct an interstate natural gas pipeline to transport gas from Canada and domestic sources to the Northeastern United States market. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy was a cooperating agency during statement development and adopted this statement on 6/15/1990.

  11. Niagara Falls Storage Site Vicinity Properties in Lewiston, New York,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNew York, NewNiagara

  12. MHK Projects/Niagara Community | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf|Myette PointMadridNiagara

  13. Assessing environmental exposure to PCBs among Mohawks at Akwesasne through the use of geostatistical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, S.; Fitzgerald, E.F.; Cayo, M.; Yang, B.Z. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology] [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology; Tarbell, A.; Jacobs, A. [Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (United States). Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment] [Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (United States). Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment

    1999-02-01

    The Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne is a Native American community located along the St. Lawrence River in New York State, Ontario, and Quebec. One component of a multiphase human health study was to assess the impact of different pathways of human exposure resulting from the off-site migration of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in this area. This paper illustrates how mapped residential information and environmental sampling data can be united to assist in exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies using geographic information system (GIS) technology and statistical methods. A proportional sampling scheme was developed to collect 119 surface soils. Using a method of cross validation, the average estimated error can be computed and the best estimator can be selected. Seven spatial methods were examined to estimate surface soil PCB concentrations; the lowest relative mean error was 0.42% for Inverse 3 nearest neighbor weighted according to the inverse distance, and the highest relative mean error was 4.4% for Voronoi polygons. Residual plots indicated that all methods performed well except near some of the sampling points that formed the outer boundaries of the sampling distribution.

  14. Local fish consumption and serum PCB concentrations among Mohawk men at Akwesasne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, E.F.; Deres, D.A.; Hwang, S.A.; Bush, B.; Yang, B. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States)] [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States); Tarbell, A.; Jacobs, A. [Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (United States). Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment] [Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (United States). Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment

    1999-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess local fish consumption patterns and their relationship to concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the serum of Mohawk men residing near three hazardous waste sites. From 1992 to 1995, 139 men were interviewed and donated a 20-ml venous blood sample. The results indicated that the men ate a mean of 21.2 local fish meals during the past year, compared with annual means of 27.7 meals 1--2 years before and 88.6 meals more than 2 years before. This change is probably a consequence of advisories issued against the consumption of local fish, since 97% of the mean were aware of the advisories and two-third had changed their behavior as a result. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum PCB levels increased with age and local fish consumption. The data suggest that local fish consumption has contributed to body burdens in this population and that the advisories have been effective in modifying local fish consumption habits.

  15. The Niagara Internet Query System Jeffrey Naughton, David DeWitt, David Maier, Ashraf Aboulnaga, Jianjun Chen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Niagara Internet Query System Jeffrey Naughton, David DeWitt, David Maier, Ashraf Aboulnaga, merely being an XML query-processing engine does not render a system suitable for querying the Internet, or are infinite streams, or both. The Niagara Internet Query System was designed from the bottom-up to provide

  16. American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to:Hempstead Biomass Facility Jump to:Niagara

  17. EIS-0109: Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of several alternatives for management and control of the radioactive wastes and residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, including a no action alternative, an alternative to manage wastes on site, and two off-site management alternatives.

  18. Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Lewiston, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1981, was continued during 1989 at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, that is currently used for interim storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils, and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at NFSS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure equivalent to approximately 2 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during a one-way flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1989 monitoring show that NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 18 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Reflexives in Mohawk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonvillain, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    –yutat- she, one:her, one. ‘Semo-reflexive’ –at- has some reflexive functions. It can also mark middle voice and detransitivized states or processes. Additional uses of –at- are exemplified. The paper concludes with discussion of comparative data...

  20. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.K. Scheider

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in-terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 1 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  1. Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring, a summary of the results, and the estimated dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. NFSS is in compliance with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) Subpart H of the Clean Air Act as well as the requirements of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) under the Clean Water Act. Located in northwestern New York, the site covers 191 acres. From 1944 to the present, the primary use of NFSS has been storage of radioactive residues that were by-products of uranium production. Most onsite areas of residual radioactivity above regulatory guidelines were remediated during the early 1980s. Additional isolated areas of onsite contamination were remediated in 1989, and the materials were consolidated into the waste containment structure in 1991. Remediation of the site has now been completed.

  2. Environmental monitoring plan for the Niagara Falls Storage Site and the Interim Waste Containment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Surplus Facility Management Program (SFMP), the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) is undergoing remedial action. Vicinity properties adjacent to and near the site are being cleaned up as part of DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These programs are a DOE effort to clean up low-level radioactive waste resulting from the early days of the nation's atomic energy program. Radioactively contaminated waste from these remedial action activities are being stored at the NFSS in an interim waste containment facility (IWCF). When the remedial actions and IWCF are completed in 1986, activities at the site will be limited to waste management. The monitoring program was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5484.1 and is designed to determine the contribution of radioactivity from the site to the environs and to demonstrate compliance with applicable criteria. Major elements of this program will also supplement other monitoring requirements including the performance monitoring system for the IWCF and the closure/post-closure plan. Emphasis will be directed toward the sampling and analysis of groundwater, surface water, air and sediment for parameters which are known to be present in the material stored at the site. The monitoring program will employ a phased approach whereby the first 5 years of data will be evaluated, and the program will be reviewed and modified as necessary. 17 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Improving fuel-rod performance. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocken, H.; Knott, S.

    1981-03-01

    To reduce the risk of fuel-rod failures, utilities operate their nuclear reactors within conservative limits on power increases proposed by nuclear-fuel vendors. Of particular concern to US utilities is that adopting these limits results in an industrywide average plant capacity loss of 3% in BWR designs and 0.3% in PWR designs. To replace lost BWR capacity by other generating means currently costs the utilities $150 million annually, and losses for PWRs are about $20 million. Efforts are therefore being made to identify the factors responsible for Zircaloy degradation under PCI condition and to improve nuclear-fuel-rod design and reactor operation.

  4. Droplet generation during core reflood. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section.

  5. The graphs at right show overall variability distribution estimated for the Pentium D 800 series (near) and the T1 Niagara (far) using the FPGA data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renau, Jose

    RESULTS The graphs at right show overall variability distribution estimated for the Pentium D 800 where a core no longer works properly. In the Sun T1 Niagara cores this is done with a built-in- self processors we record the temperature at which the failure occurred and adjust to the frequencies

  6. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Fuel cycle optimization of thorium and uranium fueled PWR systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garel, Keith Courtnay

    1977-01-01

    The burnup neutronics of uniform PWR lattices are examined with respect to reduction of uranium ore requirements with an emphasis on variation of the fuel-to-moderator ratio

  8. PWR representative behavior during a LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    To date, there has been substantial analytical and experimental effort to define the margins between design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior and regulatory limits on maximum fuel rod cladding temperature and deformation. As a result, there is extensive documentation on the modeling of fuel rod behavior in test reactors and design basis LOCA's. However, modeling of that behavior using representative, non-conservative, operating histories is not nearly as well documented in the public literature. Therefore, the objective of this paper is (a) to present calculations of LOCA induced behavior for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core representative fuel rods, and (b) to discuss the variability in those calculations given the variability in fuel rod condition at the initiation of the LOCA. This analysis was limited to the study of changes in fuel rod behavior due to different power operating histories. The other two important parameters which affect that behavior, initial fuel rod design and LOCA coolant conditions were held invarient for all of the representative rods analyzed.

  9. RIS-M-2264 CONSTRUCTION OF PWR NUCLEAR CROSS SECTIONS FOR TRANSIENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2264 CONSTRUCTION OF PWR NUCLEAR CROSS SECTIONS FOR TRANSIENT CALCULATIONS. TEST OF THE ANTI recent Westinghouse designs, representing two different PWR reactor cores, are calculated as functions oi; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; COUPLING CONSTANTS; CROSS SECTIONS; POWER DISTRIBUTION; PWR TYPE REACTORS

  10. A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Michel

    A Comparison Between Model Reduction and Controller Reduction: Application to a PWR Nuclear Planty model reduction with controller reduction for the same PWR system. We show that closed-loop techniques to the design of a low-order con- troller for a realistic model of order 42 of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

  11. Ris-M-2209 THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL PWR TRANSIENT CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-M-2209 THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL PWR TRANSIENT CODE ANTI; ROD EJECTION TEST CALCULATION A neutronics and thermal-hydraulics descrip- tion of a PWR core under transient conditions. In this report and with closed hydraulic channels. INIS descriptors. A CODES, CONTROL ELEMENTS, HYDRAULICS, PWR TYPE REACTORS

  12. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design burnup. Using peaking factors commensurate with actual burnups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document provides appendices K and L of this report which provide plots for the timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures for Oconee and Seabrook respectively.

  13. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-01

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  14. Niagara falls storage site: Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar Year 1988: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 17 refs., 31 figs., 20 tabs.

  15. Effects of Burnable Absorbers on PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.M. O'Leary; Dr. M.L. Pitts

    2000-08-21

    Burnup credit is an ongoing issue in designing and licensing transportation and storage casks for spent nuclear fuel (SNF). To address this issue, in July 1999, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Spent Fuel Project Office, issued Interim Staff Guidance-8 (ISG-8), Revision 1 allowing limited burnup credit for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in transport and storage casks. However, one of the key limitations for a licensing basis analysis as stipulated in ISG-8, Revision 1 is that ''burnup credit is restricted to intact fuel assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers''. Because many PWR fuel designs have incorporated burnable-absorber rods for more than twenty years, this restriction places an unnecessary burden on the commercial nuclear power industry. This paper summarizes the effects of in-reactor irradiation on the isotopic inventory of PWR fuels containing different types of integral burnable absorbers (BAs). The work presented is illustrative and intended to represent typical magnitudes of the reactivity effects from depleting PWR fuel with different types of burnable absorbers.

  16. Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with steam line, turbine and condenser, interconnected with pumps, valves and controllers. The model canRis9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant for Process Control and Diagnosis Finn Ravnsbjerg ^N> for Process Control and Diagnosis Finn Ravnsbjerg Nielsen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

  17. Analysis of PWR RCS Injection Strategy During Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.-J. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, K.-S. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China); Chiang, S.-C. [Taiwan Power Company, Taiwan (China)

    2004-05-15

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) injection is an important strategy for severe accident management of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Maanshan is a typical Westinghouse PWR nuclear power plant (NPP) with large, dry containment. The severe accident management guideline (SAMG) of Maanshan NPP is developed based on the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) SAMG.The purpose of this work is to analyze the RCS injection strategy of PWR system in an overheated core condition. Power is assumed recovered as the vessel water level drops to the bottom of active fuel. The Modular Accident Analysis Program version 4.0.4 (MAAP4) code is chosen as a tool for analysis. A postulated station blackout sequence for Maanshan NPP is cited as a reference case for this analysis. The hot leg creep rupture occurs during the mitigation action with immediate injection after power recovery according to WOG SAMG, which is not desired. This phenomenon is not considered while developing the WOG SAMG. Two other RCS injection methods are analyzed by using MAAP4. The RCS injection strategy is modified in the Maanshan SAMG. These results can be applied for typical PWR NPPs.

  18. Chemical behavior of fission products in the ORNL fission product release program. Supplement. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, J.L.; Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Tests data are presented for BWR and PWR rods in test HI-4 and test HI-5. Operating conditions fission product release data are included.

  19. ACHILLES: Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    1. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA LIBRARY ACHILLES -Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase. 2. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAMS N/A 3. CONTRIBUTOR AEA Technology, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester DT2 8DH United Kingdom through the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. 4. DESCRIPTION OF TEST FACILITY The most important features of the Achilles rig were the shroud vessel, which contained the test section, and the downcomer. These may be thought of as representing the core barrel and the annular downcomer in the reactor pressure vessel. The test section comprises a cluster of 69 rods in a square array within a circular shroud vessel. The rod diameter and pitch (9.5 mm and 12.6 mm) were typical of PWR dimensions. The internal diameter of the shroud vessel was 128 mm. Each rod was electrically heated over a length of 3.66 m, which is typical of the nuclear heated length in a PWR fuel rod, and each contained 6 internal thermocouples. These were arranged in one of 8 groupings which concentrated the thermocouples in different axial zones. The spacer grids were at prototypic PWR locations. Each grid had two thermocouples attached to its trailing edge at radial locations. The axial power profile along the rods was an 11 step approximation to a "chopped cosine". The shroud vessel had 5 heating zones whose power could be independently controlled. 5. DESCRIPTION OF TESTS The Achilles experiments investigated the heat transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor during the re-flood phase of a postulated large break loss of coolant accident. The results provided data to validate codes and to improve modeling. Different types of experiments were carried out which included single phase cooling, re-flood under low flow conditions, level swell and re-flood under high flow conditions. Three series of experiments were performed. The first and the third used the same test section but the second used another test section, similar in all respects except that it contained a partial blockage formed by attaching sleeves (or "balloons") to some of the rods. 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA Phenomena Tested - Heat transfer in the core of a PWR during a re-flood phase of postulated large break LOCA. Test Designation - Achilles Rig. The programme includes the following types of experiments: - on an unballooned cluster: -- single phase air flow -- low pressure level swell -- low flooding rate re-flood -- high flooding rate re-flood - on a ballooned cluster containing 80% blockage formed by 16 balloon sleeves -- single phase air flow -- low flooding rate re-flood 7. DISCUSSION OF THE DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAM N/A 8. DATA FORMAT AND COMPUTER Many Computers (M00019MNYCP00). 9. TYPICAL RUNNING TIME N/A 11. CONTENTS OF LIBRARY The ACHILLES package contains test data and associated data processing software as well as the documentation listed above. 12. DATE OF ABSTRACT November 2013. KEYWORDS: DATABASES, BENCHMARKS, HEAT TRANSFER, LOSS-OF-COLLANT ACCIDENT, PWR REACTORS, REFLOODING

  20. CASL - PWR Reactor Vessel Multi-Physics CFD Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransenBusinessInitial Validation and BenchmarkPWR Reactor

  1. Grand Valley Rrl Pwr Line, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia: EnergyGorlitzLedge, Michigan:River, Ohio: EnergyPwr

  2. Michigan South Central Pwr Agy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO is developedShores,Ethanol LLC Jump to:Pwr Agy

  3. East Mississippi Elec Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG|Elec Pwr Assn Jump to:

  4. East River Elec Pwr Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG|Elec Pwr Assn Jump to:River

  5. Northeast Missouri El Pwr Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishi ElectricElecCompany LLC JumpPwr Coop

  6. Pearl River Valley El Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Twin County Electric Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson ElectricTurquoiseCounty Electric Pwr Assn

  8. Vermont Public Pwr Supply Auth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZUtility RatesComercio eVercipiaVermillion,Pwr

  9. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel rods. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzarolli, F.; Jung, W.; Schoenfeld, H.; Garde, A.M.; Parry, G.W.; Smerd, P.G.

    1982-12-01

    There is an economic incentive to extend average fuel-rod-discharge burnup to about 50 GWd/t. For these higher burnups it is necessary to know if increased waterside corrosion of the cladding will influence fuel-rod performance. For this reason, EPRI sponsored a joint program with C-E and KWU with the objective of investigating PWR waterside corrosion. This final report presents and discusses the results of various subtasks that comprised this project. In the review of corrosion data and models in the literature it was concluded that the PWR environment enhances the corrosion rate by about three times that expected from ex-reactor tests. A large number of fuel rods were characterized in both spent-fuel-pool and hot-cell campaigns. Chemical, physical and microstructural attributes of irradiated and unirradiated oxide films were measured. These included determinations of chemical composition, crystal structure, microstructure, density, specific heat, thermal conductivity, and post-irradiation autoclave corrosion behavior. Procedures used to calculate the fuel-rod surface temperature were reviewed. A model has been developed to predict in-reactor corrosion behavior.

  10. Westinghouse VANTAGE+ fuel assembly to meet future PWR operating requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doshi, P.K.; Chapin, D.L.; Scherpereel, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Many utilities operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are implementing longer reload cycles. Westinghouse is addressing this trend with fuel products that increase fuel utilization through higher discharge burnups. Higher burnup helps to offset added enriched uranium costs necessary to enable the higher energy output of longer cycles. Current fuel products have burnup capabilities in the area of 40,000 MWd/tonne U or more. There are three main phenomena that must be addressed to achieve even higher burnup levels: accelerated cladding, waterside corrosion, and hydriding; increased fission gas production; and fuel rod growth. Long cycle lengths also require efficient burnable absorbers to control the excess reactivity associated with increased fuel enrichment while maintaining a low residual absorber penalty at the end of cycle. Westinghouse VANTAGE + PWR fuel incorporates features intended to enhance fuel performance at very high burnups, including advances in the three basic elements of the fuel assembly: fuel cladding, fuel rod, and fuel assembly skeleton. ZIRLO {sup TM} cladding, an advanced Zircaloy cladding that contains niobium, offers a significant improvement in corrosion resistance relative to Zircaloy-4. Another important Westinghouse PWR fuel feature that facilitates long cycles is the zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorber (ZrB{sub 2}IFBA).

  11. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  12. TRANSPORT CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED PWR LOCA GENERATED DEBRIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. K. MAJI; B. MARSHALL; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    In the unlikely event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), break jet impingement would dislodge thermal insulation from nearby piping, as well as other materials within the containment, such as paint chips, concrete dust, and fire barrier materials. Steam/water flows induced by the break and by the containment sprays would transport debris to the containment floor. Subsequently, debris would likely transport to and accumulate on the suction sump screens of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) pumps, thereby potentially degrading ECCS performance and possibly even failing the ECCS. In 1998, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a generic study (Generic Safety Issue-191) to evaluate the potential for the accumulation of LOCA related debris on the PWR sump screen and the consequent loss of ECCS pump net positive suction head (NPSH). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), supporting the resolution of GSI-191, was tasked with developing a method for estimating debris transport in PWR containments to estimate the quantity of debris that would accumulate on the sump screen for use in plant specific evaluations. The analytical method proposed by LANL, to predict debris transport within the water that would accumulate on the containment floor, is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combined with experimental debris transport data to predict debris transport and accumulation on the screen. CFD simulations of actual plant containment designs would provide flow data for a postulated accident in that plant, e.g., three-dimensional patterns of flow velocities and flow turbulence. Small-scale experiments would determine parameters defining the debris transport characteristics for each type of debris. The containment floor transport methodology will merge debris transport characteristics with CFD results to provide a reasonable and conservative estimate of debris transport within the containment floor pool and subsequent accumulation of debris on the sump screen. The complete methodology will, of course, include a means of estimating debris generation, transport to the containment floor, transport to the sump screen, and the resulting loss of NPSH.

  13. PWR loss of feedwater ATWS: analysis and sensitivity study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shier, W.G.; Lu, M.S.; Levine, M.M.; Diamond, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The incident at the Salem Nuclear plant has presented a renewed interest in the analysis of the consequences of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS). This paper presents the results of an analysis of a complete loss of feedwater ATWS for a typical 4-loop PWR. The loss of feedwater transient was selected since previous analyses have shown that this transient produces one of the more limiting overpressure conditions in the primary system. These results provide a detailed analysis of this transient using current analytical techniques and show the sensitivity to several important parameters and plant modeling techniques. The RELAP5/MOD1 computer code has been used for this analysis. The code version is designated as Cycle 13 with additional modifications provided by both INEL and BNL.

  14. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, T. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  15. Study of a Station Blackout Event in the PWR Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching-Hui Wu; Tsu-Jen Lin; Tsu-Mu Kao [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    On March 18, 2001, a PWR nuclear power plant located in the Southern Taiwan occurred a Station Blackout (SBO) event. Monsoon seawater mist caused the instability of offsite power grids. High salt-contained mist caused offsite power supply to the nuclear power plant very unstable, and forced the plant to be shutdown. Around 24 hours later, when both units in the plant were shutdown, several inadequate high cycles of bus transfer between 345 kV and 161 kV startup transformers degraded the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears. Then, in the Train-A switchgear room of Unit 1 occurred a fire explosion, when the degraded switchgear was hot shorted at the in-coming 345 kV breaker. Inadequate configuration arrangement of the offsite power supply to the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears led to loss of offsite power (LOOP) events to both units in the plant. Both emergency diesel generators (EDG) of Unit 1 could not be in service in time, but those of Unit 2 were running well. The SBO event of Unit 1 lasted for about two hours till the fifth EDG (DG-5) was lined-up to the Train-B switchgear. This study investigated the scenario of the SBO event and evaluated a risk profile for the SBO period. Guidelines in the SBO event, suggested by probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) procedures were also reviewed. Many related topics such as the re-configuration of offsite power supply, the addition of isolation breakers of the emergency 4.16 kV switchgears, the betterment of DG-5 lineup design, and enhancement of the reliability of offsite power supply to the PWR plant, etc., will be in further studies. (authors)

  16. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Materials Samples: Material Certification, Fluence, and Temperature (Nonproprietary Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Krug; R. Shogan; A. Fero; M. Snyder

    2004-11-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs require detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel. This report contains basic material characterization information of the as-installed samples of reactor internals material which were harvested from a decommissioned PWR.

  17. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukelow, J S [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harrison, D G [Jason Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morgenstern, M [Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents.

  18. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Krug, R.Shogan

    2004-09-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR.

  19. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Lewiston, New York: Annual site environmental report, Calendar year 1987: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1987 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 13 refs., 10 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Assessment of PWR waterside corrosion models and data. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.

    1985-10-01

    The published data on waterside corrosion of PWR fuel cladding and unfuelled components have been reviewed, and the models used to assess the data have been studied. All corrosion models use too simplified a view of the corrosion process to obtain other than a general trend for the actual oxidation data. The in-reactor post-transition oxidation of the Zircaloys appears to be heavily dependent on water chemistry variations both between reactors, and along the length of an individual fuel rod. Crud deposition may be one primary cause of this, perhaps by allowing the independent development of the water chemistry within the crud layer, as much as by its effect on cladding surface temperatures. However, the effect of the thickening of the oxide film, which permits the development of an independent water chemistry inside the oxide, leading to an accelerating oxidation rate at large oxide thicknesses, seems to be the most important factor. It is concluded that a spectrum of results ranging from essentially no in-reactor enhancement of the oxidation rate to a sizeable enhancement (>10) may be seen depending upon the thickness of the oxide films, the water chemistry of the reactor, and crud deposition. A post-irradiation test that may help to distinguish between the factors involved has been suggested. 105 refs., 38 figs.

  1. Analysis of Potential Hydrogen Risk in the PWR Containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Jian; Xuewu Cao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)

    2006-07-01

    Various studies have shown that hydrogen combustion is one of major risk contributors to threaten the integrity of the containment in a nuclear power plant. That hydrogen risk should be considered in severe accident strategies in current and future NPPs has been emphasized in the latest policies issued by the National Nuclear Safety Administration of China (NNSA). According to a deterministic approach, three typical severe accident sequences for a PWR large dry containment, such as the large break loss-of-coolant (LLOCA), the station blackout (SBO), and the small break loss-of-coolant (SLOCA) are analyzed in this paper with MELCOR code. Hydrogen concentrations in different compartments are observed to evaluate the potential hydrogen risk. The results show that there is a great amount of hydrogen released into the containment, which causes the containment pressure to increase and some potential in-consecutive burning. Therefore, certain hydrogen management strategies should be considered to reduce the risk to threaten the containment integrity. (authors)

  2. PWR FLECHT SEASET unblocked bundle, forced and gravity reflood task data report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Conway, C.E.; Dodge, C.E.; Tong, A.; Rosal, E.R.; Valkovic, M.M.; Wong, S.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents data from the Unblocked Bundle, Forced and Gravity Reflood Task of the Full-Length Emergency Core Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Tests (FLECHT SEASET) program. The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflood experiments and steam cooling tests, using electrical heater rods to simulate current nuclear fuel arrays (similar to Westinghouse 17 x 17 assemblies) of PWR and PWR fuel vendors. Data obtained include rod clad temperatures, turnaround and quench times, heat transfer coefficients, inlet flooding rates, overall mass balance, differential pressures and calculated void fractions in the test section, thimble wall and steam temperatures, and exhaust steam and liquid carryover rates.

  3. PWR FLECHT SEASET unblocked bundle, forced and gravity reflood task data report. Volume 2. Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Conway, C.E.; Dodge, C.E.; Tong, A.; Rosal, E.R.; Valkovic, M.M.; Wong, S.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents data from the Unblocked Bundle, Forced and Gravity Reflood Task of the Full-Length Emergency Core Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Tests (FLECHT SEASET) program. The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflood experiments and steam cooling tests, using electrical heater rods to simulate current nuclear fuel arrays (similar to Westinghouse 17 x 17 assemblies) of PWR and PWR fuel vendors. Data obtained include rod clad temperatures, turnaround and quench times, heat transfer coefficients, inlet flooding rates, overall mass balance, differential pressures and calculated void fractions in the test section, thimble wall and steam temperatures, and exhaust steam and liquid carryover rates.

  4. In-core and ex-core calculations of the VENUS simulated PWR benchmark experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.L.; Chowdhury, P.; Landesman, M.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The VENUS PWR engineering mockup experiment was established to simulate a beginning-of-life, generic PWR configuration at the zero-power VENUS critical facility located at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium. The experimental measurement program consists of (1) gamma scans to determine the core power distribution, (2) in-core and ex-core foil activations, (3) neutron spectrometer measurements, and (4) gamma heating measurements with TLD's. Analysis of the VENUS benchmark has been performed with two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory, using the DOT-IV code.

  5. UNDERSTANDING OF HYDRIDING MECHANISMS OF ZIRCALOY-4 ALLOY DURING CORROSION IN PWR SIMULATED CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    1 UNDERSTANDING OF HYDRIDING MECHANISMS OF ZIRCALOY-4 ALLOY DURING CORROSION IN PWR SIMULATED CONDITIONS AND INFLUENCE OF ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDES ON ZIRCALOY-4 CORROSION C. BISOR-MELLOUL, M. TUPIN, P. BOSSIS-sur-Yvette ­ France A. MOTTA Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Penn State University 227 Reber Building

  6. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures.

  7. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented.

  8. Performance evaluation of two-stage fuel cycle from SFR to PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, T.; Hoffman, E.A.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Nuclear Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01

    One potential fuel cycle option being considered is a two-stage fuel cycle system involving the continuous recycle of transuranics in a fast reactor and the use of bred plutonium in a thermal reactor. The first stage is a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel cycle with metallic U-TRU-Zr fuel. The SFRs need to have a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 in order to produce fissile material for use in the second stage. The second stage is a PWR fuel cycle with uranium and plutonium mixed oxide fuel based on the design and performance of the current state-of-the-art commercial PWRs with an average discharge burnup of 50 MWd/kgHM. This paper evaluates the possibility of this fuel cycle option and discusses its fuel cycle performance characteristics. The study focuses on an equilibrium stage of the fuel cycle. Results indicate that, in order to avoid a positive coolant void reactivity feedback in the stage-2 PWR, the reactor requires high quality of plutonium from the first stage and minor actinides in the discharge fuel of the PWR needs to be separated and sent back to the stage-1 SFR. The electricity-sharing ratio between the 2 stages is 87.0% (SFR) to 13.0% (PWR) for a TRU inventory ratio (the mass of TRU in the discharge fuel divided by the mass of TRU in the fresh fuel) of 1.06. A sensitivity study indicated that by increasing the TRU inventory ratio to 1.13, The electricity generation fraction of stage-2 PWR is increased to 28.9%. The two-stage fuel cycle system considered in this study was found to provide a high uranium utilization (>80%). (authors)

  9. TITAN code development for application to a PWR steam line break accident : final report 1983-1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chon-Kwo

    1984-01-01

    Modification of the TITAN computer code which enables it to be applied to a PWR steam line break accident has been accomplished. The code now has the capability of simulating an asymmetric inlet coolant temperature transient ...

  10. Transient thermal analysis of PWR’s by a single-pass procedure using a simplified nodal layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jack S. H.

    1979-01-01

    PWR accident conditions and analysis methods have been reviewed. Limitations of the simplified method with respect to analysis of these accident conditions are drawn and two transients ( loss of coolant flow, seized rotor) ...

  11. DOSE RATES FOR WESTINGHOUSE 17X17 MOX PWR SNF IN A WASTE PACKAGE (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.L. Lotz

    1997-01-29

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to estimate the dose rate on and near the surface a Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) PWR waste package (WP) which is loaded with Westinghouse 17 x 17 mixed oxide (MOX) PWR fuel. The 21 PWR MPC WP is used to provide an upper bound for waste package designs since the 12 PWR MPC WP will have a smaller source term and an equivalent amount of shielding. the objectives of this evaluation are to calculate the requested dose rate(s) and document the calculation in a fashion to allow comparisons to other waste forms and WP designs at a future time.

  12. Safety analysis of B and W Standard PWR using thorium-based fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uotinen, V.O.; Carroll, W.P.; Jones, H.M.; Toops, E.C.

    1980-06-01

    A study was performed to assess the safety and licenseability of the Babcock and Wilcox standard 205-fuel assembly PWR when it is fueled with three types of thoria-based fuels denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, denatured (/sup 235//U/sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, and (Th-Pu)O/sub 2/. Selected transients were analyzed using typical PWR safety analysis calculational methods. The results support the conclusion that it is feasible from a safety standpoint to utilize either of the denatured urania-thoria fuels in the standard B and W plant. In addition, it appears that the use of thoria-plutonia fuels would probably also be feasible. These tentative conclusions depend on a data that is more limited than that available for UO/sub 2/ fuels.

  13. An Empirical Approach to Bounding the Axial Reactivity Effects of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. M. O'Leary; J. M. Scaglione

    2001-04-04

    One of the significant issues yet to be resolved for using burnup credit (BUC) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters (such as local power, fuel temperature, moderator temperature, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration) affect the isotopic inventory of fuel that is depleted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). However, obtaining the detailed operating histories needed to model all PWR fuel assemblies to which BUC would be applied is an onerous and costly task. Simplifications therefore have been suggested that could lead to using ''bounding'' depletion parameters that could be broadly applied to different fuel assemblies. This paper presents a method for determining a set of bounding depletion parameters for use in criticality analyses for SNF.

  14. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  15. PCI-related cladding failures during off-normal events - draft. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Houten, R.; Tokar, M.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1984-05-01

    Pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) has long been identified as a fuel rod failure mechanism during power increases in both pressurized and boiling water reactors, and commercial guidelines have practically eliminated such failures during standard operations. A question remains regarding the possible formation of through-wall cladding cracks during several types of postulated off-normal reactor events involving power increases. This report includes preliminary findings for reactor events of the type addressed by Chapter 15 of the NRC Standard Review Plan. Specifically, the BWR turbine trip without bypass, PWR control rod withdrawal error, subcritical PWR control rod withdrawal error, BWR control blade withdrawal error, and the PWR steamline break are analyzed on the joint bases of peak rod power, power increase, ramp rate, and duration at elevated power. These Chapter 15 events are compared to numerous test reactor results and to other relevant investigations, and tentative conclusions on transient severity and data base adequacy are presented. Progress in developing computer codes for predicting PCI-induced fuel rod failures is also discussed. 49 references.

  16. Analysis of a double-ended cold-leg break simulation: THTF Test 3. 05. 5B. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craddick, W.G.; Pevey, R.E.

    1982-09-01

    On July 3, 1980, an experiment was performed in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility that simulated a double-ended cold-leg break pressurized-water reactor (PWR) accident. Analysis of the experiment revealed that nuclear fuel rods exposed to the same hydrodynamic environment as that which existed in the experiment would have departed from nucleate boiling both earlier and later than the fuel rod simulator (FRS), depending on the size of the gap between the nuclear fuel pellets and cladding and on the initial power of the nuclear fuel rod. Comparison of the results of the current experiment, which used an FRS bundle with geometry similar to 17 x 17 PWR fuel assemblies, to the results of earlier experiments, which used an FRS bundle with geometry similar to 15 x 15 PWR fuel assemblies, revealed no differences that can be attributed to the difference in geometries.

  17. Importance of thermal nonequilibrium considerations for the simulation of nuclear reactor LOCA transients. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Nelson, R.A.; Sullivan, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of considering thermal nonequilibrium effects in computer simulations of the refill and reflood portions of pressurized water reactor (PWR) loss-of-coolnat accident (LOCA) transients. Although RELAP4 assumes thermodynamic equilibrium between phases, models that account for the nonequilibrium phenomena associated with the mixing of subcooled emergency cooling water with steam and the superheating of vapor in the presence of liquid droplets have recently been incorporated into the code. Code calculated results, both with and without these new models, have been compared with experimental test data to assess the importance of including thermal nonequilibrium phenomena in computer code simulations.

  18. Thermal Response of the 21-PWR Waste Package to a Fire Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.P. Faucher; H. Marr; M.J. Anderson

    2000-10-03

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal response of the 21-PWR WP (pressurized water reactor waste package) to the regulatory fire event. The scope of this calculation is limited to the two-dimensional waste package temperature calculations to support the waste package design. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation (Attachment IV) is that of the potential design of the type of waste package considered in this calculation. The procedure AP-3.12Q.Calculations (Reference 1), and the Development Plan (Reference 24) are used to develop this calculation.

  19. Application of LBB to high energy piping systems in operating PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C. [Westinghouse Nuclear Technology Division, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The amendment to General Design Criterion 4 allows exclusion, from the design basis, of dynamic effects associated with high energy pipe rupture by application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology. This new approach has resulted in substantial financial savings to utilities when applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary loop piping and auxiliary piping systems made of stainless steel material. To date majority of applications pertain to piping systems in operating plants. Various steps of evaluation associated with the LBB application to an operating plant are described in this paper.

  20. Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

  1. Study of a transient identification system using a neural network for a PWR plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishihara, Yoshinao; Kasai, Masao; Kambara, Masayuki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Mitsuda, Hiromichi; Kurata, Toshikazu; Shirosaki, Hidekazu [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., Kyoto (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper presents the procedure and results of a system for identifying PWR plant abnormal events, which uses neural network techniques. The neural network recognizes the abnormal event from the patterns of the transient changes of analog data from plant parameters when they deport from their normal state. For the identification of abnormal events in this study, events that cause a reactor to scram during power operation were selected as the design base events. The test data were prepared by simulating the transients on a compact PWR simulator. The simulation data were analyzed to determine how the plant parameters respond after the occurrence of a transient. A method of converting the pattern of the transient changes into characteristic parameters by fitting the data to pre-determined functions was developed. These characteristic parameters were used as the input data to the neural network. The neural network learning procedure used a generalized delta rule, namely a back-propagation algorithm. The neural network can identify the type of an abnormal event from a limited set of events by using these characteristic parameters obtained from the pattern of the changes in the analog data. From the results of this application of a neural network, it was concluded that it would be possible to use the method to identify abnormal events in a nuclear power plant.

  2. Validation of the new code package APOLLO2.8 for accurate PWR neutronics calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D.; Blaise, P.; Leconte, P.; Palau, J. M.; Roque, B.; Vaglio, C.; Vidal, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper summarizes the Qualification work performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the new APOLLO2.S/SHEM-MOC package based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file for the prediction of PWR neutronics parameters. This experimental validation is based on PWR mock-up critical experiments performed in the EOLE/MINERVE zero-power reactors and on P.I. Es on spent fuel assemblies from the French PWRs. The Calculation-Experiment comparison for the main design parameters is presented: reactivity of UOX and MOX lattices, depletion calculation and fuel inventory, reactivity loss with burnup, pin-by-pin power maps, Doppler coefficient, Moderator Temperature Coefficient, Void coefficient, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} poisoning worth, Efficiency of Ag-In-Cd and B4C control rods, Reflector Saving for both standard 2-cm baffle and GEN3 advanced thick SS reflector. From this qualification process, calculation biases and associated uncertainties are derived. This code package APOLLO2.8 is already implemented in the ARCADIA new AREVA calculation chain for core physics and is currently under implementation in the future neutronics package of the French utility Electricite de France. (authors)

  3. Non-Linear Dynamics Analysis of a PWR with Up-to-date Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riverola Gurruchaga, Javier [ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas S.A., Santiago Rusinol 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The Lyapunov stability theorems are applied to a simplified system of non-linear differential equations representative of a current 3 loop /12 feet contemporary PWR (Generation II) with up-to-date 17x17 lattice fuel design. The one-speed non-linear point kinetics model with six delayed neutron groups and lumped parameter heat transfer equations in the fuel rod and coolant along with a reactivity function with Doppler and moderator feedback effects is considered. First, local asymptotic stability is demonstrated at a variety of equilibrium state-points ranging from start-up to 150% nominal power. Then, a Lyapunov V function is found with the mathematical condition for sign definiteness and the stability region of attraction around the equilibrium HFP state is obtained. This study is complemented with the application of the Welton criterion for non linear kinetics and linear feedback in the frequency domain. As expected and consistently with Reactor Physics theory and experience, the strong asymptotic stable trend of a PWR is confirmed again for all analyzed conditions. This method is general and adaptable to other fuel assembly designs and reactor types. (authors)

  4. Application of the MELCOR code to design basis PWR large dry containment analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jesse; Notafrancesco, Allen (USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Rockville, MD); Tills, Jack Lee (Jack Tills & Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM)

    2009-05-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under USNRC sponsorship to provide capability for independently auditing analyses submitted by reactor manufactures and utilities. MELCOR is a fully integrated code (encompassing the reactor coolant system and the containment building) that models the progression of postulated accidents in light water reactor power plants. To assess the adequacy of containment thermal-hydraulic modeling incorporated in the MELCOR code for application to PWR large dry containments, several selected demonstration designs were analyzed. This report documents MELCOR code demonstration calculations performed for postulated design basis accident (DBA) analysis (LOCA and MSLB) inside containment, which are compared to other code results. The key processes when analyzing the containment loads inside PWR large dry containments are (1) expansion and transport of high mass/energy releases, (2) heat and mass transfer to structural passive heat sinks, and (3) containment pressure reduction due to engineered safety features. A code-to-code benchmarking for DBA events showed that MELCOR predictions of maximum containment loads were equivalent to similar predictions using a qualified containment code known as CONTAIN. This equivalency was found to apply for both single- and multi-cell containment models.

  5. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, O.W.

    1999-09-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotope) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, were considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation.

  6. Prototypical steam generator (MB-2) transient testing program. Task plan/scaling analysis report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, M.Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Mendler, O.J.; Hopkins, G.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the Westinghouse MB-2 model boiler test facility and the test program currently planned (with Westinghouse/EPRI/NRC funding) to investigate various types of possible accidents which might occur in a PWR steam generator. The planned tests will simulate loss of feedwater (LOF) transients, various steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) scenarios, and steamline breaks (SLB). The facility will be extensively modified to allow measurement of local wall and fluid temperatures, and to measure possible moisture carryover during the SLB and SGTR tests. This report is divided into six sections. The first three sections describe the facility and the new components and instrumentation to be installed. The next section is a detailed scaling analysis of MB-2. Section 5 describes the background and objectives of the tests, and section 6 describes the analysis of the data which if planned.

  7. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  8. Effect of coolant chemistry on PWR radiation transport processes. Progress report on reactor loop studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.J.; Flynn, G.; Haynes, J.W.; Kitt, G.P.; Large, N.R.; Lawson, D.; Mead, A.P.; Nichols, J.L.; Woodwark, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of various PWR-type coolant chemistry regimes on the behavior of corrosion products has been studied in the DIDO Water Loop at Harwell. There are strong indications that the in-core deposition behavior of corrosion product species is not fully accounted for by the solubility model based on nickel ferrite; boric acid plays a role apart from its influence on pH, and corrosion products are adsorbed to some extent in the zirconium oxide film on the fuel cladding. In DWL, soluble species appear to be dominant in deposition processes. A most important factor governing deposition behavior is surface condition; the influence of weld regions and the effect of varying pretreatment conditions have both been demonstrated. 13 figs.

  9. Fuel-rod response during the large-break LOCA Test LOC-6. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinjamuri, K.; Cook, B.A.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The large break Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) Test LOC-6 was conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by EG and G Idaho, Inc. The objectives of the PBF LOCA tests are to obtain in-pile cladding ballooning data under blowdown and reflood conditions and assess how well out-of-pile ballooning data represent in-pile fuel rod behavior. The primary objective of the LOC-6 test was to determine the effects of internal rod pressures and prior irradiation on the deformation behavior of fuel rods that reached cladding temperatures high in the alpha phase of zircaloy. Test LOC-6 was conducted with four rods of PWR 15 x 15 design with the exception of fuel stack length (89 cm) and enrichment (12.5 W% /sup 235/U). Each rod was surrounded by an individual flow shroud.

  10. LOCA rupture strains and coolability of full-length PWR fuel bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohr, C.L.; Hesson, G.M.

    1983-03-01

    The LOCA Simulation Program tests sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission are the first full-length nuclear-heated experiments designed to investigate the deformation and rupture characteristics as well as the coolability of nuclear-heated fuel under accident conditions. The results of the seven tests preformed in the program using 32-rod full-length PWR fuel bundles have shown that for a wide range of flow blockage condtions no significant reduction in coolability of the fuel bundle could be found. These results have been confirmed by data from out-of-pile electrically-heated experiments. Although there is a difference between nuclear and electrically-heated test data, the conclusion is still the same. Coolability of a deformed bundle during reflood is dominated by the dispersion of droplets in the deformed zone which provides adequate cooling and which is not reduced by the deformation of the fuel rod cladding.

  11. Source term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-05-21

    For a severe PWR accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the steam generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating will cause a water boiloff. Without effective cooling of the core, steam will begin to oxidize the Zircaloy cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as Cs and I, that are major contributors to the radiological source term, will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  12. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed.

  13. IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles Youinou; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-03-01

    This report presents the results of a neutronics analysis done in response to the charter IFCA-SAT-2 entitled 'Fuel impurity physics calculations'. This charter specifies that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies (UOX SNF) is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Only non-gaseous FP have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1). This mixture of Pu and FP is called PuFP. Note that, in this preliminary analysis, the FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

  14. The CASTOR-V/21 PWR spent-fuel storage cask: Testing and analyses: Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dziadosz, D.; Moore, E.V.; Creer, J.M.; McCann, R.A.; McKinnon, M.A.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.R.; Goodman, R.L.; Schoonen, D.H.; Jensen, M.

    1986-11-01

    A performance test of a Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear Service CASTOR-V/21 pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel storage cask was performed. The test was the first of a series of cask performance tests planned under a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power and the US Department of Energy. The performance test consisted of loading the CASTOR-V/21 cask with 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies from Virginia Power's Surry reactor. Cask surface and fuel assembly guide tube temperatures, and cask surface gamma and neutron dose rates were measured. Testing was performed with vacuum, nitrogen, and helium backfill environments in both vertical and horizontal cask orientations. Limited spent fuel integrity data were also obtained. Results of the performance test indicate the CASTOR-V/21 cask exhibited exceptionally good heat transfer performance which exceeded design expectations. Peak cladding temperatures with helium and nitrogen backfills in a vertical cast orientation and with helium in a horizontal orientation were less than the allowable of 380/sup 0/C with a total cask heat load of 28 kW. Significant convection heat transfer was present in vertical nitrogen and helium test runs as indicated by peak temperatures occurring in the upper regions of the fuel assemblies. Pretest temperature predictions of the HYDRA heat transfer computer program were in good agreement with test data, and post-test predictions agreed exceptionally well (25/sup 0/C) with data. Cask surface gamma and neutron dose rates were measured to be less than the design goal of 200 mrem/h. Localized peaks as high as 163 mrem/h were measured on the side of the cask, but peak dose rates of <75 mrem/h can easily be achieved with minor refinements to the gamma shielding design. From both heat transfer and shielding perspectives, the CASTOR-V/21 cask can, with minor refinements, be effectively implemented at reactor sites and central storage facilities for safe storage of spent fuel.

  15. Irradiation Test of Advanced PWR Fuel in Fuel Test Loop at HANARO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Kun Woo; Park, Su Ki; Seo, Chul Gyo

    2007-07-01

    A new fuel test loop has been constructed in the research reactor HANARO at KAERI. The main objective of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) is an irradiation test of a newly developed LWR fuel under PWR or Candu simulated conditions. The first test rod will be loaded within 2007 and its irradiation test will be continued until a rod average their of 62 MWd/kgU. A total of five test rods can be loaded into the IPS (In-Pile Section) and fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure and fuel stack elongation can be measured by an on-line real time system. A newly developed advanced PWR fuel which consists of a HANA{sup TM} alloy cladding and a large grain UO{sub 2} pellet was selected as the first test fuel in the FTL. The fuel cladding, the HANA{sup TM} alloy, is an Nb containing Zirconium alloy that has shown better corrosion and creep resistance properties than the current Zircaloy-4 cladding. A total of six types of HANA{sup TM} alloy were developed and two or three of these candidate alloys will be used as test rod cladding, which have shown a superior performance to the others. A large-grain UO{sub 2} pellet has a 14{approx}16 micron 2D diameter grain size for a reduction of a fission gas release at a high burnup. In this paper, characteristics of the FTL and IPS are introduced and the expected operation and irradiation conditions are summarized for the test periods. Also the preliminary fuel performance analysis results, such as the cladding oxide thickness, fission gas release and rod internal pressure, are evaluated from the test rod safety analysis aspects. (authors)

  16. Probability and consequences of a rapid boron dilution sequence in a PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.; Kohut, P.; Nourbakhsh, H.; Valtonen, K.; Secker, P.

    1995-11-01

    The reactor restart scenario is one of several beyond-design-basis events in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) which can lead to rapid boron dilution in the core. This in turn can lead to a power excursion and the potential for fuel damage. A probabilistic analysis had been done for this event for a European PWR. The estimated core damage frequency was found to be high partially because of a high frequency for a LOOP and assumptions regarding operator actions. As a result, a program of analysis and experiment was initiated and corrective actions were taken. A system was installed so that the suction of the charging pumps would switch to the highly borated refueling water storage tank (RWST) when there was a trip of the RCPs. This was felt to reduce the estimated core damage frequency to an acceptable level. In the US, this original study prompted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to issue an information notice to follow work being done in this area and to initiate studies such as the work at BNL reported herein. In order to see if the core damage frequency might be as high in US plants, a probabilistic assessment of this scenario was done for three plants. Two important conservative assumptions in this analysis were that (1) the mixing of the injectant was insignificant and (2) fuel damage occurs when the slug passes through the core. In order to study the first assumption, analysis was carried out for two of the plants using a mixing model. The second assumption was studied by calculating the neutronic response of the core to a slug of deborated water for one of the plants. All three types of analyses are summarized below. More information is available in the original report.

  17. Radionuclide release from PWR fuels in a reference tuff repository groundwater subsquently changed to Radionuclide release from PWR fuels in J-13 well water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1985-04-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI) is studying the suitability of the welded devitrified Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, for potential use as a high level nuclear waste repository. In support of the Waste Package task of NNWSI, tests have been conducted under ambient air environment to measure radionuclide release from two pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuels in water obtained from the J-13 well near the Yucca Mountain site. Four specimen types, representing a range of fuel physical conditions that may exist in a failed waste canister containing a limited amount of water were tested. The specimen types were: (1) fuel rod sections split open to expose bare fuel particles; (2) rod sections with water-tight end fittings with a 2.5-cm long by 150-{mu}m wide slit through the cladding; (3) rod sections with water-tight end fittings and two 200-{mu}m diameter holes through the cladding; and (4) undefected rod segments with water-tight end fittings. Radionuclide release results from the first 223-day test runs on H.B. Robinson spent fuel specimens in J-13 water are reported and compared to results from a previous test series in which similar Turkey Point reactor spent fuel specimens were tested in deionized water. Selected initial results are also given for Turkey Point fuel specimens tested in J-13 water. Results suggest that the actinides Pu, Am, Cm and Np are released congruently with U as the UO{sub 2} spent fuel matrix dissolves. Fractional release of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 99}Tc was greater than that measured for the actinides. Generally, lower radionuclide releases were measured for the H.B. Robinson fuel in J-13 water than for Turkey Point Fuel in deionized water.

  18. Analysis of results from a loss-of-offsite-power-initiated ATWS experiment in the LOFT facility. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Koizumi, Y.; Giri, A.H.; Koske, J.E.; Sanchez-Pope, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    An anticipated transient without scram (ATWS), initiated by loss-of-offsite power, was experimentally simulated in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR). Primary system pressure was controlled using a scaled safety relief valve (SRV) representative of those in a commercial PWR, while reactor power was reduced by moderator reactivity feedback in a natural circulation mode. The experiment showed that reactor power decreases more rapidly when the primary pumps are tripped in a loss-of-offsite-power ATWS than in a loss-of-feedwater induced ATWS when the primary pumps are left on. During the experiment, the SRV had sufficient relief capacity to control primary system pressure. Natural circulation was effective in removing core heat at high temperature, pressure, and core power. The system transient response predicted using the RELAP5/MOD1 computer code showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Results and analysis of a loss-of-feedwater induced ATWS experiment in the LOFT facility. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grush, W.H.; Woerth, S.C.; Koizumi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    An anticipated transient without scram (ATWS), initiated by a loss of feedwater, was experimentally simulated in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) pressurized water reactor (PWR). Primary system pressure was controlled using a two-position actuator relief valve to simulate a scaled power-operated relief valve (PORV) and safety relief valve (SRV) representative of those in a commercial PWR. Auxiliary feedwater injection was delayed during the experiment until the plant recovery phase where long-term shutdown was achieved by an operator-controlled plant recovery procedure without inserting the control rods. The system transient response predicted by the RELAP5/MOD1 computer code showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. SAS2H Generated Isotopic Concentrations For B&W 15X15 PWR Assembly (SCPB:N/A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.W. Davis

    1996-08-29

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide pressurized water reactor (PWR) isotopic composition data as a function of time for use in criticality analyses. The objectives of this evaluation are to generate burnup and decay dependant isotopic inventories and to provide these inventories in a form which can easily be utilized in subsequent criticality calculations.

  1. Examination of spent PWR fuel rods after 15 years in dry storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Tsai, H.C.; Billone, M.C.; Hilton, B.A.

    2002-02-11

    Virginia Power Surry Nuclear Station Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel was stored in a dry inert atmosphere Castor V/21 cask at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) for 15 years at peak cladding temperatures decreasing from about 350 to 150 C. Prior to the storage, the loaded cask was subjected to extensive thermal benchmark tests. The cask was opened to examine the fuel for degradation and to determine if it was suitable for extended storage. No rod breaches had occurred and no visible degradation or crud/oxide spallation were observed. Twelve rods were removed from the center of the T11 assembly and shipped from INEEL to the Argonne-West HFEF for profilometric scans. Four of these rods were punctured to determine the fission gas release from the fuel matrix and internal pressure in the rods. Three of the four rods were cut into five segments each, then shipped to the Argonne-East AGHCF for detailed examination. The test plan calls for metallographic examination of six samples from two of the rods, microhardness and hydrogen content measurements at or near the six metallographic sample locations, tensile testing of six samples from the two rods, and thermal creep testing of eight samples from the two rods to determine the extent of residual creep life. The results from the profilometry (12 rods), gas release measurements (4 rods), metallographic examinations (2 samples from 1 rod), and microhardness and hydrogen content characterization (2 samples from 1 rod) are reported here. The tensile and creep studies are just starting and will be reported at a later date, along with the additional characterization work to be performed. Although only limited prestorage characterization is available, a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn based on comparison with characterization of Florida Power Turkey Point rods of a similar vintage. Based on this comparison, it appears that little or no cladding thermal creep and fission gas release from the fuel pellets occurred during the thermal benchmark tests or storage. Measurements of the cladding outer-diameter, oxide thickness and wall thickness are in the expected range for cladding of the Surry exposure. The measured hydrogen content is consistent with the oxide thickness. The volume of hydrides varies azimuthally around the cladding, but there is little variation across the thickness, of the cladding. It is most significant that all of the hydrides appear to have retained the circumferential orientation typical of prestorage PWR fuel rods.

  2. Examination of Spent PWR Fuel Rods After 15 Years in Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Tsai, H.C.; Billone, M.C.; Hilton, B.A.

    2002-07-01

    Virginia Power Surry Nuclear Station Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel was stored in a dry inert atmosphere Castor V/21 cask at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) for 15 years at peak cladding temperatures decreasing from about 350 to 150 deg. C. Prior to the storage, the loaded cask was subjected to extensive thermal benchmark tests. The cask was opened to examine the fuel for degradation and to determine if it was suitable for extended storage. No rod breaches had occurred and no visible degradation or crud/oxide spallation were observed. Twelve rods were removed from the center of the T11 assembly and shipped from INEEL to the Argonne-West HFEF for profilometric scans. Four of these rods were punctured to determine the fission gas release from the fuel matrix and internal pressure in the rods. Three of the four rods were cut into five segments each, then shipped to the Argonne-East AGHCF for detailed examination. The test plan calls for metallographic examination of six samples from two of the rods, microhardness and hydrogen content measurements at or near the six metallographic sample locations, tensile testing of six samples from the two rods, and thermal creep testing of eight samples from the two rods to determine the extent of residual creep life. The results from the profilometry (12 rods), gas release measurements (4 rods), metallographic examinations (2 samples from 1 rod), and microhardness and hydrogen content characterization (2 samples from 1 rod) are reported here. The tensile and creep studies are just starting and will be reported at a later date, along with the additional characterization work to be performed. Although only limited pre-storage characterization is available, a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn based on comparison with characterization of Florida Power Turkey Point rods of a similar vintage. Based on this comparison, it appears that little or no cladding thermal creep and fission gas release from the fuel pellets occurred during the thermal benchmark tests or storage. Measurements of the cladding outer-diameter, oxide thickness and wall thickness are in the expected range for cladding of the Surry exposure. The measured hydrogen content is consistent with the oxide thickness. The volume of hydrides varies azimuthally around the cladding, but there is little variation across the thickness, of the cladding. It is most significant that all of the hydrides appear to have retained the circumferential orientation typical of pre-storage PWR fuel rods. (authors)

  3. TREAT source-term experiment STEP-1 simulating a PWR LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Blomquist, C.A.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    In a hypothetical pressurized water reactor (PWR) large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in which the emergency core cooling system fails, fission product decay heating causes water boil-off and reduced heat removal. Zircaloy cladding is oxidized by the steam. The noble gases and volatile fission products such as cesium and iodine that constitute a principal part of the source term will be released from the damaged fuel at or shortly after the time of cladding failure. TREAT test STEP-1 simulated the LOCA environment when the volatile fission products would be released using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The principal objective was to collect a portion of the releases carried by the flow stream in a region as close as possible to the test zone. In this paper, the test is described and the results of an analysis of the thermal and steam/hydrogen environment are compared with the test measurements in order to provide a characterization for analysis of fission product releases and aerosol formation. The results of extensive sample examinations are reported separately.

  4. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Surry PWR TMLB` (with a DCH study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Summers, R.M.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-02-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC. This code models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As part of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze a station blackout transient in Surry, a three-loop Westinghouse PWR. Basecase results obtained with MELCOR 1.8.2 are presented, and compared to earlier results for the same transient calculated using MELCOR 1.8.1. The effects of new models added in MELCOR 1.8.2 (in particular, hydrodynamic interfacial momentum exchange, core debris radial relocation and core material eutectics, CORSOR-Booth fission product release, high-pressure melt ejection and direct containment heating) are investigated individually in sensitivity studies. The progress in reducing numeric effects in MELCOR 1.8.2, compared to MELCOR 1.8.1, is evaluated in both machine-dependency and time-step studies; some remaining sources of numeric dependencies (valve cycling, material relocation and hydrogen burn) are identified.

  5. LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop by using the US NRC approved methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory requirements for postulated pipe ruptures have changed significantly since the first nuclear plants were designed. The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology is now accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of double-ended guillotine breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. The previous pipe rupture design requirements for nuclear power plant applications are responsible for all the numerous and massive pipe whip restraints and jet shields installed for each plant. This results in significant plant congestion, increased labor costs and radiation dosage for normal maintenance and inspection. Also the restraints increase the probability of interference between the piping and supporting structures during plant heatup, thereby potentially impacting overall plant reliability. The LBB approach to eliminate postulating ruptures in high energy piping systems is a significant improvement to former regulatory methodologies, and therefore, the LBB approach to design is gaining worldwide acceptance. However, the methods and criteria for LBB evaluation depend upon the policy of individual country and significant effort continues towards accomplishing uniformity on a global basis. In this paper the historical development of the U.S. LBB criteria will be traced and the results of an LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop applying U.S. NRC approved methods will be presented. In addition, another approach using the Japanese LBB criteria will be shown and compared with the U.S. criteria. The comparison will be highlighted in this paper with detailed discussion.

  6. MHK Projects/Mohawk MHK Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf| OpenMauriceMississippi 6

  7. CEPAN method of analyzing creep collapse of oval cladding. Volume 5. Evaluation of interpellet gap formation and clad collapse in modern PWR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, W.M.; Fisher, H.D.; Litke, H.J.; Mordarski, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report presents the results from a review of interpellet-gap formation, ovality, creepdown and clad collapse data in modern PWR fuel rods. Conclusions are reached regarding the propensity of modern PWR fuel to form such gaps and to undergo clad collapse. CEPAN, a creep-collapse predictor approved by the NRC in 1976, has been reformulated to include the creep analysis of cladding with finite interpellet gaps. The basis for this reformulation is discussed in detail. The model previously used in the calculation of the augmentation factor, a peak linear heat rate penalty due to the presence of interpellet gaps within the fuel rod, has been modified to incorporate gap-formation statistics from modern fuel. Finnally, the benefits of the limited gap formation and the CEPAN reformulation for the licensing of modern PWR fuel rods are evaluated.

  8. Radionuclide release from PWR fuels in a reference tuff repository groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1985-03-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI) is studying the suitability of the welded devitrified Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, for potential use as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In support of the Waste Package task of NNWSI, tests have been conducted under ambient air environment to measure radionuclide release from two pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuels in water obtained from the J-13 well near the Yucca Mountain site. Four specimen types, representing a range of fuel physical conditions that may exist in a failed waste canister containing a limited amount of water were tested. The specimen types were: fuel rod sections split open to expose bare fuel particles; rod sections with water-tight end fittings with a 2.5-cm long by 150-{mu}m wide slit through the cladding; rod sections with water-tight end fittings and two 200-{mu}m-diameter holes through the cladding; and undefected rod segments with water-tight end fittings. Radionuclide release results from the first 223-day test runs on H.B. Robinson spent fuel specimens in J-13 water are reported and compared to results from a previous test series in which similar Turkey Point reactor spent fuel specimens were tested on deionized water. Selected initial results are also given for Turkey Point fuel specimens tested on J-13 water. Results suggest that the actinides Pu, Am, Cm and Np are released congruently with U as the UO{sub 2} spent fuel matrix dissolves. Fractional release of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 99}Tc was greater than that measured for the actinides. Generally, lower radionuclide releases were measured for the H.B. Robinson fuel in J-13 water than for Turkey Point Fuel in deionized water. 8 references, 7 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Analyses of High Pressure Molten Debris Dispersion for a Typical PWR Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osamu KAawabata; Mitsuhiro Kajimoto [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    In such severe core damage accident, as small LOCAs with no ECCS injection or station blackout, in which the primary reactor system remains pressurized during core melt down, certain modes of vessel failure would lead to a high pressure ejection of molten core material. In case of a local failure of the lower head, the molten materials would initially be ejected into the cavity beneath the pressure vessel may subsequently be swept out from the cavity to the containment atmosphere and it might cause the early containment failure by direct contact of containment steel liner with core debris. When the contribution of a high-pressure scenario in a core damage frequency increases, early conditional containment failure probability may become large. In the present study, the verification analysis of PHOENICS code and the combining analysis with MELCOR and PHOENICS codes were performed to examine the debris dispersion behavior during high pressure melt ejection. The PHOENICS code which can treat thermal hydraulic phenomena, was applied to the verification analysis for melt dispersion experiments conducted by the Purdue university in the United States. A low pressure melt dispersion experiment at initial pressure 1.4 MPas used metal woods as a molten material was simulated. The analytical results with molten debris dispersion mostly from the model reactor cavity compartment showed an agreement with the experimental result, but the analysis result of a volumetric median diameter of the airborne debris droplets was estimated about 1.5 times of the experimental result. The injection rates of molten debris and steam after reactor vessel failure for a typical PWR plant were analyzed using the MELCOR code. In addition, PHOENICS was applied to a 3D analysis for debris dispersion with low primary pressure at the reactor vessel failure. The analysis result showed that almost all the molten debris were dispersed from the reactor vessel cavity compartment by about 45 seconds after the start of steam release. (authors)

  10. Containment pressurization and burning of combustible gases in a large, dry PWR containment during a station blackout sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Fan, C.T. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hsinchu (TW))

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, responses of a large, dry pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment in a station blackout sequence are analyzed with the CONTAIN, MARCH3, and MAAP codes. Results show that the predicted containment responses in a station blackout sequence of these three codes are substantially different. Among these predictions, the MAAP code predicts the highest containment pressure because of the large amount of water made available to quench the debris upon vessel failure. The gradual water boiloff by debris pressurizes the containment. The combustible gas burning models in these codes are briefly described and compared.

  11. First interim examination of defected BWR and PWR rods tested in unlimited air at 229/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Cook, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A five-year whole rod test was initiated to investigate the long-term stability of spent fuel rods under a variety of possible dry storage conditions. Both PWR and BWR rods were included in the test. The first interim examination was conducted after three months of testing to determine if there was any degradation in those defected rods stored in an unlimited air atmosphere. Visual observations, diametral measurements and radiographic smears were used to assess the degree of cladding deformation and particulate dispersal. The PWR rod showed no measurable change from the pre-test condition. The two original artificial defects had not changed in appearance and there was no diametral growth of the cladding. One of the defects in BWR rod showed significant deformation. There was approximately 10% cladding strain at the defect site and a small axial crack had formed. The fuel in the defect did not appear to be friable. The second defect showed no visible change and no cladding strain. Following examination, the test was continued at 230/sup 0/C. Another interim examination is planned during the summer of 1983. This paper discusses the details and meaning of the data from the first interim examination.

  12. Experiment data report for LOFT large-break loss-of-coolant experiment L2-5. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayless, P.D.; Divine, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Selected pertinent and uninterpreted data from the third nuclear large break loss-of-coolant experiment (Experiment L2-5) conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility are presented. The LOFT facility is a 50-MW(t) pressurized water reactor (PWR) system with instruments that measure and provide data on the system thermal-hydraulic and nuclear conditions. The operation of the LOFT system is typical of large (approx. 1000 MW(e)) commercial PWR operations. Experiment L2-5 simulated a double-ended offset shear of a cold leg in the primary coolant system. The primary coolant pumps were tripped within 1 s after the break initiation, simulating a loss of site power. Consistent with the loss of power, the starting of the high- and low-pressure injection systems was delayed. The peak fuel rod cladding temperature achieved was 1078 +- 13 K. The emergency core cooling system re-covered the core and quenched the cladding. No evidence of core damage was detected.

  13. Impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposures at nuclear power plants. Case study: PWR during routine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Haggard, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present data in support of evaluating the impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposure. To determine quantitatively whether fuel cladding failure contributes significantly to occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure measurements were taken at comparable locations in two mirror-image pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and their common auxiliary building. One reactor, Unit B, was experiencing degraded fuel characterized as 0.125% fuel pin-hole leakers and was operating at approximately 55% of the reactor's licensed maximum core power, while the other reactor, Unit A, was operating under normal conditions with less than 0.01% fuel pin-hole leakers at 100% of the reactor's licensed maximum core power. Measurements consisted of gamma spectral analyses, radiation exposure rates and airborne radionuclide concentrations. In addition, data from primary coolant sample results for the previous 20 months on both reactor coolant systems were analyzed. The results of the measurements and coolant sample analyses suggest that a 3560-megawatt-thermal (1100 MWe) PWR operating at full power with 0.125% failed fuel can experience an increase of 540% in radiation exposure rates as compared to a PWR operating with normal fuel. In specific plant areas, the degraded fuel may elevate radiation exposure rates even more.

  14. LOFTRAN/RETRAN comparison calculations for a postulated loss-of-feedwater ATWS in the Sizewell 'B' PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papez, K.L.; Risher, D.H.

    1983-05-01

    The loss-of-main-feedwater transient without reactor trip (scram) has received particular attention in pressurized water reactor (PWR) anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) analysis primarily due to the potential for reactor coolant system over pressurization. To assist in the licensing of the U.K. PWR, Sizewell 'B', comparative calculations of a loss-of-feedwater ATWS have been performed using the Westinghouse-developed LOFTRAN loop analysis code and the Electric Power Research Institute/ Energy Incorporated-developed RETRAN-01 code. The calculations were performed with and without the emergency boration system (EBS), which is included in the Sizewell reference design. Initial results showed good agreement between the codes for the major features of the transient, but also a time shift in the transient profiles at the time of the pressurizer pressure peak. This was found to be due to differences in the steam generator modeling, which resulted in a difference in the onset of the very rapid degradation in heat transfer as the steam generators approach dryout. When the same model was used in both codes, very good agreement was obtained. Remaining differences in the results are attributed primarily to differences in the boron injection models, which resulted in an over-prediction of the core boron concentration in the RETRAN calculation. The results with an EBS indicate that the peak pressurizer pressure is relatively insensitive to variations in modeling.

  15. TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading. A measurement of the average assembly burnup is required and that measurement must be within 10% of the utility burnup record for the assembly to be accepted. The measurement device must be accurate to within 10%. Each step is described in detail for use with any computer code system and is then demonstrated with the SCALE 4.2 computer code package using 27BURNUPLIB cross sections.

  16. In-Vessel Retention of Molten Core Debris in the Westinghouse AP1000 Advanced Passive PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scobel, James H.; Conway, L.E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0355 (United States); Theofanous, T.G. [Center for Risk Studies and Safety, University of California Santa Barbara (United States)

    2002-07-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris via external reactor vessel cooling is the hallmark of the severe accident management strategies in the AP600 passive PWR. The vessel is submerged in water to cool its external surface via nucleate boiling heat transfer. An engineered flow path through the reactor vessel insulation provides cooling water to the vessel surface and vents steam to promote IVR. For the 600 MWe passive plant, the predicted heat load from molten debris to the lower head wall has a large margin to the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel, which is the upper limit of the cooling capability. Up-rating the power of the passive plant from 600 to 1000 MWe (AP1000) significantly increases the heat loading from the molten debris to the reactor vessel lower head in the postulated bounding severe accident sequence. To maintain a large margin to the coolability limit for the AP1000, design features and severe accident management (SAM) strategies to increase the critical heat flux on the external surface of the vessel wall need to be implemented. A test program at the ULPU facility at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been initiated to investigate design features and SAM strategies that can enhance the critical heat flux. Results from ULPU Configuration IV demonstrate that with small changes to the ex-vessel design and SAM strategies, the peak critical heat flux in the AP1000 can be increased at least 30% over the peak critical heat flux predicted for the AP600 configuration. The design and SAM strategy changes investigated in ULPU Configuration IV can be implemented in the AP1000 design and will allow the passive plant to maintain the margin to critical heat flux for IVR, even at the higher power level. Continued testing for IVR phenomena is being performed at UCSB to optimize the AP1000 design and to ensure that vessel failure in a severe accident is physically unreasonable. (authors)

  17. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task. Task plan report. FLECHT SEASET Program report No. 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Basel, R.A.; Dennis, R.J.; Lee, N.; Massie, H.W. Jr.; Loftus, M.J.; Rosal, E.R.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    This report presents a descriptive plan of tests for the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). This task will consist of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. All tests will be performed with a cosine axial power profile. These tests are planned to be used to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 161-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  18. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  19. Chemical System Decontamination at PWR Power Stations Biblis A and B by Advanced System Decontamination by Oxidizing Chemistry (ASDOC-D) Process Technology - 13081

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeb, Andreas; Runge, Hartmut; Stanke, Dieter; Bertholdt, Horst-Otto; Adams, Andreas; Impertro, Michael; Roesch, Josef

    2013-07-01

    For chemical decontamination of PWR primary systems the so called ASDOC-D process has been developed and qualified at the German PWR power station Biblis. In comparison to other chemical decontamination processes ASDOC-D offers a number of advantages: - ASDOC-D does not require separate process equipment but is completely operated and controlled by the nuclear site installations. Feeding of chemical concentrates into the primary system is done by means of the site's dosing systems. Process control is performed by standard site instrumentation and analytics. - ASDOC-D safely prevents any formation and precipitation of insoluble constituents - Since ASDOC-D is operated without external equipment there is no need for installation of such equipment in high radioactive radiation surrounding. The radioactive exposure rate during process implementation and process performance may therefore be neglected in comparison to other chemical decontamination processes. - ASDOC-D does not require auxiliary hose connections which usually bear high leakage risk. The above mentioned technical advantages of ASDOC-D together with its cost-effectiveness gave rise to Biblis Power station to agree on testing ASDOC-D at the volume control system of PWR Biblis unit A. By involving the licensing authorities as well as expert examiners into this test ASDOC-D received the official qualification for primary system decontamination in German PWR. As a main outcome of the achieved results NIS received contracts for full primary system decontamination of both units Biblis A and B (each 1.200 MW) by end of 2012. (authors)

  20. Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hill, L.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains summaries of the electric utilities performance-based rate plans for the following companies: Alabama Power Company; Central Maine Power Company; Consolidated Edison of New York; Mississippi Power Company; New York State Electric and Gas Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; PacifiCorp; Pacific Gas and Electric; Southern California Edison; San Diego Gas & Electric; and Tucson Electric Power. In addition, this document also contains information about LBNL`s Power Index and Incentive Properties of a Hybrid Cap and Long-Run Demand Elasticity.

  1. BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Zamansky; Chris Lindsey; Vitali Lissianski

    2000-01-28

    This project is designed to develop engineering and modeling tools for a family of NO{sub x} control technologies utilizing biomass as a reburning fuel. During the ninth reporting period (September 27--December 31, 1999), EER prepared a paper Kinetic Model of Biomass Reburning and submitted it for publication and presentation at the 28th Symposium (International) on Combustion, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, July 30--August 4, 2000. Antares Group Inc, under contract to Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, evaluated the economic feasibility of biomass reburning options for Dunkirk Station. A preliminary report is included in this quarterly report.

  2. Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment of low power and shutdown operations at a PWR: Phase 2 results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Musicki, Z.; Wong, S.M.; Yang, J.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Su, R.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, London (United Kingdom); Siu, N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Bley, D.; Lin, J. [Pickard, Lowe and Garrick, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    As a result of the Chernobyl accident and other precursor events (e.g., Diablo Canyon), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) initiated an extensive project during 1989 to carefully examine the potential risks during Low Power and Shutdown (LP&S) operations. Shortly after the program began, an event occurred at the Vogtle plant during shutdown, which further intensified the effort of the LP&S program. In the LP&S program, one pressurized water reactor (PWR), Surry, and one boiling water reactor (BWR), Grand Gulf, were selected, mainly because they were previously analyzed in the NUREG-1150 Study. The Level-1 Program is being performed in two phases. Phase 1 was dedicated to performing a coarse screening level-1 analysis including internal fire and flood. A draft report was completed in November, 1991. In the phase 2 study, mid-loop operations at the Surry plant were analyzed in detail. The objective of this paper is to present the approach of the phase 2 study and the preliminary results and insights.

  3. Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment of low power and shutdown operations at a PWR: Phase 2 results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Musicki, Z.; Wong, S.M.; Yang, J.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Su, R.F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Holmes, B. (AEA Technology, London (United Kingdom)); Siu, N. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Bley, D.; Lin, J. (Pickard, Lowe and Garrick, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl accident and other precursor events (e.g., Diablo Canyon), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) initiated an extensive project during 1989 to carefully examine the potential risks during Low Power and Shutdown (LP S) operations. Shortly after the program began, an event occurred at the Vogtle plant during shutdown, which further intensified the effort of the LP S program. In the LP S program, one pressurized water reactor (PWR), Surry, and one boiling water reactor (BWR), Grand Gulf, were selected, mainly because they were previously analyzed in the NUREG-1150 Study. The Level-1 Program is being performed in two phases. Phase 1 was dedicated to performing a coarse screening level-1 analysis including internal fire and flood. A draft report was completed in November, 1991. In the phase 2 study, mid-loop operations at the Surry plant were analyzed in detail. The objective of this paper is to present the approach of the phase 2 study and the preliminary results and insights.

  4. Effects of Zircaloy oxidation and steam dissociation on PWR core heat-up under conditions simulating uncovered fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viskanta, R.; Mohanty, A.K.

    1986-04-01

    The studies described in this report identify the regimes of slow transients in a partially uncovered core of a PWR. The threshold height and onset time for oxidation of the cladding of a fuel rod have been evaluated. The effects of oxidation in increasing the decay heat load, component temperature, reduction of cladding thickness and generation of hydrogen have been estimated. The condition for steam starvation has been determined. At high uncovered core heights, typically say 2.8 m for a geometry simulating the TMI-2 type of reactor, the solid and coolant temperatures can reach the limits of steam dissociation. The effects of radiation heat exchange between cladding and coolant, Zircaloy oxidation, steam dissociation, gap conductance between fuel and cladding and system pressure on the heatup of fuel rods have been investigated. The time for uncovering a certain core height is taken as the independent parameter. It is seen that if the uncovering process is allowed to continue beyond 9 minutes corresponding to an uncovered height of 1.9 m, onset of cladding oxidation can be a reality. These values provide a guideline for the response time of the emergency core cooling systems. 10 refs., 22 figs.

  5. Benchmark of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions of depletion analyses for San Onofre PWR MOX fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-02-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, fabricated with both uranium and plutonium, after discharge from reactors is of significant interest to the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The validation of the SCALE (SAS2H) depletion code for use in the prediction of isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to previous validation studies on uranium-only fueled reactors, has corresponding significance. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program examined the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit 1, during cycles 2 and 3. Isotopic analyses of the MOX spent fuel were conducted on 13 actinides and {sup 148}Nd by either mass or alpha spectrometry. Six fuel pellet samples were taken from four different fuel pins of an irradiated MOX assembly. The measured actinide inventories from those samples has been used to benchmark SAS2H for MOX fuel applications. The average percentage differences in the code results compared with the measurement were {minus}0.9% for {sup 235}U and 5.2% for {sup 239}Pu. The differences for most of the isotopes were significantly larger than in the cases for uranium-only fueled reactors. In general, comparisons of code results with alpha spectrometer data had extreme differences, although the differences in the calculations compared with mass spectrometer analyses were not extremely larger than that of uranium-only fueled reactors. This benchmark study should be useful in estimating uncertainties of inventory, criticality and dose calculations of MOX spent fuel.

  6. Rod consolidation of RG and E's (Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation) spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1987-05-01

    The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling the fuel rods from five fuel assemblies from Unit 1 of RG and E's R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant. Slow and careful rod pulling efforts were used for the first and second fuel assemblies. Rod pulling then proceeded smoothly and rapidly after some minor modifications were made to the UST and D consolidation equipment. The compaction ratios attained ranged from 1.85 to 2.00 (rods with collapsed cladding were replaced by dummy rods in one fuel assembly to demonstrate the 2:1 compaction ratio capability). This demonstration involved 895 PWR fuel rods, among which there were some known defective rods (over 50 had collapsed cladding); no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. However, one of the rods with collapsed cladding unexplainably broke during handling operations (i.e., reconfiguration in the failed fuel canister), subsequent to the rod consolidation demonstration. The broken rod created no facility problems; the pieces were encapsulated for subsequent storage. Another broken rod was found during postdemonstration cutting operations on the nonfuel-bearing structural components from the five assemblies; evidence indicates it was broken prior to any rod consolidation operations. During the demonstration, burnish-type lines or scratches were visible on the rods that were pulled; however, experience indicates that such lines are generally produced when rods are pulled (or pushed) through the spacer grids. Rods with collapsed cladding would not enter the funnel (the transition device between the fuel assembly and the canister that aids in obtaining high compaction ratios). Reforming of the flattened areas of the cladding on those rods was attempted to make the rod cross sections more nearly circular; some of the reformed rods passed through the funnel and into the canister.

  7. PWR FLECHT SEASET 163-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task data report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 13, August-October 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M J; Hochreiter, L E; McGuire, M F; Valkovic, M M

    1983-10-01

    This report presents data from the 163-Rod Bundle Blow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Systems Effects and Separate Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The task consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. These tests were designed to determine effects of flow blockage and flow bypass on reflooding behavior and to aid in the assessment of computational models in predicting the reflooding behavior of flow blockage in rod bundle arrays.

  8. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

  9. Graphical and tabular summaries of decay characteristics for once-through PWR, LMFBR, and FFTF fuel cycle materials. [Spent fuel, high-level waste fuel can scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Liberman, M.S.; Morrison, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the results of ORIGEN2 and a newly developed code called ORMANG, graphical and summary tabular characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel assembly structural material (cladding) waste are presented for a generic pressurized-water reactor (PWR), a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The characteristics include radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity (water dilution volume). Given are graphs and summary tables containing characteristic totals and the principal nuclide contributors as well as graphs comparing the three reactors for a single material and the three materials for a single reactor.

  10. Performance Spec. for Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shipping Port Spent Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-03-14

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders.

  11. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, Brian J; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-10-01

    In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

  12. Corrosion and hydriding performance evaluation of three zircaloy-2 clad fuel assemblies after continuous exposure in PWR cores 1 and 2, at Shippingport, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillner, E.

    1980-01-01

    Three original Zircaloy-2 clad blanket fuel bundles from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station were discharged after continuous exposure during Cores 1 and 2. Detailed visual examination of these components after approx. 6300 calendar days of operation (51,140 EFPH) revealed only the anticipated uniform light gray (post-transition) corrosion products with no evidence of unexpected corrosion deterioration, fuel rod warpage, or other damage. All corrosion films were found to be tightly adherent to the underlying cladding. An extensive destructive examination of a selected fuel rod from each of three fuel bundles produced appreciably greater end-of-life rod average oxide film thickness when compared with corresponding values produced from a set of empirical equations generated from the out-of-pile (autoclave) testing of Zircaloy coupons.

  13. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse Report No. 11. Appendices K-P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  14. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  15. The impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposures at nuclear power plants: Case study, PWR (pressurized-water reactor) during an outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    This report is the second in a series of case studies designed to evaluate the magnitude of increase in occupational radiation exposures at commercial US nuclear power plants resulting from small incidents or abnormal events. The event evaluated is fuel cladding failure, which can result in elevated primary coolant activity and increased radiation exposure rates within a plant. For this case study, radiation measurements were made at a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) during a maintenance and refueling outage. The PWR had been operating for 22 months with fuel cladding failure characterized as 105 pin-hole leakers, the equivalent of 0.21% failed fuel. Gamma spectroscopy measurements, radiation exposure rate determinations, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) assessments, and air sample analyses were made in the plant's radwaste, pipe penetration, and containment buildings. Based on the data collected, evaluations indicate that the relative contributions of activation products and fission products to the total exposure rates were constant over the duration of the outage. This constancy is due to the significant contribution from the longer-lived isotopes of cesium (a fission product) and cobalt (an activation product). For this reason, fuel cladding failure events remain as significant to occupational radiation exposure during an outage as during routine operations. As documented in the previous case study (NUREG/CR-4485 Vol. 1), fuel cladding failure events increased radiation exposure rates an estimated 540% at some locations of the plant during routine operations. Consequently, such events can result in significantly greater radiation exposure rates in many areas of the plant during the maintenance and refueling outages than would have been present under normal fuel conditions.

  16. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm lithium metaborate solution respectively at the saturation temperature for 1000 psi (68.9 bar) coolant pressure. Boiling tests also revealed the formation of fine deposits of boron and lithium on the cladding surface which degraded the heat transfer rates. The boron and lithium metaborate precipitates after a 5 day test at 5000 ppm concentration and 1000 psi (68.9 bar) operating pressure reduced the heat transfer rate 21% and 30%, respectively for the two solutions.

  17. Application of MELCOR Code to a French PWR 900 MWe Severe Accident Sequence and Evaluation of Models Performance Focusing on In-Vessel Thermal Hydraulic Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Rosa, Felice [ENEA, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    In the ambit of the Severe Accident Network of Excellence Project (SARNET), funded by the European Union, 6. FISA (Fission Safety) Programme, one of the main tasks is the development and validation of the European Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC Code). One of the reference codes used to compare ASTEC results, coming from experimental and Reactor Plant applications, is MELCOR. ENEA is a SARNET member and also an ASTEC and MELCOR user. During the first 18 months of this project, we performed a series of MELCOR and ASTEC calculations referring to a French PWR 900 MWe and to the accident sequence of 'Loss of Steam Generator (SG) Feedwater' (known as H2 sequence in the French classification). H2 is an accident sequence substantially equivalent to a Station Blackout scenario, like a TMLB accident, with the only difference that in H2 sequence the scram is forced to occur with a delay of 28 seconds. The main events during the accident sequence are a loss of normal and auxiliary SG feedwater (0 s), followed by a scram when the water level in SG is equal or less than 0.7 m (after 28 seconds). There is also a main coolant pumps trip when {delta}Tsat < 10 deg. C, a total opening of the three relief valves when Tric (core maximal outlet temperature) is above 603 K (330 deg. C) and accumulators isolation when primary pressure goes below 1.5 MPa (15 bar). Among many other points, it is worth noting that this was the first time that a MELCOR 1.8.5 input deck was available for a French PWR 900. The main ENEA effort in this period was devoted to prepare the MELCOR input deck using the code version v.1.8.5 (build QZ Oct 2000 with the latest patch 185003 Oct 2001). The input deck, completely new, was prepared taking into account structure, data and same conditions as those found inside ASTEC input decks. The main goal of the work presented in this paper is to put in evidence where and when MELCOR provides good enough results and why, in some cases mainly referring to its specific models (candling, corium pool behaviour, etc.) they were less good. A future work will be the preparation of an input deck for the new MELCOR 1.8.6. and to perform a code-to-code comparison with ASTEC v1.2 rev. 1. (author)

  18. A review of "Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits." by Allan Greer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Br. Benet Exton, O.S.B.

    2005-01-01

    of black bile without dismissing the existence of black bile itself ? (192). Douglas Trevor?s The Poetics of Melancholy is a theoretically informed, his- torically grounded, and critically nuanced account of the influence of schol- arly melancholy... in those days. He shows how difficult it was for the first Jesuit missionaries, especially the North American Martyrs. The Indians were brutal with their captives, usually torturing them to death. He reflects that it would have been better to be killed...

  19. St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 12, 2015 - 1:51pm Addthis Six photovoltaic arrays generate 32 kilowatts of energy to power 20 units at the Akwesasne Housing Authoritys (AHA) Sunrise Acres...

  20. St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future; Kicks Off

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartmentSpecial Report:DepartmentEnergy St.

  1. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: fuel temperature measurements under imposed dry storage conditions (I kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterzuber, R.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-09-01

    A spent fuel assembly temperature test under imposed dry storage conditions was conducted at the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site in support of spent fuel dry storage technology development. This document presents the test data and results obtained from an approximately 1.0 kW decay heat level PWR spent fuel assembly. A spent fuel test apparatus was designed to utilize a representative stainless steel spent fuel canister, a canister lid containing internal temperature instrumentation to measure fuel cladding temperatures, and a carbon steel liner that encloses the canister and lid. Electrical heaters along the liner length, on the lid, and below the canister are used to impose dry storage canister temperature profiles. Temperature instrumentation is provided on the liner and canister. The liner and canister are supported by a test stand in one of the large hot cells (West Process Cell) inside E-MAD. Fuel temperature measurements have been performed using imposed canister temperature profiles from the electrically heated and spent fuel drywell tests being conducted at E-MAD as well as for four constant canister temperature profiles, each with a vacuum, helium and air backfill. Computer models have been utilized in conjunction with the test to predict the thermal response of the fuel cladding. Computer predictions are presented, and they show good agreement with the test data.

  2. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: fuel temperature measurements under imposed dry storage conditions (1.4 kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterzuber, R.

    1981-09-01

    A spent fuel assembly temperature test under imposed dry storage conditions was conducted at the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site in support of spent fuel dry storage technology development. This document presents the test data and results obtained from an approximately 1.4 kW decay heat level PWR spent fuel assembly. A spent fuel test apparatus was designed to utilize a stainless steel canister representative of actual fuel canisters, a canister lid containing internal temperature instrumentation to measure fuel cladding temperatures, and a carbon steel liner that encloses the canister and lid. Electrical heaters along the liner length, on the lid, and below the canister are used to impose dry storage canister temperature profiles. Temperature instrumentation is provided on the liner and canister. The liner and canister are supported by a test stand in one of the large hot cells (West Process Cell) inside E-MAD. Fuel temperature measurements have been performed using imposed canister temperature profiles from the electrically heated and spent fuel near-surface drywell tests being conducted at E-MAD, the spent fuel deep geologic storage test being conducted in Climax granite on the Nevada Test Site, and for five constant canister temperature profiles, each with a vacuum, helium and air backfill. Computer models have been utilized in conjunction with the test to predict the thermal response of the fuel cladding. Computer predictions are presented, and they show good agreement with the test data.

  3. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presented at the Waste Management 2012 Conference. February 26 through March 1, 2012, Phoenix, Arizona. Christopher Clayton, Vijendra Kothari, and Ken Starr, U.S. Department of...

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties NY -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - IL 26Processing SiteYork,NY

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara VP_FUSRAP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing -Nevada Test Site -New York,

  6. Mr. Frank Archer President Niagara Cold Drawn Steel Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJ

  7. Niagara County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire: Energy Resources JumpNgawha Geothermal Area

  8. Niagara Falls, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire: Energy Resources JumpNgawha Geothermal

  9. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996)Price780Year JanYear Jan3a . Net188,525 88,983

  10. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996)Price780Year JanYear Jan3a . Net188,525

  11. Niagara Falls, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to:Inc Jump to:of TexasJump to:

  12. ADDENDUM TO ACTION DESCRIPTION MEMORANDUM NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB10081278MaywoodWayne Site83 UMTRCA3.1[ {

  13. MHK Projects/Niagara Community 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf|Myette PointMadrid

  14. Two-phase flow regimes and carry-over in a large-diameter model of a PWR hot leg. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashemi, A.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes a series of tests investigating two-phase flow characterization and carryover in a transparent model of a Babcock and Wilson (B and W) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) hot leg geometry. This work was performed, inpart, to support the interpretation of results from the Once-Through Integral System (OTIS) and Multi-loop Integral Test (MIST) facilities. Test conditions were selected to cover a wide range of gas and liquid superficial velocities (0.01 m/s < j/sub g/ < 2 m/s, 0 < j/sub l/ < 0.5 m/s) expected to occur in a prototypical reactor geometry during a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA). Tests at high gas superficial velocities (j/sub g/ > 2 m/s) were also performed for comparison with semi-analytical predictions. Tests were conducted in two different test rigs, one with 10.2-cm (4-inch) diameter pipe, and the other with 30.5-cm (12-inch) diameter pipe. Results include average void fraction, amount of water carryover through the U-bend, transient flow rates and pressure histories, and video movies of the two-phase flow phenomena. Results of the 10.2-cm (4-inch) pipe tests show generally good agreement with the Taitel and Dukler (1) flow regime map for vertical pipes. For the 30.5-cm pipe tests, slug flow was not observed. Instead, as the air flow rate was increased, the flow regime progressed from bubbly to churn-type flow with the presence of large bubbles (approximately 15-cm diameter). The results also indicate that flow regimes and collapsed liquid level are more strongly dependent on air superficial velocity than the water superficial velocity and that the amount of water carryover for a given air flow rate is a strong function of collapsed water level (void fraction). Furthermore, the results show that similar thresholds for breakdown in natural circulation flow exist between the 10.2-cm and 30.5-cm pipe tests for gas and liquid superficial velocities expected in a SBLOCA. 20 refs., 24 figs.

  15. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod-bundle flow-blockage task: data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 11, main report and appendices A-J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  16. An archaeological survey of the proposed Camp Mohawk County Park in East-Central Brazoria County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-12

    with terminations include 4 feathered, 1 hinge, and 1 step. One lip flake and thr ee biface thinning flakes are also represented. One flake is of opal or opalized wood, and the rest are of local gravels. One flake has been crazed from heat, and another...

  17. Curriculum Vitae Michael Gelfond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    , Department of Mathematics. 1979 - 1980 Mohawk Data Science Corporation, Los Gatos, Ca. Design System

  18. Evidence for the inherent unsteadiness of a river plume: Satellite observations of the Niagara River discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horner-Devine, Alex

    consists of a semicircular bulge region immediately offshore of the mouth and a narrow current that propagates east along the shoreline. During the low-wind period from 27 to 29 May 1999, the width and Murthy 1992; Hickey et al. 1998) and in large ocean inflows (Lanoix 1974). Traditionally, models have

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison - IL 26Processing SiteYork,

  20. GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadisonAMOCOELIkNATION ;.7,? . -

  1. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF THE UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION METALS DIVISION PLANT, NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TACe - .' N"lr 7%

  2. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996)Price780Year JanYear Jan3a .Thousand

  3. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Marthrough 1996)Price780Year JanYear Jan3aFeet) Year Jan

  4. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing22, 2014 The Department of5 The0 The

  5. COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY P NIAGARA FALIS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I V E R A D T

  6. Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping new U.S.Use DOE-STD-3009

  7. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecade Year-0Decade Year-00Thousand

  8. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecade Year-0Decade

  9. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecade Year-0DecadeFeet) Decade

  10. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecade Year-0DecadeFeet)

  11. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecade Year-0DecadeFeet)Thousand

  12. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecade

  13. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecadeFeet) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  14. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayDecadeFeet) Decade Year-0

  15. Consolidation and disposal of PWR fuel inserts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeman, B.H. (Virginia Electric and Power Co., Glen Allen, VA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Design and licensing of the Surry Power Station Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation was initiated in 1982 by Virginia Power as part of a comprehensive strategy to increase spent fuel storage capacity at the Station. Designed to use large, metal dry storage casks, the Surry Installation will accommodate 84 such casks with a total storage capacity of 811 MTU of spent pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Virginia Power provided three storage casks for testing at the Idaho National Engineerinq Laboratory's Test Area North and the testing results have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute. Sixty-nine spent fuel assemblies were transported in truck casks from the Surry Power Station to Test Area North for testing in the three casks. Because of restrictions imposed by the cask testing equipment at Test Area North, the irradiated insert components stored in these fuel assemblies at Surry were removed prior to transport of the fuel assemblies. Retaining these insert components proved to be a problem because of a shortage of spent fuel assemblies in the spent fuel storage pool that did not already contain insert components. In 1987 Virginia Power contracted with Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. to process and dispose of 136 irradiated insert components consisting of 125 burnable poison rod assemblies, 10 thimble plugging devices and 1 part-length rod cluster control assembly. This work was completed in August and September 1987, culminating in the disposal at the Barnwell, SC low-level radioactive waste facility of two CNS 3-55 liners containing the consolidated insert components.

  16. TRAC independent assessment for PWR analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    LANL is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) for application to PWRs. Goal was to analyze large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), and the TRAC-P1A and TRAC-PD2 codes primarily addressed the large-break LOCA. The TRAC-PF1 code contained modifications which enhanced the computational speed of the code and improved its application to small-break LOCAs. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 code added improved steam-generator modeling, a turbine component, and a control system together with modified constitutive relations to model the balance of plant on the secondary side and to extend the applications to non-LOCA transients. During the past year we assessed TRAC-PD2, TRAC-PF1, and TRAC-PF1/MOD1, using LOFT and Semiscale experiments.

  17. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report.

  18. LOFT lead rod test results evaluation. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driskell, W.B.; Tolman, E.L.

    1980-07-30

    The purpose for evaluating the LOFT Lead Rod Test (simulations of large break, loss-of-coolant accidents) data was to determine; (a) if the centerline thermocouple and fuel rod elongation sensor data show indications of the collapsed fuel rod cladding, (b) the capability of the FRAP-T5 computer code to accurately predict cladding collapse, and (c) if cladding surface thermocouples enhance fuel rod cooling. With consideration to unresolved questions on data integrity, it was concluded that: the fuel rod centerline thermocouple and elongation sensor data do show indications of the fuel rod cladding collapse; the FRAP-T5 code conservatively predicts cladding collapse; and there is an indication that cladding surface thermocouples are enhancing fuel rod cooling.

  19. Fuel performance during severe accidents. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buescher, B.J.; Gruen, G.E.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage test program to evaluate fuel rod and core response during severe accidents similar to TMI-2. This program is underway in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In preparation for the first test, predictions have been performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer. This paper presents the calculated results showing a slow heatup to 2400 K over 5 hours, and the analysis includes accelerated oxidation of the zirconium cladding at temperatures above 1850 K.

  20. Cracked-fuel mechanics. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williford, R.E.; Lanning, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a modelling concept and a set of measurable parameters that have been shown to improve the prediction of the mechanical behavior of cracked fuel/cladding systems without added computational expense. The transition from classical annular gap/cylindrical pellet models to modified bulk properties and further to local behavior for cracked fuel systems is discussed. The results of laboratory experiments to verify these modelling parameters are shown. Data are also presented from laboratory experiments on unirradiated and irradiated rods which show that fuel rod mechanical response depends on fuel fragment size. The impact of these data on cracked fuel behavior and failure modelling is also discussed.

  1. PWR fuel performance program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunishi, H.; Miller, R.S.; Roberts, E.

    1985-09-01

    Tests of 15 x 15 and 17 x 17 fuel assemblies, irradiated at burnup levels well beyond the standard 33 GWd/MtU, showed that no inherent material limitations stand in the way of such assemblies achieving average burnups of approximately 55 GWd/MtU. The study also showed that cladding waterside corrosion can be minimized by controlling the lithium-to-boron ratio in the coolant to reduce crud deposition.

  2. Harquahala Valley Pwr District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynnMassachusetts: EnergySoftware IncHarmon, Illinois:Oklahoma:Harquahala

  3. Overhearing in 802.11 mesh networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afanasyev, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    through a port on an HP 2626-PWR switch. There are sevenuplink, but no neighbors in the mesh. ) CDF of nodes Pwr5 Pwr 10 Pwr 15 Pwr 20 Pwr 30 Pwr 40 Pwr 50 Pwr 60

  4. Combining water budgets and IFIM results for analyzing operation alternatives at peaking projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conners, M.E.; Homa, J. Jr. [Ichthyological Associates, Inc., Lansing, NY (United States); Carrington, G. [Northrup, Devine, and Tarbell, Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Licensing of hydropower projects often involves evaluating and comparing several different alternatives for project operation. Projects with peaking capabilities, in particular, are frequently required to compare peaking operation with substantially different alternatives, such as continuous run-of-the-river flows. Instream flow studies are used to assess the environmental impacts of hydropower operation by modeling the amount of aquatic habitat available at various flows. It can be difficult, however, to apply instream flow models downstream of peaking operations, or to present habitat model results in a way that clearly compares operation alternatives. This paper presents a two-stage analysis that was used in the successful negotiation of a licensing settlement for Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation`s Salmon River Project in upstate New York. A water budget model based on project configuration was used to compile flow-duration curves for the project under several alternative operating rules. A spreadsheet model was developed that combines the results of instream flow habitat models with flow-duration statistics. This approach provides a clear, quantitative comparison of the effect of alternative project operations on downstream aquatic habitat.

  5. PWR FLECHT SEASET unblocked bundle, forced and gravity reflood task. Data evaluation and analysis report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, N.; Wong, S.; Yeh, H.C.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1982-02-01

    This analysis of the unblocked bundle task data provides further understanding of reflood heat transfer mechanisms, which can be used for assessing prediction models. A new heat transfer correlation has been developed and shown to predict the FLECHT SEASET data as well as the older FLECHT data. The scaling logic of maintaining the same integrated power per unit flow area has been proved valid, and a method has been developed to calculate steam quality just above the quench front. Improved models for estimating effluence rate and preliminary exploration of the transition zone above the quench front are discussed. Droplet size and velocity data deduced from high-speed movies taken during the tests have led to better understanding of these parameters. A model has been proposed to predict the onset of droplet entrainment, and an analytical expression to predict critical void fraction developed. A network analysis of radiation heat exchange and calculation of convective heat transfer are among efforts expected to give better prediction for heat transfer and wall temperature transients. Recommendations evolving from the data analysis are also included.

  6. CGS-IAH Conf. Niagara Falls 2002 (to be published -confidential) INTERPRETATION OF FIELD TESTS TO DETERMINE THE OXYGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    from the atmosphere to the reactive tailings and hence control the production of acid mine drainage production du drainage minier acide (DMA). Le coefficient de diffusion effective De et le coefficient de taux conférence. 1. INTRODUCTION It is well known that acid mine drainage (AMD) ensuing from the oxidation

  7. CGS-IAH Conf. Niagara Falls 2002 (to be published -confidential) ANALYSES NUMRIQUES DES COULEMENTS NON SATURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    dumps. This aspect is particularly important for cases where acid mine drainage (AMD) may be produced ayant une composante hydrogéologique. Ainsi, le drainage minier acide (DMA), qui constitue probablement overcome this problem. Such inclined layers prevent internal drainage within dumps, as water is routed

  8. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District Office 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, New York, 14207

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1(DOE) isa briefd ' .~ t e

  9. DOE/OR/20722-133 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I V E9

  10. RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL I'IEASUREMENTS HIGHT{AYS 18 AI.ID IO4 IN NIAGARA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOGorPLEASE5 R A D I9s'

  11. RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOGorPLEASE5 R A D I9s'7At

  12. TRAC-PD2 analysis of FLECHT experiments. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bott, T.F.; Mandell, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes TRAC-PD2 calculations of FLECHT (Full Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer) tests 4831 and 17201. The calculations were performed as part of the TRAC-PD2 developmental assessment where the objective was to assess TRAC-PD2 reflood modeling under forced flooding conditions. Calculated and experimental values for peak fuel-rod clad temperature, clad quenching time, and rod bundle effluent rates are compared; and calculations with an approximate radiation heat-transfer model added to the basic TRAC-PD2 code are performed. Findings demonstrate the potential importance of surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer in these tests.

  13. Improved guidelines for RELAP4/MOD6 reflood calculations. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.H.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations were performed for an extensive selection of forced- and gravity-feed reflood experiments. This effort was a portion of the assessment procedure for the RELAP4/MOD6 thermal hydraulic computer code. A common set of guidelines, based on recommendations from the code developers, was used in determining the model and user-selected input options for each calculation. The comparison of code-calculated and experimental data was then used to assess the capability of the RELAP4/MOD6 code to model the reflood phenomena. As a result of the assessment, the guidelines for determining the user-selected input options were improved.

  14. Comparison of TRAC calculations with experimental data. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.F.; Vigil, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    TRAC is an advanced best-estimate computer code for analyzing postulated accidents in light water reactors. This paper gives a brief description of the code followed by comparisons of TRAC calculations with data from a variety of separate-effects, system-effects, and integral experiments. Based on these comparisons, the capabilities and limitations of the early versions of TRAC are evaluated.

  15. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 computer code. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    TRAC-PF1 was designed to improve the ability of TRAC-PD2 to handle small-break LOCAs and other transients. TRAC-PF1 has all of the major improvements of TRAC-PD2 but, in addition, uses a full two-fluid model with two-step numerics in the one-dimensional components. The two-fluid model, in conjunction with a stratified-flow regime, handles countercurrent flow better than the drift-flux model previously used. The two-step numerics allow large time steps to be taken for slow transients. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 was designed to provide full balance-of-plant modeling capabilities. This required addition of a general capability for modeling plant control systems. The steam generator model was replaced to allow a wider variety of feedwater connections and better modeling of steam tube ruptures. A special turbine component also has been added, but new components were not required for adequate modeling of condensors, heaters, and pumps in the secondary system.

  16. Integrated TRAC/MELPROG analyses of a PWR station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henninger, R.; Dearing, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The first complete, coupled, and largely mechanistic analysis of the entire reactor-coolant system during a station blackout (TMLB') core-meltdown accident has been made with MELPROG/TRAC. The calculation was initiated at the start of the transient and ended with a late recovery of cooling. Additional cooling provided by water from the primary system delayed events relative to a standalone MELPROG calculation. Natural circulation within the vessel was established and primary-relief-valve action did little to disturb this flow. In addition, it was calculated directly that the hot leg reached a failure temperature long before vessel failure. Beyond relocation of the core, we have calculated the boiloff of the water in the lower head and have estimated the time of vessel failure to be at about 14,700 s into the transient. For ''nominal'' corium-water heat transfer, the boiloff process (steam-production rate) is slow enough that the relief valves prevent pressurization beyond 17.5 MPa. Parametric cases with increased corium-water heat transfer resulted in steaming rates beyond the capability of the relief valves, leading to pressures in excess of 19.2 MPa. Natural convection flow around the loop, if started by removing the water in the loop seal, was blocked by a relatively less-dense hydrogen/steam mixture that flowed to the top of the steam generator. Emergency core-cooling system activation late in the transient (after core slump) resulted in rapid cooling of the periphery of the debris region but slower cooling in the interior regions because of poor water penetration.

  17. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration. [PWR; BWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P. Jr.

    1980-06-06

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  18. Hydrogen production during fragmented debris/concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Blose, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    In the unlikely event that molten core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete and structural materials become the driving forces for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia Laboratories is a research effort to characterize the nature of these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as hydrogen generation, aerosol production, and fission product release that arise because of the melt/concrete interactions.

  19. Prediction of quench and rewet temperatures. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunnerson, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Many postulated nuclear reactor accidents result in high-temperature dryout or film boiling within the nuclear core. In order to mitigate potential fuel rod damage or rod failure, safe or lower fuel rod temperatures must be reestablished by promoting coolant/cladding contact. This process is commonly referred to as quenching or rewetting, and often, these terms are not differentiated. All theoretical predictions of the cooling process by various models based on single or multidimensional analytical and numerical studies require a knowledge of either the quenching or the rewetting temperature. The purpose of this paper is to define quench and rewet temperatures and present a method whereby each may be estimated.

  20. SPEAR fuel reliability code system. General description. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, R.

    1980-03-01

    A general description is presented for the SPEAR fuel reliability code system. Included is a discussion of the methodology employed and the structure of the code system, as well as discussion of the major components: the data preparation routines, the mechanistic fuel performance model, the mechanistic cladding failure model, and the statistical failure model.

  1. PBF LOCA test LOC-6 fuel-behavior report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broughton, T.M.; Vinjamuri, K.; Hagrman, D.L.; Golden, D.W.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the results of Loss-of-Coolant (LOC) Test LOC-6, conducted in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Postirradiation examination results are included, together with the results of thermal-hydraulic and fuel behavior calculations using the RELAP4 and FRAP-T6/BALON-2 computer codes. Two of the four light water reactor type fuel rods ballooned and ruptured during the test. Peak cladding temperatures at the rupture locations were high in the alpha phase (1066 and 1098/sup 0/K). The effects of initial rod internal prepressurization and prior irradiation were investigated during the experiment. The effect of rod prepressurization was found to be significant, and, for burnups of about 17,000 MWd/t, prior irradiation increased cladding circumferential strains at failure.

  2. Core melt/coolant interactions: modelling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.; McGlaun, J.M.; Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If there is not adequate cooling water in the core of a light-water reactor (LWR), the fission product decay heat would eventually cause the reactor fuel and cladding to melt. This could lead to slumping of the molten core materials into the lower plenum of the reactor vessel, possibly followed by failure of the vessel wall and pouring of the molten materials into the reactor cavity. When the molten core materials enter either region, there is a strong possibility of molten core contacting water. This paper focuses on analysis of recent FITS experiments, mechanistic and probabilistic model development, and the application of these models to reactor considerations.

  3. Severe fuel-damage scoping test performance. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, G.E.; Buescher, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage test program to evaluate fuel rod and core response during severe accidents similar to TMI-2. The first test of Phase I of this series has been successfully completed in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Following the first test, calculations were performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code with actual experimental boundary conditions. This paper discusses the test conduct and performance and presents the calculated and measured test bundle results. The test resulted in a slow heatup to 2000 K over about 4 h, with an accelerated reaction of the zirconium cladding at temperatures above 1600 K in the lower part or the bundle and 2000 K in the upper portion of the bundle.

  4. Relocation and freezing of liquefied fuel-rod material. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, R.L.; Broughton, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Severe degraded core cooling accidents, such as occurred at TMI-2 can potentially reach temperatures in excess of cladding melting. When the molten cladding is in contact with UO/sub 2/ fuel, the UO/sub 2/ will be dissolved contributing significantly to the total amount of liquefied material flowing down the rod and eventually freezing in a lower, cooler region of the core. The primary objectives of this paper are to evaluate the relocation and freezing characteristics of liquefied fuel rod material over a wide range of system conditions, physical characteristics of the fuel rod and liquefied material, and material thermo-physical properties to determine the relative influence of the controlling parameters. First the analytical model used in the analysis is briefly reviewed. The results of the analyses are then presented and discussed, and this is followed by the conclusions.

  5. Thermometry in the multirod burst test program. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.L.; Carr, K.R.; Kollie, T.G.

    1982-03-01

    A temperature measurement error analysis was performed for the Type S (0.25-mm-diam, bare-wire) and Type K (0.71-mm-diam, sheathed) thermocouple circuits used to measure the temperature of the Zircaloy-clad, electrically heated fuel-rod simulators in the Multirod Burst Test program (MRBT) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). An important objective of the MRBT program is to improve the understanding of the behavior of the Zircaloy cladding of nuclear fuel rods under conditions postulated for a large-break, loss-of-coolant accident. Eight categories of error sources were studied both analytically and experimentally: thermal shunting; electrical shuntng and leakage; thermocouple calibration; thermocouple decalibration in service; thermoelectric properties of thermocouple extension wire, plugs, and jacks; thermocouple reference junction; data acquisition system; and electrical noise.

  6. Fuel axial relocation in ballooning fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel movement, in the longitudinal direction in ballooning fuel rods, shifts the position of heat generation and may cause an increase in cladding temperature in the ballooning region. This paper summarizes the axial fuel relocation data obtained in fuel rod tests conducted in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany, describes a model for calculating fuel axial relocation, and gives a quantitative analysis of the impact of fuel relocation on cladding temperature. The amount of fuel relocation in 18 ballooned fuel rods was determined from neutron radiographs, niobium gamma decay counts, and photomicrographs. The fuel rods had burnups in the range of 0 to 35,000 MWd/t and cladding hoop strains varying from 0 to 72%.

  7. Structure of high-burnup-fuel Zircaloy cladding. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H.M.

    1983-06-01

    Zircaloy cladding from high-burnup (> 20 MWd/kg U) fuel rods in light-water reactors is characterized by a high density of irradiation-induced defects (RID), compositional changes (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen uptake) associated with in-service corrosion, and geometrical changes produced by creepdown, bowing, and irradiation-induced growth. During a reactor power transient, the cladding is subject to localized stress imposed by thermal expansion of the cracked fuel pellets and to mechanical constraints imposed by pellet-cladding friction. As part of a program to provide a better understanding of brittle-type failure of Zircaloy fuel cladding by pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) phenomenon, the stress-rupture properties and microstructural characteristics of high-burnup spent fuel cladding have been under investigation. This paper reports the results of the microstructural examinations by optical microscopy, scanning (SEM), 100-keV transmission (TEM), and 1 MeV high-voltage (HVEM) electron microscopies of the fractured spent fuel cladding with a specific empahsis on a correlation of the structural characteristics with the fracture behavior.

  8. Temperature estimates from zircaloy oxidation kinetics and microstructures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    This report reviews state-of-the-art capability to determine peak zircaloy fuel rod cladding temperatures following an abnormal temperature excursion in a nuclear reactor, based on postirradiation metallographic analysis of zircaloy microstructural and oxidation characteristics. Results of a comprehensive literature search are presented to evaluate the suitability of available zircaloy microstructural and oxidation data for estimating anticipated reactor fuel rod cladding temperatures. Additional oxidation experiments were conducted to evaluate low-temperature zircaloy oxidation characteristics for postirradiation estimation of cladding temperature by metallographic examination. Results of these experiments were used to calculate peak cladding temperatures of electrical heater rods and nuclear fuel rods that had been subjected to reactor temperature transients. Comparison of the calculated and measured peak cladding temperatures for these rods indicates that oxidation kinetics is a viable technique for estimating peak cladding temperatures over a broad temperature range. However, further improvement in zircaloy microstructure technology is necessary for precise estimation of peak cladding temperatures by microstructural examination.

  9. Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

    2013-01-01

    High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

  10. Support arrangements for core modules of nuclear reactors. [PWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1983-11-03

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  11. Minor Actinides Transmutation Scenario Studies in PWR with Innovative Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grouiller, J. P.; Boucher, L.; Golfier, H.; Dolci, F.; Vasile, A.; Youinou, G.

    2003-02-26

    With the innovative fuels (CORAIL, APA, MIX, MOX-UE) in current PWRs, it is theoretically possible to obtain different plutonium and minor actinides transmutation scenarios, in homogeneous mode, with a significant reduction of the waste radio-toxicity inventory and of the thermal output of the high level waste. Regarding each minor actinide element transmutation in PWRs, conclusions are : neptunium : a solution exists but the gain on the waste radio-toxicity inventory is not significant, americium : a solution exists but it is necessary to transmute americium with curium to obtain a significant gain, curium: Cm244 has a large impact on radiation and residual power in the fuel cycle; a solution remains to be found, maybe separating it and keeping it in interim storage for decay into Pu240 able to be transmuted in reactor.

  12. Estimation of structural reliability under combined loads. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, M.; Kako, T.; Hwang, H.; Brown, P.; Reich, M.

    1983-01-01

    For the overall safety evaluation of seismic category I structures subjected to various load combinations, a quantitative measure of the structural reliability in terms of a limit state probability can be conveniently used. For this purpose, the reliability analysis method for dynamic loads, which has recently been developed by the authors, was combined with the existing standard reliability analysis procedure for static and quasi-static loads. The significant parameters that enter into the analysis are: the rate at which each load (dead load, accidental internal pressure, earthquake, etc.) will occur, its duration and intensity. All these parameters are basically random variables for most of the loads to be considered. For dynamic loads, the overall intensity is usually characterized not only by their dynamic components but also by their static components. The structure considered in the present paper is a reinforced concrete containment structure subjected to various static and dynamic loads such as dead loads, accidental pressure, earthquake acceleration, etc. Computations are performed to evaluate the limit state probabilities under each load combination separately and also under all possible combinations of such loads.

  13. INTERCOMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIAMOND,D.J.; ARONSON,A.; JO,J.; AVVAKUMOV,A.; MALOFEEV,V.; SIDOROV,V.; FERRARESI,P.; GOUIN,C.; ANIEL,S.; ROYER,M.E.

    1999-10-01

    This study is part of an overall program to understand the uncertainty in best-estimate calculations of the local fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident. Local fuel enthalpy is used as the acceptance criterion for this design-basis event and can also be used to estimate fuel damage for the purpose of determining radiological consequences. The study used results from neutron kinetics models in PARCS, BARS, and CRONOS2, codes developed in the US, the Russian Federation, and France, respectively. Since BARS uses a heterogeneous representation of the fuel assembly as opposed to the homogeneous representations in PARCS and CRONOS, the effect of the intercomparison was primarily to compare different intra-assembly models. Quantitative comparisons for core power, reactivity, assembly fuel enthalpy and pin power were carried out. In general the agreement between methods was very good providing additional confidence in the codes and providing a starting point for a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in calculated fuel enthalpy using best-estimate methods.

  14. Wire wrapped fuel pin hexagonal arrays for PWR service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diller, Peter Ray

    2005-01-01

    This work contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). Core design is ...

  15. Component failures that lead to reactor scrams. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Lim, E. Y.

    1980-04-01

    This report summarizes the operating experience scram data compiled from 35 operating US light water reactors (LWRs) to identify the principal components/systems related to reactor scrams. The data base utilized to identify the scram causes is developed from a EPRI-utility sponsored survey conducted by SAI coupled with recent data from the USNRC Gray Books. The reactor population considered in this evaluation is limited to 23 PWRs and 12 BWRs because of the limited scope of the program. The population includes all the US NSSS vendors. It is judged that this population accurately characterizes the component-related scrams in LWRs over the first 10 years of plant operation.

  16. Sam Rayburn Municipal Pwr Agny | Open Energy Information

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  16. Vermont Yankee Nucl Pwr Corp | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairex CorporationVerenium CorporationPublicVermont

  17. Western Minnesota Mun Pwr Agny | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWeVirginiaElectric Assn IncWestern

  18. Cuming County Public Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)|Alabama:Crofton,DevelopingMaine: Energy ResourcesCuming

  19. Keosauqua Municipal Light & Pwr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItronKanosh TownKenetech/WintechSmallholder

  20. Arizona Electric Pwr Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump| OpenExplorationArgentina:

  1. Wolverine Pwr Supply Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: navigation, search Name: WisconsinWPowerSupply

  2. Cuming County Public Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9) Wind Farm Jump to:

  3. Northwest Rural Pub Pwr Dist | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork Electric Coop, Inc JumpNorthwest Rural Pub

  4. Property:EnvReviewPwrPlantSiting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search

  5. Nordisk kernesikkerhedsforskning Norrnar kjarnryggisrannsknir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................................................................6 2.2. PWR TS

  6. SOURCES OF HYDROGRAPHIC AND METERIOLOGICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Clair - Detroit River Lake Erie ·· Niagara River · · · · Lake Ontario · · · · Table 2. Inland data. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, Detroit River, and Niagara River) 75 6. Orientation chart, Lake 0 nt ar io

  7. ORNL/RASA-85/1 RESULTS OF THE II4OBILE GAMMA SCANNING ACTIVITIES IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEvl YORK AREA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOGor _^ 4q-utSPJ\e?Ll (

  8. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) used nuclear fuel. The firstrepository tunnels, the PWR type of used fuel is typicallyby the length of individual PWR fuel elements and the number

  9. From rational numbers to algebra: Separable contributions of decimal magnitude and relational understanding of fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWolf, M; Bassok, M; Holyoak, KJ

    2015-01-01

    disseminated broadly. OTO fraction PWR NOTO fraction Decimala part- to-whole ratio (PWR) is the relation between theof relationships. The PWR is a conventional relationship for

  10. T? tunable porous silicon iron oxide nanocomposites for magnetic resonance imaging guided drug delivey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ananda Yogendran, Shalini

    2012-01-01

    > y) & (0 z)) if (sqrt(pwr(x-xpos[sphere],2) + pwr (y-ypos[sphere],2)+pwr( z-zpos[sphere], 2)) <=sphere_radius) { int

  11. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steefel, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) used nuclear fuel. The firstrepository tunnels, the PWR type of used fuel is typicallyby the length of individual PWR fuel elements and the number

  12. A vascular access system (VAS) for preclinical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry-Pusey, Brittany Nan

    2012-01-01

    control system for the VAS include SIGNAL PWR GND SIGNALK7 K7 PWR GNDSIGNAL PWR GND SIGNAL ´ SHLD FWD REV ENC ENC GND DIR DIR

  13. A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croft, S.

    2012-01-01

    Determining Fissile Content in PWR Spent Fuel Assembliesalong the length of several PWR fuel rods (including somebeen studied for a wide range of PWR assembly cases and two

  14. Probabilistic analysis of allowed outage times relaxation at a PWR plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, N.; Chu, T.; Xue, D.; Bozoki, G.; Youngblood, R.

    1986-01-01

    Technical Specifications (TS) in a nuclear power plant are specific requirements on its day-to-day operation, designed to protect public health and safety. Two primary aspects of the TS are (1) limiting conditions of operation (LCO) with allowed outage times (AOTs) and (2) surveillance testing intervals (STIs). In recent years, there has been growing interest in the nuclear community in reexamining the TS. One of the reasons is that a significant portion of reactor downtime (plant unavailability) is attributable to the strict TS. Existing TS were derived from engineering judgement based on deterministic review; they were not directly risk-based, and their efficacy in enhancing public safety is difficult to establish. This paper presents a summary of a critical review of the Westinghouse report which proposed that AOTs for a number of safety systems at the Byron Generating Station be increased from 3 to 7 days.

  15. Analysis of operating data related to power and flow distribution in a PWR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Henry Christophe

    1974-01-01

    The analysis of the effects of the uncertainties associated with temperature and power measurements in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor leads to the evaluation of the uncertainty associated with the effective flow factor. ...

  16. Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

  17. Posttest TRAC-PD2/MOD1 predictions for FLECHT SEASET test 31504. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, C.P.

    1982-01-01

    TRAC-PD2/MOD1 is a publicly released version of TRAC that is used primarily to analyze large-break loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). TRAC-PD2 can calculate, among other things, reflood phenomena. TRAC posttest predictions are compared with test 31504 reflood data from the Full-Length Emergency Core Heat Transfer (FLECHT) System Effects and Separate Effects Tests (SEASET) facility. A false top-down quench is predicted near the top of the core and the subcooling is underpredicted at the bottom of the core. However, the overall TRAC predictions are good, especially near the center of the core.

  18. TRAC-PD2 modeling of LOFT and PWR small cold-leg breaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, T.D.; Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.; Lime, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. TRAC-PD2, the latest publicly released version of the code, is currently being tested against small-break and other transients in experimental facilities; it is also being used to analyze postulated accidents in commercial power reactors. Calculated results for LOFT small-break experiments are compared to data, and the results from two small-break calculations for two different reactor systems are presented. It is concluded that TRAC-PD2 is useful for the analysis of cold-leg small-break accidents.

  19. TRAC analysis of the system pressure effects tests in the Slab Core Test Facility. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis, using the TRAC computer code, of three system pressure effects reflood tests performed during 1981 at the Slab Core Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokai, Japan. Comparisons of the calculated results with the experimental data were very good, particularly for rod temperature histories, core differential pressures, mass inventories, liquid carryover, and fluid velocities in the loops. These comparisons indicate that the TRAC code can predict reasonably well the effects of pressure variations in test conditions. This and similar calculations demonstrate that TRAC is a useful tool for the design of nuclear reactor systems and the analysis of system response during postulated accident sequences.

  20. Design and fuel management of PWR cores to optimize the once-through fuel cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, Edward Kei

    The once-through fuel cycle has been analyzed to see if there are substantial prospects for improved uranium ore utilization in current

  1. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

  2. WAPD-SC-545 HYDROGEN FLAMMABILITY DATA AND APPLICATION TO PWR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    order. CO2 N2 He A To render any mixture of hydrogen and air harmless, 11 volumes of helium, or 10.2 volumes of CO2 per volume of combustible mixture are required. ' Division...

  3. Liquid level, void fraction, and superheated steam sensor for nuclear-reactor cores. [PWR; BWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-10-27

    This disclosure relates to an apparatus for monitoring the presence of coolant in liquid or mixed liquid and vapor, and superheated gaseous phases at one or more locations within an operating nuclear reactor core, such as pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor.

  4. Attack of fragmented-core debris on concrete in the presence of water. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Bradley, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the unlikely event that core debris escapes the reactor pressure vessel, the interactions of the debris with concrete, structural materials, and coolant become the driving force for severe accident phenomena. The Ex-Vessel Core Debris Interactions Program at Sandia National Laboratories is an experimental research effort to characterize these interactions and the magnitude of safety-related phenomena such as flammable gas generation, aerosol production, fission product release, and concrete attack. Major areas of study within the program include molten core simultants in contact with concrete, high pressure melt streaming into scaled reactor cavities, the addition of coolant to high-temperature melt/concrete interactions, and the attack of hot, solid core debris on concrete. This paper describes results from the last of these efforts, i.e., hot, but not molten debris attacking concrete.

  5. Aerosol source term in high-pressure-melt ejection. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, J.E.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    Pressurized ejection of melt from a reactor pressure vessel has been identified as an important element of a severe reactor accident. Copious aerosol production is observed when thermitically generated melts pressurized with nitrogen or carbon dioxide to 1.3 to 17 MPa are ejected into an air atmosphere. Aerosol particle size distributions measured in the tests have modes of about 0.5, 5, and > 10..mu..m. Mechanisms leading to formation of these multimodal size distributions are suggested. This aerosol is a potentially important fission product source term which has not been considered in previous severe accident analyses.

  6. Impact of PWR spent fuel variations on TRU-fueled VHTRS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde

    2009-05-15

    yield per 17 fission was linear. Based on the increasing neutron production at fast energies, fission of TRU nuclide may be more likely at these energies. T o t a l N e u t r o n Y i e l d p e r F i s s i o n 2 .0 2 .5 3 .0 3 .5 4 .0 4... n c i d e n t n e u t r o n ( e V ) N u m b e r o f n e u t r o n s r e l e a s e d p e r n e u t r o n a b s o r b e d E N D F / B 6 . 8 (a) ENDF/B6.8 N u m b e r o f n e u t r o n s r e l e a s e d p e r n e u t r o...

  7. Multi-Recycling of Transuranic Elements in a Modified PWR Fuel Assembly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Alex

    2012-10-19

    The nuclear waste currently generated in the United States is stored in spent fuel pools and dry casks throughout the country awaiting a permanent disposal solution. One efficient solution would be to remove the actinides from the waste...

  8. Pwr fuel assembly optimization using adaptive simulated annealing coupled with translat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Timothy James

    2009-05-15

    assembly to be used in an operating nuclear power reactor. The two main cases of optimization are: one that finds the optimal 235U enrichment layout of the fuel pins in the assembly and another that finds both the optimal 235U enrichments where gadolinium...

  9. The comparison of available data on PWR assembly thermal behavior with analytical predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jack S. H.

    The comparison of available data with analytical predictions has been illustrated in this report. Since few data on the cross flow are available, a study of parameters in the transverse momentum equation were performed to ...

  10. Prediction of departure from nucleate boiling in PWR fast power transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenci, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    An assessment is conducted of the differences in predicted results between use of steady state versus transient Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) models, for fast power transients under forced convective heat exchange ...

  11. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor. [PWR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVolpi, A.

    1984-07-20

    The invention provides improved means for detecting the water levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting the density of the water in these regions. The invention utilizes a plurality of exterior gamma radiation detectors and a collimator technique operable to sense separate regions of the reactor vessel to give respectively, unique signals for these regions, whereby comparative analysis of these signals can be used to advise of the presence and density of cooling water in the vessel.

  12. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Germina; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  13. Analytical model for transient gas flow in nuclear fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, D.S.; Oehlberg, R.N.

    1981-08-01

    An analytical model for calculating gas flow and pressure inside a nuclear fuel rod is presented. Such a model is required to calculate the pressure loading of cladding during ballooning that could occur for postulated reactor accidents. The mathematical model uses a porous media (permeability) concept to define the resistance to gas flow along the fuel rod. 7 refs.

  14. Variations in Zircaloy-4 cladding deformation in replicate LOCA simulation tests. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longest, A.W.; Crowley, J.L.; Chapman, R.H.

    1982-09-01

    Five single-rod, heated-shroud replicate burst tests were conducted to study statistical variations in Zircaloy cladding deformation under simulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The test conditions used (low steam coolant flow and a heating rate of approx. 10 K/s to tube failure at approx. 775/sup 0/C) were conductive to large deformation and matched those used in two of the Multirod Burst Test Program bundle tests so that the results could be used to aid in interpretation of differences observed for individual rods in bundle tests. The largest variation observed was in burst strain, which ranged from 50 to 96%. Burst temperature ranged from 767 to 779/sup 0/C, burst pressure from 9405 to 9870 kPa, average strain over the heated length from 18 to 23%, and tube volume increase from 39 to 51%. As expected, cladding deformation was influenced by small temperature gradients: the more uniform the temperature, the greater (and more uniform) the deformation.

  15. Experiment data report for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundle B-6. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R H; Longest, A W; Crowley, J L

    1984-07-01

    A reference source of MRBT bundle B-6 test data is presented with minimum interpretation. The primary objective of this 8 x 8 multirod burst test was to investigate cladding deformation in the alpha-plus-beta-Zircaloy temperature range under simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. B-6 test conditions simulated the adiabatic heatup (reheat) phase of an LOCA and produced very uniform temperature distributions. The fuel pin simulators were electrically heated (average linear power generation of 1.42 kW/m) and were slightly cooled with a very low flow (Re approx. 140) of low-pressure superheated steam. The cladding temperature increased from the initial temperature (330/sup 0/C) to the burst temperature at a rate of 3.5/sup 0/C/s. The simulators burst in a very narrow temperature range, with an average of 930/sup 0/C. Cladding burst strain ranged from 21 to 56%, with an average of 31%. Volumetric expansion over the heated length of the cladding ranged from 16 to 32%, with an average of 23%. 23 references.

  16. Multirod burst test program. Progress report, July-December 1979. [BWR; PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R.H.

    1980-08-01

    A series of scoping tests designed to explore the effect of shroud heating on Zircaloy cladding deformation was conducted in the single-rod test facility, which was recently modified to permit independent heating of the shroud under specified conditions. To facilitate comparison of the test results, the series included tests under conditions used previously. Significantly greater deformation was observed in heated shroud tests than would be expected from unheated stroud tests. Fabrication of fuel pin simulators for the B-5 (8 x 8) bundle test continued with approx.90% of the required number being completed. Five fuel pin simulators, identical to the simulators used in the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute multirod bundle burst tests, were delivered by the Japanese manufacturer. The surface temperature distribution of the simulators was characterized for several heating rates by infrared scanning and was compared to similar characterizations of Oak Ridge National Laboratory simulators. Plans are under way for conducting burst tests on the Japanese simulators in the single-rod test facility. 14 refs., 116 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Experiment prediction for LOFT nuclear experiments L5-1/L8-2. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The LOFT Experiments L5-1 and L8-2 simulated intermediate break loss-of-coolant accidents with core uncovery. This paper compares the predictions with the measured data for these experiments. The RELAP5 code was used to perform best estimate double-blind and single-blind predictions. The double-blind calculations are performed prior to the experiment and use specified nominal initial and boundary conditions. The single-blind calculations are performed after the experiment and use measured initial and boundary conditions while maintaining all other parameters constant, including the code version. Comparisons of calculated results with experimental results are discussed; the possible causes of discrepancies are explored and explained. RELAP5 calculated system pressure, mass inventory, and fuel cladding temperature agree reasonably well with the experiment results, and only slight changes are noted between the double-blind and single-blind predictions.

  18. Experimental study of the deformation of Zircaloy PWR fuel rod cladding under mainly convective cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens 450 mm long were filled with alumina pellets and tested at temperatures between 630 and 915 degree C in flowing steam at atmospheric pressure. Internal test pressures were in the range 0.69 to 11.0 MPa. The length of cladding strained 33 percent or more was greatest (about 20 times the original diameter) when the initial pressure was 1.38/plus or minus/0.17MPa. This results from oxidation strengthening of the surface layers acting as an additional mechanism for stabilizing the deformation or partial superplastic deformation, or both. For adjacent rods in a fuel assembly not to touch at any temperature, the pressure would have to be less than about 1 MPa. These results are compared with those form multirod tests elsewhere, and it is suggested that heat transfer has a dominant effect in determining deformation. The implications for the behavior of fuel elements in a loss-of-coolant accident are outlined. 37 refs.

  19. Thermal-hydraulics of the PFB/LOFT lead rod loss-of-coolant experiments. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Garner, R.W.; MacDonald, P.E.; Cox, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of the four PBF/LOFT Lead Rod sequential blowdown tests conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are presented. The primary objective of the test series was to evaluate the extent of mechanical deformation that would be expected to occur to low pressure (0.1 MPa), light water reactor design fuel rods subjected to a series of nuclear blowdown tests, and to determine if subjecting deformed fuel rods to subsequent testing would result in rod failure. The extent of mechanical deformation (buckling, collapse, or waisting of the cladding) was evaluated by comparison of cladding temperature versus system pressure response with out-of-pile experimental data, and by posttest visual examinations and cladding diametral measurements. Tests LLR-3, LLR-5, LLR-4, and LLR-4A were performed at system conditions of 595/sup 0/K coolant inlet temperature, 15.5 MPa system pressure, and 41, 46, 57 and 56 kW/m test rod peak linear powers, respectively, at initiation of blowdown. Cladding temperatures during the tests ranged from 870 to 1260/sup 0/K.

  20. FRAP-T5 predictions during reactor shutdown events. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, G.B.; Laats, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Transient Fuel Rod Analysis Program, FRAP-T5, was recently assessed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. As part of this assessment, the measured and FRAP-T5 predicted fuel centerline temperature response during reactor shutdown events were compared. For these events either forced convection or nucleate boiling boundary conditions existed, resulting in a negligible effect on fuel behavior from cladding temperature and deformation uncertainties. This allowed the assessment of internal heat transfer to be emphasized.

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1984. Volume 3. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from July 1 through September 30, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted in the NRU Reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

  2. Simulated dry storage test of a spent PWR nuclear fuel assembly in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.; Oden, D.R.; Stidham, D.L.; Garnier, J.E.; Weeks, D.L.; Dobbins, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    The purpose of the dry storage test was to investigate the behavior of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in air between 200 and 275/sup 0/C. Atmospheric air was used for the cover gas because of the interest in establishing regimes where air inleakage into an initially inert system would not cause potential fuel degradation. Samples of the cover gas atmosphere were extracted monthly to determine fission gas concentrations as a function of time. The oxygen concentration was monitored to detect oxygen depletion, which would signal oxidation of the fuel. The gas analyses indicated very low but detectable levels of /sup 85/Kr during the first month of the test. A large increase (five orders of magnitude) in /sup 85/Kr and the appearance of helium in the cover gas indicated that a fuel rod had breached during the second month of the test. Stress rupture calculations showed that the stresses and temperatures were too low to expect breaches to form in defect-free cladding. It is theorized that the breach occurred in a fuel rod weakened by an existing cladding or end cap defect. Calculations based on the rate of /sup 85/Kr release suggest that the diameter of the initial breach was about 25 microns. A post-test fuel examination will be performed to locate and investigate the cause of the cladding breach and to determine if detectable fuel degradation progressed after the breach occurred. The post-test evaluation will define the consequences of a fuel rod breach occurring in an air cover gas at 270/sup 0/C, followed by subsequent exposure to air at a prototypic descending temperature.

  3. Microstructural characteristics of PWR spent fuel relative to its leaching behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1985-11-01

    Microstructural, compositional and thermochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel are discussed relative to its potential performance as a high-level waste form under proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project tuff repository conditions. Pressurized water reactor spent fuel specimens with various artificially induced cladding defects were leach tested in deionized water and in a reference tuff groundwater under ambient hot cell air and temperature conditions. Greater fractional actinide release was observed with bare fuel than with clad fuel leached through a cladding defect. Congruent actinide release and preferential release of cesium and technetium were observed in both water types. Selected summary radionuclide release data are presented and correlated to pre- and post-test microstructural characterization data.

  4. Experiment data report for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) Bundle B-5. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R H; Crowley, J L; Longest, A W

    1984-08-01

    A reference source of MRBT bundle B-5 test data is presented with interpretation limited to that necessary to understand pertinent features of the test. Primary objectives of this 8 x 8 multirod burst test were to investigate the effects of array size and rod-to-rod interactions on cladding deformation in the high-alpha-Zircaloy temperature range under simulated light-water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. B-5 test conditions, nominally the same as used in an earlier 4 x 4 (B-3) test, simulated the adiabatic heatup (reheat) phase of an LOCA and were conducive to large deformation. The fuel pin simulators were electrically heated (average linear power generation of 3.0 kW/m) and were slightly cooled with a very low flow (Re approx. 140) of low-pressure superheated steam. The cladding temperature increased from the initial temperature (335/sup 0/C) to the burst temperature at a rate of 9.8/sup 0/C/s. The simulators burst in a very narrow temperature range, with an average of 768/sup 0/C. Cladding burst strain ranged from 32% to 95%, with an average of 61%. Volumetric expansion over the heated length of the cladding ranged from 35% to 79%, with an average of 52%. The results clearly show deformation was greater in the bundle interior and suggest rod-to-rod mechanical interactions caused axial propagation of the deformation.

  5. Analysis of molten debris freezing and wall erosion during a severe RIA test. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Moore, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional physical model was developed to study the transient freezing of the molten debris layer (a mixture of UO/sub 2/ fuel and zircaloy cladding) produced in a severe reactivity initiated accident in-pile test and deposited on the inner surface of the test shroud wall. The wall had a finite thickness and was cooled along its outer surface by coolant bypass flow. Analyzed are the effects of debris temperature, radiation cooling at the debris layer surface, zircaloy volume ratio within the debris, and initial wall temperature on the transient freezing of the debris layer and the potential melting of the wall. The governing equations of this two-component, simultaneous freezing and melting problem in a finite geometry were solved using a one-dimensional finite element code based on the method of weighted residuals.

  6. Microstructural characteristics of PWR [pressurized water reactor] spent fuel relative to its leaching behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural, compositional and thermochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel are discussed relative to its potential performance as a high-level waste form under proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project tuff repository conditions. Pressurized water reactor spent fuel specimens with various artificially induced cladding defects were leach tested in deionized water and in a reference tuff groundwater under ambient hot cell air and temperature conditions. Greater fractional actinide release was observed with bare fuel than with clad fuel leached through a cladding defect. Congruent actinide release and preferential release of cesium and technetium were observed in both water types. Selected summary radionuclide release data are presented and correlated to pre- and post-test microstructural characterization data.

  7. Effect of bundle size on cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.; Longest, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    Two LOCA simulation tests were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature uniformity and radial restraint boundary conditions on Zircaloy cladding deformation. In one of the tests (B-5), boundary conditions typical of a large array were imposed on an inner 4 x 4 square array by two concentric rings of interacting guard fuel pin simulators. In the other test (B-3), the boundary conditions were imposed on a 4 x 4 square array by a non-interacting heated shroud. Test parameters conducive to large deformation were selected in order to favor rod-to-rod interactions. The tests showed that rod-to-rod interactions play an important role in the deformation process.

  8. Steady-state pressure losses for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundle B-5. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, R.T.

    1982-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has undertaken the Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) program for the purpose of characterizing the deformation behavior of unirradiated fuel cladding. As part of this program, ORNL contracted with the Babcock and Wilcox company (B and W) to obtain experimental hydraulic data for one of the MRBT bundles. This report presents the data that describe the pressure loss characteristics of Multirod Burst Test Bundle B-5 and a reference or pre-burst geometry bundle. The 8 x 8-rod bundles were flow tested at Reynolds numbers between 17,700 nd 177,000. For each of the five test flow rates, the static pressures at 480 points on the perimeter of the bundles were measured. The total pressure loss for the B-5 bundle showed about a fourfold increase over that for the reference geometry bundle. The shape of the axial pressure loss profile for the B-5 bundle agreed with the observed distribution of the clad deformations. The experimental data presented in this report will be used as one of essential inputs to the continuing analytical work at ORNL.

  9. Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700/sup 0/F).

  10. LOCA analyses for nuclear steam supply systems with upper head injection. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byers, R.K.; Bartel, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    The term Upper Head Injection describes a relatively new addition to a nuclear reactor's emergency cooling system. With this feature, water is delivered directly to the top of the reactor vessel during a loss-of-coolant accident, in addition to the later injection of coolant into the primary operating loops. Established computer programs, with various modifications to models for heat transfer and two-phase flow, were used to analyze a transient following a large break in one of the main coolant loops of a reactor equipped with upper head injection. The flow and heat transfer modifications combined to yield fuel cladding temperatures during blowdown which were as much as 440K (800/sup 0/F) lower than were obtained with standard versions of the codes (for best estimate calculations). The calculations also showed the need for more uniformity of applications of heat transfer models in the computer programs employed.

  11. Influence of FRAPCON-1 evaluation models on fuel behavior calculations for commercial power reactors. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, R.; Laats, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary set of nine evaluation models (EMs) was added to the FRAPCON-1 computer code, which is used to calculate fuel rod behavior in a nuclear reactor during steady-state operation. The intent was to provide an audit code to be used in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing activities when calculations of conservative fuel rod temperatures are required. The EMs place conservatisms on the calculation of rod temperature by modifying the calculation of rod power history, fuel and cladding behavior models, and materials properties correlations. Three of the nine EMs provide either input or model specifications, or set the reference temperature for stored energy calculations. The remaining six EMs were intended to add thermal conservatism through model changes. To determine the relative influence of these six EMs upon fuel behavior calculations for commercial power reactors, a sensitivity study was conducted. That study is the subject of this paper.

  12. Boundary effects on Zircaloy-4 cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longest, A.W.; Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding under simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions is being investigated in the Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) program in single rod and multirod tests. In these tests, internally-pressurized unirradiated Zircaloy-4 tubes containing internal electrical heaters are heated to failure in a low-pressure, superheated-steam environment (200 < Re < 800). The results provide a data base for evaluating deformation and blockage models employed with design-basis accident sequences to assess LWR core coolability for licensing purposes. Results of a recent 8 X 8 test indicate that models derived from smaller test arrays may not be representative of the behavior in large arrays, particularly for those temperature ranges in which large deformation can be expected. Two MRBT LOCA simulation tests conducted under the same nominal conditions (approx. 10 K/s heating rate from approx. 340/sup 0/C to failure at approx. 770/sup 0/C) were examined to determine the effects of array size and boundary conditions on deformation.

  13. Comparisons of the SCDAP computer code with bundle data under severe accident conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.; Beers, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The SCDAP computer code, which is being developed under the sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, models the progression of light water reactor core damage including core heatup, core disruption and debris formation, debris heatup, and debris melting. SCDAP is being used to help identify and understand the phenomena that control core behavior during a severe accident, to help quantify uncertainties in risk assessment analysis, and to support planning and interpretation of severe fuel damage experiments and data. Comparisons between SCDAP calculations and the experimental data showed good agreement. Calculated and measured bundle temperatures for SFD-ST were within 200 K for the entire bundle and within 20 K for maximum cladding temperatures. For ESSI-2, calculated and measured maximum cladding temperatures were within 50 K, and the extensive liquefaction and relocation that was calculated was in agreement with experimental results.

  14. High-temperature oxidation of Zircaloy in hydrogen-steam mixtures. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H.M.; Thomas, G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Oxidation rates of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes have been measured in hydrogen-steam mixtures at 1200 to 1700/sup 0/C. For a given isothermal oxidation temperature, the oxide layer thicknesses have been measured as a function of time, steam supply rate, and hydrogen overpressure. The oxidation rates in the mixtures were compared with similar data obtained in pure steam and helium-steam environments under otherwise identical conditions. The rates in pure steam and helium-steam mixtures were equivalent and comparable to the parabolic rates obtained under steam-saturated conditions and reported in the literature. However, when the helium was replaced with hydrogen of equivalent partial pressure, a significantly smaller oxidation rate was observed. For high steam-supply rates, the oxidation kinetics in a hydrogen-steam mixture were parabolic, but the rate was smaller than for pure steam or helium-steam mixtures. Under otherwise identical conditions, the ratio of the parabolic rate for hydrogen-steam to that for pure steam decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing steam-supply rate.

  15. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1984. Vol. 1. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K.

    1984-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data on analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

  16. Advanced digital PWR plant protection system based on optimal estimation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    An advanced plant protection system for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor plant is described and evaluated. The system, based on a Kalman filter estimator, is capable of providing on-line estimates of such critical variables as fuel and cladding temperature, departure from nucleate boiling ratio, and maximum linear heat generation rate. The Kalman filter equations are presented, as is a description of the LOFT plant dynamic model inherent in the filter. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the advanced system.

  17. Long-term, low-temperature oxidation of PWR spent fuel: Interim transition report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Buchanan, H.C.

    1988-05-01

    Since some of the fuel rods will be breached and eventually most of the cladding will corrode, exposing fuel, one factor influencing the ability of spent fuel to retain radionuclides is its oxidation state in the expected moist air atmosphere. Oxidation of the fuel could split the cladding, exposing additional fuel and changing the leaching characteristics. Thermodynamically, there is no reason why UO{sub 2} should not oxidize completely to UO{sub 3} at repository temperatures. The underlying uncertainty is the rate of oxidation. Extrapolation of higher temperature data indicates that insufficient oxidation to convert all of the fuel to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} will occur during the first 10,000 years. However, lower oxidation states, such as U{sub 4}O{sub 9} and U{sub 3}O{sub 7}, might form. To date, the tests have run between 3200 and 4100 hours out of a planned 16,000-hour duration. Some preliminary conclusions can be drawn: (1) Moisture content of the air has no significant effect on oxidation rate, (2) the data have an uncertainty of 15 to 20%, which must be accounted for in the interpretation of single sample tests, and (3) below 175{degree}C, the oxidation rate is dependent on the particle size in the sample. The smaller particles oxidize more rapidly. 19 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 US/Japanese PWR conservative LOCA prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, G E; Fisher, J E

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of a 200%, double-ended, cold-leg-break, loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) calculation using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 computer code. The reactor system represented a typical United States/Japanese pressurized water reactor with a 15 x 15 fuel bundle arrangement 12-ft long, four loops, and cold-leg Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Systems. Conservation boundary and initial conditions were used. Reactor power was 102% of the 3250 MWt rated power, decay heat was set to 120% of American Nuclear Society Standard 5.1, highest core lifetime values for power peaking and fuel stored energy were used, and the LOCA occurred simultaneously with a loss of offsite power. Best estimate assumptions were used for the break flow model, fuel rod heat transfer and metal-water reaction correlations, and steady-state fuel temperature profiles. A flow blockage model, having the capability to account for the effects of cladding ballooning or rupturing, was not used. Except for these best estimate assumptions, the boundary and initial conditions were consistent with those used in licensing calculations. Maximum fuel rod temperatures were 1380 K (2020/sup 0/F) and 1040 K (1410/sup 0/F) on the hottest evaluation model rod and hottest best estimate rod, respectively. The high reported values or fuel cladding temperature were a direct consequence of the conservative boundary and initial conditions used for the calculation, primarily the 2% overpower condition, the core decay heat assumption, and the degraded ECCS. The calculation demonstrated successful core reflooding before 1478 K (2200/sup 0/F) cladding temperature was exceeded on any fuel rod. 7 refs., 47 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. SPEAR-BETA fuel performance code system. Volume 1. General description. Final report. [BWR; PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, R.

    1982-04-01

    This document provides a general description of the SPEAR-BETA fuel reliability code system. Included is a discussion of the methodology employed and the structure of the code system, as well as discussion of the major components: the data preparation routines, the mechanistic fuel performance model, the mechanistic cladding failure model, and the statistical failure model.

  20. Calculations conducted in developing an audit capability for ECCS analysis. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartel, T.J.; Berman, M.; Byers, R.K.; Cole, R.K. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    This study has demonstrated the capability of combining the results of thermal-hydraulic and fuel rod response computer codes to produce audit-type calculations for a pressurized water reactor equipped with a relatively new form of emergency core cooling systems. Models intended specifically for use with such systems were incorporated into the codes, sample calculations were performed, and very cursory comparisons with vendor-supplied results were made. In calculations of the blowdown phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident, models for fuel rod surface quenching and for separated two-phase flow were observed to have significant effects on peak cladding temperatures and on system conditions at the beginning of core reflood. Models used for the reflood phase, particularly the model for carryover-rate fraction, were also seen to have important consequences. While the demonstration of audit capability was successful, there remain questions connected with details of coupling between the codes, and with uniformity of models as used in all phases of the calculations.

  1. Multirod burst test program progress report, January-June 1982. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, R.H.

    1982-12-01

    The B-6 (8 x 8) array was tested, and posttest examination was completed; data reduction and analysis are in progress. Preliminary quick-look results are included in this report. All 64 rods were pressurized and burst. The average burst temperature was 931/sup 0/C, and the bundle average heating rate was 3.5/sup 0/C/s during the time of deformation. Preliminary results indicate burst strains ranged from 22 to 56%, with a bundle average of 30%. Analysis of the B-5 test results continues to provide insight to the complexity of cladding deformation in bundles, particularly for conditions conducive to large deformation and rod-to-rod interactions. Additional analyses, including re-evaluation of burst temperatures, are included in this report. The B-6 test concluded the experimental phase of this research program. Future activities will be concerned with analysis and evaluation of experimental data produced by this and other research programs.

  2. FRAP-T6 calculations of fuel-rod behavior during overpower transients. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, R.; Resch, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of the FRAP-T6 computer code in calculating fuel rod failure and fission gas release during overpower transient events was analyzed. Comparisons of the code's calculations with experiment data was used to determine the accuracy of the code in these two performance areas. First, the ability of the code to replicate observed failure trends as functions of power, ramp rate, hold time, burnup, pellet-cladding gap size, cladding thickness, and fuel density was examined. Then, the capability of the code's fission gas release model to duplicate experiment measurements of unfailed rods was tested at various burnups.

  3. Experiment operations plan for the TH-2 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for TH-2--the second experiment in the series of thermal-hydraulic tests conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The major objective of TH-2 was to develop the experiment reflood control parameters and the procedures to be used in subsequent experiments in this program. In this experiment, the data acquisition and control system was used to control the fuel cladding temperature during a simulated LOCA by using variable reflood coolant flow.

  4. Source-term experiment STEP-3 simulating a PWR severe station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, R.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    For a severe pressurized water reactor accident that leads to a loss of feedwater to the stream generators, such as might occur in a station blackout, fission product decay heating causes a water boil-off. Without effective decay heat removal, the fuel elements will be uncovered. Eventually, steam will oxidize the overheated cladding. The noble gases and volatile fission products, such as cesium and iodine, that are major contributors to the radiological source term will be released from the damaged fuel shortly after cladding failure. The accident environment when these volatile fission products escape was simulated in STEP-3 using four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor. The primary objective was to examine the releases in samples collected as close to the test zone as possible. In this paper, an analysis of the temperatures and hydrogen generation is compared with the measurements. The analysis is needed to estimate releases and characterize conditions at the source for studies of fission product transport.

  5. Evaluation of prompt release of fission gas from a breached cladding. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    It is a concern in the current safety analysis of nuclear reactors to understand the different release mechanisms of fission products to accurately determine the radiological source term for a wide variety of accidents. The mechanism which is least understood and which produces an uncertainty in determining the radiological source term during a reactor accident is the early release of fission gas present in the fuel-cladding gap through a cladding breach. In a loss-of-coolant type accident the fuel rods would be surrounded mainly by steam, therefore, the release of the gap gas can simply be treated as a discharge problem through an orifice. However, during reactor normal operation or in those accidents where the failed fuel rods are surrounded by liquid coolant, the release process of the gap gas would be strongly influenced by the coolant conditions (pressure, temperature and flow rate). The purpose of this work is to describe analytically the prompt escape of volatiles and gaseous fission products, present in the fuel-cladding gap through a cladding breach, where the fuel rod is surrounded by liquid coolant.

  6. Assessment of SPEAR-FCODE-BETA for fuel licensing. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.R.; Lanning, D.D.; Fiero, I.B.; Freeburn, H.R.; Garde, A.M.; Krammen, M.A.; Rotondo, P.L.

    1983-03-01

    The EPRI FCODE-BETA fuel performance code is the mechanistic model portion for the SPEAR-BETA fuel reliability code, which was developed for EPRI by Entropy Limited. FCODE-BETA was assessed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Combustion Engineering, Inc., for adequacy in simulating fuel performance in fuel licensing proceedings. The assessment included a detailed review of those thermal and mechanical performance models of greatest importance to fuel licensing, including fission gas release, fuel temperatures, and cladding uniform strain. It was concluded that the code is inadequate for licensing calculations in its present form. Recommendations for modeling and usability improvements are made.

  7. Lifetime of PWR silver-indium-cadmium control rods. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sipush, P.J.; Woodcock, J.; Chickering, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    A hot cell examination was performed on selected rodlets of a lead rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) which had experienced eleven cycles of operation in Point Beach Unit 1. The principal purpose of the program was to evaluate the performance of RCCAs. The hot cell examination of the rodlets involved detailed visual inspections, profilometry, metallography, cladding chemistry, dosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, corrosion tests, microhardness tests, absorber density measurements, and cladding tensile tests. Wear scars and a hairline crack in the cladding were evaluated. The results of the examinations and analysis of WEPCO site photographs led to an estimate of the service life for RCCAs which are used in Westinghouse 14 x 14 fuel assemblies. Also, wear scar widths were correlated with wear scar depths. The correlation may be used to estimate wear scar depths based on site photographs of wear scars for 14 x 14 RCCAs. The results of the program may be used as guidelines for RCCAs for 15 x 15 and 17 x 17 Westinghouse fuel designs. 10 refs., 89 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Accelerated high-temperature tests with spent PWR and BWR fuel rods under dry storage conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porsch, G.; Fleisch, J.; Heits, B.

    1986-09-01

    Accelerated high-temperature tests on 25 intact pressurized water and boiling water reactor rods were conducted for more than 16 months at 400, 430, and 450/sup 0/C in a helium gas atmosphere. The pretest characterized rods were examined by nondestructive methods after each of the three test cycles. No cladding breaches occurred and the creep deformation remained below 1%, which was in good agreement with model calculations. The test atmospheres were analyzed for /sup 85/Kr and tritium. The /sup 85/Kr concentrations were negligible and the tritium release agreed with the theoretical predictions. It can be concluded that for Zircaloy-clad fuel, cladding temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C are acceptable for dry storage in inert cover gases.

  9. Analysis of molten fuel-coolant interaction during a reactivity-initiated accident experiment. [BWR; PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a reactivity-initiated accident experiment, designated RIA-ST-4, are discussed and analyzed with regard to molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI). In this experiment, extensive amounts of molten UO/sub 2/ fuel and zircaloy cladding were produced and fragmented upon mixing with the coolant. Coolant pressurization up to 35 MPa and coolant overheating in excess of 940 K occurred after fuel rod failure. The initial coolant conditions were similar to those in boiling water reactors during a hot startup (that is, coolant pressure of 6.45 MPa, coolant temperature of 538 K, and coolant flow rate of 85 cm/sup 3//s). It is concluded that the high coolant pressure recorded in the RIA-ST-4 experiment was caused by an energetic MFCI and was not due to gas release from the test rod at failure, Zr/water reaction, or to UO/sub 2/ fuel vapor pressure. The high coolant temperature indicated the presence of superheated steam, which may have formed during the expansion of the working fluid back to the initial coolant pressure; yet, the thermal-to-mechanical energy conversion ratio is estimated to be only 0.3%.

  10. Determination of post-DNB and post-BT fuel design limits. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croucher, D.W.; Loyd, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Categories of light water reactor transients and the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and boiling transition (BT) fuel design limits in light water reactors are reviewed. These fuel design limits for reactor licensing may be overly conservative because experiments have shown that fuel rods do not fail and may not experience damage as a result of momentary operation in film boiling or dryout conditions. Damage to the fuel rod is strongly dependent on the peak cladding temperature and the length of time at that temperature durng the transient. Testing of two potential licensing fuel design limits is suggested: (a) fuel rod functional capabilities are retained and fuel system dimensions remain within operational telerances; and (b) cladding deformation is permitted, but no significant oxidation is allowed. Damage mechanisms which may affect post-DNB or post-BT operation of fuel rods are permanent rod bowing and pellet-cladding interaction. The data necessary to support a fuel design limit and a means of obtaining these data are outlined.

  11. EPRI/B and W cooperative program on PWR fuel-rod performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papazoglou, T.P.; Davis, H.H.

    1983-03-01

    Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding specimens were irradiated in a fueled and non-fueled condition for two and four cyles of irradiation, respectively, in the Oconee 2 reactor. The purpose of this long-term surveillance program was to study the in-reactor performance of four Zircaloy-4 cladding types with distinctly different properties, in combination with two types of UO/sub 2/ fuel pellets. The cladding types included Sandvik Special Metals tubing in the cold-worked/stress relieved and cold-worked/recrystallized conditions, and German VDM cladding with two different anneal temperatures. The fuel pellets included a conventional densifying pellet type, and a special (shorter) stable pellet type intended to reduce pellet-clad mechanical interaction. The irradiation growth and creep under compressive stress of the above cladding types were studied and followed up to fluences of 1.3 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV).

  12. Data summary report for fission product release test HI-1. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, M.F.; lorenz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Webster, C.S.

    1982-12-01

    This first in a series of high-temperature fission product release tests was conducted for 30 min at 1400/sup 0/C, with the release taking place into flowing steam. The fuel specimen was a 20-cm-long section of H.B. Robinson fuel rod, irradiated to 28,000 MWd per metric ton (t). After the test, the Zircaloy cladding of the specimen was almost completely oxidized and was quite fragile. The fission product collection system included a thermal gradient tube (700-150/sup 0/C), filters, heated charcoal, and cooled charcoal. Gamma ray analysis of apparatus components and collectors showed that about 2.83% of the /sup 85/Kr and 1.75% of the /sup 137/Cs were released from the fuel. Activation analysis of leach solutions from these components indicated that 2.04% of the /sup 129/I was released. Other analyses revealed small but significant releases of the radionuclides /sup 125/Sb and /sup 106/Ru, and of the elements Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Ag, Sn, Te, Ba, and La.

  13. Cladding axial elongation models for FRAP-T6. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, V.N.; Carlson, E.R.; Berna, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the cladding axial elongation models developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for use by the FRAP-T6 computer code in analyzing the response of fuel rods during reactor transients in light water reactors (LWR). The FRAP-T6 code contains models (FRACAS-II subcode) that analyze the structural response of a fuel rod including pellet-cladding-mechanical-interaction (PCMI). Recently, four models were incorporated into FRACAS-II to calculate cladding axial deformation: (a) axial PCMI, (b) trapped fuel stack, (c) fuel relocation, and (d) effective fuel thermal expansion. Comparisons of cladding axial elongation measurements from two experiments with the corresponding FRAP-T6 calculations are presented.

  14. Fission gas induced fuel swelling in low and medium burnup fuel during high temperature transients. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of light water reactor fuel elements under postulated accident conditions is being studied by the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Thermal Fuels Behavior Program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As a part of this program, unirradiated and previously irradiated, pressurized-water-reactor type fuel rods were tested under power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). During these integral in-reactor experiments, film boiling was produced on the fuel rods which created high fuel and cladding temperatures. Fuel rod diameters increased in the film boiling region to a greater extent for irradiated rods than for unirradiated rods. The purpose of the study was to investigate and assess the fuel swelling which caused the fuel rod diameter increases and to evaluate the ability of an analytical code, the Gas Release and Swelling Subroutine - Steady-State and Transient (GRASS-SST), to predict the results.

  15. Fuel Performance Improvement Program. Semiannual progress report, October 1979-March 1980. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    Progress on the Fuel Performance Improvement Program's fuel design tests and demonstration irradiations for October 1979 through March 1980 is reported. Included are the results of out-of-reactor experiments with Zircaloy cladding using a device that simulates the interaction between fuel and cladding. Also included are reports on the irradiation of the advanced LWR fuel designs in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor and in Consumers Power Company's Big Rock Point Reactor. The establishment of the technical bases and licensing requirements for the advanced fuel concepts are also described.

  16. Feasibility of on-line fuel-condition monitoring. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, D.A.; Osetek, D.J.; Croucher, D.W.; Hartwell, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between fuel rod damage and fission product release is investigated to assess the feasibility of using on-line gamma spectroscopy of reactor coolant to estimate not only numbers of detected fuel rods, but also the type of core damage which may occur during an accident or off-normal transient. Fission product release signatures for various fuel conditions and accident scenarios are compared, and unique indicators of fuel damage, ranging from cladding pinholes to severely damaged fuel rods, are suggested, The configuration of monitoring hardware and data analysis soft ware are described, and the benefits, development needs, and usefulness of the envisaged power plant system are discussed.

  17. Comparison of BALON2 with cladding ballooning strain tables in NUREG-0630. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resch, S.C.; Laats, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    For this comparison study, the two computer models used for calculating fuel rod cladding failure and the resulting permanent strains were compared against experiment data. The two models considered were the mechanistic BALON2 model and the empirical model described in the NUREG-0630 report. The purpose for making this comparison was simply to gain insight into the relative strengths and weaknesses of each model. The experiment data sample consisted of data from both single and bundle tests conducted sometimes in in-pile facilities, but mostly in out-of-pile facilities. Comparisons between models indicated that the empirical NUREG-0630 model more accurately calculated the local cladding temperature and pressure conditions at rupture, but the mechanistic BALON2 model more accurately calculated the resulting cladding permanent strain at the rupture location.

  18. Effects of thermocouple installation and location on fuel rod temperature measurements. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the results of analyses of nuclear fuel rod cladding temperature data obtained during in-reactor experiments under steady state and transient (simulated loss-of-coolant accident) operating conditions. The objective of the analyses was to determine the effect of thermocouple attachment method and location on measured thermal response. The use of external thermocouples increased the time to critical heat flux (CHF), reduced the blowdown peak temperature, and enhanced rod quench. A comparison of laser welded and resistance welded external thermocouple responses showed that the laser welding technique reduced the indicated cladding steady state temperatures and provided shorter time-to-CHF. A comparison of internal welded and embedded thermocouples indicated that the welded technique gave generally unsatisfactory cladding temperature measurements. The embedded thermocouple gave good, consistent results, but was possibly more fragile than the welded thermocouples. Detailed descriptions of the thermocouple designs, attachment methods and locations, and test conditions are provided.

  19. Experiment data report for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundle B-4. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longest, A.W.; Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    A compilation of bundle B-4 test data is presented. These data were obtained during the test and from pretest and posttest examination of the test array. They are presented in considerable detail but with minimum interpretation. The B-4 test is the only 6 x 6 array in a series of 4 x 4, 6 x 6, and 8 x 8 bundle tests performed by the Multirod Burst Test Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This research is sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and is designed to investigate Zircaloy cladding deformation behavior under simulated light-water-reactor loss-of-coolant accident conditions. A brief description of the experiment and a summary of the test results are included with the detailed results of the B-4 test. Both graphical and tabular formats are used to show temperature and pressure data as functions of test time and strain data for the cladding in each of the fuel rod simulators. Photographic documentation is provided for both the overall bundle, before and after testing, and the 36 tubes as they were removed from the tested bundle for strain measurements.

  20. Halden In-Reactor Test to Exhibit PWR Axial Offset Anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.Bennett, B. Beverskog, R.Suther

    2004-12-01

    Many PWRs have encountered the axial offset anomaly (AOA) since the early 1990s, and these experiences have been reported widely. AOA is a phenomenon associated with localized boron hideout in corrosion product deposits (crud) on fuel surfaces. Several mitigation approaches have been developed or are underway to either delay the onset of AOA or avoid it entirely. This study describes the first phase of an experimental program designed to investigate whether the use of enriched boric acid (EBA) in the reactor coolant can mitigate AOA.

  1. TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

    2013-03-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor’s survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation process that could be implemented in upcoming Fukushima Daiichi recovery efforts.

  2. Advanced design concepts for PWR and BWR high-performance annular fuel assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Tyler Shawn

    2006-01-01

    Sobering electricity supply and demand projections, coupled with the current volatility of energy prices, have underscored the seriousness of the challenges which lay ahead for the utility industry. This research addresses ...

  3. TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

    2014-05-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor’s survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation process that could be implemented in upcoming Fukushima Daiichi recovery efforts.

  4. Final assessment of MOX fuel performance experiment with Japanese PWR specification fuel in the HBWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Hajime; Teshima, Hideyuki; Kanasugi, Katsumasa; Kosaka, Yuji; Arakawa, Yasushi

    2007-07-01

    In order to obtain high burn-up MOX fuel irradiation performance data, SBR and MIMAS MOX fuel rods with Pu-fissile enrichment of about 6 wt% had been irradiated in the HBWR from 1995 to 2006. The peak burn-up of MOX pellet achieved 72 GWd/tM. In this test, fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure, stack length and cladding length were measured for MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel as reference. MOX fuel temperature is confirmed to have no significant difference in comparison with UO{sub 2}, taking into account of adequate thermal conductivity degradation due to PuO{sub 2} addition and burn-up development. And the measured fuel temperature agrees well with FINE code calculation up to high burn-up region. Fission gas release of MOX is possibly greater than UO{sub 2} based on temperature and pressure assessment. No significant difference is confirmed between SBR and MIMAS MOX on FGR behavior. MOX fuel swelling rate agrees well with solid swelling rate in the literature. Cladding elongation data shows onset of PCMI in high power region. (authors)

  5. Three dimensional effects in analysis of PWR steam line break accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chon-Kwo

    A steam line break accident is one of the possible severe abnormal transients in a pressurized water reactor. It is required to present an analysis of a steam line break accident in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) ...

  6. Reactor physics considerations for implementing silicon carbide cladding into a PWR environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobisesky, Jacob P. (Jacob Paul), 1987-

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) offers several advantages over zirconium (Zr)-based alloys as a potential cladding material for Pressurized Water Reactors: very slow corrosion rate, ability to withstand much higher temperature with ...

  7. Modeling the performance of high burnup thoria and urania PWR fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Yun, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of ThO?-UO? fuels that can be operated to a high burnup up to 80-100MWd/kgHM in current and future Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Among the various issues ...

  8. Status of verification and validation of AREVA's ARCADIA{sup R} code system for PWR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porsch, D. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); P.O.Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Leberig, M.; Kuch, S. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Magat, P. [AREVA, AREVA NP SAS, Paris (France); Segard, K. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In March 2010 the submittal of Topical Reports for ARCADIA{sup R} and COBRA-FLX, the thermal-hydraulic module of ARCADIA{sup R}, to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded a major step in the development of AREVA's new code system for core design and safety analyses. This submittal was dedicated to the application of the code system to uranium fuel in pressurized water reactors. The submitted information comprised results for plants operated in the US (France)) and Germany and provided uncertainties for in-core measuring systems with traveling in-core detectors and for the aero-ball system of the EPR. A reduction of the uncertainties in the prediction of F{sub AH} and F{sub Q} of > 1 % (absolute) was derived compared to the current code systems. This paper extents the verification and validation base for uranium based fuel and demonstrates the basic capabilities of ARCADIA{sup R} of describing MOX. The achieved status of verification and validation is described in detail. All applications followed the same standard without any specific calibration. The paper gives also insight in the new capability of 3D full core steady-state and transient pin-by-pin/sub-channel-by-sub-channel calculations and the opportunities offered by this feature. The gain of margins with increasing detail of the representation is outlined. Currently, the strategies for worldwide implementation of ARCADIA{sup R} are developed. (authors)

  9. Combustion of hydrogen:air mixtures in the VGES cylindrical tank. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedick, W.B.; Cummings, J.C.; Prassinos, P.G.

    1984-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently involved in a number of experimental projects to provide data that will help quantify the threat of hydrogen combustion during nuclear plant accidents. Several experimental facilities are part of the Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES). The purpose of this report is to document the experimental results from the first round of combustion tests performed at one of these facilities: a 5-m/sup 3/ cylindrical tank. The data provided by tests at this facility can be used to guide further testing and for the development and assessment of analytical models to predict hydrogen combustion behavior.

  10. Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diez, Carlos Javier; Hoefer, Axel; Porsch, Dieter; Cabellos, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact ...

  11. Observation of the Isotopic Evolution of PWR Fuel Using an Antineutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowden, N S; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2008-01-01

    By operating an antineutrino detector of simple design during several fuel cycles, we have observed long term changes in antineutrino flux that result from the isotopic evolution of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Measurements made with simple antineutrino detectors of this kind offer an alternative means for verifying fissile inventories at reactors, as part of IAEA and other reactor safeguards regimes.

  12. Los Alamos PWR feed-and-bleed studies summary results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E.; Henninger, R.J.; Lime, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The adequacy of shutdown decay heat removal in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is currently under investigation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One part of this effort is review of feed-and-bleed procedures that could be used if the normal cooling mode through the steam generators was unavailable. Feed-and-bleed cooling is effected by manually activating the high-pressure injection (HPI) system and opening the power-operated relief valves (PORVs) to release the core decay energy. The feasibility of the feed-and-bleed concept as a diverse mode of heat removal has been evaluated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The TRAC-PF1 code has been used to predict the expected performances of the Oconee-1 and Calvert Cliffs-1 reactors of Babcock and Wilcox and Combustion Engineering, respectively, and the Zion-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 plants of Westinghouse. Feed and bleed was successfully applied in each of the four plants studied, provided it was initiated no later than the time of loss-of-secondary heat sink.

  13. Dynamic system characterization of an integral test facility of an advanced PWR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Simon Gregory

    1995-01-01

    leg break (AP-CL-03), to construct a mathematical model of the system. The model's constitutive equations were linearized for a selected period of the transient that is of particular importance to the safety analysis. These equations were used...

  14. SCDAP severe core-damage studies: BWR ATWS and PWR station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laats, E.T.; Chambers, R.; Driskell, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Severe Accident Sequence Analysis (SASA) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is addressing a number of accident scenarios that potentially pose a health hazard to the public. Two of the scenarios being analyzed in detail at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are the station blackout at the Bellefonte nuclear plant and the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) at the Browns Ferry-1 plant. The INEL analyses of the station blackout and ATWS have been divided into four parts, which represent the sequence being followed in this study. First, the evaluation of long term irradiation effects prior to the station blackout or ATWS was conducted using the FRAPCON-2 fuel rod behavior code; second, the reactor primary and secondary coolant system behavior is being analyzed with the RELAP5 code; third, the degradation of the core is being analyzed with the SCDAP code; and finally, the containment building response is being analyzed with the CONTEMPT code. This paper addresses only the SCDAP/MODO degraded core analyses for both the station blackout and ATWS scenarios.

  15. Near-term improvements for nuclear power plant control room annunciator systems. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.L.; Duvernoy, E.G.; Ames, K.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Eckenrode, R.J.

    1983-04-01

    This report sets forth a basic design philosophy with its associated functional criteria and design principles for present-day, hard-wired annunciator systems in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. It also presents a variety of annunciator design features that are either necessary for or useful to the implementation of the design philosophy. The information contained in this report is synthesized from an extensive literature review, from inspection and analysis of control room annunciator systems in the nuclear industry and in related industries, and from discussions with a variety of individuals who are knowledgeable about annunciator systems, nuclear plant control rooms, or both. This information should help licensees and license applicants in improving their hard-wired, control room annunciator systems as outlined by NUREG-0700.

  16. Damping test results for straight sections of 3-inch and 8-inch unpressurized pipes. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, A.G.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    EG and G Idaho is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Pressure Vessel Research Committee in supporting a final position on revised damping values for structural analyses of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a series of vibrational tests on unpressurized 3-in. and 8-in. Schedule 40 carbon steel piping was conducted to determine the changes in structural damping due to various parametric effects. The 33-ft straight sections of piping were supported at the ends. Additionally, intermediate supports comprising spring, rod, and constant-force hangers, as well as a sway brace and snubbers, were used. Excitation was provided by low-force-level hammer impacts, a hydraulic shaker, and a 50-ton overhead crane for snapback testing. Data was recorded using acceleration, strain, and displacement time histories. This report presents test results showing the effect of stress level and type of supports on structural damping in piping.

  17. Analysis of conventional and plutonium recycle unit-assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) PWR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertens, Paul Gustaaf

    1971-01-01

    An analysis and comparison of Unit Conventional UO2 Fuel-Assemblies and proposed Plutonium Recycle Fuel Assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) Reactor has been made. The influence of spectral effects, at the watergaps -and ...

  18. Primary pump power as a measure of fluid density during bubbly two-phase flow. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreery, G.E.; Linebarger, J.H.; Koske, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear plant operator requires other information on reactor coolant system inventory besides just pressurizer liquid level, which often disappears or gives ambiguous indications during a loss-of-coolant accident. Erroneous instrument readings during the Three Mile Island and Ginna accidents are examples. Pump power or current is shown in this paper to provide an additional source of inventory information. When the reactor coolant pumps are operating, it allows the operator to make decisions about the advisability of continued pump- and safety-injection operation. The inventory information is provided by a simple method of calculating fluid density for bubbly two-phase flow by relating pump power or current to fluid density. The calculational method is derived and compared with data in this paper. Calculations using the method agree well with the measured experimental data with increasing void fraction, until the flow transitions from bubbly to partially stratified churn flow within the pump.

  19. Flow visualization study of inverted annular flow of post dryout heat transfer region. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishii, M.; De Jarlais, G.

    1985-01-01

    The inverted annular flow is important in the area of LWR accident analysis in terms of the maximum cladding temperature and effectiveness of the emergency core cooling. However, the inverted annular flow thermal-hydraulics is not well understood due to its special heat transfer condition of film boiling. The review of existing data indicates further research is needed in the areas of basic hydrodynamics related to liquid core disintegration mechanisms, slug and droplet formation, entrainment, and droplet size distributions. In view of this, the inverted flow is studied in detail experimentally. A new experimental apparatus has been constructed in which film boiling heat transfer can be established in a transparent test section. The test section consists of two coaxial quartz tubes. The annular gap between these two tubes is filled with a hot, clear fluid (syltherm 800) so as to maintain film boiling temperatures and heat transfer rates at the inner quartz tube wall. Data on liquid core stability, core break-up mechanism, and dispersed-core liquid slug and droplet sizes are obtained using F 113 as a test fluid. Both high speed movies and flash photographs (3 ..mu..sec) are used.

  20. Experimental study on natural-convection boiling burnout in an annulus. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study was performed on burnout heat flux at low flow rates for low-pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The data indicated that a premature burnout occurred due to flow-regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the burnout observed in the experiment is essentially a flooding-limited burnout and the burnout heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow-regime transition. It is also shown that the conventional correlations for burnout heat flux at low mass velocities agree well with the data on circulation and entrainment-limited burnout.

  1. Post-Service Examination of PWR Baffle Bolts, Part I. Examination and Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Gussev, Maxim N.

    2015-04-30

    In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor plants, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating with Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, The Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and ATI Consulting, the selective procurement of baffle bolts that were withdrawn from service in 2011 and currently stored on site at Ginna. The goal of this program is to perform detailed microstructural and mechanical property characterization of baffle former bolts following in-service exposures. This report outlines the selection criteria of the bolts and the techniques to be used in this study. The bolts available are the original alloy 347 steel fasteners used in holding the baffle plates to the baffle former structures within the lower portion of the pressurized water reactor vessel. Of the eleven possible bolts made available for this work, none were identified to have specific damage. The bolts, however, did show varying levels of breakaway torque required in their removal. The bolts available for this study varied in peak fluence (highest dose within the head of the bolt) between 9.9 and 27.8x1021 n/cm2 (E>1MeV). As no evidence for crack initiation was determined for the available bolts from preliminary visual examination, two bolts with the higher fluence values were selected for further post-irradiation examination. The two bolts showed different breakaway torque levels necessary in their removal. The information from these bolts will be integral to the LWRS program initiatives in evaluating end of life microstructure and properties. Furthermore, valuable data will be obtained that can be incorporated into model predictions of long-term irradiation behavior and compared to results obtained in high flux experimental reactor conditions. The two bolts selected for the ORNL study will be shipped to Westinghouse with bolts of interest to their collaborative efforts with the Electric Power Research Institute. Westinghouse will section the ORNL bolts into samples specified in this report and return them to ORNL. Samples will include bend bars for fracture toughness and crack propagation studies along with thin sections from which specimens for bend testing, subscale tensile and microstructural analysis can be obtained. Additional material from the high stress concentration region at the transition between the bolt head and shank will also be preserved to allow for further investigation of possible crack initiation sites.

  2. Behavior of triplex silicon carbide fuel cladding designs tested under simulated PWR conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stempien, John D. (John Dennis)

    2011-01-01

    A silicon carbide (SiC) fuel cladding for LWRs may allow a number of advances, including: increased safety margins under transients and accident scenarios, such as loss of coolant accidents; improved resource utilization ...

  3. The design of a compact integral medium size PWR : the CIRIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirvan, Koroush

    2010-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) is an advanced medium size, modular integral light water reactor design, rated currently at 1000 MWt. IRIS design has been under development by over 20 organizations ...

  4. Identification and Resolution of Safety Issues for the Advanced Integral Type PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Woong Sik; Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jung

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the interim results of a study on the identification and resolution of safety issues for the AIPWR licensing. The safety issues discussed in this paper include (1) policy issues for which decision-makings are needed for the procedural requirements of licensing system in the regulatory policy point of view, (2) technical issues for which either development of new requirements or amendment of some existing requirements is needed, or (3) other technical issues for which safety verifications are required. The study covers (a) the assessment of applicability of the issues identified from the previous studies to the case of the AIPWR, (b) identification of safety issues through analysis of the international experiences in the design and licensing of advanced reactors, and technical review of the AIPWR design, and (c) development of the resolutions of safety issues, and application of the resolutions to the amendment of regulatory requirements and the licensing review of the AIPWR. As the results of this study, a total of twenty eight safety issues was identified: fourteen issues from the previous studies, including the establishment of design safety goals; four issues from the foreign practices and experiences, including the risk-informed licensing; and ten issues by the AIPWR design review, including reliability of passive safety systems. Ten issues of them have been already resolved and the succeeding study is under way to resolve the remaining ones. (authors)

  5. CFD Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Bundles and Spacer Grids for PWR Reactors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capone, Luigi

    2012-10-19

    The analysis of the turbulent flows in nuclear fuel bundles is a very interesting task to optimize the efficiency of modern nuclear power plants. The proposed study utilizes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to characterize the flow pattern...

  6. Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Javier Diez; Oliver Buss; Axel Hoefer; Dieter Porsch; Oscar Cabellos

    2014-11-04

    Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact of different covariance data is studied by comparing two of the presently most complete nuclear data covariance libraries (ENDF/B-VII.1 and SCALE 6.0), which reveals a high dependency of the uncertainty estimates on the source of covariance data. The burn-up benchmark Exercise I-1b proposed by the OECD expert group "Benchmarks for Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) for the Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs" is studied as an example application. The burn-up simulations are performed with the SCALE 6.0 tool suite.

  7. Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    current approach of long-term storage at its nuclear power plants and independent spent fuel storage installation, and deferred transportation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), along...

  8. MODELING THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH BURNUP THORIA AND URANIA PWR FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Y.

    Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of ThO[subscript 2]-UO[subscript 2]

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - MISO-SPP Market Impacts HydPwrConf 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnow widely usingOverview ofWeSchool MACRUC 15

  10. Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ, CA,EnergystudentThisWear |Non-Road Engines, Report 1

  11. WAPD-SC-545 HYDROGEN FLAMMABILITY DATA AND APPLICATION TO PWR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , oW4,

  12. Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on HBU PWR Cladding Alloys | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVthe nextof Energy Effects of Multiple

  13. Embrittlement and DBTT of High-Burnup PWR Fuel Cladding Alloys | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofAprilofEnergy 1 DOEEliminating Highof Energy

  14. Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDan O"HaganTalley,Surrogate Normal Conditions of

  15. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics & Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavusoglu, Cenk

    Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics & Automation Niagara Falls, Canada - Recent developments in the field of robotics, smart materials, micro actuators and mechatronics have

  16. STRAWBERRY ISLAND PHASE III EROSION CONTROL AND WETLAND HABITAT RESTORATION: A CASE STUDY IN THE SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF IN-LIEU FEE MITIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spierto, Timothy J.; Lazazzero, Sarah A.; Nelson, Patricia L.

    2003-01-01

    Corporation. 1988. Strawberry Island Draft Report. Barrow,1996. Bossert, H. D. 1973. Strawberry Island, Theories as to1998. Geologic Study or Strawberry Island, Niagara River,

  17. The Honorable Anthony Mosillo'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Washington,, DC 20585 The Honorable Anthony Mosillo' ', ' 6500 Niagara Square. 'Buffalo, New York 14202 Dear Mayor Mosillo: , ' ", Secretary of Energy Hazel, O'Leary has...

  18. TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Tentamen 2IC08: ComputerSystemen 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    die is aangesloten via een H- brug op de PWR0 en PWR1 uitgangen van de practicumprocessor. De uitgangen PWR2 t/m PWR7 worden niet gebruikt en mogen elke w

  19. On the Disposition of Graphite Containing TRISO Particles and the Aqueous Transport of Radionuclides via Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Akker, Bret Patrick

    2012-01-01

    element) 0.225 (compact only) 5.144 Graphite CSNF 21-PWR12-PWR 44-BWR 24-BWR UO2 21 PWR fuel assemblies 12 PWR fuel assemblies, 44

  20. Scratch, Click & Vote: E2E voting over the Internet Miroslaw Kutylowski and Filip Zagrski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science Wroclaw University of Technology mirekk@im.pwr.wroc.pl filipz@im.pwr

  1. On Some Distributed Disorder Detection Krzysztof Szajowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; e-mail: Krzysztof.Szajowski@pwr.edu.pl http://im.pwr.edu.pl/~szajow AMS Subject Classification(2010

  2. 1 Objective The aim of the work was to install the Trilinos software library on the HPCx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvester, David J.

    ='xlc_r -q64 -O3 -qarch=pwr5 -qtune=pwr5' \\ CXX='xlC_r -q64 -qrtti=all -O3 -qarch=pwr5 -qtune=pwr5' \\ F77='xlf_r -q64 -O3 -qarch=pwr5 -qtune=pwr5' \\ --prefix=$HOME/trilinos7-mpi-libs \\ --enable-mpi \\ --with

  3. Microsoft Word - Cover Page - Exhibit 7

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Steady Easement Appalachian Trail Tract 164-03 Jahoda CE SILVIO O. CONTE NATIONAL FISH AND WILDLIFE Appalachian Trail Tract 164-05 Mohawk Div. of Silvio O Conte NFWR...

  4. CX-004898: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gila-Wellton-Mohawk (Structure Maintenance)CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 11/05/2010Location(s): Yuma County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  5. CX-000219: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    United States Army Corps Niagara River, New York Small HydropowerCX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 11/30/2009Location(s): Niagara River, New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. Understanding Hydraulic Processes Primary Investigator: Frank H. Quinn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Hydraulic Processes Primary Investigator: Frank H. Quinn Overview The hydraulic and connecting channel hydraulics models for use in Great Lakes water resource studies. 2000 Plans Niagara River Hydraulic Studies: Detailed analysis of the impact of hydraulic regime changes in the Niagara River

  7. 210272-1732/05/$20.00 "2005 IEEE Published by the IEEE computer Society Over the past two decades, micro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olukotun, Kunle

    in microproces- sor design complexity and made power dissi- pation a major concern. For these reasons, Sun of focusing on the performance of single or dual threads, Sun optimized Niagara for mul- tithreaded Kathirgamar Aingaran Kunle Olukotun SunMicrosystems THE NIAGARA PROCESSOR IMPLEMENTS A THREAD

  8. CMP/CMT Scaling of SPECjbb2005 on UltraSPARC T1 Dimitris Kaseridis and Lizy K. John

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    }@ece.utexas.edu Abstract The UltraSPARC T1 (Niagara) from Sun Microsystems is a new multi-threaded processor that combines-studied designs, basically driven by the increasing demands for performance along with power efficiency and multithreaded designs [2, 3]. Sun's UltraSPARC T1 [4, 5] is such a processor. A processor like Niagara

  9. Inferred summer precipitation for southern Ontario back to AD 610, as reconstructed from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inferred summer precipitation for southern Ontario back to AD 610, as reconstructed from ring-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L.) from the Niagara Escarpment in southern Ontario, Canada. Using principal dendrochronologiques du thuya occidental (Thuja occidentalis L.) provenant de l'escarpement du Niagara dans le sud de l'Ontario

  10. URL: http://www.kasahara.cs.waseda.ac.jp/ , ,,TV, DVD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Hironori

    -core SMP Server Compile Option: (*1) Sequential: -O3 ­qarch=pwr6, XLF: -O3 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=auto, OSCAR: -O3 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=noauto (*2) Sequential: -O5 -q64 ­qarch=pwr6, XLF: -O5 ­q64 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=auto, OSCAR: -O5 ­q64 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=noauto (Others) Sequential: -O5 ­qarch=pwr6, XLF: -O5

  11. Results and insights of a level-1 internal event PRA of a PWR during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1993-12-31

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analysis that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. The objective of this paper is to present the approach utilized in the level-1 PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A comparison of the results with those of other shutdown studies is provided. Relevant safety issues such as plant and hardware configurations, operator training, and instrumentation and control is discussed.

  12. TRAC analysis of the effect of increased ECC subcooling on the reflood transient in the Slab Core Test Facility. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    A blind posttest calculation of Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Run 510, the high-subcooling test, was completed with TRAC-PD2/MOD1 using initial conditions provided by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), but without knowledge of the actual test results. There is good comparison between the calculation and the data for rod temperatures, turnaround times, core differential pressures, and mass inventories, and reasonable comparison for absolute pressures, upper plenum pool formation, and fluid temperatures and mass accumulation in the steam-water separator. Comparison of this calculation with the calculation of the base case test (Run 507) shows that the qualitative behavior during reflood is calculated correctly for both cases. In addition, from this comparison the following conclusions can be drawn: for the high-subcooling case, the peak rod temperture was lower, calculated quench times were earlier, there was more entrainment and liquid carryover from the core to the upper plenum, and the liquid mass accumulation in both the core and the upper plenum was greater.

  13. Integrated TRAC/MELPROG analysis of core damage from a severe feedwater transient in the Oconee-1 PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henninger, R.J.; Boyack, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    A postulated complete loss-of-feedwater event in the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor has been analyzed. With an initial version of the lonked TRAC and MELPROG codes, we have modeled the loss-of-feedwater event from initiation to the time of complete disruption of the core, which was calculated to occur by 6800 s. The highest structure temperatures otuside the vessel are on the flow path from the vessel to the pressurizer relief valve. Temperatures in excess of 1200 K could result in failure and depressurization of the primary system before vessel failure.

  14. TRAC-PF1 analysis of LOFT steam-generator feedwater transient test L9-1. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-PF1) calculations were compared to test data from Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) L9-1, which was a loss-of-feedwater transient. This paper includes descriptions of the test and the TRAC input and compares the TRAC-calculated results with the test data. We conclude that the code predicted the experiment well, given the uncertainties in the boundary conditions. The analysis indicates the need to model all the flow paths and heat structures, and to improve the TRAC wall condensation heat-transfer model.

  15. Technical considerations related to interim source-term assumptions for emergency planning and equipment qualification. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemczyk, S.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1982-09-01

    The source terms recommended in the current regulatory guidance for many considerations of light water reactor (LWR) accidents were developed a number of years ago when understandings of many of the phenomena pertinent to source term estimation were relatively primitive. The purpose of the work presented here was to develop more realistic source term assumptions which could be used for interim regulatory purposes for two specific considerations, namely, equipment qualification and emergency planning. The overall approach taken was to adopt assumptions and models previously proposed for various aspects of source term estimation and to modify those assumptions and models to reflect recently gained insights into, and data describing, the release and transport of radionuclides during and after LWR accidents. To obtain illustrative estimates of the magnitudes of the source terms, the results of previous calculations employing the adopted assumptions and models were utilized and were modified to account for the effects of the recent insights and data.

  16. Role of ex-vessel interactions in determining the severe reactor-accident source term for fission products. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, D.A.; Brockmann, J.E.; Bradley, D.R.; Tarbell, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    The role fission-product release and aerosol generation outside the primary system can have in determining the severe reactor-accident source term is reviewed. Recent analytical and experimental studies of major causes of ex-vessel fission product release and aerosol generation are described. The ejection of molten-core debris from a pressurized-reactor vessel is shown to be a potentially large source of aerosols that has not been recognized in past severe-accident evaluations. A mechanistic model of fission-product release during core-debris interactions with concrete is discussed. Calculations with this model are compared to correlations of experimental data and previous estimates of ex-vessel fission-product release. Predictions with the mechanistic model agree quite well with the data correlations but do not agree at all well with estimates made in the past.

  17. In-Vessel Retention Technology Development and Use for Advanced PWR Designs in the USA and Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.G. Theofanous; S.J. Oh; J.H. Scobel

    2004-05-18

    In-Vessel Retention (IVR) of molten core debris by means of external reactor vessel flooding is a cornerstone of severe accident management for Westinghouse's AP600 (advanced passive light water reactor) design. The case for its effectiveness (made in previous work by the PI) has been thoroughly documented, reviewed as part of the licensing certification, and accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A successful IVR would terminate a severe accident, passively, with the core in a stable, coolable configuration (within the lower head), thus avoiding the largely uncertain accident evolution with the molten debris on the containment floor. This passive plant design has been upgraded by Westinghouse to the AP1000, a 1000 MWe plant very similar to the AP600. The severe accident management approach is very similar too, including In-Vessel Retention as the cornerstone feature, and initial evaluations indicated that this would be feasible at the higher power as well. A similar strategy is adopted in Korea for the APR1400 plant. The overall goal of this project is to provide experimental data and develop the necessary basic understanding so as to allow the robust extension of the AP600 In-Vessel Retention strategy for severe accident management to higher power reactors, and in particular, to the AP1000 advanced passive design.

  18. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  19. Temperature estimates from the Zircaloy oxidation kinetics in the. cap alpha. plus. beta. phase region. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidation rates of Zircaloy in steam were measured at temperatures between 961 and 1264 K and for duration times between 25 and 1900 seconds in order to calculate, in conjunction with measurements from postirradiation metallographic examination, the prior peak temperatures of Zircaloy fuel rod cladding. These temperature estimates will be used in light water reactor research programs to assess (a) the accuracy of temperature measurements of fuel rod cladding peak temperatures from thermocouples attached to the surface during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), (b) the perturbation of the fuel rod cladding LOCE temperature history caused by the presence of thermocouples, and (c) the measurements of cladding azimuthal temperature gradients near the thermocouple locations.

  20. Assessment of Biasi and Columbia University CHF correlations with GE 3x3 rod bundle experiment. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, B.C.J.; Chien, T.H.; Sha, W.T.; Kim, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF), at which a sudden degradation of heat transfer occurs without corresponding decrease in heat generation, is one of the limiting parameters for safe operation of nuclear reactors. Reactor operation beyond the CHF causes a rapid rise in fuel cladding temperature and thus should be avoided to maintain the fuel element integrity. Reactor power limits are therefore set so that a prescribed safety margin below the CHF is maintained. Two CHF correlations are evaluated for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis: the Biasi correlation and the Columbia University correlation. The BODYFIT-2PE computer code is used for this assessment. The CHF predicted by the BODYFIT-2PE using the two correlations is compared with GE 3x3 rod bundle CHF experiment.

  1. Evaulation of power-reactor fuel-rod-analysis capabilities. Phase 1 topical report. Volume 2. Code evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, D.R.

    1983-09-01

    FRAPCON-2 (V1M4) was applied to generate fuel performance predictions for 60 rods of a recently evaluated power reactor data sample. Rod design, operational, and performance data was obtained from the RPRI Fuel Performance Data Base. The data was systematically processed to generate code input parameters. FRAPCON was initially applied for scoping studies to identify the best estimate mechanical response and fission gas release modeling options. Based on final scoping results, the balance of rods were analyzed with FRACAS-2 mechanics and FASTGRASS gas release models. Comparisons between measured and calculated fuel and cladding deformation, fission gas release, internal pressure, and gas composition are presented and interpreted relative to code error magnitudes, distributions, and trends versus rod design and operating parameters. The results indicate the FRAPCON-2 has best estimate capability for analysis of moderate duty fuel rod performance, provided that rod fabrication parameters are well characterized, and the fuel is dimensionally stable.

  2. Evaluation of flow redistribution due to flow blockage in rod bundles using COBRA code simulation. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prelewicz, D.A.; Caruso, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    During a Loss-of-Coolant Accident, fuel rod cladding may reach temperatures approaching 2200/sup 0/F. At these temperatures, swelling and rupture of the cladding may occur. The resulting flow blockage will affect steam flow and heat transfer in the bundle during the period of reflooding. The COBRA-IV-I subchannel computer code was used to simulate flow redistribution due to sleeve blockages in the FLECHT-SEASET 21-rod bundle and plate blockages in the JAERI Slab Core Test Facility. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine the effects of spacer grid and blockage interaction, sleeve shape effects, sleeve length effects, blockage magnitude and distribution, thermally induced mixing and bundle average velocity on flow redistribution. Pressure drop due to sleeve blockages was also calculated for several blockage configurations.

  3. FRAP-T6: a computer code for the transient analysis of oxide fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, L.J.; Shah, V.N.; Berna, G.A.; Hohorst, J.K.

    1983-06-01

    FRAP-T6 is a computer code which is being developed to calculate the transient behavior of a light water reactor fuel rod. This report is an addendum to the FRAP-T6/MODO user's manual which provides the additional user information needed to use FRAP-T6/MOD1. This includes model changes, improvements, and additions, coding changes and improvements, change in input and control language, and example problem solutions to aid the user. This information is designed to supplement the FRAP-T6/MODO user's manual.

  4. Temperature estimates from the zircaloy oxidation kinetics in the. cap alpha. plus. beta. phase region. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidation rates of zircaloy in steam were measured at temperatures between 961 and 1264 K and for duration times between 25 and 1900 seconds in order to calculate, in conjunction with measurements from postirradiation metallographic examination, the prior peak temperatures of zircaloy fuel rod cladding. These temperature estimates will be used in light water reactor research programs to assess (a) the accuracy of temperature measurements of fuel rod cladding peak temperatures from thermocouples attached to the surface during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), (b) the perturbation of the fuel rod cladding LOCE temperature history caused by the presence of thermocouples, and (c) the measurements of cladding azimuthal temperature gradients near thermocouple locations.

  5. Description and assessment of structural and temperature models in the FRAP-T6 code. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    The FRAP-T6 code was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the purpose of calculating the transient performance of light water reactor fuel rods during reactor transients ranging from mild operational transients to severe hypothetical loss-of-coolant accidents. An important application of the FRAP-T6 code is to calculate the structural performance of fuel rod cladding. The capabilities of the FRAP-T6 code are assessed by comparisons of code calculations with the measurements of several hundred in-pile experiments on fuel rods. The results of the assessments show that the code accurately and efficiently models the structural and thermal response of fuel rods.

  6. Analysis of fission gas release measurements using the COMETHE IIIJ and FCODE-Alpha computer codes. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leppert, G.; Rayes, L.; Rumble, E.; Stuart, R.

    1981-07-01

    Fission gas release predictions from FCODE-Alpha and COMETHE IIIJ were compared with experimental data from a representative group of light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods and with each other. In the first phase of the study, standard versions of the codes obtained from the Electric Power Software Center were compared with data from 36 rods. A modified version of COMETHE was used in the second phase of the study, which compared measurements from some of the same rods studied in the first phase, as well as with an additional 27 rods. Fission gas release predictions from both codes show substantial deviation from experimental measurements, and additional well-qualified data from LWR's is needed for comparison. Unpressurized rods experience significant degradation in heat transfer across the fuel-to-cladding gap as the lower thermal conductivity fission gases mix with the helium.

  7. Heavy-section steel technology program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1982. Volume 4. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitman, G.D.; Pugh, C.E.; Bryan, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    The investigation focuses on the behavior and structural integrity of steel pressure vessels containing cracklike flaws. Current work is organized into seven tasks: (1) program administration and procurement, (2) fracture-mechanics analyses and investigations, (3) investigations of irradiated materials, (4) thermal-shock investigations, (5) pressure vessel investigations, (6) stainless steel cladding investigations, and (7) environmentally assisted crack growth studies. A superposition solution technique for determining stress-intensity factors for semielliptical surface cracks in cylinders was implemented in pressurized thermal-shock (PTS) analyses. Subcontractors continued studies on crack arrest, cleavage fracture initiation, and cleavage transition. Specimens of the ORNL single-wire cladding were fabricated for irradiation. Pretest analyses were carried out for the upcoming thermal-shock test, TSE-7, and posttest analyses and examinations were under way for intermediate vessel test ITV-8A. Preparations for the first PTS experiment continued with design, procurement, and construction of the test facility, test vessels, and experimental apparatus.

  8. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store lightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97{degree}C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350{degree}C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97{degree}C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350{degree}C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep-related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97{degree}C for the full 1000-yr analysis period.

  9. FRAP-T6 uncertainty study of LOCA tests LOFT L2-3 and PBF LLR-3. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, R.; Driskell, W.E.; Resch, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the accuracy and uncertainty of fuel rod behavior calculations performed by the transient Fuel Rod Analysis Program (FRAP-T6) during large break loss-of-coolant accidents. The accuracy of the code was determined primarily through comparisons of code calculations with cladding surface temperature measurements from two loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs). These LOCEs were the L2-3 experiment conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility and the LOFT Lead Rod 3 (LLR-3) experiment conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Uncertainties in code calculations resulting from uncertainties in fuel and cladding design variables, material property and heat transfer correlations, and thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions were analyzed.

  10. Effects of high temperature and flow blockage on the reflood behavior of a 4-rod bundle. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drucker, M.; Dhir, V.K.

    1981-11-01

    It is usual in reactor safety analysis to assume that blocking or deforming the reactor core decreases the heat removal. This simplistic approach may not only penalize reactor power, but must be investigated experimentally to determine the real extent, if any. The experiments reported here examine quenching and heat removal in a blocked four-rod bundle. The local heat transfer in the blockage region is enhanced, despite the flow diversion away from the blockage. Additionally, data and correlations are given which compare the quenching rate of steel pins (typical of experiments) with Zircaloy (typical of reactor cladding). The Zircaloy bundle quenches faster when correlated on a local basis because of its smaller heat capacity. Additional work is under way to explain and correlate the intriguing results in more detail.

  11. Comparison of COMETHE-IIIJ and FCODE-BETA fission gas-release predictions with measurements. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Rayes, L.; Rumble, E.; Wheeler, D.; Woods, A.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes a comparison of the Fission Product Gas Release (FGR) predictability of two LWR fuel rod modeling codes: COMETHE-IIIJ and FCODE-BETA. The comparison is made using 124 well characterized fuel rods with FGR measurements in the EPRI Fuel Performance Data Base.

  12. Mechanistic prediction of fission-product release under normal and accident conditions: key uncertainties that need better resolution. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rest, J.

    1983-09-01

    A theoretical model has been used for predicting the behavior of fission gas and volatile fission products (VFPs) in UO/sub 2/-base fuels during steady-state and transient conditions. This model represents an attempt to develop an efficient predictive capability for the full range of possible reactor operating conditions. Fission products released from the fuel are assumed to reach the fuel surface by successively diffusing (via atomic and gas-bubble mobility) from the grains to grain faces and then to the grain edges, where the fission products are released through a network of interconnected tunnels of fission-gas induced and fabricated porosity. The model provides for a multi-region calculation and uses only one size class to characterize a distribution of fission gas bubbles.

  13. SPEAR-BETA fuel-performance code system: fission-gas-release module. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The original SPEAR-BETA general description manual covers both mechanistic and statistical models for fuel reliability, but only mechanistic modeling of fission gas release. This addendum covers the SPEAR-BETA statistical model for fission gas release.

  14. Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L.

    2007-07-01

    Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  15. FEMAXI-V benchmarking study on peak temperature and fission gas release prediction of PWR rod fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwardi; Dewayatna, W.; Briyatmoko, B.

    2012-06-06

    The present paper reports a study of FEMAXI-V code and related report on code benchmarking. Capabilities of the FEMAXI-V code to predict the thermal and fission gas release have been tested on MOX fuels in LWRs which has been done in SCK{center_dot}CEN and Belgonucleaire by using PRIMO MOX rod BD8 irradiation experiment after V Sobolev as reported O. J. Ott. Base irradiation in the BR3 reactor, the BD8 rod was transported to CEA-Saclay for irradiation in the OSIRIS reactor (ramp power excursion). The irradiation device used for the PRIMO ramps was the ISABELLE 1 loop, installed on a movable structure of the core periphery. The power variations were obtained by inwards/backwards movements of the loop in the core water. The preconditioning phase for rod BD8 occurred at a peak power level of 189 W/cm with a hold time of 27 hours. The subsequent power excursion rate amounted to 77 W/ (cm.min), reaching a terminal peak power level of 395 W/cm that lasted for 20 hours.

  16. Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF.

  17. Aerosol generation from sparging of molten pools of corium by gases released from core-concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginsberg, T.

    1983-02-01

    A model for calculation of the aerosol generation rate resulting from surface bubble rupture during molten core-concrete interactions is discussed. One aspect of the model, based upon previous work in the literature, considers that film rupture occurs due to growth of film oscillation disturbances in the surface liquid film. Calculations are presented for molten pools with liquid properties in the range of prototypic interest.

  18. The Greedy Exhaustive Dual Binary Swap methodology for fuel loading optimization in PWR reactors using the poropy reactor optimization Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Carl C. (Carl Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the development and analysis of a deterministic optimization scheme termed Greedy Exhaustive Dual Binary Swap for the optimization of nuclear reactor core loading patterns. The goal of this optimization ...

  19. Life Estimation of PWR Steam Generator U-Tubes Subjected to Foreign Object-Induced Fretting Wear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Jhung, Myung Jo; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-10-15

    This paper presents an approach to the remaining life prediction of steam generator (SG) U-tubes, which are intact initially, subjected to fretting-wear degradation due to the interaction between a vibrating tube and a foreign object in operating nuclear power plants. The operating SG shell-side flow field conditions are obtained from a three-dimensional SG flow calculation using the ATHOS3 code. Modal analyses are performed for the finite element models of U-tubes to get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and participation factor. The wear rate of a U-tube caused by a foreign object is calculated using the Archard formula, and the remaining life of the tube is predicted. Also discussed in this study are the effects of the tube modal characteristics, external flow velocity, and tube internal pressure on the estimated results of the remaining life of the tube.

  20. 2.1E Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    version added HERM-CENT-COND-PWR HERM-CENT-COND-TYPE P -QUAD V 4 , 3 HERM-REC-COND-PWR P - PLANT-PARAMETERS V 2 . .FT DEFROST-CAP-FT DEFROST-PWR-FT HPDefrst HPDefrst HPDefrst

  1. Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques NGSI Research Overview and Update on NDA Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A., V. Mozin, S.J. Tobin, L.W. Cambell, J.R. Cheatham, C.R. Freeman, C.J. Gesh,

    2012-01-01

    considered one of the 17x17 PWR assemblies from the NGSIplutonium signal because in a PWR spent fuel its content isspectra for a single PWR fuel pin with fresh and spent UO 2

  2. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    pressurized water reactors (PWR) with a combined capacity ofelements from the Loviisa PWRs assemblies as well. The emptyBWR/4 BWR/4 BWR/6 BWR/6 PWR PWR ABWR (scheduled) operating

  3. In-situ Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of the Surface Films on Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in Pressurized Water Reactor-Primary Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    oxidation of Alloy 600 in PWR Primary Water. The layered-oxidation of Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water. The film ofwith oxidation of Alloy 600 in PWR Primary Water. The film

  4. Full Core, Heterogeneous, Time Dependent Neutron Transport Calculations with the 3D Code DeCART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    core layout for the 1/8th PWR core model ________________ 76and future of the NEACRP PWR core transient benchmark. 199449. Hursin, M. (2008). PWR Control Rod Ejection Analysis

  5. PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chan, T.

    2011-01-01

    to the power generated by a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor)or 1 kW, corresponding to a PWR spent fuel assembly 2.5 andcanister, the heat output of a PWR of spent fuel assembly

  6. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    2013-01-01

    of conventional LWR systems (PWR & BWRs), partly due to thethe margin to boiling in a PWR is ?15 ? C, while the coolantprimary heat exhangers of a PWR, in which borated water is

  7. Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyer, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Production of plutonium in PWR fuel as function ofNDA NEP PNCC PR PSD PTR PWR SQUID TES TIMS UHV wt% Adiabaticcomposition of plutonium in a PWR as a function of burn up

  8. Spin-On for the Renaissance? The Current State of China's Nuclear Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Jing-dong

    2010-01-01

    are primarily based on two PWR designs: the CPR-1000 andpressurized water reactor (PWR) in Qinshan in the mid-1980s,civilian purposes. Fabrication of PWR fuel is undertaken at

  9. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in Heated Subsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    packages such as the “21 PWR” or the “44 BWR” (Figure 3).drift length (for the “21 PWR”). For comparison: the initialdrift) "5 HLW Long" "21 PWR AP" "44 BWR AP" "5 HLW SHORT"

  10. Optimal Partial Feedback Design for MIMO Block Fading Channels with Causal Noiseless Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Youjian "Eugene"

    T . . . . . . . . y1 ynR (a) No CSIT. Encoder Encoder Encoder Pwr Pwr Pwr Eigen- beamforming N=min{nT,nR} X1 X2 XNT X1

  11. LIPs on Venus Vicki L. Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Vicki

    -O, Quetzalpetlatl, Atahensik), crustal plateaus, and `plains with wrinkle ridges', unit pwr. Unit pwr, widely by massive partial mantle melting caused by large bolide impact on thin lithosphere. The status of unit pwr

  12. Drift Natural Convection and Seepage at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    2010-01-01

    between to hot 21-PWR waste packages. . . . . . . . . . .difference between a hot 21-PWR waste canister (having anis placed next to a hot 21-PWR waste canister and see what

  13. A STUDY OF REGIONAL TEMPERATURE AND THERMOHYDROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR WASTES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    to a BWR Effects of different PWR fuel cycles from the sameFig. 14 Effects of different PWR cycles from the same amountof wastes from different PWR fuel cycles normalized to 10 W/

  14. GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION NEEDS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION IN CRYSTALLINE AND ARGILLACEOUS ROCKS SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    recycling of plutonium in PWR. KBS Report 111. Lakatos, T. (hogaktivt avfall fr%n·en PWR beraknade med ORIGEN ("Emissionand high-level waste from a PWR, calculated using ORIGEW'),

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    the earliest one- and two-loop PWR design and the CNP-1000as the standard three-loop PWR design with a high burn-upCPR-1000 and 1000+ Generation II PWR designs and the AP1000

  16. China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Ed., David

    2008-01-01

    in Guangdong has two 900 MW PWR units. Source: EB, Chinain Guangdong has two 900 MW PWR units. Source: EB, ChinaUnits (MW x no units) 900x2 PWR nuclear 300x2 600x2 [1

  17. Uncertainties in the Anti-neutrino Production at Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic Analysis of High-Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Samples FromIsotopic Predictions for PWR Spent Fuel”, ORNL/TM-13317,Analysis for San Onofre PWR MOX Fuel”, ORNL/TM-1999/326,

  18. Small-Scale Readout Systems Prototype for the STAR PIXEL Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szelezniak, Michal A.

    2008-01-01

    PIXEL detector. PIXEL COLUMN CIRCUITRY VREF1 PWR_ON VREF2VDD RESET PWR_ONREAD PWR_ON CALIB RESET VR1 VR2 Q READ MOSCAP SOURCE

  19. Boric Acid Causes ER Stress and Activates the eIF2alpha/ATF4 and ATF6 Branches of the Unfolded Protein Response in Prostate Cancer Cells and Using Toxicology in the Public Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobylewski, Sarah Ellen

    2012-01-01

    isoforms in DU-145, LNCaP, and PWR-1E cells. Biochem Biophysisoforms in DU-145, LNCaP, and PWR-1E cells. Biochem Biophysin prostate DU-145, LNCaP, and PWR-1E cells. Biochemical and

  20. IEEE Computer Society Board of Governors kasahara@waseda.jp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasahara, Hironori

    on IBM p6 595 Power6 (4.2GHz) based 32-core SMP Server Compile Option: (*1) Sequential: -O3 ­qarch=pwr6, XLF: -O3 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=auto, OSCAR: -O3 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=noauto (*2) Sequential: -O5 -q64 ­qarch=pwr6, XLF: -O5 ­q64 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=auto, OSCAR: -O5 ­q64 ­qarch=pwr6 ­qsmp=noauto (Others

  1. TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Tentamen 2IC08: ComputerSystemen 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    de uitgangen PWR0 t/m PWR3. Daarbij is telkens één uitgang hoog en de overige uitgangen zijn laag. Door de hoge uitgang één poort modulo 4 naar boven op te schuiven (bijvoorbeeld van PWR1=1 naar PWR2=1 of van PWR3=1 naar PWR0=1) zet de motor een stap naar links. Schuift de hoge uitgang naar de andere kant

  2. NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE:NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE: ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGES OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITYADDRESSING THE CHALLENGES OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­­LWR, BWR, PWR, CANDU, VVER, RBMKLWR, BWR, PWR, CANDU, VVER, RBMK 19951995 ­­ 2010 GEN III2010 GEN III and1 and--2; Fukushima2; Fukushima--1;1; GariglianoGarigliano PWR:PWR: HB Robinson; Palisades; Early:BWR: OskarshamnOskarshamn--2; La Salle; Fuku2; La Salle; Fuku--2;2; TokaiTokai--2, Leibstatd2, Leibstatd PWR:PWR

  3. The chemistry of OH and HO2 radicals in the boundary layer over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    CO and NO), respectively. Pwr is the laser power enterings). Using the above values and Pwr = 9 mW, LODs of 1.1×10 6

  4. Automatic aligning free space communication platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, John Michael

    2008-01-01

    addchannel(d,2,'Power'); %% PWR else addchannel(d,0,'Y addchannel(d,2,'Power'); %% PWR end %%% Set up sampling

  5. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01

    1.2.1 PWRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2Actinides Multi-Recycling in PWR Using Hydride Fuels. InRecycling in Hydride Fueled PWR Cores. Nuclear Engineering

  6. Half-Scale Model Tests on the Three Quarter Wave R.F. System for the 184-inch Frequency Modulated Cyclotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    ~ o DC PLATE VOLTAGE o PWR INPUT WATTS TO TRIODES ~--o--,110-I DC PLATE' VOLTAGE' PWR INPUT WATTS TO TRIODES

  7. Power Efficiency and the Top500 John Shalf, Shoaib Kamil, Erich Strohmaier, David Bailey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SystemPower(kW) max pwr avg pwr Growth in Power Consumption (Top50) Excluding Cooling 0.00 100.00 200

  8. - United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .' 41 G I? SUBJECT: Elimination of the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Co., Niagara Falls, New York TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site. summary and elimination...

  9. Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics & Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics & Automation Niagara Falls, Canada research methodologies that have revolutionized the mechatronics domain. In particular, this work the process of design, analysis, and validation of various electromechanical and mechatronic systems

  10. Popular matchings: structure and algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermid, E.

    McDermid,E. Irving,R.W. Proceedings of COCOON 2009, 15th Annual International Computing and Combinatorics Conference, Niagara Falls USA, July 2009, Lecture Notes in Computer Science vol. 5609 pp 506-515 Springer

  11. Vegetable Demonstrations in the Star Area (1970-1977). 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam D.; Johnson, Jerral D.

    1978-01-01

    , Extension Horticulturist Date Planted: April 2, 1975 Date Evaluated: June 19, 1975 Plot Size: Plots 15 ft. long on single row. Plots planted by hand using Planet Jr. hand planter. Conclusions: Niagara 773, NK 113-70, Sprite, Executive, Lake Geneva... and Keystone 4721 produced the highest yields in the trial. Niagara 773, Executive, Lake Geneva and Keystone 4721 produced pods with good length. Executive and NK 113-70 were exceptionally uniform with regard to pod shape and size. Sprite, Executive...

  12. DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, James V.

    2011-01-01

    210 GA 2/0 GA I I I I C I 20A Instrument regulated pwr I 15AInstrument non-regulated pwr 20A I • I I 30 A twistA twist lock tool box Pump pwr Zero gas generated pwr

  13. DATA ACQUISITION, HANDLING, AND DISPLAY FOR THE HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEvoy, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    8M. INTLKS. COIfIPL. t..O HZ. PWR. ON X EMERt:'£NCY LlGHT! ;~ ~"cf? ;;:~~ (}t; ( 50NZ PWR. ,wHlPWR. I 77M>PWR. HA ISH . (jb"" IN~li1L 50

  14. DESIGN OF A MOBILE LABORATORY FOR VENTILATION STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, James V.

    2011-01-01

    i co i 2KVA sou reg. X Instrument regulated pwr 20A 20AInstrument non-regulated pwr 30A twist lock tool box 30 Alock ( __J~ v x-k \\^_J~ Pump pwr 30A Zero gas generated pwr

  15. Mechanisms of Small RNA Degradation and Characterization of THO Complex Mutants in Arabidopsis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZHAO, YUANYUAN

    2013-01-01

    LIL HSP20/ LIL Ler WT-Ler_r2 CGATGT Ctrl Ler pwr-1_r2 TGACCAWT-Ler_r2 PWR Ler top1a_r2 ACAGTG WT-Ler_r2 TOP1A ColGCCAAT 9-7-2_r2 TAF6 Col pwr-2_r2 GTCCGC Col_r2 PWR Col

  16. Rhodopsin Reconstituted into a Planar-Supported Lipid Bilayer Retains Photoactivity after Cross-Linking Polymerization of Lipid Monomers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael F.

    -waveguide resonance (PWR) spectroscopy10 to characterize Rho in PSLBs. PWR is highly sensitive to the optical the aqueous volume of the PWR cell has been described.7,11 Rho12 was reconstituted into the PSLB by introducing small aliquots of octylglucoside-solubi- lized receptor into the PWR cell, which contained 10 m

  17. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, supplment au n03, Tome 47, mars 1986 page c2-191

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reactors (PWR), respectively. The Zircaloys contain tin and small amounts of iron and chromium. Zircaloy-2 is not the same in PWR and BWR environments. In water (PWR) "general corrosion" dominates. This type of corrosion in a PWR, "nodular corrosion" is the life determining mechanism. In this case, after some time of general

  18. RIS-M-2299 CALCULATION OF DOSE CONSEQUENCES OF A HYPOTHETICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but there is a failure to isolate the containment. This release is represented by the PWR-4 release. The third and cesium decrease by a decade from BWR-2 to PWR-4, and from PWR-4 to BEED, while the release fractions POPULATIONS; IODINE 131; MELTDOWN; PWR TYPE REAC- TORS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION HAZARDS; RARE GASES

  19. Molecular Cell, Volume 45 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    imaging of (A) FLO11 and PWR1, (A) FLO11 and ICR1, and (C) ICR1 and PWR1 transcripts in individual cells) and PWR1 (Cy5; red dots) transcripts in fields of intact individual WT cells. DAPI staining (blue) shows the locations of nuclei. (C) Merged fluorescence and DIC microscopy images show ICR1 (TMR; green dots) and PWR

  20. w Ris Report No. 318 J-Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Description of the Real Time PWR Power Plant Model PWR-PLASIM by P. la Cour Christensen November 1974 M n\\ATOM UDC «l^».524^9i; MlJ : 519JW November 1 974 Risø Report No. 318 Description of the Real Time PWR Power Plant Model PWR-PLASIM by P. la Cour Christensen Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment

  1. NuclearNuclear ""BurningBurning"" of Nuclearof Nuclear ""WasteWaste"" Constantine P. Tzanos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fragments and their decay products #12;Contributors to dose: PWR fuel withContributors to dose: PWR fuel of 70,000 MTIHM of PWR Spent Fuel Repository, Normalized to the PeakPWR Spent Fuel Repository 233 U 99 Tc 129 I 234 U 236 U 238 U #12;Dose Rate: 70,000 MTIHM of PWR Spent Fuel withDose Rate: 70

  2. CX-000033: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs for Buildings and FacilitiesCX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9Date: 11/02/2009Location(s): New YorkOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  3. Variation in ecogeographical traits of pecan cultivars and provenances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagaram, Madhulika

    2009-05-15

    and provenances (i.e., the area of origin of seed). An assessment of leaf anatomical traits of pecan cultivars (Pawnee, Mohawk and Starking Hardy Giant) collected from three locations (Tifton, GA., Chetopa, KS., and Stillwater, OK.) was conducted to provide...

  4. HL7 FHIR: An Agile and RESTful Approach to Healthcare Information Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartipi, Kamran

    .bender@mohawkcollege.ca Kamran Sartipi, PhD, P.Eng. Dept. Electrical, Computer, and Software Eng. University of Ontario Institute.Eng. Dept. Electrical and Computer Eng. Technology Mohawk College Hamilton, ON, L8N 3T2, Canada duane embarked in the development of a new standard referred to as Fast Healthcare Interoperability Re- sources

  5. Energy Systems Technology - A Development in Experiential Learning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumber, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    ~79. Initially about half of the placements were in the institutional/commercial sector and one quarter were in the indust rial sector. The "energy-bus", which was developed at Mohawk in 1975 and then operated for four years under contract to the Ontario...

  6. TRAC-PF1 post-test predictions for the Semiscale Natural-Circulation Tests S-NC-2 and S-NC-6. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, C.P.

    1983-01-01

    The TRAC prediction are compared to the data for the Semiscale natural-circular Tests S-NC-2B and S-NC-6. S-NC-2B is a baseline test covering single- and two-phase natural circulation as well as reflux; here TRAC compares quite well with the experiment results for mass flow. For Test S-NC-6, which is a reflux test with various amounts of nitrogen injected into the system, the TRAC prediction of the reflux rate is close to the experiment value with no nitrogen in the system. Ultimately, the maximum reflux rate predicted by TRAC is about 20% higher than the data.

  7. Fission gas and iodine release measured in IFA-430 up to 15 GWd/t UO/sub 2/ burnup. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Turnbull, J.A.; White, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The release of fission products from fuel pellets to the fuel-cladding gap is dependent on the fuel temperature, the power (fission rate) and the burnup (fuel structure). As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Fuel Behavior Program, EG and G Idaho, Inc., is conducting fission product release studies in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway. This paper presents a summary of the results up to December, 1982. The data cover fuel centerline temperatures ranging from 700 to 1500/sup 0/C for average linear heat ratings of 16 to 35 kW/m. The measurements have been performed for the period between 4.2 and 14.8 GWd/t UO/sub 2/ of burnup of the Instrumented Fuel Assembly 430 (IFA-430). The measurement program has been directed toward quantifying the release of the short-lived radioactive noble gases and iodines.

  8. Steady-state axial pressure losses along the exterior of deformed fuel cladding: Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundles B-1 and B-2. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincey, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental and COBRA-IV computational data presented in this report confirm that increased pressure losses, induced by the steady-state axial flow of water exterior to deformed Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundles B-1 and B-2, may be closely predicted using a bundle-averaged approach for describing flow channel restrictions. One anomaly that was encountered using this technique occurred while modeling the B-2 flow test data near a severe channel restriction: the COBRA-IV results tended to underestimate experimental pressure losses.

  9. Application of analytical capability to predict rapid cladding cooling and quench during the blowdown phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksan, S.N.; Tolman, E.L.; Nelson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Large-break Experiments L2-2 and L2-3 conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility experienced core-wide rapid quenches early in the blowdown transients. To further investigate rapid cladding quenches, separate effects experiments using Semiscale solid-type electric heater rods were conducted in the LOFT Test Support Facility (LTSF) over a wide range of inlet coolant conditions. The analytical capability to predict the cladding temperature response from selected LTSF experiments estimated to bound the hydraulic conditions causing the LOFT early blowdown quenches was investigated using the RELAP4 computer code and was shown to be acceptable over the film boiling cooldown phase. This analytical capability was then used to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel rods under the same hydraulic conditions. The calculations show that, under rapid cooling conditions, the behaviors of nuclear and electrical heater rods are significantly different because the nuclear rods are conduction limited, while the electrical rods are convection limited.

  10. Analysis of the PBF in-pile large-break LOCA test results with FRAP-T6/BALON-2. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broughton, J.M.; Golden, D.W.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    A series of four, large-break loss-of-coolant accident fuel behavior experiments have been performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. These experiments have been analyzed by using out-of-pile data to understand the phenomenology of zircaloy cladding ballooning and to construct a mechanistic computer code to describe cladding deformation and failure. The code was then used to quantify the influence of rod internal pressure, cladding heatup, and cladding circumferential temperature differences on ballooning and rupture for fresh and irradiated test rods in the PBF. The analysis indicates that the timing and magnitude of cladding circumferential temperature differences are the primary controlling parameters. Both the experimental and the analytical results support the hypothesis that previously irradiated rods exhibit greater cladding strain at failure than do fresh rods because of small local temperature differences within the cladding.

  11. Corrosion and hydriding performance evaluation of three Zircaloy-2 clad fuel assemblies after continuous exposure in PWR cores 1 and 2 at Shippingport, PA. Addendum. LWBR Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillner, E.

    1983-12-01

    The cladding from one additional Zircaloy-2 clad fuel rod from the pressurized water reactor at Shippingport, Pa. was destructively examined for corrosion film thickness and hydrogen accumulation. These additional examinations were conducted primarily to determine whether or not the hydrogen pickup ratio (..delta..H/..delta..O) increased with increasing neutron exposure, as had been suggested by the results from earlier studies on these fuel rods. The current results indicate that the hydrogen pickup ratio for Zircaloy-2 does not change with increasing neutron exposure and suggest that some of the earlier reported data may be anomolous.

  12. Comparison of GAPCON-THERMAL-3 and FRAPCON-2 fuel-performance codes to in-reactor measurement of elastic cladding deformation. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanning, D.D.; Rausch, W.N.; Williford, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A revision of the GAPCON-3 computer code became part of the NRC-sponsored FRAPCON-2 code. This paper presents a comparison of both codes to in-reactor data from IFA-508, a 3-rod test rig in the Halden Reactor, Norway, which features simultaneous measurements of fuel temperature, power, axial elongation, and diametral strain. The modeling revisions included putting all regions of the fuel in contact with cladding at all time, but assigning non-linear, spatially dependent, anisotropic elastic moduli to the fuel on an incremental load step basis. The moduli are functions of the local available void within the cladding. These concepts bring demonstrable improvement to the code predictions.

  13. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 analysis of a 200% cold-leg break in a US/Japanese PWR with four loops and 15 x 15 fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spore, J.W.; Cappiello, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the results of a TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculation that simulated a 200% double-ended cold-leg-break loss-of-coolant accident in a generic US/Japanese pressurized water reactor. This is a best-estimate analysis using conservative boundary conditions and minimum safeguards. The calculation shows that the peak cladding temperature (PCT) occurs during blowdown and that the core reheat is minimal during reflood. The results also show that for an evaluation-model peak rod linear power of 15.85 kW/ft, a PCT of 1084 K is reached at 3.5 s into the blowdown transient, which is approx.394 K below the design basis limit of 1478 K. 10 figs.

  14. Thomas, J.R. and Clem, A.W, 1991, PWR moderator temperature coefficient via noise analysis: time series methods, Proceedings of SMORNVI, Gatlinburg, 34.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    .M.R., 1974, Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors, Pergamon Press, Oxford #12; ­ 35 ­ Ku, C.C., Lee K.Y., and Edwards R.M., 1991, Neural network for adapting nuclear power plant control for wide­range operation, Noise Analysis Method for Monitoring the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Pressurized Water Reactors

  15. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 9. PRAISE computer code user's manual. Load Combination Program Project I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, E.Y.

    1981-06-01

    The PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) computer code estimates the influence of earthquakes on the probability of failure at a weld joint in the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor. Failure, either a through-wall defect (leak) or a complete pipe severance (a large-LOCA), is assumed to be caused by fatigue crack growth of an as-fabricated interior surface circumferential defect. These defects are assumed to be two-dimensional and semi-elliptical in shape. The distribution of initial crack sizes is a function of crack depth and aspect ratio. PRAISE treats the inter-arrival times of operating transients either as a constant or exponentially distributed according to observed or postulated rates. Leak rate and leak detection models are also included. The criterion for complete pipe severance is exceedance of a net section critical stress. Earthquakes of various intensity and arbitrary occurrence times can be modeled. PRAISE presently assumes that exactly one initial defect exists in the weld and that the earthquake of interest is the first earthquake experienced at the reactor. PRAISE has a very modular structure and can be tailored to a variety of crack growth and piping reliability problems. Although PRAISE was developed on a CDC-7600 computer, it was, however, coded in standard FORTRAN IV and is readily transportable to other machines.

  16. Dispersed-flow film boiling in rod-bundle geometry: steady-state heat-transfer data and correlation comparisons. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G. L.; Morris, D. G.; Mullins, C. B.; Ott, L. J.; Reed, D. A.

    1982-03-01

    Assessment of six film boiling correlations and one single-phase vapor correlation has been made using data from 22 steady state upflow rod bundle tests (series 3.07.9). Bundle fluid conditions were calculated using energy and mass conservation considerations. Results of the steady state film boiling tests support the conclusions reached in the analysis of prior transient tests 3.03.6AR, 3.06.6B, and 3.08.6C. Comparisons between experimentally determined and correlation-predicted heat transfer coefficients, are presented.

  17. Centrale nucleaire de production d'electricite. Analyse d'une centrale type P.W.R. du palier 900 MWe.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravelet, Florent

    / tonne), il reste : ´el´ements potentiellement fissiles ; beaucoup d'Uranium 238 ; produits de fission) et aspersion. Contr^ole du niveau. Une / boucle (branche froide). H´elico-centrifuge mono-´etage. Qv

  18. IBM United States Withdrawal Announcement 908-175, dated August 05, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M LC/LC FIBER CABLE 2053 All 5601 PWR CORD, 250V 2.5A, ARGEN 2053 All 9231 PWR CORD, 250V 2.5A, AUSTR 2053 All 9232 PWR CORD, 250V 2.5A, EU 2053 All 9233 PWR CORD, 125V 3A, US 2053 All 9234 PWR CORD, 250V 2.5A, UK 2053 All 9235 PWR CORD, 250V 2.5A, KOREA 2053 All 9236 Machine type 2054 8-PORT IP

  19. Folie 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ic, 1 CASTOR IIa, 3 CASTOR V19) Bernhard Droste BAMSandia Workshop * CASTOR Ib with 4 PWR SNF Assemblies, NPP Stade-WAK Karlsruhe * CASTOR Ia with 4 PWR SNF Assemblies, NPP...

  20. A universal low-noise analog receiver baseband in 65-nm CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tekin, Ahmet; Elwan, Hassan; Pedrotti, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    ð ð BW Á C tot Þ=N Þ Á ð ð Pwr Þ= ð N Á BW Þ Þ where DR isamount of capacitance used, Pwr is the power consumption and

  1. Nordisk kernesikkerhedsforskning Norrnar kjarnryggisrannsknir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , PWR, neutron detector, keff, IACIP: NKS_R_2008_61 NKS-211 ISBN 978-87-7893-280-8 Electronic report Keywords CYGNUS, VNEM, Ringhals, unit 3, PWR, neutron detector, keff, IACIP: NKS_R_2008_61 Comparison

  2. Hypothetical Reactor Accident Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POPULATIONS; IODINE 131; MELTDOWN; METEOROLOGY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; P CODES; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RADIATION in a Typical BWR and in a typical PWR. Comparison with WASH-1400 by C F . Højerup 202 APPENDIX 3. Calculation

  3. Thermodynamic Investigations of Aqueous Ternary Complexes for Am/Cm Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leggett, Christina Joy

    2012-01-01

    discharge (uranium-fueled PWR). Figure 1.2 Production of Cf.and pressurized water reactors (PWR). The majority of thepressurized water reactors. In PWRs, the coolant (water),

  4. Advanced phase modulation techniques for stimulated brillouin scattering suppression in fiber optic parametric amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, James

    2009-01-01

    s-1. —Measurement Results Integ Pwr: -Markers B 190.3398 THzMeasurement Results Integ Pwr: 0.375 dBrn MeanWL: 1575.03832

  5. 3.3.3AC Sweep AC . AC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­. DC ­ AC ­) .( . ­ ,, '­Spice .Spice . : 0 0 E1 PWR(V(%IN+, %IN . )2.3( Etable " . . : 00 V1 0Vdc E2 Pwr(V(%IN+, %IN-),2) ETABLE TABLE = (5

  6. Nordisk kernesikkerhedsforskning Norrnar kjarnryggisrannsknir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    follows vessel gen- erations ­ first to third generation; and reactor types ­ PWR and LMC technol- ogy generation; and reactor types ­ PWR and LMC technology. Most of the available information is related

  7. CRICKET V2.0 NETWORKS AND MOBILE SYSTEMS GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _AMP_VREF US _AMP_PWR US_AMP_OUT US_AMP_VREF US_AMP_PWR PDATA POT_CS POT_SCK US_IN_ENA US_DETECT VCC VCC R45 R

  8. China Energy Primer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Chun Chun

    2010-01-01

    pressurized water reactors (PWRs) the principal but not theJiangsu Capacity (MW) Reactor Type PWR:CNP-300 Operator CNNC1991 Qinshan Phase II Unit 1 PWR:CNP-600 CNNC 2-Jun-1996 15-

  9. Study of a low Mach nuclear core model for two-phase ows with phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1 for schematic pictures of PWR and BWR reactors). A natural approach is to represent Paris, France yohan.penel@cerema.fr 1PWR is the acronym for Pressurized Water Reactor. 2BWR

  10. RIS-M-2302 LIST OF SELECTED PUBLICATIONS 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Dimensional PWR Transient Code ANTI. Riso-M-2256 (1980) 106 pp. Friis Jensen, J. and I. Misfeldt, User Manual Neutron Dosemeter. Risø-M- 2247 (1980) 14 pp. Hvidtfeldt Larsen, A. M., The Three-Dimensional PWR

  11. A. E. K. Ris Ris-M-l1 Title and author^*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulator ANDYOAP 30 6.2 The PWR Power Plant Simulator 31 6.3 A l-Dime^sional BWR Plant Dynamic Model. PWR Reports 51 #12;- 2 - 1. General Introduction The work of the Department of Reactor Technology

  12. Energy efficient data centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-01-01

    contribution to demand growth Units Msf W/sf GW TWh Totalcontribution to demand growth Units Msf W/sf GW TWh TotalPower Density (W/SF) Avg Pwr Demand (KW) Peak Pwr Demand (

  13. Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrani, Kurt Amir

    2010-01-01

    re- actor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) designsin integral boiling water super heat reactors. Technical

  14. Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson editor, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    the reactors are boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and three arereactors [PWR] and boiling-water reactors [BWR]) with a

  15. Supplementary Data to Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Afrika Koeberg 1 PWR operational 900 944 04.04.1984 (14.08.2024) 127.092 Koeberg 2 PWR operational 900 under construction since 2010 610 650 ­ ­ ­ Daya Bay (Guangdong) 1 PWR operational 944 984 31.08.1993 (06.05.2034) 93.096 Daya Bay (Guangdong) 2 PWR operational 944 984 07.02.1994 (31.01.2034) 91

  16. ICLU RFP December 2011 Page 1 of 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2011 Page 3 of 12 Attachments 1 to 7 of Schedule A Cisco 1841 Nortel 4550T-PWR x2 67 Users Single mode AA1419002 24 x Multi Mode AA1419001 10 servers Parktown Campus Gables End Nortel 4548GT-PWR 15 Users Knockando (RES) Nortel 4526GT PWR x2 Nortel BPS2000 x1 Nortel 4548GT PWR x1 360 Users

  17. CHAPTER 7 EVALUATION KIT CHAPTER CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    RTN 5V BATT MAIN PWR ONEPPS RED BLACK WHITE DRAIN WHITE DRAIN GREEN ORANGE BROWN BLUE YELLOW 9 PIN D RTCM IN PWR RTN VPP ONEPPS RTN 5V BATT MAIN PWR ONEPPS (100mm) BANANA JACK, POMONA PART NO. 5167-0, 6 NAME 1 RS-232 RXD2 2 RS-232 RXD1 3 RS-232 TXD 4 VPP 5 ONEPPS RTN 6 5V BATT 7 PWR RTN AND RS-232 RTN 8

  18. January 2005 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    signoff Intermediate No Chopper bulk pwr supplies on Regen HER arc 11 Some RF Processing RF processing RFCAV HER septum flow pwr dip actually on pipe PBL pwr tap NDR RF, T-gun 4-3 NIRP 4-3 NIRP Mini-ROD LER 4-4 NIRP PPS, SDR klys Bldg 685 pwr out T3018K59 RF 12-5, 12-6 flow swtch SDR septum 18 beam losses

  19. A. E. K. Ris Ris-M-GHZ Title and authors)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. K. Risø Risø-M-GHZ r» I Gto Title and authors) Users Manual for the PWR-PLASIM Model by P. la of the PWR power plant model PWR-PLASIM described in Risø Report No. 318. It should serve as a users guide Reactor Technology Group's own registration numbers) PWR-1-7 5 Copies to Abstract to #12;ISBN 87 550 0302

  20. 0.5 -1.0 GHZ-3 1.25-1.75GHZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . NOTES ALFA MONITOR ALFA 6A ALFA "7A" PWR SPLITTER FIBER RECEIVER RACK 5 Ortel 10450 .01-6 GHz 1,2,...11d -20 -20 -20 -20 GPIB READ- OUT -10 HP4412 PWR HEAD -10 HP4412 PWR HEAD FROM POL B IF AMP (RACK 6) DUAL CHANNEL POWER METER #1 HP E4419A RACK 5 LEFT HAND PWR METER TRANSFER (REVERSING) SWITCH: EXAMPLE: if2 "if2

  1. Ranger: CircumstancesRanger: Circumstances, Events, Legacy, g y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RA 3: Mirror image m/c, missed Moon · RA-4: Main pwr. short at Agena separation · RA 5: Main pwr lost; 10 32 screw overheat· RA-5: Main pwr. lost; 10-32 screw overheat · RA-6: Plasma short circuit

  2. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A

    2011-01-01

    NJOY NRES NRFXSSI NRF PDF PWR QM RIPL SNF TD TTB wt. % XCOMrotation angle for typical 17x17 PWR assembly. The source ofux. Assembly IE Type 17x17 PWR 3.1 9x9 BWR 1.91 VVER440 M U

  3. Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

    2008-01-01

    s Comp . Speed as_exp _sh_pwr Goto 1 Torque = deltaPower / w= Inertia * dw/dt Add as_comp _sh_pwr Goto as_net _sh_pwr Goto 2 Figure 19 Compressor speed calculation

  4. Class Name: OS101 W07 Class Key: I25425H764 You will need

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    by pressing the PWR/JOIN button. Join ­ the response pads automatically search for a class roster to join to join, turn on the response pad and press the PWR/JOIN button. Manually Join ­ to manually join a class, turn on the response pad and press the PWR/JOIN button twice. Join: appears on the LCD screen. Type

  5. RIS-M-2256 INPUT DESCRIPTION FOR THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2256 INPUT DESCRIPTION FOR THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL PWR TRANSIENT CODE ANTI E. Falcon Nielsen A calculations for the PWR core. It combines a nodal theory neutron kinetics calculation with transient sub, PWR TYPE REACTORS, REACTOR KINETICS, THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS, TRANSIENTS. UDC 621.039.514 : 621

  6. ESAIM: PROCEEDINGS, Vol. ?, 2012, 1-10 Editors: Will be set by the publisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    variables (like temperature) within the reactor. Let us rst present the normal functioning of a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) see Fig. 1. In a PWR, the primary coolant (water) is pumped under high pressure circuit of a PWR. where steam is generated and ows to a turbine which, in turn, spins an electric

  7. Compiling Esterel Better Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _state = STANDBY_PWR_DN; end else if (valid_diag_window | ibuf_full | jmp_e) begin next_state = cur_state; end else STANDBY_PWR_DN: begin if(!pcsu_powerdown | jmp_e ) begin next_state = IDLE; end else next_state = STANDBY_PWR

  8. Nordisk kernesikkerhedsforskning Norrnar kjarnryggisrannsknir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The method of core modelling and parameters used in calculation of VNEM is completely the same as the "PWR of adjustment was done. Key words VNEM, Ringhals, unit 3, PWR, neutron detector, keff, IACIP: NKS_R_2008_61 NKS Retention time 15 Keywords VNEM, Ringhals, unit 3, PWR, neutron detector, keff, IACIP: NKS_R_2008

  9. An Assessment of 238Puand239+240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Assessment of 238Puand239+240 Puinthe Primary Cooling Waterofa PWR Q. Chen, S.P. Nielsen and S+240puinthe Primary Cooling Water of a PWR Q. Chen1 , S.P. Nielsen1 and S. Duniec2 1 Risø National Laboratory of transuranics in these devices. Unit 2 (PWR) of the Ringhals power plant was investigated in this study which

  10. Multi-band high efficiency power amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besprozvanny, Randy-Alexander Randolph

    2011-01-01

    $FPRJ p3: Freq = 0.75 GHz Pwr = 28 dBm p1: Freq = 1.25 GHzTime_Output p2 p1 p3 p1: Freq = 2 GHz Pwr = 30 dBm Time (ns)p2: Freq = 2 GHz Pwr = 30 dBm Current Waveform (mA) Voltage

  11. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01

    f o r 1 0 - y e a r - o l d PWR SF. I n i t i a l Heat G e nt nuclear fuel cycles for a PWR. Decay heat power for d i fKBS LWR MOX NRC NWTS ONWI OWI PWR RH-TRU WIPP b o i l i n g

  12. A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    W NA C C OK/W NA C C OK/W PWR secondary-to- B. Metal—waterfrom core binding OK(WDB) 3. PWR steam a. b. c. Pump Ap S(C Post-CHF heat transfer PWR reflood heat transfer OK (CUP)/

  13. Laboratoire des Solides Irradis, UMR 7642 Laboratoire des Solides Irradis Tl. : 33 1 69 33 44 80

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.3 PWR Water Radiolysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 3 hal-00841142,version1-19Aug2013 #12;CONTENTS 3 Corrosion issues of 316L under Primary PWR Conditions 69 3.1 The Oxide on 316L Formed under Primary PWR Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.1.A

  14. NuSCR Quick Checker Reformation of Quick Checker for verifying NuSCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOD, FSM, TTS, SDT . 1 KNICS RPS(Reactor Protection System) BP (Bistable Process) g_VAR_OVER_PWR . . , . , . , . . 1 g_VAR_OVER_PWR FOD FSM history variable node . FSM . NuSCR . FSM . . . Timed history variable node TTS . TTS FSM . . 2 Waiting Trip k_VAR_OVER_PWR

  15. SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilovic, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    set_sleep_mode(SLEEP_MODE_PWR_DOWN); //enter Power-down Mode4 #define SEL2_PB0 8 #define SEL1_PD7 7 #define PWR_CTRL_PINPD5 #define PWR_CTRL_SD_CARD 6 //SmartCast bitFields for

  16. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01

    N1 Relay 3 (also Sheet 10) Ia PWR Ib Ic In F to CB32, andalso Sheet 10) Ia Ib Ic In PWR F to CB42 and Microsource A2DAS_24dcPOS Vc com Vs E Relay PWR Vsn Ia A52 B52 C52 (5A) (

  17. Energy Efficient Computing with the Low Power, Energy Aware Processing (LEAP) Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntire, Dustin Hale

    2012-01-01

    and communications module PWR RT618+RT620 Power module andwith a power supply module (PWR module), and a high fidelityAUX_BUS_CHAIN_OUT EMAP2 +MAG_PWR V5BUS V33BUS V9BUS -V9BUS

  18. ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF INDUCTANCE IN CLOCK DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Xuchu

    2012-01-01

    17ps on average. Non-resonant CDN Sink MA S.Cap MA mm 2 Pwr.1 Pwr. 2 Resonant CDN LA Skew MA P wr. 2 P wr.mm 2 mW mW ps m Avg. 1431 Pwr. 1 : Switched capacitance CDN

  19. 2.1E BDL Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    TOWERAIR) ' OPEN-CENT-COND-PWR(0.3;0.0 to 1.0 Btu/Btu) •changed i n 2.1E OPEN-REC-COND-PWR(0.03;0.0 to 1.0Btu/Btu) HERM-CENT-COND-PWR(0.3;0.0 to 1.0 Btu/Btu) •

  20. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2012-01-01

    the mass of 239 Pu in a 17x17 PWR fuel assembly with 45 GWd/center of 40 GWd/MTU burn-up PWR fuel assembly with coolingrate for the 11 y cooled PWR fuel was used as a source term