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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

MA.+'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MA.+' MA.+' t -@ . ;' OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY i OPtRATED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITE0 STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ,,y , - IhI of ORNL/TM-10053 RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE VENTRON SITE, BEVERLY, MASSACHUSETTS W. D. Cottrell R. F. Carrier -.- _ ..-. - . . . -~~.- ~~- Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: ~06 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United StatesGovernment. Neither the U nited StatesGovernment nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

2

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 January ........................... 86.9 87.6 86.7 77.8 84.8 78.4 87.3 85.7 88.4 102.4 February ......................... 87.4 88.2 87.8 77.4 84.9 78.5 87.3 85.9 88.5 103.4 March .............................. 86.6 87.3 87.0 76.3 82.5 77.7 87.0 85.6 87.6 103.3 April ................................ 85.4 85.8 85.2 76.7 81.9 76.6 86.5 84.8 87.0 100.0 May ................................. 86.4 86.9 86.5 78.7 84.7 75.8 86.1 84.5 85.2 93.2 June ................................ 84.6 85.2 84.2 78.1 82.5 74.5 83.2 83.9 83.0 NA July ................................. 82.0 82.4 79.4 76.9 80.6 72.9 81.7 81.7 80.0 85.1 August ............................ 80.7 81.1 77.4 76.7 80.9 73.0 85.3 81.7 82.1 W September ...................... 82.3 82.7 79.2 76.2 81.7 73.8 84.9 82.5 82.4 86.1 October ...........................

3

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1997 January ........................... 107.9 109.0 108.6 105.2 106.5 102.1 107.0 104.4 106.5 130.4 February ......................... 105.1 106.0 105.2 102.2 103.4 101.0 104.5 103.5 104.2 127.0 March .............................. 101.6 102.5 99.3 94.3 97.7 98.6 100.4 103.1 100.7 121.4 April ................................ 99.2 100.3 97.6 90.9 95.9 95.2 99.4 100.4 100.1 116.3 May ................................. 96.4 97.1 93.4 90.6 93.0 91.9 97.3 97.7 96.4 108.6 June ................................ 92.3 92.9 89.9 88.1 89.1 89.1 93.3 92.9 90.8 99.9 July ................................. 88.3 88.7 83.7 86.7 87.5 85.6 91.6 91.1 88.8 W August ............................ 86.9 86.8 84.2 85.8 84.7 85.3 91.0 92.7 89.2 W September ...................... 88.7 89.0 85.5 87.0 87.0 86.3 91.2 91.7 88.5 NA October ...........................

4

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 January ........................... 94.6 96.1 94.5 93.0 92.0 89.1 94.9 92.6 94.7 111.7 February ......................... 95.9 97.5 96.2 93.2 93.8 90.8 95.6 93.7 94.4 112.9 March .............................. 99.1 100.6 99.6 96.7 99.3 93.8 99.7 97.3 96.1 117.7 April ................................ 101.5 102.7 102.1 98.7 101.5 96.5 98.8 100.3 100.7 115.9 May ................................. 97.8 98.1 96.8 95.4 95.9 93.6 94.9 98.8 98.0 109.7 June ................................ 91.0 91.3 88.8 90.1 87.9 87.2 88.7 92.2 91.9 102.5 July ................................. 87.9 88.0 84.9 87.5 87.5 83.6 87.7 88.5 91.0 97.3 August ............................ 88.1 88.2 84.0 89.5 89.0 85.1 88.3 89.0 91.0 99.2 September ...................... 94.5 94.4 92.5 96.4 93.1 91.9 96.6 94.4 95.3 106.2 October ...........................

5

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1994 January ........................... 89.6 91.0 90.2 83.8 88.4 80.4 87.3 88.8 92.1 102.5 February ......................... 92.9 94.6 93.8 90.4 91.3 86.6 91.4 92.3 91.5 105.5 March .............................. 91.4 92.5 92.1 85.9 88.3 83.6 89.4 91.0 91.2 102.0 April ................................ 88.2 89.0 89.4 80.8 86.0 78.2 85.1 88.3 89.2 93.7 May ................................. 86.1 86.6 85.4 76.8 85.1 75.4 83.3 86.7 84.4 83.1 June ................................ 85.2 85.6 86.1 75.6 83.7 73.1 82.3 84.6 82.0 W July ................................. 82.7 83.1 84.2 75.6 82.1 71.8 81.6 83.0 80.5 W August ............................ 82.1 82.4 79.7 78.0 78.7 72.8 84.0 83.8 82.3 81.9 September ...................... 83.2 83.7 80.5 78.5 81.1 72.9 84.7 83.3 83.1 86.2 October ........................... 84.7

6

Year Month U.S. Average PAD District I Average CT ME MA NH RI  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1993 January ........................... 94.3 95.7 94.9 85.2 94.0 87.1 91.7 93.4 91.2 105.2 February ......................... 94.6 95.9 96.2 85.4 94.4 86.9 91.8 93.3 90.8 106.8 March .............................. 95.4 96.5 96.7 86.4 94.8 86.6 92.4 93.7 92.4 108.5 April ................................ 92.6 93.4 93.6 83.0 91.5 84.5 90.4 91.2 91.6 106.7 May ................................. 91.1 91.7 91.6 81.7 91.1 83.9 90.7 91.3 89.4 104.3 June ................................ 88.9 89.4 88.6 81.1 88.6 82.4 87.6 89.7 90.6 100.4 July ................................. 85.6 85.9 86.5 78.5 83.9 78.3 85.2 85.5 86.4 100.2 August ............................ 84.1 84.6 84.0 77.4 83.4 76.0 82.7 85.6 83.5 96.1 September ...................... 85.5 85.8 84.2 78.3 83.8 74.9 84.8 86.6 84.6 95.5 October ...........................

7

Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Appendix to the final environmental impact report supplement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is an appendix to the final Environmental Impact Report Supplement, published on February 15, 1995, addressing the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this document is to discuss the selection of the Boston area electrical substation site and the relocation of a paralleling station in East Foxboro.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Record of decision: Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Northeast Corridor Improvement Project electrification, New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This record of decision (ROD) completes the environmental review by the Federal Administration (FRA) of the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to extend electric train operation from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. In this ROD, FRA approves Amtrak`s proposal subject to the inclusion into the project of a number of measures to eliminate or minimize potential adverse environmental impacts.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

MA.2  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IS .:,I. ;' IS .:,I. ;' MA.2 0 y-AU Mr. M ichael Matt W a tertown Redevelopment Authority 319 Arlington Street W a tertown, Massachusetts 02172 Dear Mr. Matt: The Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized under the Manhattan Engineer District and/or the Atomic Energy C o m m ission in the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. As you know from information previously sent to you, portions of the W a tertown Arsenal in W a tertown, Massachusetts, were identified as possible sites. The areas investigated included those areas which were the sites of Buildings 34, 41, and 421 and the GSA site. The enclosed documents, which represent the Department's review of the

15

Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Northeast corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. To Boston, MA. Volume 1. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 X 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. This volume considers impacts on the Human and Natural Environment utilizing guidance as outlined in CFR Part 1500, Council on Environmental Quality, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA as amended and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) regulations (301 CMR 11:00). Impacts analyzed include changes in the natural environment (air quality, noise and vibration, energy, electromagnetic fields, natural resources, hazardous materials and visual/aesthetics), changes in the social environment (land use and recreation, transportation and traffic), impacts on historic and archaeological sites, changes in transit service and patronage, associated changes in highway and airport congestion, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and financial implications. Impacts are identified both for the proposed construction period and for the long-term operation of the alternatives.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Beverly MA Site - MA 04  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Beverly MA Site - MA 04 Beverly MA Site - MA 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Beverly, MA Alternate Name(s): Metal Hydrides, Inc. Ventron Corporation MA.04-1 Location: Congress Street, Beverly, Massachusetts MA.04-4 Historical Operations: Provided uranium metal production under contract with MED. Thorium and radium contamination occurred from non-MED operations. MA.04-6 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MA.04-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey, Verification Survey MA.04-4 MA.04-7 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice included MA.04-5 MA.04-6 MA.04-7 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP Also see Beverly, MA, Site Documents Related to Beverly, MA Beverly Site Aerial Photograph

18

L. Lynn Ma | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L. Lynn Ma Advanced Applications Engineer Education Xiamen University, B.S., Applied Mathematics Florida Institute of Technology, M.S., Physical Oceanography State University of...

19

DE-MA0002512  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Award No. 2. Modification No. 3. Effective Date Award No. 2. Modification No. 3. Effective Date 4. CFDA No. DE-MA0002512 03/27/2012 ASSISTANCE AGREEMENT 7. Period of Performance 6. Sponsoring Office 5. Awarded To Other Cooperative Agreement Grant test 10. Purchase Request or Funding Document No. 9. Authority 8. Type of Agreement 11. Remittance Address 12. Total Amount 13. Funds Obligated Govt. Share: $0.00 Cost Share : $0.00 Total : $0.00 This action: $0.00 Total : $0.00 test 14. Principal Investigator 15. Program Manager 16. Administrator test 19. Submit Reports To 18. Paying Office 17. Submit Payment Requests To 20. Accounting and Appropriation Data See Schedule 21. Research Title and/or Description of Project For the Recipient For the United States of America 22. Signature of Person Authorized to Sign

20

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Discovery and utilization of sorghum genes (Ma5/Ma6)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and composition for the production of non-flowering or late flowering sorghum hybrid. For example, in certain aspects methods for use of molecular markers that constitute the Ma5/Ma6 pathway to modulate photoperiod sensitivity are described. The invention allows the production of plants having improved productivity and biomass generation.

Mullet, John E; Rooney, William L; Klein, Patricia E; Morishige, Daryl; Murphy, Rebecca; Brady, Jeff A

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

The ma Ni Song 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ba sgrol ma Date of recording November 10th 2009. Place of recording Ci jo Village, Phu ma Township, Sde dge County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China. Name(s), age, sex, place of birth of performer(s) Bo...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

NREL: Energy Sciences - Jie Ma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jie Ma Jie Ma Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Jie Ma Phone: (303) 384-6511 Email: jie.ma@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2010 Dr. Ma graduated from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2004 and received a Ph.D. degree from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2009. Jie joined the Computational Materials Science Team at NREL as a postdoctoral researcher in March, 2010. He is currently working on computational design and characterization of nanoscale materials for doping, water splitting, and solar cells, using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Research Interests Low-dimensional systems (quantum dots, nanotube and nanowires, and surfaces) Doping in semiconductors. Solar cell and water splitting.

24

MA Mortenson | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mortenson Mortenson Jump to: navigation, search Name MA Mortenson Place Minnesota Zip 55440-0710 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Construction and building firm active in the installation of wind and solar farms. References MA Mortenson[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. MA Mortenson is a company located in Minnesota . References ↑ "MA Mortenson" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MA_Mortenson&oldid=348551" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

25

M.A. Silva Dias,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 a 260. 1 Modelando o Impacto Climtico Regional e Remoto do Desmatamento M.A. Silva Dias, 1 R. Avissar, 2 e P. Silva Dias 1,3 As observaes e os modelos concordam que os...

26

MA - Office of Management - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA Energy Conservation Plan MA Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 1 Office of Management Office-Level Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 I. BACKGROUND This energy conservation plan represents an effort to reduce energy consumption within Office of Management (MA) office spaces and to increase employee awareness of and participation in energy conservation measures. II. SCOPE The plan and procedures in this document apply to all Office of Management (MA) office suites in the Forrestal and Germantown Facilities as well as the 950 L'Enfant Plaza Building. The actions and procedures set forth in this plan apply to each separate MA office suite as follows: MA-1: 4A-107 MA-43: 1F-039 MA-70: 7E-074 MA-1.1: 7E-028 MA-43: 1F-037 MA-70: 7E-054 MA-30: GH-081 MA-43:

27

Category:Boston, MA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boston, MA Boston, MA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Boston, MA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 67 KB SVHospital Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVHospital Boston MA M... 65 KB SVLargeHotel Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Boston MA... 65 KB SVLargeOffice Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Boston M... 65 KB SVMediumOffice Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Boston ... 65 KB SVMidriseApartment Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVMidriseApartment Bos... 65 KB SVOutPatient Boston MA Massachusetts Electric Co.png SVOutPatient Boston MA...

28

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Indian Orchard MA Site - MA 08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indian Orchard MA Site - MA 08 Indian Orchard MA Site - MA 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Indian Orchard, MA Alternate Name(s): Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company Chapman Valve Site Crane Company MA.08-3 MA.08-4 Location: 203 Hampshire Street, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts MA.08-2 Historical Operations: Machined extruded natural uranium rods and supplied valves and other products to MED and AEC. Also machined natural uranium rods into slugs for Brookhaven National Laboratory. MA.08-6 MA.08-7 MA.08-8 MA.08-14 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MA.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey, Verification Survey MA.08-11 MA.08-12 Site Status: Certified - Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice included. MA.08-13 MA.08-14 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

29

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

30

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

31

MA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Status: The State has unbundling programs for its residential gas customers, but participation is quite limited. Overview: Massachusetts used a ...

32

WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Map of Chester wind tower site April 11, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 5 UniversityWIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 ­ February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology April 11, 2007 Report template version 3.1 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

33

WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a given direction and the average wind speed in that May 2, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Wind Speed, December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007 May 2, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory PageWIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 ­ February 28th , 2007 Prepared

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

34

Category:Concord, NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Go Back to PV Economics By Location Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Concord, NH" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 74 KB SVHospital Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVHospital Concord NH ... 75 KB SVLargeHotel Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeHotel Concord N... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVLargeOffice Concord ... 76 KB SVMediumOffice Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMediumOffice Concord... 74 KB SVMidriseApartment Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVMidriseApartment Con... 71 KB SVOutPatient Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png SVOutPatient Concord N... 72 KB SVPrimarySchool Concord NH Public Service Co of NH.png

35

MA Org Chart, August 01, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA-1 MA-1 Ingrid Kolb, Director Chief Acquisition Officer (Vacant) Laurie Morman, Chief of Staff Office of Resource Management and Planning MA-1.1 Marilyn Dillon, Director Willie Mae Ingram, Dep. Director (Acting) Office of Acquisition & Project Management Paul Bosco, Director David Boyd, Dep. Director Jay Glascock, Senior Advisor Office of Policy MA-63 Berta Schreiber Director Office of Contract Management Patrick Ferraro Director Office of Project Management Michael Peek Director Office of Headquarters Procurement Services Mark Brady Director Office of Property Management Carmelo Melendez Director MA-60 Office of Scheduling and Advance Anthony Rediger, Director James Covey, Dep. Director MA-10 MA-30 MA-40 MA-70 MA-90 Office of Aviation

36

InThrMa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InThrMa InThrMa Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: InThrMa Agency/Company /Organization: InThrMa Sector: Energy Focus Area: - HVAC Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website, Mobile Device Website: www.inthrma.com/ Web Application Link: www.inthrma.com/ Cost: Paid Language: English InThrMa Screenshot References: InThrMa[1] Logo: InThrMa Web based HVAC EMS for Internet connected thermostats, focusing on energy efficiency, including Auto Demand Response capabilities. Harnessing Data & Technology To Derive HVAC Efficiency Overview InThrMa's HVAC Energy Management Suite (EMS) allows users to manage and optimize their HVAC systems from any web browser or mobile phone. The InThrMa EMS provides various tools for programming, monitoring and

37

MA-60 Org chart | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA-60 Org chart MA-60 Org chart Updated May 6,2013 APM Org Chart v12.pptx More Documents & Publications Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Organization Chart Office...

38

Data Update for Blandford, MA November 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Blandford, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Matthew Lackner Monthly Data Summary for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Blandford monitoring site in Blandford, MA, at 42.223° N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

39

Data Update for Paxton, MA September, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA September, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for September, 2004 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

40

Data Update for Paxton, MA December, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA December, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for December, 2004 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Data Update for Paxton, MA October, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA October, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for October, 2004 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

42

Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA July, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for July, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

43

Data Update for Paxton, MA November, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA November, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for November, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

44

Data Update for Paxton, MA November, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA November, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for November, 2004 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

45

Data Update for Paxton, MA January, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA January, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for January, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

46

Data Update for Paxton, MA August, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA August, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for August, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

47

Data Update for Paxton, MA February, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA February, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for February, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

48

Data Update for Paxton, MA September, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA September, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for September, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

49

Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA June, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for June, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

50

Data Update for Blandford, MA October 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Blandford, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Matthew Lackner Monthly Data Summary for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Blandford monitoring site in Blandford, MA, at 42.223° N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

51

Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA May, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for May, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

52

Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA May, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for May, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

53

Data Update for Paxton, MA December, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA December, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for December, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

54

Data Update for Paxton, MA August, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA August, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for August, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

55

Data Update for Paxton, MA October, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA October, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for October, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

56

Data Update for Paxton, MA September, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA September, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for September, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

57

Data Update for Paxton, MA October, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA October, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for October, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

58

Data Update for Paxton, MA February, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA February, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for February, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

59

Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA June, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for June, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

60

Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA July, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for July, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Data Update for Paxton, MA December, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA December, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for December, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

62

Data Update for Paxton, MA March, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA March, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for March, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

63

Data Update for Paxton, MA January, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA January, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for January, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

64

Data Update for Paxton, MA April, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA April, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for April, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

65

Data Update for Paxton, MA March, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA March, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for March, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

66

Data Update for Paxton, MA November, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA November, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for November, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

67

Data Update for Paxton, MA April, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Paxton, MA April, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for April, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

68

NH NH NH NH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Grand Station Foyer Continental Breakfast - Grand Station iii PoSt-CoMbuStion MeMbrane-baS Moderator - Jos Figueroa, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Techno tueSday,...

69

Updated 6/10 Volunteer NH!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant a garden 5 Hitchcock Hall Durham, NH 03824 Marianne Fortescue, Coordinator 603-862-2197 marianne.fortescue

Pohl, Karsten

70

Precios de Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precios de Gasolina para Ciudades en EEUU Pulse en el mapa para ver los precios de la gasolina en diferentes ciudades de su estado. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV...

71

M.A. Silva Dias,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 a 260. 1 a 260. 1 Modelando o Impacto Climático Regional e Remoto do Desmatamento M.A. Silva Dias, 1 R. Avissar, 2 e P. Silva Dias 1,3 As observações e os modelos concordam que os níveis atuais e os padrões de desmatamento da Amazônia de fato intensificam as transferências de massa e energia entre a terra e a atmosfera por meio da criação de circulações impulsionadas termicamente com efeitos significativos sobre a precipitação, mas que variam sazonal e regionalmente. Isso também indicou a necessidade de identificar o limiar onde o aumento do desmatamento realmente implica a diminuição de pluviosidade, conforme apontado pela maioria dos modelos de circulação geral de baixa resolução. Grande parte dos estudos sobre o impacto remoto ainda é exploratória, mas indicam que

72

Ma'aden Open Mould Casting Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper will describe Ma'aden experience in ingot casting machines: commissioning and start-up, the challenges faced specially with De-molding machines,...

73

WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA 9/1/06-11/30/06 Prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) Golden the closest tower leg The data from the SecondWind Nomad2 logger is emailed to the Renewable Energy Research Energy Research Laboratory Page 10 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 #12;Wind Speed

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

74

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shpack Landfill - MA 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shpack Landfill - MA 06 Shpack Landfill - MA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shpack Landfill, NY Alternate Name(s): Attleboro, MA Metals and Controls Site Norton Landfill area MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Location: 68 Union Road, Norton, Massachusetts MA.06-2 Historical Operations: No AEC activities were conducted on site. Contamination was suspected from disposal of materials containing uranium and zirconium ash. MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MA.06-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MA.06-4 MA.06-5 MA.06-6 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. MA.06-7 MA.06-8 USACE Website Long-term Care Requirements: To be determined upon completion. Also see Documents Related to Shpack Landfill, NY MA.06-1 - DOE Memorandum; Meyers to Hart; Subject: Shpack Landfill,

75

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Watertown Arsenal - MA 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Watertown Arsenal - MA 02 Watertown Arsenal - MA 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WATERTOWN ARSENAL (MA.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to EPA, State of Massachusetts, and the NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Building Site 421 , Watertown , Massachusetts MA.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 MA.02-2 MA.02-3 Site Operations: Building 421 was used in the late 1940's and early 1950's by M.I.T. under Contract #AT (30-1)-956 for work on African Ores, and a modified ion-exchange technique was developed. Activities at Buildings 34, 41 and the GSA Site were conducted under AEC licensed. MA.02-4 MA.02-5 MA.02-6 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority MA.02-6 MA.02-7 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MA.02-4

76

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Englehard Industries - MA...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

operations - uranium metal - under AEC license. MA.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MA.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials...

77

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- R Brew Co - NH 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R Brew Co - NH 01 R Brew Co - NH 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: R. BREW CO. (NH.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Concord , New Hampshire NH.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NH.01-2 Site Operations: Conducted vacuum furnace tests using uranium and copper billets. NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NH.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NH.01-1 NH.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - radiological monitoring during operations NH.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to R. BREW CO. NH.01-1 - Memorandum/Checklist; Landis to File; Subject: R. Brew

78

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tracerlab Inc - MA 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tracerlab Inc - MA 11 Tracerlab Inc - MA 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TRACERLAB, INC. (MA.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 130 High Street , Boston , Massachusetts MA.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MA.11-3 Site Operations: Research and development regarding uranium irradiation and cesium blocks during the early 1950s. MA.11-1 MA.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MA.11-2 MA.11-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Cesium MA.11-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to TRACERLAB, INC. MA.11-1 - Tracerlab Letter; Epple to Mason; Subject: Steps to Secure

79

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenwal Inc - MA 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fenwal Inc - MA 14 Fenwal Inc - MA 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenwal, Inc. (MA.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Ashland , Massachusetts MA.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 MA.14-2 MA.14-3 Site Operations: Performed pilot scale explosion suppression tests on uranium contaminated magnesium fluoride powder in the late 1960s. MA.14-1 MA.14-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials handled MA.14-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MA.14-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Fenwal, Inc.

80

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Fireworks Ordnance Corp - MA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fireworks Ordnance Corp - Fireworks Ordnance Corp - MA 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NATIONAL FIREWORKS ORDNANCE CORP (MA.13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: American Potash and Chemical Corporation MA.13-3 Location: West Hanover , Massachusetts MA.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MA.13-1 Site Operations: Performed bench scale research and development on uranium forming during the 1960s. MA.13-2 MA.13-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantity of materials handled MA.13-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Metal and Powders MA.13-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated MA.13-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Nuclear Metals Inc - MA 09  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Metals Inc - MA 09 Metals Inc - MA 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NUCLEAR METALS, INC. (MA.09) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Licensed facility - included in NRC action plan (Site Decommissioning Management Plan) in 1990 for cleanup Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1555 Massachusetts Ave. , Cambridge , Massachusetts MA.09-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 MA.09-1 Site Operations: Produced natural uranium tubes for Savannah River reactor program and fabricated power reactor fuel elements under AEC/NRC license. MA.09-4 MA.09-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority under FUSRAP - AEC licensed operation MA.09-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium MA.09-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

82

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Manufacturing Laboratories Inc - MA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Manufacturing Laboratories Inc - MA Manufacturing Laboratories Inc - MA 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MANUFACTURING LABORATORIES, INC. (MA.0-04 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 272 Northampton Street , Boston , Massachusetts MA.0-04-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MA.0-04-3 Site Operations: Developed a process for making projectiles from depleted uranium during the early 1950s. MA.0-04-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope of operations at the site MA.0-04-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MA.0-04-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP

83

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Norton Co - MA 12  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

26, 1987 MA.12-4 - AEC Letter; White to Warde; Subject: Thorium Samples; February 19, 1954 MA.12-5 - AEC Memorandum; Morgan to Epp; Subject: Shipment of Fused Uranium Oxide...

84

MaNDi: the Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer at SNS | ORNL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer at SNS MaNDi detector Detector array for the MaNDi instrument before installation. Detector cutaway Cutaway view of detector array for the...

85

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for September 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

86

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

87

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for June 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

88

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for February 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

89

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

90

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

91

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for June 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

92

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for March 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

93

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

94

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

95

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

96

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for March 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

97

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for September 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

98

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for July 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

99

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for August 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

100

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for November 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for April 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

102

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for July 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

103

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for November 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

104

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA April 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for April 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

105

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA September 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for September 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

106

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for May 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

107

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for July 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

108

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA May 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for May 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

109

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA June 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for June 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59.2" N, 72

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

110

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

111

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

112

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for August 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

113

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

114

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Elkinton Monthly Data Summary for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

115

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Puneet Malhotra Monthly Data Summary for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

116

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Update for Mt. Tom, Holyoke, MA December 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Melissa Ray Monthly Data Summary for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Mt. Tom monitoring site in Holyoke, MA, at 42° 14' 59

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

117

NH House Committee_April27 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Mercury Control Technology R&D Program for Coal-Fired Boilers Working Session of the New Hampshire House Science, Technology, & Energy Committee April 26, 2005 Concord, New Hampshire Thomas J. Feeley, III thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov National Energy Technology Laboratory NH House Committee_April 2005 Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program Performance/Cost Objectives * Have technologies ready for commercial demonstration by 2007 for all coals * Reduce "uncontrolled" Hg emissions by 50-70% * Reduce cost by 25-50% compared to baseline cost estimates Baseline Costs: $50,000 - $70,000 / lb Hg Removed 2000 Year Cost NH House Committee_April 2005 Stages of Mercury Control Technology Development DOE RD&D Model Lab/Bench/Pilot-Scale Testing Field Testing

118

KwanliuMa_NERSC2011.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis and Visualization Analysis and Visualization Computing Requirements A Case Study Kwan-Liu Ma University of California, Davis SciDAC Institute for Ultrascale Visualization Outline * SciDAC Institute for Ultrascale Visualization * Visualization Solutions for Turbulent Combustion Simulations * A Case Study on Particle Trajectories Data Visualization Turbulent Combustion Simulations  Jackie Chen, Sandia National Laboratory  Direct numerical simulation tools are being developed Turbulent Combustion Simulations * High fidelity modeling is required to reliably predict efficiency and pollutant emission for new engines and new fuels * The current simulation code running on a supercomputer like the Cray XT5 uses up to 48,000 cores and over 14 million CPU hours per run

119

El Ma Electronic Machining srl | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ma Electronic Machining srl Ma Electronic Machining srl Jump to: navigation, search Name El.Ma. Electronic Machining srl Place Riva del Garda (TN), Italy Zip 38066 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar, Wind energy Product String representation "Italy-based, in ... solar sectors." is too long. References El.Ma. Electronic Machining srl[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. El.Ma. Electronic Machining srl is a company located in Riva del Garda (TN), Italy . References ↑ "El.Ma. Electronic Machining srl" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=El_Ma_Electronic_Machining_srl&oldid=344591" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

120

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ... Weld Overlay Claddings by Gas-metal-arc Welding Process for Extending Plant...

122

Price of Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

123

A MaRIE Perspective - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MaRIE will be an international user facility and will enable unprecedented in-situ, transient measurements of real mesoscale materials in relevant extremes,...

124

Radiation Protection Instrument Manual, Revision 1, PNL-MA-562  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNL-MA-562 This manual provides specific information for operating and using portable radiological monitoring instruments available for use on the Hanford Site.

Johnson, Michelle Lynn

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

RECIPIENT:Hull Municipal Light Plant STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 01 :L RECIPIENT:Hull Municipal Light Plant STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE: Hull Offshore Wind Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement...

126

MA Doping Analysis on Breeding Capability and Protected Plutonium Production of Large FBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent fuel from LWR can be seen as long-live waste if it is not recycled or as a 'new fuel' resource if it is recycled into the reactors. Uranium and plutonium have been used for 'new fuel' resources from LWR spent fuel as MOX fuel type which is loaded into thermal reactor or fast reactor types. Other actinides from the spent fuel such as neptunium, americium and curium as minor actinide (MA) are considered to be loaded into the reactors for specific purposes, recently. Those purposes such as for increasing protected plutonium production and breeding capability for protected plutonium as well as in the same time those amount of MA can be reduced to a small quantity as a burner or transmutation purpose. Some investigations and scientific approaches are performed in order to increase a material ''barrier'' in plutonium isotope composition by increasing the even mass number of plutonium isotope such as Pu-238, Pu-240 and Pu-242 as plutonium protected composition. Higher material barrier which related to intrinsic properties of plutonium isotopes with even mass number (Pu-238, Pu-240 and Pu-242), are recognized because of their intense decay heat (DH) and high spontaneous fission neutron (SFN) rates. Those even number mass of plutonium isotope contribute to some criteria of plutonium characterization which will be adopted for present study such as IAEA, Pellaud and Kessler criteria (IAEA, 1972; Pellaud, 2002; and Kessler, 2007). The present paper intends to evaluate the breeding capability as a fuel sustainability index of the reactors and to analyze the composition of protected plutonium production of large power reactor based on the FaCT FBR as reference (Ohki, et al., 2008). Three dimensional FBR core configuration has been adopted which is based on the core optimization calculation of SRAC-CITATION code as reactor core analysis and JENDL-3.3 is adopted for nuclear data library. Some MA doping materials are loaded into the blanket regions which can be considered as breeding region for protected plutonium production. Breeding capability of the reactor can be increased effectively by increasing MA doping rate while criticality condition of the reactor is reduced by doping MA. Adopting MA cycle is also effective to increase the isotopic Pu-238 production in plutonium vector composition for denaturing purpose of plutonium.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Non-proliferation Science and Technology Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

PNNL-MA-530 PNNL-SA-79982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PNNL-MA-530 PNNL-SA-79982 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flight Operations Manual August 2011 #12;#12;PNNL-MA-530 PNNL-SA-79982 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flight Manual August 2011 Prepared for the U

128

,"Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pittsburg, NH Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","172014" ,"Next...

129

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

130

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) NH Clean Power Act (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NH Department of Environmental Services The Act calls for annual reductions of multiple pollutants, including SO2, Nox, CO2, and mercury. The Act calls for an 87% reduction in SO2 emissions and a 70% reduction in Nox emissions from 1999 levels. CO2 emissions are to be reduced to 1990 levels by the end of 2006. Act is implemented under NH Rules Env-A 2900. This act applies specifically to three existing fossil

131

Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

132

Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Rhode Island Coordinates 41.5800945°, -71.4774291° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5800945,"lon":-71.4774291,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

133

Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Australia ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

134

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

135

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

136

Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

137

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Australia...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Australia (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Australia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

138

Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE), Los Alamos...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MaRIE: Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Experimental Facility MaRIE Home MaRIE 1.0 Fission, Fusion materials Facility Accelerator Systems Making, Measuring and Modeling...

139

SE-MA-NO Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MA-NO Electric Coop MA-NO Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name SE-MA-NO Electric Coop Place Missouri Utility Id 16851 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Municipal HPS 100 W Lighting Municipal HPS 250 W Lighting Residential Residential Residential/Commercial HPS 100 W Lighting Residential/Commercial HPS 250 W Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0804/kWh Commercial: $0.0763/kWh Industrial: $0.0649/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

140

PIA - Management and Administration (MA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Management and Administration (MA) PIA - Management and Administration (MA) PIA - Management and Administration (MA) The E-Government Act of 2002 requires Federal agencies to perform Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs), an analysis of how information is handled, in order: (i) to ensure handling conforms to applicable legal, regulatory, and policy requirements regarding privacy, (ii) to determine the risks and effects of collecting, maintaining and disseminating information in identifiable form in an electronic information system, and (iii) to examine and evaluate protections and alternative processes for handling information to mitigate potential privacy risks. The DOE PIA process helps to ensure privacy protections are considered and implemented throughout the system life cycle. Following are all PIAs that have been done for Management and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gas Prices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prices Gasoline Prices for U.S. Cities Click on the map to view gas prices for cities in your state. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV VA NC SC FL GA AL MS TN KY IN...

142

Reconstruction of CT Images from Parsimonious Angular ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal human organs in a non-invasive manner. Any CT scan ...... Relative reconstruction error results for CT data without measurement error types of noisy CT...

143

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals and Controls Corp FSM Dept - MA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and Controls Corp FSM Dept - and Controls Corp FSM Dept - MA 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS AND CONTROLS CORP., FSM DEPT. ( MA.21 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: M&C Texas Instruments MA.21-1 Location: Attleboro , Massachusetts MA.21-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MA.21-4 Site Operations: Nuclear fuel fabrication during the 1950s and 1960s. MA.21-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MA.21-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MA.21-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MA.21-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP MA.21-2 Also see Documents Related to METALS AND CONTROLS CORP., FSM DEPT. MA.21-1 - Texas Instruments Letter; Veale to Duffy; Subject: Further

144

Microsoft Word - MA HCM Workforce Plan.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HUMAN CAPITAL HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT WORKFORCE PLAN September 2006 This page left blank intentionally. MA Workforce Plan - September 2006 TABLE OF CONTENTS Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................... i Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... 1 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 Mission and Business Vision .........................................................................................3 1.2 Human Capital Management Strategy ...........................................................................4

145

MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MA50177: Scientific Computing Case Study Nuclear Reactor Simulation ­ Generalised Eigenvalue of a malfunction or of an accident experimentally, the numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is of utmost balance in a nuclear reactor are the two-group neutron diffusion equations -div (K1 u1) + (a,1 + s) u1 = 1

Scheichl, Robert

146

MaRS: a macro-pipelined reconfigurable system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce MaRS, a reconfigurable, parallel computing engine with special emphasis on scalability, lending itself to the computation-/data-intensive multimedia data processing and wireless communication. Global communication between the processing ... Keywords: 2D-mesh network, MIMD, computer graphics, multimedia, reconfigurable architectures, wireless communication

Nozar Tabrizi; Nader Bagherzadeh; Amir H. Kamalizad; Haitao Du

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

MaGate Simulator: A Simulation Environment for a Decentralized Grid Scheduler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulator for of a decentralized modular grid scheduler named MaGate. MaGate's design emphasizes scheduler interoperability by providing intelligent scheduling serving the grid community as a whole. Each MaGate scheduler instance ... Keywords: Grid Scheduling, MaGate Simulator, Simulation, SmartGRID

Ye Huang; Amos Brocco; Michele Courant; Beat Hirsbrunner; Pierre Kuonen

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NH NH (Redirected from PSNH) Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections

149

Town of Danvers, MA Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Grid Project Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Town of Danvers, MA Country United States Headquarters Location Danvers, Massachusetts Recovery Act Funding $8,476,800.00 Total Project Value $16,953,600.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Town of Danvers, MA Smart Grid Project Coordinates 42.5750946°, -70.9300507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

150

Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: MaRIE (draft)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To achieve breakthrough scientific discoveries in the 21st century, a convergence and integration of world-leading experimental facilities and capabilities with theory, modeling, and simulation is necessary. In this issue of Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas, I am excited to present our plans for Los Alamos National Laboratory's future flagship experimental facility, MaRIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes). MaRIE is a facility that will provide transformational understanding of matter in extreme conditions required to reduce or resolve key weapons performance uncertainties, develop the materials needed for advanced energy systems, and transform our ability to create materials by design. Our unique role in materials science starting with the Manhattan Project has positioned us well to develop a contemporary materials strategy pushing the frontiers of controlled functionality - the design and tailoring of a material for the unique demands of a specific application. Controlled functionality requires improvement in understanding of the structure and properties of materials in order to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. In the nuclear weapons program today, improving data and models to increase confidence in the stockpile can take years from concept to new knowledge. Our goal with MaRIE is to accelerate this process by enhancing predictive capability - the ability to compute a priori the observables of an experiment or test and pertinent confidence intervals using verified and validated simulation tools. It is a science-based approach that includes the use of advanced experimental tools, theoretical models, and multi-physics codes, simultaneously dealing with multiple aspects of physical operation of a system that are needed to develop an increasingly mature predictive capability. This same approach is needed to accelerate improvements to other systems such as nuclear reactors. MaRIE will be valuable to many national security science challenges. Our first issue of Vistas focused on our current national user facilities (the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center [LANSCE], the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory-Pulsed Field Facility, and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies) and the vitality they bring to our Laboratory. These facilities are a magnet for students, postdoctoral researchers, and staff members from all over the world. This, in turn, allows us to continue to develop and maintain our strong staff across the relevant disciplines and conduct world-class discovery science. The second issue of Vistas was devoted entirely to the Laboratory's materials strategy - one of the three strategic science thrusts for the Laboratory. This strategy has helped focus our thinking for MaRIE. We believe there is a bright future in cutting-edge experimental materials research, and that a 21st-century facility with unique capability is necessary to fulfill this goal. The Laboratory has spent the last several years defining MaRIE, and this issue of Vistas presents our current vision of that facility. MaRIE will leverage LANSCE and our other user facilities, as well as our internal and external materials community for decades to come, giving Los Alamos a unique competitive advantage, advancing materials science for the Laboratory's missions and attracting and recruiting scientists of international stature. MaRIE will give the international materials research community a suite of tools capable of meeting a broad range of outstanding grand challenges.

Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

151

EDeMa (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EDeMa EDeMa Country Germany Headquarters Location Mülheim, Germany Coordinates 51.427074°, 6.886492° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.427074,"lon":6.886492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY...

153

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tufts College - MA 0-05  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tufts College - MA 0-05 Tufts College - MA 0-05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TUFTS COLLEGE ( MA.0-05 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Medford , Massachusetts MA.0-05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MA.0-05-1 Site Operations: Research and development using only small quantities of radioactive material. MA.0-05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of material handled MA.0-05-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium MA.0-05-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to TUFTS COLLEGE MA.0-05-1 - Aerospace Letter; Young to Wallo; Subject: Elimination

154

Public Service Co of NH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Public Service Co of NH Name Public Service Co of NH Place New Hampshire Service Territory New Hampshire Website www.psnh.com Green Button Landing Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Reference Page www.psnh.com/SaveEnergyMo Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 15472 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now!

155

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E B Badger - MA 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

E B Badger - MA 0-01 E B Badger - MA 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: E.B. Badger (MA.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 75 Pitts Street , Boston , Massachusetts MA.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MA.0-01-2 Site Operations: Construction contractor during the mid-1940s; constructed facility to refine pitchblende ore and produce feed materials at another location. MA.0-01-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication of radioactive materials handled at this site MA.0-01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None MA.0-01-2 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to E.B. Badger

156

Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website http:www-pub.iaea.orgMTCDp References MAED 21 "MAED model evaluates future energy demand based on medium- to long-term scenarios of socio-economic,...

157

Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

MaGate: An Interoperable, Decentralized and Modular High-Level Grid Scheduler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the design and architecture of a decentralized grid scheduler named MaGate, which is developed within the SmartGRID project and focuses on grid scheduler interoperation. The MaGate scheduler is modular structured, and emphasizes the ... Keywords: Grid Computing, MaGate Scheduler, Meta-Scheduling, Scheduling, SmartGRID

Ye Huang; Amos Brocco; Michele Courant; Beat Hirsbrunne; Pierre Kuonen

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

RECIPIENT:Hull Municipal Light Plant STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: : Page 1 01 :L RECIPIENT:Hull Municipal Light Plant STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE: Hull Offshore Wind Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number 09EE0000326 DE-EE0000326 GFO-OO00326-001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution; and

160

Characterization of the selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective reduction of NO by NH/sub 3/ addition has been studied in a lean-burning oil-fired laboratory combustion tunnel as a function of equivalence ratio, NH/sub 3/ injection temperature, concentration of NH/sub 3/ added, and the source of NO. Ammonia breakthrough was found to depend strongly on the NH/sub 3/ addition temperature. The total concentration of nitrogen containing species other N/sub 2/, NO, and NH/sub 3/ was measured with a variety of techniques and was found to be less than 5 ppM over the range of conditions studied.

Lucas, D.; Brown, N.J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

162

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNLs Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNLs Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

A rational minor actinide (MA) recycling concept based on innovative oxide fuel with high AM content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rational MA recycle concept based on high Am content fuel has been proposed. A design study of an Am- MOX fabrication plant, which is a key facility for the MA recycle concept, has been done and the facility concept was clarified from the viewpoint of basic process viability. Preliminary cost estimation suggested that the total construction cost of the MA recycle facilities including Am-MOX, Np-MOX and MA recovery could be comparable with that of the large scale LWR-MOX fabrication plant required for plutonium in LWR fuel cycle. (authors)

Tanaka, Kenya; Sato, Isamu; Ishii, Tetsuya; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Asaga, Takeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higasiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1393 (Japan); Kurosaki, Ken [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

165

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNLs Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNLs Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Page 1 of 7 2013 NH 4-H HORSE QUIZ BOWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at http://extension.unh.edu/4H/NH4-HHorseProject.htm or by sending an Excel document to Rhiannon.Beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

167

Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bridgeport, CT Bridgeport, CT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Bridgeport, CT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 63 KB SVHospital Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVHospital Bridgeport ... 71 KB SVLargeHotel Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Bridgepor... 67 KB SVLargeOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Bridgepo... 72 KB SVMediumOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Bridgep...

168

Practical CT technology and techniques  

SciTech Connect

This handbook equips both radiologists and radiologists in training with a thorough working knowledge of the mechanisms and processes of computed tomography (CT) image generation, the common causes of image artifacts, and useful examination protocols for each area of the body. The author explains the fundamental technological principles of CT, focusing on those concepts crucial to successful CT examinations. The first part of the book succinctly reviews the fundamentals of CT technology. It begins with a methodical introduction to key principles of X-ray physics and technology, in which topics such as the modulation transfer function, magnification, and the X-ray tube are discussed in understandable, nonmathematical terms. The author then explains the basic technology of CT scanners, the principles of scan projection radiography, and the essential rules for radiation dosage determination and radiation protection. Careful attention is given to selectable scan factors in both routine and dynamic scanning, as well as to the processes involved in image creation and refinement and the chief determinants of image quality. Basic and specialized program features and the technology of image display, recording, and storage are also thoroughly described.

Berland, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanfords DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNLs Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the manual by PNNL was discontinued beginning with Revision 0.2.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanfords DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNLs Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the manual by PNNL was discontinued beginning with Revision 0.2.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNLs Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNLs Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor revision. Updated Chapters 5, 6 and 9 to reflect change in default ring calibration factor used in HEDP dose calculation software. Factor changed from 1.5 to 2.0 beginning January 1, 2007. Pages on which changes were made are as follows: 5.23, 5.69, 5.78, 5.80, 5.82, 6.3, 6.5, 6.29, 9.2.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

MA57---a code for the solution of sparse symmetric definite and indefinite systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a new code for the direct solution of sparse symmetric linear equations that solves indefinite systems with 2 2 pivoting for stability. This code, called MA57, is in HSL 2002 and supersedes the well used HSL code MA27. We describe ... Keywords: Augmented systems, direct sparse factorization, multifrontal method, numerical optimization, sparse definite and indefinite systems

Iain S. Duff

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water Resources:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water Resources: VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water Resources: Crisis and Opportunity Speaker(s): Ma Jun Date: July 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The rivers in China, and the hundreds of millions who depend on them, are in trouble. A water crisis looms large in most parts of China. In his book, China Water Crisis, Ma Jun traces 4,000 years of the history of China's watersheds, and their mis/management. Armed with scientific data and compelling stories, Ma reveals the causes and character of the looming ecological disaster. His book has been quoted in The Economist and many western media. Limited water resources pose a major threat to social and economic development in the 21st century. Three Gorges Dam and redirecting water from south to north occupy the main focus of the efforts to increase

174

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model, MA3T Project U.S. consumer demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among various light-duty vehicle technologies for hundreds of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/contactus.shtml References Retrieved from

175

Figure 23. Average price of natural gas delivered to U.S. commercial...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

176

Microsoft Word - figure_22.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

177

Microsoft Word - figure_21.doc  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA...

178

New England Wind Forum: More Search Options  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT More Search Options New England Wind Forum Site...

179

Resolution and noise trade-off analysis for volumetric CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, most studies addressing the trade-off between spatial resolution and quantum noise were performed in the context of single-slice CT. In this study, we extend the theoretical framework of previous works to volumetric CT and further extend it by taking into account the actual shapes of the preferred reconstruction kernels. In the experimental study, we also attempt to explore a three-dimensional approach for spatial resolution measurement, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional approaches that were widely adopted in previously published studies. By scanning a finite-sized sphere phantom, the MTF was measured from the edge profile along the spherical surface. Cases of different resolutions (and noise levels) were generated by adjusting the reconstruction kernel. To reduce bias, the total photon fluxes were matched: 120 kVp, 200 mA, and 1 s per gantry rotation. All data sets were reconstructed using a modified FDK algorithm under the same condition: Scan field-of-view (SFOV)=10 cm, and slice thickness=0.625 mm. The theoretical analysis indicated that the variance of noise is proportional to >4th power of the spatial resolution. Our experimental results supported this conclusion by showing the relationship is 4.6th (helical) or 5th (axial) power.

Li Baojun; Avinash, Gopal B.; Hsieh, Jiang [Applied Science Laboratory, General Electric Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNLs Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNLs Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the manual by PNNL was discontinued beginning with Revision 0.2. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Updated Chapters 5, 6 and 9 to reflect change in default ring calibration factor used in HEDP dose calculation software. Factor changed from 1.5 to 2.0 beginning January 1, 2007. Pages on which changes were made are as follows: 5.23, 5.69, 5.78, 5.80, 5.82, 6.3, 6.5, 6.29, and 9.2. Rev 0.2 (8/28/2009) Updated Chapters 3, 5, 6, 8 and 9. Chapters 6 and 8 were significantly expanded. References in the Preface and Chapters 1, 2, 4, and 7 were updated to reflect updates to DOE documents. Approved by HPDAC on 6/2/2009. Rev 1.0 (1/1/2010) Major revision. Updated all chapters to reflect the Hanford site wide implementation on January 1, 2010 of new DOE requirements for occupational radiation protection. The new requirements are given in the June 8, 2007 amendment to 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection (Federal Register, June 8, 2007. Title 10 Part 835. U.S., Code of Federal Regulations, Vol. 72, No. 110, 31904-31941). Revision 1.0 to the manual replaces ICRP 26 dosimetry concepts and terminology with ICRP 60 dosimetry concepts and terminology and replaces external dose conversion factors from ICRP 51 with those from ICRP 74 for use in measurement of operational quantities with dosimeters. Descriptions of dose algorithms and dosimeter response characteristics, and field performance were updated to reflect changes in the neutron quality factors used in the measurement of operational quantities.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Investment Partners LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name CT Investment Partners LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 2AZ Sector Carbon Product Venture capital arm of the...

182

Institutions and Cross-border Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A) Value Creation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross-border Merger and Acquisitions (M&As) are an increasingly important strategy adopted by firms in order to create value in fiercely competitive global markets. Cross-border M&A value creation, that is, wealth creation for shareholders from cross-border M&As, is therefore of considerable theoretical and practical importance. However, our understanding of the sources of cross-border M&A value creation remains limited. Researchers have found that the most commonly researched variables have little effect on cross-border M&A value creation. We therefore still do not understand the processes behind cross-border M&As. In this is dissertation I examine the main effects of host country regulatory, economic and physical infrastructure institutions on cross-border M&A value creation. I further examine the moderating effects of host country political institutions on the relationship between host country regulatory institutions and cross-border M&A value creation. Moreover, I investigate the effects of institutional distance between host and home country on cross-border M&A value creation. I argue that the effects of institutional distance (regulatory and economic distance) on cross-border M&A value creation are not symmetric, but rather the effects are contingent upon the direction of the distance. My hypotheses are tested on a sample of 6141 cross-border M&As between 1995 and 2003. Results of this analysis show that acquirers are more likely to create value by acquiring targets in countries with less advanced regulatory institutions. Further, my results indicate that host country political institutions positively moderate the relationship between host country regulatory institutions and cross-border M&A value creation. Host country economic institutions have an inverted U-shaped relationship with cross-border M&A value creation, and host country physical infrastructure institutions have a positive relationship with cross-border M&A value creation. Additionally, results show that there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between institutional distance and cross-border M&A value creation. The findings suggest that the effects of regulatory and economic institutional distance on cross-border M&A value creation are not symmetric. The effects are contingent upon the direction of the distance. That is whether the level of host country institutions is higher or lower than that of home country institutions. Implications for management and public policy are discussed.

Zhu, Hong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Diverse latest Pliocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the north-central Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia are newly interpreted as components of a large caldera system that erupted a compositionally zoned rhyolite-dacite ash-flow sheet at 2.83 ± 0.02 Ma (sanidine and biotite 40Ar/39Ar). Despite its location within a cratonic collision zone, the Chegem system is structurally and petrologically similar to typical

184

Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues an important solid waste in Florida, i.e., coal combustion residues (CCR) detailed in #2-4 of the current

Ma, Lena

185

Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

186

Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

187

VIDEO SEMINAR of Ma Jun's 6/17/02 presentation: China's Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speaker(s): Ma Jun Date: July 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The rivers in China, and the hundreds of millions who depend on them, are in trouble. A water crisis looms...

188

Nanocrystals for Solar Energy MaRIE--A Facility in the Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the Manhattan Project, Los Alamos National Laboratory's mission was not only secret but very for hominid fossils in Ethiopia. FEATURES MY VIEW JOHN SARRAO, MaRIE PROJECT PROGRAM DIRECTOR 2 10 18 Tiny

189

Oxide-dispersion-strengthened turbine blades, volume 1. [MA6000 alloy  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Project 4 was to develop a high-temperature, uncooled gas turbine blade using MA6000 alloy. The program objectives were achieved. Production scale up of the MA6000 alloy was achieved with a fair degree of tolerance to nonoptimum processing. The blade manufacturing process was also optimized. The mechanical, environmental, and physical property evaluations of MA6000 were conducted. The ultimate tensile strength, to about 704 C (130 F), is higher than DS MAR-M 247 but with a corresponding lower tensile elongation. Also, above 982 C (180 F) MA6000 tensile strength does not decrease as rapidly as MAR-M 247 because the ODS mechanism still remains active. Based on oxidation resistance and diffusional stability considerations, NiCrAlY coatings are recommended. CoCrAly coating should be applied on top of a thin NiCrAlY coating. Vibration tests, whirlpit tests, and a high-rotor-rig test were conducted to ensure successful completion of the engine test of the MA6000 TFE731 high pressure turbine blades. The results of these tests were acceptable. In production quantities, the cost of the Project 4 MA6000 blade is estimated to be about twice that of a cast DS MAR-M 247 blade.

Millan, P.P. Jr.; Mays, J.C.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

CT Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Offshore CT Offshore Place Otterup, Denmark Zip 5450 Sector Wind energy Product Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project management, damage assessment and stabilization as well as other activities related to wind farms and subsea maintenance. Coordinates 55.543228°, 10.40294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.543228,"lon":10.40294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

191

Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES OF THE SELECTIVE REDUCTION OF NO by NH3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Maloney, K.L. , "NOx Reduction with Ammonia: Laboratoryand Hashizawa, K. , "Reduction of NOx in Combustion ExhaustSelective Noncatalytic Reduction of NOx with NH3," EPRI NOx

Brown, N.J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

U-178: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain Elevated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain 8: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-178: VMware vMA Library Loading Error Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges May 29, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in VMware vMA PLATFORM: Version(s): vMA 4.0, 4.1, 5 patch 1 (5.0.0.1) ABSTRACT: A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. Reference Links: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027099 CVE-2012-2752 Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A local user can exploit a library loading error to cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target system with elevated privileges. Impact: Privilege escalation Solution: The vendor has issued a fix (vSphere Management Assistant 5.0 Patch 2 (5.0.0.2)). Addthis Related Articles T-591: VMware vmrun Utility Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

194

Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place Erlangan, Germany Sector Solar Product R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently researching buckyballs and conductive plastic for solar...

195

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must...

196

EDeMa (Smart Grid Project) (Krefeld, Germany) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EDeMa (Smart Grid Project) (Krefeld, Germany) EDeMa (Smart Grid Project) (Krefeld, Germany) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EDeMa Country Germany Headquarters Location Krefeld, Germany Coordinates 50.652943°, 6.339111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.652943,"lon":6.339111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

197

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of about 80 rhyolite and associated lacustrine rocks has characterized previously unrecognized zeolitic alteration throughout the Valles caldera resurgent dome. The alteration assemblage consists primarily of smectite-clinoptilolite-mordenite-silica, which replaces groundmass and fills voids, especially in the tuffs and lacustrine rocks. Original rock textures are routinely preserved. Mineralization typically extends to

198

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.i\IAGE\tiE~TCE~TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA.i\IAGE\tiE~TCE~TER MA.i\IAGE\tiE~TCE~TER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Brayton Energy STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE: High-Efficiency Low-Cost Solar Receiver for use in a Supercritical C02 Recompression Cycle Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000595 DE-EE0005799 GF0-0005799-{)01 G05799 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, 'but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site vrsits, and audits}, data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling}, document preparation

199

Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Provider Sungage, Inc. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials. Source http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT101F

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201

Ma, Kockelman & Damien 1 A Multivariate Poisson-Lognormal Regression Model for Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Prevention, 18(1), pp.1-12. Hauer, E. (1997). Observational Before-After Studies in Road.V., Stewart, J.R., Huang, H.H., and Lagerwey, P.A. (2002). Safety Effects of Marked Vs. Unmarked Crosswalks.S. DOT. #12;Ma, Kockelman & Damien 18 List of Tables Table 1 Summary Statistics of Variables

Kockelman, Kara M.

202

The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be learned about how consumers will evaluate novel vehicle technologies, such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), extended-range electric vehicle (EREV), battery electric vehicles (BEV) and fuel cell-- passenger cars and light-duty trucks. MA3 T considers the U.S. household users of light- duty vehicles (LDV

203

ORIGINAL PAPER M.A. Schembri D.W. Ussery C. Workman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER M.A. Schembri ? D.W. Ussery ? C. Workman H. Hasman ? P. Klemm DNA microarray-45-252506 Fax: +45-45-932809 D.W. Ussery ? C. Workman Centre for Biological Sequence Analysis, Bio 276:9924­9930 Pedersen AG, Jensen LJ, Brunak S, Staerfeldt HH, Ussery DW (2000) A DNA structural atlas

Ussery, David W.

204

Alameda County Medical Center Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alameda County Medical Center Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco Cedar Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles Children's Hospital Orange Co. City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte CA Community Regional Medical Center, Fresno Desert Regional

Tsien, Roger Y.

205

Gravity Based Autonomous Calibration for Robot Manipulators Donghai Ma, John M. Hollerbach and Yangming Xu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity Based Autonomous Calibration for Robot Manipulators Donghai Ma, John M. Hollerbach, the gravity torque exerted on the joint varies sinusoidally with rotation angle. By means of sinusoidal curve. The gravity vec- tor, expressed in the defined base coordinates, can also be found. Thereafter we determine

Hollerbach, John M.

206

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nano-mineralogy studies by advanced electron microscopy Chi Ma and George R. Rossman Division and planetary materials easier and faster down to nano-scales. Small but new minerals with important geological significance are being discovered. Nano-features are being discovered in many common minerals and gems, which

Ma, Chi

207

Photolysis of solid NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O mixtures at 193 nm  

SciTech Connect

We have studied UV photolysis of solid ammonia and ammonia-dihydrate samples at 40 K, using infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microgravimetry. We have shown that in the pure NH{sub 3} sample, the main species ejected are NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}, where the hydrogen and nitrogen increase with laser fluence. This increase in N{sub 2} ejection with laser fluence explains the increase in mass loss rate detected by a microbalance. In contrast, for the ammonia-water mixture, we see very weak signals of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} in the mass spectrometer, consistent with the very small mass loss during the experiment and with a <5% decrease in the NH{sub 3} infrared absorption bands spectroscopy after a fluence of {approx}3 x 10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. The results imply that ammonia-ice mixtures in the outer solar system are relatively stable under solar irradiation.

Loeffler, M. J. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

209

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

210

Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.co [Department of Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, CA (United States); Sardesai, Milind [Department of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA (United States); Sun, Sean [Department of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Miller, Daniel W. [Department of Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

212

Simulations of the Permian (251 Ma) Monsoon Using CCSM3Simulations of the Permian (251 Ma) Monsoon Using CCSM3 (Community Climate System Model, Version 3)(Community Climate System Model, Version 3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations of the Permian (251 Ma) Monsoon Using CCSM3Simulations of the Permian (251 Ma) Monsoon.A. Shields and J.T.C.A. Shields and J.T. KiehlKiehl NCARNCAR The nature of monsoons has been studied and its impact on society.The nature of monsoons has been studied extensively in the scientific community

213

Synthesis and Characterization of Th2N2(NH) Isomorphous to Th2N3  

SciTech Connect

Using a new, low-temperature, fluoride-based process, thorium nitride imide of the chemical formula Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) was synthesized from thorium dioxide via an ammonium thorium fluoride intermediate. The resulting product phase was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and was found to be crystallographically similar to Th{sub 2}N{sub 3}. Its unit cell was hexagonal with a space group of P3m{bar 1} and lattice parameters of a = b = 3.886(1) and c = 6.185(2) {angstrom}. The presence of -NH in the nitride phase was verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Total energy calculations performed using all-electron scalar relativistic density functional theory (DFT) showed that the hydrogen atom in the Th{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) prefers to bond with nitrogen atoms occupying 1a Wyckoff positions of the unit cell. Lattice fringe disruptions observed in nanoparticle areas of the nitride species by high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images also displayed some evidence for the presence of -NH group. As ThO{sub 2} was identified as an impurity, possible reaction mechanisms involving its formation are discussed.

Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Weck, Dr. Phil F [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Page 1 of 16 2013 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Location: Belmont Middle School, 38 School Street, Belmont NH 03220 Deadline Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hit their buzzers and answer equine-related questions

New Hampshire, University of

215

Development of the East Asian monsoon: Mineralogical and sedimentologic records in the northern South China Sea since 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of the East Asian monsoon: Mineralogical and sedimentologic records in the northern Abstract We here reconstruct the past change of the East Asian monsoon since 20 Ma using samples from Ocean monsoon evolution. The consistent variation of these independent proxies since 20 Ma shows three profound

Clift, Peter

216

Third-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical Tian Ma and Shouhong Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Third-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical point Tian Ma-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical point Tian Ma1 and Shouhong Wang2 1 is to study the nature of the Andrews critical point in the gas-liquid transition in a physical

Wang, Shouhong

217

Effects of diagenesis on the Nd-isotopic composition of black shales from the 420 Ma Utica Shale Magnafacies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of diagenesis on the Nd-isotopic composition of black shales from the 420 Ma Utica Shale Abstract The Utica black shales were deposited in the Taconic Foreland basin 420 Ma ago. The organic matter in these shales is of marine origin and the timing of deposition of these shales has been constrained

Basu, Asish R.

218

u.s. DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA N A GE M E~ T CENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA N A GE M E~ T CENT MA N A GE M E~ T CENT ER NEPA DETERlIlINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Power Environmental Energy Research Institute STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geolhermallnter-Well Diagnostics Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-PS36-09G099018 Procurement Instrument Number OE·EEOOO3032 NEPA Control Number GFO-1 0-345 CID Number G03032 Based on my review orlhe Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Order 4SI.IA),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.1 Onsile and offsite site characterization and environmental monitoring. including siting, construction (or modification), operation, and dismantlement or closing (abandonment) of characterization and monitoring devices and siting,

219

MHK Projects/GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US GCK Technology Cape Cod Canal MA US < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7433,"lon":-70.6093,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA->.IAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA->.IAGEMENT CENTER MA->.IAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETFRMINATION RECIPIENT;AWS Truepower, LlC Page 1 of2 STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE: National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign - Analysis and Collaboration Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-FOA-0000414 DE-EEOOO5372 GF0-0005372-OO1 0 Based on my review oflhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation (including, but not limited to, conceptual design,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MHK Projects/GCK Technology Merrimack River Amesbury MA US | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Amesbury MA US River Amesbury MA US < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8549,"lon":-70.9267,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA:-.IAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA:-.IAGEMENT CENTER MA:-.IAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Utah State University PROJECT TITLE: Alternative and Unconventional Energy Research and Development Page 1 of2 STATE: UT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number COP DE-EEOOO3114 GF0-0003114-OO2 0 Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DO E Order 45 1.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting. oonstruction (or modification), operation. and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and oonventionallaboratory operations (for example. preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis):

223

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA>" AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA>" AGEMENT CENTER MA>" AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Oregon Department of Energy PROJECT TITLE: Oregon EECBG Fonnula - City of Winston Page I of3 STATE: OR Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number EEO Based on my review crthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.I A), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : B1.3 Routine maintenance activities and custodial services for buildings, structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures (e.g .* pathways, roads, and railroads ), vehides and eqUipment, and localized vegetatJon and pest control, dunng which operations may be suspended and resumed. Custodial services are activities to preserve facility appearance, worl

224

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA,"iAGEMENTCENTER NEPADETl!RMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA,"iAGEMENTCENTER MA,"iAGEMENTCENTER NEPADETl!RMINATION RECIPIENT:CU Cfeantech -- University of Colorado PROJECT TITLE: CU Cleantech New Venture Challenge Page 1 of2 STATE: CO Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOAOOOOS70 EE0005600 GFO-OOO5600-OO1 0 Based on my review of the information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.1A), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and disseminatio n Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits). data analysis (including. but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation (including. but not limited to, conceptual design,

225

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA..\lAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lAGEMENT CENTER lAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DEl'ERAllNAIION RECIPIENT:MA DEPT. OF ENERGY RESOURCES PROJECT TITLE: STATE ENERGY PROGRAM (SEP) Page 1 of2 STATE: MA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE·FOA.()()()()643 R130372 GF0-0130372-OO1 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authori;.o;ed under DOE Order 45 1.lA), I have made the following de termination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and as sistance to o rganizations A9 Info rm at ion gathering, analysis, and d issemination Rational for detennination: Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. Information gathering (including, but nollimited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

226

U.S. DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA,\jAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA,\jAGEMENT CENTER MA,\jAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page I of2 RECIPIENT: EECBG - American Samoa Government Territorial Energy Office STATE: AS PROJECT TITLE: Improving Recycling Capacity and Solid Waste Education in American Samoa Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PrO(urement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOOB34 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOOO634.Q01 em Number o Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 81 .31 installation or relocation of machinery and equipment Installation or relocation and operation of machinery and equipment (including, but not limited la, laboratory equipment, electronic hardware, manufacturing machinery, maintenance equipment, and health and safety equipment), provided that

227

MaGe - a Geant4-based Monte Carlo framework for low-background experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo framework, MaGe, has been developed based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit. Its purpose is to simulate physics processes in low-energy and low-background radiation detectors, specifically for the Majorana and Gerda $^{76}$Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. This jointly-developed tool is also used to verify the simulation of physics processes relevant to other low-background experiments in Geant4. The MaGe framework contains simulations of prototype experiments and test stands, and is easily extended to incorporate new geometries and configurations while still using the same verified physics processes, tunings, and code framework. This reduces duplication of efforts and improves the robustness of and confidence in the simulation output.

Yuen-Dat Chan; Jason A. Detwiler; Reyco Henning; Victor M. Gehman; Rob A. Johnson; David V. Jordan; Kareem Kazkaz; Markus Knapp; Kevin Kroninger; Daniel Lenz; Jing Liu; Xiang Liu; Michael G. Marino; Akbar Mokhtarani; Luciano Pandola; Alexis G. Schubert; Claudia Tomei

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

228

On Larkin-Imry-Ma State of 3He-A in Aerogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superfluid 3He-A shares the properties of spin nematic and chiral orbital ferromagnet. Its order parameter is characterized by two vectors d and l. This doubly anisotropic superfluid, when it is confined in aerogel, represents the most interesting example of a system with continuous symmetry in the presence of random anisotropy disorder. We discuss the Larkin-Imry-Ma state, which is characterized by the short-range orientational order of the vector l, while the long-range orientational order is destroyed by the collective action of the randomly oriented aerogel strings. On the other hand, sufficiently large regular anisotropy produced either by the deformation of the aerogel or by applied superflow suppresses the Larkin-Imry-Ma effect leading to the uniform orientation of the vector l. This interplay of regular and random anisotropy allows us to study many different effects.

G. E. Volovik

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

On Larkin-Imry-Ma State of 3He-A in Aerogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superfluid 3He-A shares the properties of spin nematic and chiral orbital ferromagnet. Its order parameter is characterized by two vectors d and l. This doubly anisotropic superfluid, when it is confined in aerogel, represents the most interesting example of a system with continuous symmetry in the presence of random anisotropy disorder. We discuss the Larkin-Imry-Ma state, which is characterized by the short-range orientational order of the vector l, while the long-range orientational order is destroyed by the collective action of the randomly oriented aerogel strings. On the other hand, sufficiently large regular anisotropy produced either by the deformation of the aerogel or by applied superflow destroys the Larkin-Imry-Ma effect leading to the uniform orientation of the vector l. This interplay of regular and random anisotropy allows us to study many different effects.

Volovik, G E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

David J. Brenner, PhD, DSc Carl D. Elliston, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cancer mortality in atomic bomb survivors. Total doses for repeated examinations are correspondingly higher. The authors used estimated cancer risks in a U.S. population derived from atomic bomb, no studies have yet been reported to indicate a life-prolonging benefit of full-body screening CT (6). While

Brenner, David Jonathan

231

mise jour: 09/12/2009 Rapport de ma mission au Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 mise à jour: 09/12/2009 Rapport de ma mission au Pakistan ?cole de recherche CIMPA du 22 au 28://www.lums.edu.pk/> pour y donner une conférence dans le cadre de French Science Tour in Pakistan Science Tour in Pakistan. · Samedi 28 février, 8 exposés organisés par Juergen Herzog permettant à des

Waldschmidt, Michel

232

mise jour: 30/03/2009 Rapport de ma mission au Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 mise à jour: 30/03/2009 Rapport de ma mission au Pakistan ?cole de recherche CIMPA du 22 au 28://www.lums.edu.pk/> pour y donner une conférence dans le cadre de French Science Tour in Pakistan Science Tour in Pakistan. · Samedi 28 février, 8 exposés organisés par Juergen Herzog permettant à des

Waldschmidt, Michel

233

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

234

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brass Co - CT 01 Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of activities at the site CT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only CT.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

235

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenn Machinery Co. (CT.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Britain , Connecticut CT.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.11-1 Site Operations: Performed short-term tests on small quantities of uranium metal to explore potential for swaging, circa mid-1950 CT.11-1 CT.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities and relatively small quantities of radioactive material used CT.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP CT.11-2

236

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site CT.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.07-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. CT.07-1 - Sperry Products Letter; VanValkenburg to DeRenzis;

237

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyanamid Co - CT 13 Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities involving radioactive material performed at this site CT.13-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.13-1 Radiological Survey(s): No

238

Page 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hitPage 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl Date: Saturday January 25, 2014 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the contest. The New Hampshire 4-H Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate

New Hampshire, University of

239

MaRIE X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Pre-Conceptual Design  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will include a 50-keV X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL), a significant extension from planned and existing XFEL facilities. To prevent an unacceptably large energy spread arsing from energy diffusion, the electron beam energy should not exceed 20 GeV, which puts a significant constraint on the beam emittance. A 100-pC baseline design is presented along with advanced technology options to increase the photon flux and to decrease the spectral bandwidth through pre-bunching the electron beam.

Carlsten, Bruce E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barnes, Cris W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duffy, Leanne D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heath, Cynthia E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Russell, Steven J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ryne, Robert D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Richard L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simakov, Evgenya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yampolsky, Nikolai A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past three decades the Town of Hull, MA has solidified its place in U.S. wind energy history through its leadership in community-based generation. This is illustrated by its commissioning of the first commercial-scale wind turbine on the Atlantic coastline, the first suburban-sited turbine in the continental United States, pursuit of community-based offshore wind, and its push toward creating an energy independent community. The town's history and demographics are briefly outlined, followed by experience in projects to provide wind power, including pre-construction and feasibility efforts, financial aspects, and market/industry factors.

Adams, Christopher

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SIMULATION AND OPTIMISATION OF A 100MA DC PHOTO-INJECTOR  

SciTech Connect

A prototype 100mA injector is presently being designed and manufactured jointly between Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and Advanced Energy Systems (AES). This paper discusses the physics optimization and performance of the injector which has been studied using the space-charge tracking code ASTRA. The objective is to operate the 7MeV injector with 135pC electron bunches at 748.5MHz repetition rate. We show that the longitudinal and transverse electron bunch properties can be realized within the constraints of the design.

Fay Hannon; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

242

Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation Reaction Pathways of H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) Oligomers: Importance of Dihydrogen Interactions (DHI)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers are possible products from dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (NH3BH3) and ammonium borohydride (NH4BH4), which belong to a class of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these oligomers and their further dehydrogenation is essential for developing BNHx-based hydrogen storage materials. We have performed computational modeling using density functional theory (DFT), ab initio wavefunction theory, and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the energetics and formation pathways for the H(NH2BH2)nH (n=1-4) oligomers, polyaminoborane (PAB), from NH3BH3 monomers and the subsequent dehydrogenation steps to form polyiminoborane (PIB). Through transition state searches and evaluation of the intrinsic reaction coordinates, we have investigated the B-N bond cleavage, the reactions of NH3BH3 molecule with intermediates, dihydrogen release through intra- and intermolecular hydrogen transfer, dehydrocoupling/cyclization of the oligomers, and the dimerization of NH3BH3 molecules. We discovered the formation mechanism of H(NH2BH2)n+1H oligomers through reactions of the H(NH2BH2)nH oligomers first with BH3 followed by reactions with NH3 and the release of H2, where the BH3 and NH3 intermediates are formed through dissociation of NH3BH3. We also found that the dimerization of the NH3BH3 molecules to form c-(NH2BH2)2 is slightly exothermic, with an unexpected transition state that leads to the simultaneous release of two H2 molecules. The dehydrogenations of the oligomers are also exothermic, typically by less than 10 kcal/(mol of H2), with the largest exothermicity for n=3. The transition state search shows that the one-step direct dehydrocoupling cyclization of the oligomers is not a favored pathway because of high activation barriers. The dihydrogen bonding, in which protic (HN) hydrogens interact with hydridic (HB) hydrogens, plays a vital role in stabilizing different structures of the reactants, transition states, and products. The dihydrogen interaction (DHI) within the -BH2(?2-H2) moiety accounts for both the formation mechanisms of the oligomers and for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. Support was provided from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and from the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Li, Jun; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Hu, Han-Shi; Schenter, Gregory K.; Autrey, Thomas; Gutowski, Maciej S.

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

A WATER MASER AND NH{sub 3} SURVEY OF GLIMPSE EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a Nobeyama 45 m H{sub 2}O maser and NH{sub 3} survey of all 94 northern GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), a sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) identified based on their extended 4.5 {mu}m emission. We observed the NH{sub 3}(1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) inversion lines, and detected emission toward 97%, 63%, and 46% of our sample, respectively (median rms {approx} 50 mK). The H{sub 2}O maser detection rate is 68% (median rms {approx} 0.11 Jy). The derived H{sub 2}O maser and clump-scale gas properties are consistent with the identification of EGOs as young MYSOs. To explore the degree of variation among EGOs, we analyze subsamples defined based on mid-infrared (MIR) properties or maser associations. H{sub 2}O masers and warm dense gas, as indicated by emission in the higher-excitation NH{sub 3} transitions, are most frequently detected toward EGOs also associated with both Class I and II CH{sub 3}OH masers. Ninety-five percent (81%) of such EGOs are detected in H{sub 2}O (NH{sub 3}(3,3)), compared to only 33% (7%) of EGOs without either CH{sub 3}OH maser type. As populations, EGOs associated with Class I and/or II CH{sub 3}OH masers have significantly higher NH{sub 3} line widths, column densities, and kinetic temperatures than EGOs undetected in CH{sub 3}OH maser surveys. However, we find no evidence for statistically significant differences in H{sub 2}O maser properties (such as maser luminosity) among any EGO subsamples. Combining our data with the 1.1 mm continuum Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, we find no correlation between isotropic H{sub 2}O maser luminosity and clump number density. H{sub 2}O maser luminosity is weakly correlated with clump (gas) temperature and clump mass.

Cyganowski, C. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Koda, J.; Towers, S.; Meyer, J. Donovan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosolowsky, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Egusa, F. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Momose, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Robitaille, T. P., E-mail: ccyganowski@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

Addition-based exponentiation modulo 2k A. Fit-Florea, D.W. Matula and M.A. Thornton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addition-based exponentiation modulo 2k A. Fit-Florea, D.W. Matula and M.A. Thornton A novel method doi: 10.1049/el:20057538 A. Fit-Florea, D.W. Matula and M.A. Thornton (Southern Methodist University', Electron. Lett., 1994, 30, (25), pp. 2115­ 2116 3 Fit-Florea, A., and Matula, D.W.: `A digit

Thornton, Mitchell

245

Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. Methods: A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. Results: High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp/mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 {mu}m isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44{+-}9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455{+-}49 and 120{+-}48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. Conclusions: A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated.

Cao Guohua; Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 10,240 11,488 7,086 8,271 8,126 8,150 7,731 7,870 5,199 5,520 9,264 4,691 2012 9,482 8,458 7,661 1,447 4,940 5,465 6,646 10,377 5,634 4,748 2,553 2,581 2013 5,126 5,003 4,629 5,171 5,626 5,173 8,023 5,961 2,995 2,674 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Everett, MA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago

247

Elemental characterization of LL-MA radioactive waste packages with the associated particle technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages with analytical methods and with non-destructive nuclear measurements. This paper concerns fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique (APT), which brings 3D information about the waste material composition. The characterization of volume elements filled with iron, water, aluminium, and PVC in bituminized and fibre concrete LL-MA waste packages has been investigated with MCNP [1] and MODAR data analysis software [2]. APT provides usable information about major elements presents in the volumes of interest. However, neutron scattering on hydrogen nuclei spreads the tagged neutron beam out of the targeted volume towards surrounding materials, reducing spatial selectivity. Simulation shows that small less than 1 L targets can be characterised up to the half-radius of a 225 L bituminized drum, the matrix of which is very rich in hydrogen. Deeper characterization in concrete is possible but limited by counting statistics due to photon attenuation in this dense matrix and, unless large inspection volumes are considered, by the lack of spatial selectivity of the tagged neutron beam due to neutron scattering. (authors)

Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Toure, M.; El Kanawati, W.; Eleon, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

[(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH-8): An Organically Templated Open-Framework Uranium Silicate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Framework Uranium Silicate Xiqu Wang, Jin Huang, and Allan J. Jacobson* Department of Chemistry, Uni pyramids we obtained also a number of open-framework uranium silicates.18,19 These new compounds were-framework uranium fluorosilicate [(CH3)4N][(C5H5NH)0.8((CH3)3NH)0.2]U2Si9O23F4 (USH- 8) that has been synthesized

Wang, Xiqu

249

Impacts of Historical Land Use on Soil Nitrogen Cycles in Falmouth, MA and the Threat of Chronic N Amendment Demonstrated at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amendment Demonstrated at the Harvard Forest LTER, Petersham, MA Brook Brouwer1 Advisor: Christopher Neill2, in Petersham, MA. At each site I measured: pH, C:N ratios, extractable inorganic nitrogen pools, net N Amendment Demonstrated at the Harvard Forest LTER, Petersham, MA" Brook Brouwer Introduction

Vallino, Joseph J.

250

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wesleyan University - CT 12 Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities performed CT.12-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.12-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Wesleyan University

251

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area prompted by public query; no site found in New Canaan. CT.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No AEC site...

252

Ammonia as a hydrogen energy-storage medium. [LH/sub 2/, MeOH, and NH/sub 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquid Hydrogen (LH/sub 2/), Methanol (MeOH), and Ammonia (NH/sub 3/) are compared as hydrogen energy-storage media on the basis of reforming the MeOH to produce H/sub 2/ and dissociating (cracking) the NH/sub 3/ to release H/sub 2/. The factors important in this storage concept are briefly discussed. Results of the comparison show that, in terms of energy input for media manufacture from natural gas, hydrogen energy content of the medium, and energy cost ($/10/sup 6/ Btu), NH/sub 3/ has a wide advantage and comes the closest to matching gasoline. The tasks required in developing a safe and practicial hydrogen energy-storage system based on the storage and cracking of NH/sub 3/ are listed. Results of the technical and economic evaluation of this concept will provide the basis for continued development.

Strickland, G

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Transformation, Inc., Production House, Devens, MA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production House Production House Devens, MA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

254

DEPART:MENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA..'JAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MENT OF ENERGY MENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA..'JAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RI<:CIPIENT:Wyoming Business Council, State Energy Office STATE: WY PROJECT TITLE: State Energy Program (SEP) PY 2012 Forumla Grant funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000643 DE-FG26-07NT43207 GF(H)()43207-OO1 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed aetion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination A11 Technical advice and assistance to organizations Rational for detennination: Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

255

EERE PROJECT MA.NAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTFIU.1INATION PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atchison Atchison u.s. DI!PARThIl1NT OF l?NERGY EERE PROJECT MA.NAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTFIU.1INATION PROJECT TITLE: EECBG DE-EEOOOO727 Atchison Library Ground Source Heat Pump Page 1 of2 STATE : KS Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE FOA 0000013 0 Based on my review of the information tORcuning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliam::e Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

256

Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25,2008 July 25,2008 Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Letter 2008-02, Audit Management SUMMARY: Attached is Acquisition Letter (AL) 2008-02, Audit Management. It provides guidance to contracting officers on effective management of contract audits for non-M&O prime ;ontracts as well as subcontracts under management and operating (M&O) contracts. This Acquisition Letter replaces AL 2006-12, Corporate Audit Management Program (CAMP), which is cancelled. This Flash and its attachment will be online within a day, at the following website: http:l/mananernent.ener~.~ov/polic~ guidance/volicv flashes-htm. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Helen Oxberger at (202) 287-1332

257

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.>.JAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, .* !. , .* !. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.>.JAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Laram!e County Community College PROJECT TITLE: LeGe Ulilty-Scale Wind Energy Technology Page 1 of2 STATE: WY Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-PS36-09G099OO9 DE-EEOOOO538 GFO-10-052 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as Nt:PA Compliance Officer (autbori7.ed under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathenng (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, Inventones, audits), data analySIS (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as oonceptual des'9n or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

258

U.S. DEP.'\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.1II AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'\RTMENT OF ENERGY '\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.1II AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT :Freshwater Wind I. lLC PROJECT TITLE: Shallow Water Offshore Wind System Optimization for the Great Lakes Page 1 of2 STATE: OH Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instl"ument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOA.Q000415 DE-EEOOOO5488 GFO-OOO5488-001 0 Based on my nview or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SUA),. have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathertng, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site Visits, and audits). data analysis

259

TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 23,2010 August 23,2010 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Templates SUMMARY: On March 29,2010, four draft acquisition templates (Confidentiality Certificate, Conflicts of Interest Certificate, Letter to Unsuccessful Offeror and Letter to Successful Offeror) were distributed for Procurement Director (PD) and Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) review and comment. All comments received were considered and changes were made as appropriate. The final versions of the four aforementioned acquisition templates will be e-mailed directly to the Procurement Directors and made available in the STRIPES Library. This Flash and its attachments will be available online within a day, at the following website:

260

U.S. DEPARTI\lIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA."IAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lIENT OF ENERGY lIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA."IAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Louisiana State University and A&M College Page 1 of2 STATE: LA PROJECT TITLE: Geothennal Resource Development with Zero Mass Withdrawal, Engineered Free Convection, and Wellbore Energy Conversion Funding Opportunity ADDounc:ement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-F0-0000336 OE-EEOOO5125 GF0-0005125-001 0 Based on my review (lrtbe infor madOD concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A),1 have' made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysIs (including

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261

U.S. DEPAR.Th.IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA'\IAGEME~TCE~TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Th.IENT OF ENERGY Th.IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA'\IAGEME~TCE~TER NEPA DETFID..ITNATION RECIPIENT:Ciemson University PROJECf TITLE: Clemson University 15MW Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) Grid Simulator Page 1 of2 STATE: SC Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number N/A (DNFA) DE-EE0005723 GF0-0005723-001 Based on my review of the information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45l.1A), l have made tbe foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), gathering, analysis, data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation (including, but

262

u.s. DEP.-\RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA. AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RTMENT OF ENERGY RTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA. AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT :louisiana Department of Natural Resources PROJECT TITLE: State of louisana ARRA-EECBG-St. James Parish (Tl Page 1 of2 STATE : LA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 EEOOOO735 0 Based on my review or lhe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (autborized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I bave made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do nol increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financia

263

Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Quasielastic neutron scattering of -NH3 and -BH3 rotational dynamics in orthorhombic ammonia borane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrons scattering techniques are ideally suited to directly probe H in materials due to the large incoherent scattering cross-section of hydrogen atom, and have been invaluable in providing direct insight into the local fluctuations and large amplitude motions in AB. Dihydrogen bonding may have a significant affect on materials to be used to store hydrogen for fuel-cell powered applications. We have noticed a trend of low temperature release of H2 in materials composed of hydridic and protonic hydrogen. This phenomenon has caught our attention and motivated our interest to gain more insight into dihydrogen bonding interactions in AB. We present results from a thorough Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) investigation of diffusive hydrogen motion in NH311BH3 and ND311BH3 to obtain (1) a direct measure of the rotational energy barriers the protonated species and (2) a confirmation of the 3-site jump model for rotational motion. The amplitude of the energy barrier of rotation of BH3 and NH3 determined by QENS are compared to those determined for BD3 and ND3 determined by 2H NMR studies.

Hess, Nancy J.; Hartman, Michael R.; Brown, Craig; Mamontov, Eugene; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Heldebrant, David J.; Daemen, Luke L.; Autrey, Thomas

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

Herschel / HIFI observations of CO, H2O and NH3 in Mon R2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Mon R2 is the only ultracompact HII region (UCHII) where the associated photon-dominated region (PDR) can be resolved with Herschel. Due to its brightness and proximity, it is the best source to investigate the chemistry and physics of highly UV-irradiated PDRs. Aims. Our goal is to estimate the abundance of H2O and NH3 in this region and investigate their origin. Methods. We present new observations obtained with HIFI and the IRAM-30m telescope. Using a large velocity gradient approach, we model the line intensities and derive an average abundance of H2O and NH3 across the region. Finally, we model the line profiles with a non-local radiative transfer model and compare these results with the abundance predicted by the Meudon PDR code. Results. The variations of the line profiles and intensities indicate complex geometrical and kinematical patterns. The H2O lines present a strong absorption at the ambient velocity and emission in high velocity wings towards the HII region. The spatial distribution of...

Pilleri, P; Cernicharo, J; Ossenkopf, V; Bern, O; Gerin, M; Pety, J; Goicoechea, J R; Rizzo, J R; Montillaud, J; Gonzlez-Garca, M; Joblin, C; Bourlot, J Le; Petit, F Le; Kramer, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Growth kinetics and micromorphology of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth kinetics and elementary growth processes on the surface of NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} heterogeneous crystals formed in the NH{sub 4}Cl-MnCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CONH{sub 3} system are experimentally studied. It is found that a change in the composition of complexes in an NH{sub 4}Cl crystal from Mn(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O to MnCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 2CONH{sub 3} leads to the occurrence of a local maximum in the kinetic curve and a change in the shape of dislocation growth centers from flat to conical. The growth kinetics of {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of heterogeneous NH{sub 4}Cl:Mn{sup 2+} crystals is described within the Bliznakov model using the Fowler-Guggenheim adsorption isotherm, which takes into account the lateral interaction of adsorbed particles.

Pyankova, L. A., E-mail: lyuba_pyan@mail.ru; Punin, Yu. O.; Bocharov, S. N.; Shtukenberg, A. G. [Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

MA FI QPR Scoring Elements 4th Qtr FY 2009 Revision v1.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reference Reference Due Date Element Measure Critical? Score > ≤ 8/15 8/15 8/22 8/22 95% 100% 80% 95% 0% 80% 2.0% 1.8% 2.0% 0.0% 1.8% 1.0% 0.5% 1.0% 0.0% 0.5% 8/30 8/30 99.9% 0.0% 99.9% 9/30 9/30 9/30 9/30 Program specific elements, negotiated with Programs: Program specific measures, negotiated with Programs: Overall Score: Green * All critical elements green, and * No more then one non-critical element yellow Yellow * Any critical element yellow, or * Any non-critical red, or * Two or more non-critical elements yellow Red * Any critical element red or * Two or more non-critical elements red TYRT September 30, 2009 Input submitted to update TYRT Submission timeliness 1 1 2 2 Enter Date or Percentage Proximity to spending target August 15, 2009 Overall Score: Yes MA F&I Quarterly Performance Report

269

?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GE 1 GE 1 ;" qr)-1 s?llq ' p raspy.. c" ifa K. mris I talked with Hr. Wllllm cIF(Iy, Metrllurgist, Wnlon CarbId@ Nuclear cOrp8ny, 08k B&t&$@, Tenne66ee, on April 26, 1961. He informed me th&t the #rtioMl Northern birislon, Ame~ic6.n ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8, la pePfopn1~ lo8lve forming studier for the. ilnion olo)w Wuolem Conpmy "p l7?JHa). The work at National Northern l#rirc.- alon ir under the 6upenl6lon of Ehsll Phillpohuc4~, v of Spealrl Prcbduots. The @ox& to data ha8 been pwfonwd wlth 430 strlnle66 rteel and urma%um metal - both hot snb 0018 wor4c have been performed at pr688u~r fmm 100,000 to 900,000 prl. The shape of the pleu88 na not dlrolored. In 6<lon work ha6 been done with

270

Alcator C-Mod Experiments in Support of the ITER Baseline 15 MA Scenario  

SciTech Connect

Experiments on Alcator C-Mod have addressed several issues for the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario from 2009-2012. Rampup studies show ICRF can save significant V-s, and that an H-mode in the ramp can be utilized to save 50% more. ICRF modifications to li(1) are minimal, although the Te profile is peaked relative to ohmic in the plasma center, and alter sawtooth onset times. Rampdown studies show H-modes can be routinely sustained, avoiding an OH coil over-current associated with the H-L transition, that fast rampdowns are preferred, the density drops with Ip, and that the H-L transition occurs at Ploss/Pthr,LH ~ 1.0-1.3 at n/nGr ~ 0.85. Flattop plasmas targeting ITER baseline parameters have been sustained for 20 ?E or 8-13 ?CR, but only reach H98 ~ 0.6 at n/nGr = 0.85, rising to 0.9 at n/nGr = 0.65.

C Kessel, et al

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar

Clift, Peter

272

On-Demand Information Portals for Disaster Yiming Ma, Dmitri V. Kalashnikov, Ram Hariharan, Sharad Mehrotra, Nalini Venkatasubramanian,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and such information is indeed valuable to disaster managers or even citizens in their response. In this paper we in the response and planning during or after the disaster. This motivates us in the direction of an "InformationOn-Demand Information Portals for Disaster Situations Yiming Ma, Dmitri V. Kalashnikov, Ram

Kalashnikov, Dmitri V.

273

China's Energy Situation and Its Implications in the New by Hengyun Ma, Les Oxley and John Gibson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the energy economy, in particular. Keywords: China; Energy; Fossil fuels; Renewable Energy JEL by an investigation and analysis of China's energy resources, including renewable energy. In the third section we1 China's Energy Situation and Its Implications in the New Millennium by Hengyun Ma, Les Oxley

Hickman, Mark

274

A review of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities for earth-orbiting spacecraft D.F. Smart *, M.A. Shea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities for earth-orbiting spacecraft D.F. Smart *, M.A. Shea Air Geomagnetic cutoff rigidities are a quantitative measure of the shielding provided by the earth?s magnetic field. More precisely, geomagnetic cutoff rigidities predict the energetic charged particle transmission

Shepherd, Simon

275

Decreasing Slip Rates From12.8 Ma to Present on the Solitario Canyon Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solitario Canyon fault, which bounds the west side of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the closest fault with Quaternary offset adjacent to the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository. Dip-slip offset between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma is determined from lithostratigraphic displacement in boreholes USW H-3 and USW WT-7, drilled in the footwall and hanging wall, respectively. The base of the 12.8-Ma Topopah Spring Tuff is interpreted to have 463.3 m of separation across the fault, an average dip slip rate of 0.036 mm/yr. Previous researchers identified a geothermal system active from 11.5 to 10.0 Ma with peak activity at 10.7 Ma that resulted in pervasive alteration of vitric rock to zeolitic minerals where the rocks were in the ground-water saturated zone. The contact between vitric (V) and pervasively zeolitic (Z) rocks cuts across the lithostratigraphic section and offset of this V-Z boundary can be used to measure slip rates between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma. In H-3, the V-Z boundary is 138.4 m below the base of the vitric, densely welded subzone of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tptpv3). In WT-7, although the V-Z boundary is identified at the base of the Tptpv3, borehole video, cuttings, and geophysical log data indicate the Tptpv3 has well-developed zeolitic alteration along fractures, and this implies 19.5 m of the total thickness of Tptpv3 (and probably additional overlying crystallized rocks) also were in the saturated zone by 10.7 Ma. The V-Z relations across the Solitario Canyon fault in H-3 and WT-7 indicate a minimum of 157.9 m of separation before 10.7 Ma, which is 34.1 percent of the total slip of the Topopah Spring Tuff, and a minimum dip slip rate of 0.075 mm/yr from 12.8 to 10.7 Ma. These data are consistent with the broader structural history of the area near Yucca Mountain. Previous workers used angular unconformities, tilting of structural blocks, and paleomagnetic data to constrain the main period of extensional faulting between 12.7 and 8.5 Ma. Paleoseismic studies in Quaternary deposits documented slip rates on the Solitario Canyon fault from 0.01 to 0.02 mm/yr since 0.077 and 0.20 Ma. The decrease of extensional activity slip rates data on the Solitario Canyon fault provide evidence of decreasing tectonic activity from the middle Miocene to present.

D. Buesch

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

CT-121_cover.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CT-121 FGD PROCESS PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM AUGUST 2002 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0449 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

277

Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning For Petrophysical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Fac R&D Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS David Wildman Division Director Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4913 david.wildman@netl.doe.gov T. Robert McLendon Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2008 t.mclen@netl.doe.gov Duane H. Smith Geosciences Division

278

CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma  

SciTech Connect

A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R A D O. U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 89 Table CT6. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960 ...

280

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors - Energy ...  

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 365 Table CT2. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960-2011, North ...

282

Paleogene cooling (55-30 MA) as inferred from oxygen isotope variation within mollusc shells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paleogene cooling (c. 50-30 Ma) started sometime in the early-middle Eocene. This was a time when high-latitude and deep-sea temperatures were significantly warmer than today. This cooling culminated during the earliest Oligocene marked by the sudden appearance of a major continental glacier on Antarctica. We examine this cooling trend by analyzing oxygen isotope variation within mollusc shells from the Gulf Coastal Plain of the southern U.S. Our records show a secular cooling trend of mean annual temperature (MAT) in the Mississippi Embayment from an early Eocene tropical climate (26-27 ?C), with a seasonal temperature range (seasonality) of ~6 ?C, to an Oligocene paratropical climate (22-23?C) with an seasonality of ~8 ?C. These temperature records agree well with terrestrial climate proxies. This secular cooling trend, combined with sea-level change, was likely one of the major causes of molluscan turnover in the Mississippi Embayment to cool-tolerant taxa along the Paleogene cooling. Winter temperatures steadily decreased from the middle Eocene to early Oligocene. This contrasts with the sudden winter cooling at Eocene-Oligocene boundary proposed by Ivany et al. (2000). We examined seasonal temperature distribution of the modern marine shelf of the present northern U.S. Gulf Coast. A deeper water temperature model fits well with isotopic temperature profiles derived from fossils shells of the Red Bluff and Yazoo Formations shells, consistent with the paleobathymetry estimates inferred from independent proxies. This reveals that depth effect is one of the major factors controlling seasonality recorded in mollusc shells, resulting in decreasing MAT estimates when temperature stratification exists as in the present ocean. Warm Eocene low-latitude temperatures derived from molluscan oxygen isotope data agree with computer modeling results incorporating higher greenhouse gas concentrations. This supports the contention that the major reason for warm earth climate is elevated concentration of the greenhouse gases, giving a new insight for future climate response to anthropogenic CO? increase.

Kobashi, Takuro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Piecewise structural diffusion defined on shape index for noise reduction in dual-energy CT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing radiation dose in dual-energy CT (DE-CT) scanning due to the double exposures at 80 kVp and 140 kVp is a major concern in the application of DE-CT. This paper presents a novel image-space denoising method, called piecewise structural ... Keywords: dual-energy CT, dual-energy CT colonography, noise reduction

Wenli Cai; June-Goo Lee; Da Zhang; Christina Piel; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

CT reconstruction from limited projection angles  

SciTech Connect

When the available CT projection data are incomplete, there exists a null space in the space of possible reconstructions about which the data provide no information. Deterministic CT reconstructions are impotent in regard to this null space. Furthermore, it is shown that consistency conditions based on projection moments do not provide the missing projections. When the projection data consist of a set of parallel projections that do not encompass a complete 180/sup 0/ rotation, the null space corresponds to a missing sector in the Fourier transform of the original 2-D function. The long-range streak artifacts created by the missing sector can be reduced by attenuating the Fourier transform of the reconstruction smoothly to zero at the sector boundary. It is shown that the Fourier transform of a reconstruction obtained under a maximum entropy constraint is nearly zero in the missing sector. Hence, maximum entropy does not overcome the basic lack of information. It is suggested that some portion of the null space might be filled in by use of a priori knowledge of the type of image expected.

Hanson, K.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of sulfated CaO on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess oxygen was investigated to evaluate the potential of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO removal at the temperature range of 700-850{sup o}C. The physical and chemical properties of the CaO sulfation products were analyzed to investigate the NO reduction mechanism. Experimental results showed that sulfated CaO had a catalytic effect on NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} after the sulfation reaction entered the transition control stage. With the increase of CaO sulfation extent in this stage, the activity for NO reduction first increased and then decreased, and the selectivity of NH{sub 3} for NO reduction to N{sub 2} increased. The byproduct (NO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O) formation during NO reduction experiments was negligible. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that neither CaSO{sub 3} nor CaS was detected, indicating that the catalytic activity of NO reduction by NH{sub 3} in the presence of excess O{sub 2} over sulfated CaO was originated from the CaSO{sub 4} product. These results revealed that simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NOx control by injecting NH{sub 3} into the dry flue gas desulfurization process for NO reduction might be achieved. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Tianjin Li; Yuqun Zhuo; Yufeng Zhao; Changhe Chen; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electronic cleansing in CT colonography: past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fecal tagging is a means of marking' fecal residues (stool and fluid) in a colon by use of the oral administration of a positive contrast agent (barium or iodine) in CT Colonography (CTC). Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for ... Keywords: CT colonography, bowel preparation, electronic cleansing, fecal tagging

Wenli Cai; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Former Worker Program - Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense...

289

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA;"AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DET1!R1.IINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O". )' O". )' U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA;"AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DET1!R1.IINATION RECIPIENT:Resolute Marine Energy, Inc. PROJECT TITLE: Wave-Actuated Power Take Off Device for Electricity Generation Page 1 of2 STATE: MA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 DE-EEOOO4565 GFO-OOO4565-001 0 Based on my review orthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordtr451.IA), I have made tbe rollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

290

Plasma-sprayed semiconductor electrodes: Photoelectrochemical characterization and NH sub 3 photoproduction by substoichiometric tungsten oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two substoichiometric tungsten oxide coatings have been obtained by plasma spray of WO{sub 3} powder on Ti substrates. The films are 40 {plus minus} 20 {mu}m thick and are yellow (WO{sub 2.99}) or dark blue (WO{sub 2.97}). WO{sub 2.99} coatings show a highly textured surface with a specific area 27.9 times the geometrical one. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that their structure is a mixture of monoclinic and triclinic phases. The yellow films have been characterized photoelectrochemically in regenerative cells by using O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O redox at pH 2.0. Under anodic polarization of 1.5 V (SCE) their quantum yield is between 10% and 20% in the wavelength range comprised between 270 and 430 nm with an indirect bandgap of 2.55 eV and a flatband potential of {minus}0.1 V. WO{sub 2.99} films have been tested for NH{sub 3} photoproduction.

Ladouceur, M.; Dodelet, J.P. (INRS-Energie, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)); Tourillon, G. (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Parent, L.; Dallaire, S. (IGM, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada))

1990-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

CT Solar Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Loan Solar Loan No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 29, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Connecticut Name CT Solar Loan Incentive Type State Loan Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State/Territory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Terms 15 years Program Administrator The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Website http://www.energizect.com/residents/programs/ctsolarloan Last DSIRE Review 03/29/2013 References Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency[1] Summary The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan

294

Microsoft Word - Ct121R1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Applications Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2002/1177 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 West Third Street, Suite 1400 Tulsa, OK 74103-3519 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

295

CT113-53 Cape Wind Report_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation Technology Service Corporation an employee-owned company 55 Corporate Drive 3rd Floor, Trumbull, Connecticut 06611 Phone: (203) 268-1249 Fax: (203) 452-0260 www.tsc.com Ref: TSC-CT113-53 Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project Submitted to the United States Coast Guard December 16, 2008 USCG Order #HSCG24-08-F-16A248

296

Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more smoothed appearance than the pre-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign 100% FBP image. Finally, relative to non-ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign images with 100% of standard dose across the pediatric phantom age spectrum, similar noise levels were obtained in the images at a dose reduction of 48% with 40% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign and a dose reduction of 82% with 100% ASIR Trade-Mark-Sign . Conclusions: The authors' work was conducted to identify the dose reduction limits of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for a pediatric oncology population using automatic tube current modulation. Improvements in noise levels from ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction were adapted to provide lower radiation exposure (i.e., lower mA) instead of improved image quality. We have demonstrated for the image quality standards required at our institution, a maximum dose reduction of 82% can be achieved using 100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ; however, to negate changes in the appearance of reconstructed images using ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign with a medium to low frequency noise preserving reconstruction filter (i.e., standard), 40% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign was implemented in our clinic for 42%-48% dose reduction at all pediatric ages without a visually perceptible change in image quality or image noise.

Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Capacitive deionization of NH{sub 4}CIO{sub 4} solutions with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes was developed. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system; electricity is used instead. An aqueous solution of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ions are removed from the water by the imposed electric field and trapped in the extensive cathodic and anodic double layers. Thsi process produces one stream of purified water and a second stream of concentrate. Effects of cell voltage, salt concentration, and cycling on electrosorption capacity were studied and results reported.

Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A reaction mechanism for titanium nitride CVD from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A gas-phase and surface reaction mechanism for the CVD of TiN from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is proposed. The only gas-phase process is complex formation, which can compete with deposition. The surface mechanism postulates the stepwise elimination of Cl and H atoms from TiCl{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, respectively, to form solid TiN and gaseous HCl. The mechanism also accounts for the change in oxidation state of Ti by allowing for liberation of N{sub 2}. Provided that the surface composition is at steady state, the stoichiometry of the overall reaction is reproduced exactly. In addition, the global kinetic law predicted by the mechanism is successfully fit to new deposition data from a rotating disk reactor and is shown to be consistent with literature results.

Larson, R.S.; Allendorf, M.D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 22nd NREL Industry Growth Forum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 22nd NREL Industry Growth Forum Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Applications to Present MA: 22 CT: 2 NH: 2 RI

300

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK DE 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998...

302

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 15. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 2001...

303

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy...

304

NGA98fin5.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

305

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE...

306

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to D. Arnold; Subject: Description of work and associated costs for tests; October 19, 1954 CT.14-2 - US NRC Letter; R. Bellamy to J. Russo; Subject: NRC Safety Inspection and...

307

Composite structure development decisions using X-ray CT measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides measurement data useful for making composite manufacturing development decisions. X-ray CT measurements of material characteristics are quantitative in terms of the dimensions, density, and composition. The CT data on internal conditions, such as consolidation, gaps, delaminations, cracks, porosity and detail placement can be applied to the refinement of production techniques for composite manufacture. The key item of interest is the effect of variations in pressure loading, temperature, mold shape, material surface preparation, and bond layer thickness on the resulting consolidation or bondline quality in new composite manufacturing processes. X-ray CT measurements of densification and defect presence as a function of technique parameters are of critical importance to processes such as resin transfer molding, injection molding, composite welding, composite layup and advanced bonding methods.

Bossi, R.H.; Georgeson, G.E. [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Microsoft Word - CT for NETL Final rev4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Display 32 Fig. 25. Sensor Side of 64-Element Array 33 Fig. 26. Integral Surface Mount Support Electronics 33 Fig. 27. Screen Shot of 64-Element Display 34 Fig. 28. 16-Element CT...

309

Supervised probabilistic segmentation of pulmonary nodules in CT scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic method for lung nodule segmentation from computed tomography (CT) data is presented that is different from previous work in several respects. Firstly, it is supervised; it learns how to obtain a reliable segmentation from examples in a training ...

Bram van Ginneken

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Segmentation of airway trees from multislice CT using fuzzy logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The segmentation and reconstruction of the human airway tree from volumetric computed tomography (CT) images facilitates many clinical applications and physiological investigations. The main problem with standard automated region-growing segmentation ...

Tan Kok Liang; Toshiyuki Tanaka; Hidetoshi Nakamura; Toru Shirahata; Hiroaki Sugiura

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and commercial applications. CT.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CT.0-02-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

312

Gluonic Higgs Scalar, Abelianization and Monopoles in QCD -- Similarity and Difference between QCD in the MA Gauge and the NAH Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the similarity and the difference between QCD in the maximally abelian (MA) gauge and the nonabelian Higgs (NAH) theory by introducing the ``gluonic Higgs scalar field'' $\\vec \\phi(x)$ corresponding to the ``color-direction'' of the nonabelian gauge connection. The infrared-relevant gluonic mode in QCD can be extracted by the projection along the color-direction $\\vec \\phi(x)$ like the NAH theory. This projection is manifestly gauge-invariant, and is mathematically equivalent to the ordinary MA projection. Since $\\vec \\phi(x)$ obeys the adjoint gauge transformation and is diagonalized in the MA gauge, $\\vec \\phi(x)$ behaves as the Higgs scalar in the NAH theory, and its hedgehog singularity provides the magnetic monopole in the MA gauge like the NAH theory. We observe this direct correspondence between the monopole appearing in the MA gauge and the hedgehog singularity of $\\vec \\phi(x)$ in lattice QCD, when the gluon field is continuous as in the SU($N_c$) Landau gauge. In spite of several similarities, QCD in the MA gauge largely differs from the NAH theory in the two points: one is infrared monopole condensation, and the other is infrared enhancement of the abelian correlation due to monopole condensation.

Hideo Suganuma; Hiroko Ichie

2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

UNH Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer, UNH, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and NH counties cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up of what you did to Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator. Signature of Applicant Date: Rhiannon Beauregard, 4-H State Program Coordinator Moiles House, 180 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 Rhiannon.beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

314

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

316

U.S. DEPAR.Th:IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA1\JAGEME~T CE~TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Th:IENT OF ENERGY Th:IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA1\JAGEME~T CE~TER NEPA DETEin:ITNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:City of Henderson; Henderson; NV STATE: NV PROJECT TITLE : Henderson Solar Energy Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EE0003166 GF0-0003166-003 G03166 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.16 Solar photovoltaic systems The installation, modification, operation, and removal of commercially available solar photovoltaic systems located on a building or other structure (such as rooftop, parking lot or facility, and mounted to s1gnage,

317

u.s. DEP.-illThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA"IAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

illThIl!NT OF ENERGY illThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA"IAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE:rJ!IU...lINATION RECIPIENT:TX STATE ENERGY CONSERVATION OFFICE PROJECT TITLE: SHARYLAND ISD Page 1 of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instmment Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-EEOOO116 DE-EEOOO116 GFO-OOO0116-032 GOO Based OD my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.16 Solar photovoltaic systems The installation, modification. operation, and removal of commercially avaUable solar photovoltaic systems located on a building or other structure (such as rooftop, par1o:.ing lot or facility, and mounted to signage, lighting, gates, or fences), or if

318

U.S. DFPAR.Tl\IFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA:'\1AGE\1ENTCEN rER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tl\IFNT OF ENERGY Tl\IFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA:'\1AGE\1ENTCEN rER NEPA DETFRl\.ITNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Southwest Research Institute STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE : Optimizing the CSP Tower Air Brayton Cycle System to meet the SunShot Objectives Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000595 DE-EE0005805 GF0-0005805-001 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made tbe foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

319

U.S. DEP.-illTUENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA"AG EM ENT CEN T  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

illTUENT OF ENERGY illTUENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA"AG EM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION RECIPIENT:City of San Antonio PROJECT TITLE: City of San Antonio ARRA·EECBG * Activity #7 (S) Page 1 of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number 81.128 Procurement Instrument Number DE·EEOOOO970 NEPA Control Number cm Number o Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 I. IA), I have made the followin g determination: CX, EA , EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

320

U.S. DEPARTI\t.IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.J'\JAGE\ofENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

t.IENT OF ENERGY t.IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA.J'\JAGE\ofENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:San Diego State University STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE: A Small Particle Solar Receiver for High Temperature Brayton Power Cycles Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-SOL-0000595 DE-EE0005800 GF0-0005800-001 G05800 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.6 Small-scale research and development. laboratory operations, and pilot projects Rational for determination: Siting, construction, modification, operation, and decommissioning of facilities for smallscale research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

DENSE GAS TRACERS IN PERSEUS: RELATING THE N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, AND DUST CONTINUUM PROPERTIES OF PRE- AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate 35 prestellar cores and 36 protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. We find a very tight correlation between the physical parameters describing the N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} gas. Both the velocity centroids and the line widths of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} correlate much better than either species correlates with CO, as expected if the nitrogen-bearing species are probing primarily the dense core gas where the CO has been depleted. We also find a tight correlation in the inferred abundance ratio between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and para-NH{sub 3} across all cores, with N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = 22 +- 10. We find a mild correlation between NH{sub 3} (and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) column density and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum derived H{sub 2} column density for prestellar cores, N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(H{sub 2}) {approx}10{sup -8}, but do not find a fixed ratio for protostellar cores. The observations suggest that in the Perseus molecular cloud the formation and destruction mechanisms for the two nitrogen-bearing species are similar, regardless of the physical conditions in the dense core gas. While the equivalence of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} as powerful tracers of dense gas is validated, the lack of correspondence between these species and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum observations for protostellar cores is disconcerting and presently unexplained.

Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Tafalla, Mario, E-mail: doug.johnstone@nrc-cnrc.gc.c [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

323

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Radium CT.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator CT.05-1 - MED Memorandum; To the Files, Thru Ruhoff, et. al.;

324

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Selling Corp - CT 0-01 Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location CT.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS SELLING CORP. CT.0-01-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist D. Levine to File; Subject -

325

Surface-Layer Fluxes Measured Using the CT2-Profile Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first experimental test of obtaining heat and momentum fluxes from measurements of the profile of the temperature structure parameter CT2 is performed. The parameter CT2 is obtained from resistance-wire thermometers as well as from optical-...

Reginald J. Hill; Gerard R. Ochs; James J. Wilson

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A New Approach in Metal Artifact Reduction for CT 3D Reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D representation of CT scans is widely used in medical application such as virtual endoscopy, plastic reconstructive surgery, dental implant planning systems and more. Metallic objects present in CT studies cause strong artifacts like beam hardening ...

Valery Naranjo; Roberto Llorens; Patricia Paniagua; Mariano Alcaiz; Salvador Albalat

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data  

SciTech Connect

Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR/FB, 85601-970, Caixa Postal 135, Francisco Beltrao - PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana-UTFPR/FB,85601-970,Caixa Postal 135,Francisco Beltrao-PR (Brazil) and Faculdades Pequeno Principe-FPP, Av. Iguacu, 333, Rebou (Brazil); Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina - UFSC/ARA, 88900-000, Rua Pedro Joao Pereira, 150, Ararangua - SC (Brazil); Klock, Margio C. L. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR Litoral, 80230-901, Rua Jaguaraiva 512, Caioba, Matinhos - PR (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

Wa s h i n g t o n Ma r r i o t t e n Me t r o C e...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wa s h i n g t o n Ma r r i o t t e n Me t r o C e n t e r F a c u l t a d d e D e r e c h o d e l a U n i v e r s i d a d d e H o w a r d C o n f e r e n c i a y P r o g r a ma d...

329

Rig 'dzin Tshe dbang mchog grub (1761-1829) et la constitution du rNying ma rgyud 'bum de sDe dge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

les textes en une collection Ug palung, le fief de la ligne Zur3. Un article plus rcent encore de Mi Nyag Thubbstan chos dar fait le point sur les diverses versions existantes, mentionnantdailleurs un certain nombre dentre elles qui ne sont... and the Bai-ro- rgyud-bum, p. 9. 4 Mi nyag Thub bstan chos dar, rNying ma rgyud 'bum gyi mtshams sbyor, passim. 5 Voir Achard, La liste des Tantras du rNying mai rgyud bum selon ldition tablie par Kun mkhyen Jigs med gling pa, Revue d...

Achard, Jean-Luc

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Matter Matters: Unphysical Properties of the Rh = ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that there is matter in the universe and, in this paper, we show that the existence of matter is extremely problematic for the proposed Rh = ct universe. Considering a dark energy component with an equation of state of w=-1/3, it is shown that the presence of matter destroys the strict expansion properties that define the evolution of Rh = ct cosmologies, distorting the observational properties that are touted as its success. We further examine whether an evolving dark energy component can save this form of cosmological expansion in the presence of matter by resulting in an expansion consistent with a mean value of = -1/3, finding that the presence of mass requires unphysical forms of the dark energy component in the early universe. We conclude that matter in the universe significantly limits the fundamental properties of the Rh = ct cosmology, and that novel, and unphysical, evolution of the matter component would be required to save it. Given this, Rh = ct cosmology is not simpler or...

Lewis, Geraint F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

MaSST 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... How does the nondeterminism of scheduling ... memory use, parallelism, virtual machines, and cloud ... Jeehyun Hwang, North Carolina State University. ...

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 NOIlVUlSININdV NOIlVWdOdNI AOd3N3 ACTO3NH 0661 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the Hearing Impaired Only: (202) 586-1181 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F

333

A model of the gas-phase chemistry of boron nitride CVC from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The kinetics of gas-phase reactions occurring during the CVD of boron nitride (BN) from BCl{sub 3} and NH{sub 3} are investigated using an elementary reaction mechanism whose rate constants were obtained from theoretical predictions and literature sources. Plug-flow calculations using this mechanism predict that unimolecular decomposition of BCl{sub 3} is not significant under typical CVD conditions, but that some NH{sub 3} decomposition may occur, especially for deposition occurring at atmospheric pressure. Reaction of BCl{sub 3} with NH{sub 3} is rapid under CVD conditions and yields species containing both boron and nitrogen. One of these compounds, Cl{sub 2}BNH{sub 2}, is predicted to be a key gas-phase precursor to BN.

Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.; Osterheld, T.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

FLUORESCENCE EXCITATION MODELS OF AMMONIA AND AMIDOGEN RADICAL (NH{sub 2}) IN COMETS: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ)  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 {mu}m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH{sub 2}-a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 {mu}m wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH{sub 3} lines, the mixing ratio of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O is 0.46% {+-} 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH{sub 2} observations (0.31%-0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH{sub 3} could be the sole parent of NH{sub 2} in this comet.

Kawakita, Hideyo [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Mumma, Michael J., E-mail: kawakthd@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, NASA Godard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Short-term recovery of NH4-15N applied to a temperate forest inceptisol and ultisol in east Tennessee USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term fate and retention of ammonium (NH4)-{sup 15}nitrogen (N) applied to two types of forest soils in east Tennessee was investigated. Four ridgetop forests, predominantly oak (Quercus spp.), were studied. Five applications of NH{sub 4}-{sup 15}N tracer were made to the forest floor at 2- to 4-week intervals over a 14-week period in 2004. Nitrogen-15 recovery in the forest floor, fine roots (100 weeks) indicated the forest floor is an effective filter for atmospheric N inputs.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE/EIA-0131(96) Distribution Category/UC-960 Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ID ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1996 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL KY (T) MA ME (T) AL LA MA NH (T) AL MO (T) MA NJ (T) AL SC MD DC CT RI RI MA DE MD VA DC MA CT (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 906,407 355,260 243,866 220 384,311 576,420 823,799 842,114 27,271 126,012 133 602,841 266 579,598 16,837 268,138 48,442 182,511 219,242 86,897 643,401 619,703 8,157 937,806 292,711 869,951 12,316 590,493 118,256

337

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

338

Environment assessment: allocation of petroleum feedstock, Algonquin SNG Inc. , Freetown SNG Plant, Bristol County, MA. [Effects of 100, 78, 49% allocations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed administrative action to deny, grant or modify the Algonquin SNG, Inc. (Algonquin) petition for an adjusted allocation of naphtha feedstock may significantly affect the ehuman environment. The volume of feedstock requested is 4,425,571 barrels per year of naphtha to be used in Algonquin's Freetown, MA synthetic natural gas (SNG) plant. Environmental impacts of 100, 78, and 49% allocations were evaluated.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Artifacts in Conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Free Breathing Four-Dimensional CT Induce Uncertainty in Gross Tumor Volume Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size was compared to GTV sizes in 3DCT, at midventilation (MidV), at end-inspiration (Insp), and at end-expiration (Exp) bins from the 4DCT scan. Results: The median BHCT GTV size was 4.9 cm{sup 3} (0.1-53.3 cm{sup 3}). Median deviation between 3DCT and BHCT GTV size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-3.3 to 30.0 cm{sup 3}), between MidV and BHCT size was 0.2 cm{sup 3} (-5.7 to 19.7 cm{sup 3}), between Insp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.7 to 24.8 cm{sup 3}), and between Exp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.8 to 25.5 cm{sup 3}). The 3DCT, MidV, Insp, and Exp median GTV sizes were all significantly larger than the BHCT median GTV size. Conclusions: In the present study, the choice of CT method significantly influenced the delineated GTV size, on average, leading to an increase in GTV size compared to the reference BHCT. The uncertainty caused by artifacts is estimated to be in the same magnitude as delineation uncertainty and should be considered in the design of margins for radiotherapy.

Fredberg Persson, Gitte, E-mail: gitte.persson@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Munch af Rosenschoeld, Per; Richter Vogelius, Ivan; Josipovic, Mirjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Korreman, Stine Sofia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nh ct ma" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

MIEDER, WOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004. 304 pp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selecta bibliografa, Proverbs: A Handbook interesado en unWOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood,libros de referencia de Handbooks" publicado en el nueva la

Lee, Alejandro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administrati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11...

344

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Metal artifact reduction in dental CT images using polar mathematical morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Most dental implant planning systems use a 3D representation of the CT scan of the patient under study as it provides a more intuitive view of the human jaw. The presence of metallic objects in human jaws, such as amalgam or gold fillings, ... Keywords: Artifact reduction, Dental CT, Polar morphology

Valery Naranjo; Roberto Llorns; Mariano Alcaiz; Fernando Lpez-Mir

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I. [Centro Diagnostico Docente, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Seccion de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Castillo, J. [University of Applied Science of Aachen (Germany)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

347

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

Boykov, Yuri

348

ECG-correlated image reconstruction from subsecond multi-slice spiral CT scans of the heart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsecond spiral computed tomography(CT) offers great potential for improving heartimaging. The new multi-row detector technology adds significantly to this potential. We therefore developed and validated dedicated cardiacreconstruction algorithms for imaging the heart with subsecond multi-slice spiral CT utilizing electrocardiogram (ECG) information. The single-slice cardiacz-interpolation algorithms 180CI and 180CD [Med. Phys. 25

Marc Kachelrie; Stefan Ulzheimer; Willi A. Kalender

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microsoft Word - figure_8.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

T I D O R W Y ND SD C A N V U T CO NE KS A Z NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR M S AL GA T N KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI A K J a p a n Mexico M e x...

350

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

351

First analysis of radiative properties of moderate-atomic-number planar wire arrays on Zebra at UNR at higher current of 1.7 MA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of implosions of Cu and Ag planar wire array (PWA) loads recently performed at the enhanced 1.7 MA Zebra generator at UNR is presented. Experiments were performed with a Load Current Multiplier with a 1cm anode-cathode gap (twice shorter than in a standard 1 MA mode). A full diagnostic set included more than ten different beam-lines with the major focus on time-gated and time-integrated x-ray imaging and spectra, total radiation yields, and fast, filtered x-ray detector data. In particular, the experimental results for a double PWA load consisting of twelve 10 {micro}m Cu wires in each row (total mass M {approx} 175 {micro}g) and a much heavier single PWA load consisting of ten 30 {micro}m Ag wires (M {approx} 750 {micro}g) were analyzed using a set of theoretical codes. The effects of both a decreased a-c gap and an increased current on radiative properties of these loads are discussed.

Keim, S. F. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Chuvatin, Alexander S. (Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France); Osborne, Glenn C. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Esaulov, Andrey A. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Presura, R. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Shrestha, I. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Shlyaptseva, V. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Coverdale, Christine Anne; Williamson, K. M. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Ouart, Nicholas D. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Astanovitsky, A. L. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Weller, M. E. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Safronova, Alla S. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); LeGalloudec, B. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

William J. ODonnell; Donald S. Griffin

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effects of gaseous NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the concentration profiles of PCDD/F in flyash under post-combustion zone conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on 2378-PCDD/F in flyash and flue gases was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} decreased the concentration of PCDD and PCDF by 21-40% from the flue gases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 99% PCDD and 93% PCDF reductions in the flyash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SO{sub 2} led to 89% PCDD and 76% PCDF reductions in the flue gases. - Abstract: The influence of gaseous ammonia and sulphur dioxide on the formation of 2378-substituted PCDD/F on a reference flyash from a municipal waste incinerator has been investigated using a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor. The reference flyash samples (BCR-490) was reacted under a simulated flue gas stream at temperatures of 225 and 375 Degree-Sign C for 96 h. The experiments were carried out in two series: first with simulated flue gas alone, and then with injection of NH{sub 3} or SO{sub 2} gas into the flue gas just before the reactor inlet. It was found that the injection of gaseous ammonia into the flue gas could decrease the concentration of both PCDD and PCDF by 34-75% from the solid phase and by 21-40% from the gas phase. Converting the results to I-TEQ values, it could reduce the total I-TEQ values of PCDD and PCDF in the sum of the flyash and exhaust flue gas by 42-75% and 24-57% respectively. The application of SO{sub 2} led to 99% and 93% reductions in the PCDD and PCDF average congener concentrations, respectively in the solid phase. In the gas phase, the total reductions were 89% and 76% for PCDD and PCDF, respectively. Moreover, addition of SO{sub 2} reduced the total I-TEQ value of PCDD and PCDF in the flyash and exhaust flue gas together by 60-86% and 72-82% respectively. Sulphur dioxide was more effective than ammonia in suppressing PCDD/F formation in flyash under the conditions investigated.

Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A. [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk [Energy Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Decomposition of NH3BH3 at sub-ambient pressures: A combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report a systematic study of the isothermal decomposition of ammonia borane, NH3BH3, at 363 K as a function of argon pressure ranging between 50 and 1040 mbar using thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis coupled with mass analysis of the volatile species. During thermal aging at 363 K, evolution of hydrogen, aminoborane and borazine is monitored, with the relative mass loss strongly depending on the pressure in the reaction chamber. Furthermore, the induction period required for hydrogen release at 363 K decreases with decreasing pressure.

Palumbo, Oriele; Paolone, Annalisa; Rispoli, Pasquale; Cantelli, Rosario; Autrey, Thomas

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Australia Australia Trinidad Qatar Malaysia Canada Mexico Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL TX MA NH CT RI MD DC DE MD RI MA MA CT VA DC (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 837,902 415,636 225,138 232 308,214 805,614 803,034 800,345 685 147 628,589 9,786 790,088 17,369 278,302 40,727 214,076 275,629 51,935 843,280 826,638 9,988 998,603 553,440 896,187 11,817 629,551 98,423

356

Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions. Calculation of spontaneous polarization and electric field strength in experiments  

SciTech Connect

The results of experiments with quantum wells on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions obtained by various methods are reconsidered. Spontaneous polarizations, field strengths, and energies of local levels in quantum wells on 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunctions were calculated within a unified model. The values obtained are in agreement with the results of all considered experiments. Heterojunction types are determined. Approximations for valence band offsets on heterojunctions between silicon carbide polytypes and the expression for calculating local levels in quantum wells on the 3C-SiC/NH-SiC heterojunction are presented. The spontaneous polarizations and field strengths induced by spontaneous polarization on 3C-SiC/4H-SiC and 3C-SiC/6H-SiC heterojunctions were calculated as 0.71 and 0.47 C/m{sup 2} and 0.825 and 0.55 MV/cm, respectively.

Sbruev, I. S.; Sbruev, S. B., E-mail: science@yandex.ru [Moscow Aviation Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

HfO2 Gate Dielectric on (NH4)2S Passivated (100) GaAs Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface between hafnium oxide grown by atomic layer deposition and (100) GaAs treated with HCl cleaning and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S passivation has been characterized. Synchrotron radiation photoemission core level spectra indicated successful removal of the native oxides and formation of passivating sulfides on the GaAs surface. Layer-by-layer removal of the hafnia film revealed a small amount of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at the interface during the dielectric deposition. Traces of arsenic and sulfur out-diffusion into the hafnia film were observed after a 450 C post-deposition anneal, and may be the origins for the electrically active defects. Transmission electron microscopy cross section images showed thicker HfO{sub 2} films for a given precursor exposure on S-treated GaAs versus the non-treated sample. In addition, the valence-band and the conduction-band offsets at the HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interface were deduced to be 3.18 eV and a range of 0.87-0.97 eV, respectively. It appears that HCl+(NH{sub 4})2{sub S} treatments provide a superior chemical passivation for GaAs and initial surface for ALD deposition.

Chen, P.T.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, E.; McIntyre, P.C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Tsai, W.; Garner, M.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nishi, Y.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Chui, C.O.; /UCLA

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

AFFECTS OF MECHANICAL MILLING AND METAL OXIDE ADDITIVES ON SORPTION KINETICS OF 1:1 LiNH2/MgH2 MIXTURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The destabilized complex hydride system composed of LiNH{sub 2}:MgH{sub 2} (1:1 molar ratio) is one of the leading candidates of hydrogen storage with a reversible hydrogen storage capacity of 8.1 wt%. A low sorption enthalpy of {approx}32 kJ/mole H{sub 2} was first predicted by Alapati et al. utilizing first principle density function theory (DFT) calculations and has been subsequently confirmed empirically by Lu et al. through differential thermal analysis (DTA). This enthalpy suggests that favorable sorption kinetics should be obtainable at temperatures in the range of 160 C to 200 C. Preliminary experiments reported in the literature indicate that sorption kinetics are substantially lower than expected in this temperature range despite favorable thermodynamics. Systematic isothermal and isobaric sorption experiments were performed using a Sievert's apparatus to form a baseline data set by which to compare kinetic results over the pressure and temperature range anticipated for use of this material as a hydrogen storage media. Various material preparation methods and compositional modifications were performed in attempts to increase the kinetics while lowering the sorption temperatures. This paper outlines the results of these systematic tests and describes a number of beneficial additions which influence kinetics as well as NH{sub 3} formation.

Erdy, C.; Anton, D.; Gray, J.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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361

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET), the Obama Administration will advance a major initiative to produce next generation aviation and marine biofuels to power military and commercial transportation. The initiative responds to a directive from President Obama issued in March as part of his Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future, the

362

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

363

High-throughput and in situ EDXRD investigation on the formation of two new metal aminoethylphosphonates - Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) and Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

The system Ca{sup 2+}/2-aminoethylphosphonic acid/H{sub 2}O/NaOH was systematically investigated using high-throughput methods. The experiments led to one new compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2} H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) (1) and the crystal structure was determined using in house X-ray powder diffraction data (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=9.7753(3), b=6.4931(2), c=8.4473(2) A, {beta}=106.46(2) Degree-Sign , V=514.20(2) A{sup 3}, Z=4). The formation of 1 was investigated by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements (EDXRD) at beamline F3 at HASYLAB (light source DORIS III), DESY, Hamburg. An intermediate, Ca(OH)(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), was observed and could be isolated from the reaction mixture at ambient temperatures by quenching the reaction. The crystal structure of 2 was determined from XRPD data using synchrotron radiation (monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.2193(7), b=7.1488(3), c=5.0635(2) A, {beta}=100.13(4) Degree-Sign , V=399.78(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2). - Graphical abstarct: The detailed in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) investigation on the formation of the new inorganic-organic hybrid compound Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) leads to the discovery of a new crystalline intermediate phase. Both crystal structures were elucidated using X-ray powder diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-throughput investigation led to new metal aminoethylphosphonate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}) was followed by in situ EDXRD measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystalline intermediate Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was discovered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of Ca(O{sub 3}PC{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})(OH){center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was accomplished by quenching experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures were determined using X-ray powder diffraction data.

Schmidt, Corinna; Feyand, Mark [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany); Rothkirch, Andre [HASYLAB, DESY Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Stock, Norbert, E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Max-Eyth Strasse 2, D 24118 Kiel (Germany)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller patients. However, the overall risk of cancer incidence attributable to the CT examination was much higher for the newborn (2.4 in 1000) than for the teenager (0.7 in 1000). For the two pediatric-aged patients in our study, CTDI{sub vol} underestimated dose to large organs in the scan coverage by 30%-48%. The effective dose derived from DLP using published conversion coefficients differed from that calculated using patient-specific organ dose values by -57% to 13%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 60 were used, and by -63% to 28%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 103 were used. Conclusions: It is possible to estimate patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations by combining a validated Monte Carlo program with patient-specific anatomical models that are derived from the patients' clinical CT data and supplemented by transformed models of reference adults. With the construction of a large library of patient-specific computer models encompassing patients of all ages and weight percentiles, dose and risk can be estimated for any patient prior to or after a CT examination. Such information may aid in decisions for image utilization and can further guide the design and optimization of CT technologies and scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

High external quantum efficiency and fill-factor InGaN/GaN heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

High external quantum efficiency (EQE) p-i-n heterojunction solar cells grown by NH{sub 3}-based molecular beam epitaxy are presented. EQE values including optical losses are greater than 50% with fill-factors over 72% when illuminated with a 1 sun AM0 spectrum. Optical absorption measurements in conjunction with EQE measurements indicate an internal quantum efficiency greater than 90% for the InGaN absorbing layer. By adjusting the thickness of the top p-type GaN window contact layer, it is shown that the short-wavelength (<365 nm) quantum efficiency is limited by the minority carrier diffusion length in highly Mg-doped p-GaN.

Lang, J. R.; Hurni, C. A.; Cruz, S. C.; Matioli, E.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Neufeld, C. J.; Mishra, U. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

QM/MM Lineshape Simulation of the Hydrogen-bonded Uracil NH Stretching Vibration of the Adenine:Uracil Base Pair in CDCl$_3$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out for the Watson-Crick base pair of 9-ethyl-8-phenyladenine and 1-cyclohexyluracil in deuterochloroform solution at room temperature. The resulting trajectory is analyzed putting emphasis on the N-H$...$N Hydrogen bond geometry. Using an empirical correlation between the $\\NN$-distance and the fundamental NH-stretching frequency, the time-dependence of this energy gap along the trajectory is obtained. From the gap-correlation function we determine the infrared absorption spectrum using lineshape theory in combination with a multimode oscillator model. The obtained average transition frequency and the width of the spectrum is in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data.

Yan, Yun-an; Khn, Oliver

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microsoft Word - S07581_MA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Groundwater and Surface Water Groundwater and Surface Water Monitoring Activities at Site A/Plot M March 2011 LMS/SAM/S07581 This page intentionally left blank LMS/SAM/S07581 Groundwater and Surface Water Monitoring Activities at Site A/Plot M March 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Groundwater and Surface Water Monitoring Activities at Site A/Plot M March 2011 Doc. No. S07581 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Background ............................................................................................................................1

368

MA_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionMassachusettsWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of...

369

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERL) at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Wind monitoring/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_inter pretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.25 mph. #12;January 10, 2005 Renewable Energy/s, Offset ­ 0.350 m/s) · 3 - #200P Wind direction vanes Tower location #12;January 10, 2005 Renewable Energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

370

WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_interpretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.237 mph. July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research square. Figure 1 - Map of Chester wind tower site July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page average wind speeds are plotted against time. July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 8

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

371

WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_interpretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.237 mph. July 10, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Distributions Figure 3 - Wind Speed Distribution, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 10, 2007 Renewable Energy Figure 5 - Diurnal Average Wind Speed, March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 July 10, 2007 Renewable Energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

372

BUILDING MA TERIALS and STRUCTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SALE BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS, WASHINGTON, DC PRIC E 10 CENTS ... brands; g and k stand for gun grade and knife ~de ...

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

373

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect of various parameters including pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2, NH3-to-NO ratio, inlet oxygen concentration, and space velocity. The concentrations of the species (e.g. NO, NH3, and others) were determined using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The temperature was varied from ambient (25 C) to 500 C. The investigation showed that all of the above parameters (except pre-treatment with H2) significantly affected the peak NO reduction, the temperature at which peak NO reduction occurred, and residual ammonia left at higher temperatures (also known as 'NH3 slip'). Depending upon the particular values of the parameters, a peak NO reduction of around 90% was obtained for both the catalysts. However, an accompanied generation of N2O and NO2 species was observed as well, being much higher for the vanadium-based catalyst than for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst. For both catalysts, the peak NO reduction decreased with an increase in space velocity, and did not change significantly with an increase in oxygen concentration. The temperatures at which peak NO reduction and complete NH3 removal occurred increased with an increase in space velocity but decreased with an increase in oxygen concentration. The presence of more ammonia at the inlet (i.e. higher NH3-to-NO ratio) improved the peak NO reduction but simultaneously resulted in an increase in residual ammonia. Pretreatment of the catalyst sample with H2 (performed only for the Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst) did not produce any perceivable difference in any of the results for the conditions of these experiments.

Gupta, Saurabh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Analysis of Compact Cylindrical Wire Array Implosions with Brass and also by Alternating Brass and Al wires on the 1-MA COBRA Generator  

SciTech Connect

Implosions from compact cylindrical wire arrays (CCWA) with mid-Z and low-Z wires were carried out on the 1-MA COBRA generator at Cornell University. In particular, the CCWA used either Brass 310 (70% Cu, 30% Zn) wires or a combination of Brass 310 and Al 5056 (95% Al, 5% Mg) wires arranged in an alternating pattern. A total of 16 wires were used on either a 6 or 4 mm diameter array. The diagnostic suite included a bolometer, fast x-ray detectors, a time-integrated spectrometer, and a streak camera. A higher energy output was observed from bolometer measurements when alternating the brass and Al wires compared to using only the brass wires. This study will focus mainly on the spectroscopy of the brass and alternating brass and Al CCWA by applying the non-LTE kinetic models of Cu and Zn to account for the L-shell radiation. The resulting plasma parameters, electron density and electron temperature, will be discussed and compared for the CCWA with only brass wires and alternating brass and Al wires. The simulations with the novel Wire Ablation Dynamics Model that account for wire ablation will be performed to analyze the differences in implosion dynamics of the uniform and alternating compact cylindrical arrays.

Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Bell, K. S.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials. [Inconel MA 754  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H/sub 2//5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH/sub 4//<0.05 Pa H/sub 2/O (500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2//50 ..mu..atm CO/50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4//<0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O) at 900/sup 0/C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables.

Thompson, L.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A phantom for testing of 4D-CT for radiotherapy of small lesions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) in radiotherapy requires strict quality assurance to ensure the accuracy of motion management protocols. The aim of this work was to design and test a phantom capable of large amplitude motion for use in 4D-CT, with particular interest in small lesions typical for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods: The phantom of 'see-saw' design is light weight, capable of including various sample materials and compatible with several surrogate marker signal acquisition systems. It is constructed of polymethylmethacrylate (Perspex) and its movement is controlled via a dc motor and drive wheel. It was tested using two CT scanners with different 4D acquisition methods: the Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT (helical scan, pressure belt) and a General Electric Discovery STE PET/CT (axial scan, infrared marker). Amplitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 cm and frequencies of up to 40 cycles per minute were used to study the effect of motion on image quality. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs), as well as average intensity projections (AIPs) of moving objects were investigated and their quality dependence on the number of phase reconstruction bins assessed. Results: CT number discrepancies between moving and stationary objects were found to have no systematic dependence on amplitude, frequency, or specific interphase variability. MIP-delineated amplitudes of motion were found to match physical phantom amplitudes to within 2 mm for all motion scenarios tested. Objects undergoing large amplitude motions (>3.0 cm) were shown to cause artefacts in MIP and AIP projections when ten phase bins were assigned. This problem can be mitigated by increasing the number of phase bins in a 4D-CT scan. Conclusions: The phantom was found to be a suitable tool for evaluating the image quality of 4D-CT motion management technology, as well as providing a quality assurance tool for intercenter/intervendor testing of commercial 4D-CT systems. When imaging objects with large amplitudes, the completeness criterion described here indicates the number of phase bins required to prevent missing data in MIPs and AIPs. This is most relevant for small lesions undergoing large motions.

Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Callahan, J.; Franich, R. D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia) and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Improved image quality for x-ray CT imaging of gel dosimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study provides a simple method for improving precision of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of irradiated polymer gel dosimetry. The noise affecting CT scans of irradiated gels has been an impediment to the use of clinical CT scanners for gel dosimetry studies. Methods: In this study, it is shown that multiple scans of a single PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used to extrapolate a ''zero-scan'' image which displays a similar level of precision to an image obtained by averaging multiple CT images, without the compromised dose measurement resulting from the exposure of the gel to radiation from the CT scanner. Results: When extrapolating the zero-scan image, it is shown that exponential and simple linear fits to the relationship between Hounsfield unit and scan number, for each pixel in the image, provide an accurate indication of gel density. Conclusions: It is expected that this work will be utilized in the analysis of three-dimensional gel volumes irradiated using complex radiotherapy treatments.

Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queesland 4001, Australia and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, DPAM, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, PO Nilore, Islamabad 45450 (Pakistan); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, ARPANSA, Yallambie, Vic 3085 (Australia); Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Ql d 4001 (Australia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Classification of the Colonic Polyps in CT-Colonography Using Region Covariance as Descriptor Features of Suspicious Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to classify polyps in CT colonography images utilizing covariance matrices as object descriptors. Since these descriptors do not lie on a vector space, they cannot simply be fed to traditional machine learning tools such as support ... Keywords: CT colonography, Colonic polyp detection, Covariance descriptor

Niyazi Kilic; Olcay Kursun; Osman Nuri Ucan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features. Results: The authors acquire a total of 20 MRI-CT patient studies and use the leave-one-out strategy to train and evaluate four different LSSMs. First, a fusion-based LSSM (fLSSM) is built using expert ground truth delineations of the prostate on MRI alone, where the ground truth for the gland on CT is obtained via coregistration of the corresponding MRI and CT slices. The authors compare the fLSSM against another LSSM (xLSSM), where expert delineations of the gland on both MRI and CT are employed in the model building; xLSSM representing the idealized LSSM. The authors also compare the fLSSM against an exclusive CT-based SSM (ctSSM), built from expert delineations of the gland on CT alone. In addition, two LSSMs trained using trainee delineations (tLSSM) on CT are compared with the fLSSM. The results indicate that the xLSSM, tLSSMs, and the fLSSM perform equivalently, all of them out-performing the ctSSM. Conclusions: The fLSSM provides an accurate alternative to SSMs that require careful expert delineations of the SOI that may be difficult or laborious to obtain. Additionally, the fLSSM has the added benefit of providing concurrent segmentations of the SOI on multiple imaging modalities.

Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

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381

LOW-TEMPERATURE ION TRAP STUDIES OF N{sup +}({sup 3} P{sub ja} ) + H{sub 2}(j) {yields} NH{sup +} + H  

SciTech Connect

Using a low-temperature 22-pole ion trap apparatus, detailed measurements for the title reaction have been performed between 10 K and 100 K in order to get some state specific information about this fundamental hydrogen abstraction process. The relative population of the two lowest H{sub 2} rotational states, j = 0 and 1, has been varied systematically. NH{sup +} formation is nearly thermo-neutral; however, to date, the energetics are not known with the accuracy required for low-temperature astrochemistry. Additional complications arise from the fact that, so far, there is no reliable theoretical or experimental information on how the reactivity of the N{sup +} ion depends on its fine-structure (FS) state {sup 3} P{sub ja} . Since in the present trapping experiment, thermalization of the initially hot FS population competes with hydrogen abstraction, the evaluation of the decay of N{sup +} ions over long storage times and at various He and H{sub 2} gas densities provides information on these processes. First assuming strict adiabatic behavior, a set of state specific rate coefficients is derived from the measured thermal rate coefficients. In addition, by recording the disappearance of the N{sup +} ions over several orders of magnitude, information on nonadiabatic transitions is extracted including FS-changing collisions.

Zymak, I.; Hejduk, M.; Mulin, D.; Plasil, R.; Glosik, J.; Gerlich, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Imaging ion-molecule reactions: Charge transfer and C-N bond formation in the C{sup +}+ NH{sub 3} system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity mapping ion imaging method is applied to the ion-molecule reactions occurring between C{sup +} and NH{sub 3}. The velocity space images are collected over the relative collision energy range from 1.5 to 3.3 eV, allowing both product kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions to be obtained from the data. The charge transfer process appears to be direct, dominated by long-range electron transfer that results in minimal deflection of the products. The product kinetic energy distributions are consistent with a process dominated by energy resonance. The kinetic energy distributions for C-N bond formation appear to scale with the total available energy, providing strong evidence that energy in the [CNH{sub 3}]{sup +} precursor to products is distributed statistically. The angular distributions for C-N bond formation show pronounced forward-backward symmetry, as expected for a complex that resembles a prolate symmetric top decaying along its symmetry axis.

Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

Make Checks Payable to the 4-H Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4-H State Horse Show Website  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4 Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon Exposition. Please notify Rhiannon Beauregard, NH 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science Education Coordinator

New Hampshire, University of

385

A PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for prostate cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the USA. Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this "blind" biopsy approach can miss at least 20% of prostate cancers. ... Keywords: 3D ultrasound imaging, PET/CT, image segmentation, imageguided biopsy, molecular imaging, nonrigid image registration, prostate cancer, wavelet transform

Baowei Fei; Viraj Master; Peter Nieh; Hamed Akbari; Xiaofeng Yang; Aaron Fenster; David Schuster

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Louisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary production. estiMateD cost The estimated cost to implement the Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project is $15,582,600. (Estimated costs for some of the projects were updated from those provided in the DERPLouisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion The Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project

387

Department of History, Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8324  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilemma': Making a Place for Historians in the Climate Change and Energy Debates," Environmental History History (undergraduate lecture) Energy in American History (undergraduate seminar) United States GlobalPaul Sabin Department of History, Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8324 Telephone: (203) 436

388

The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

Kim, Jung-Ha [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); Nuyts, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven (Belgium); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fulton, Roger [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Robust Segmentation and Anatomical Labeling of the Airway Tree from Thoracic CT Scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for automatic extraction and labeling of the airway tree from thoracic CT scans is presented and extensively evaluated on 150 scans of clinical dose, low dose and ultra-low dose data, in inspiration and expiration from both relatively healthy ...

Bram Ginneken; Wouter Baggerman; Eva M. Rikxoort

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The noise power spectrum in CT with direct fan beam reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The noise power spectrum (NPS) is a useful metric for understanding the noise content in images. To examine some unique properties of the NPS of fan beam CT, the authors derived an analytical expression for the NPS of fan beam CT and validated it with computer simulations. The nonstationary noise behavior of fan beam CT was examined by analyzing local regions and the entire field-of-view (FOV). This was performed for cases with uniform as well as nonuniform noise across the detector cells and across views. The simulated NPS from the entire FOV and local regions showed good agreement with the analytically derived NPS. The analysis shows that whereas the NPS of a large FOV in parallel beam CT (using a ramp filter) is proportional to frequency, the NPS with direct fan beam FBP reconstruction shows a high frequency roll off. Even in small regions, the fan beam NPS can show a sharp transition (discontinuity) at high frequencies. These effects are due to the variable magnification and therefore are more pronounced as the fan angle increases. For cases with nonuniform noise, the NPS can show the directional dependence and additional effects.

Baek, Jongduk; Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

Sotiropoulou, Evangelia ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Stathochristopoulou, Irene [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Stathopoulos, Konstantinos ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.co ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose distributions were clinically identical. In all patient cases, radiation oncologists rated O-MAR corrected images as higher quality. Formerly obscured critical structures were able to be visualized. The overall image quality and the conspicuity in critical organs were significantly improved compared with the uncorrected images: overall quality score (1.35 vs 3.25, P= 0.0022); bladder (2.15 vs 3.7, P= 0.0023); prostate and seminal vesicles/vagina (1.3 vs 3.275, P= 0.0020); rectum (2.8 vs 3.9, P= 0.0021). The noise levels of the selected ROIs were reduced from 93.7 to 38.2 HU. On most cases (8/10), the average CT Hounsfield numbers of the prostate/vagina on the O-MAR corrected images were closer to the referenced value (41.2 HU, an average measured from patients without metal implants) than those on the uncorrected images. High {gamma} pass rates of the five IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated that the dose distributions were not significantly affected by the CT image improvements. Conclusions: Overall, this study indicated that the O-MAR function can remarkably reduce metal artifacts and improve both CT Hounsfield number accuracy and target and critical structure visualization. Although there was no significant impact of the O-MAR algorithm on the calculated dose distributions, we suggest that O-MAR corrected images are more suitable for the entire treatment planning process by offering better anatomical structure visualization, improving radiation oncologists' confidence in target delineation, and by avoiding subjective density overrides of artifact regions on uncorrected images.

Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

NH_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionNewHampshireWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of New...

395

Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using either step function based or typical clinical arterial input function (AIF) inputs. The measured TACs were in excellent agreement with predictions across all comparison metrics with goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) for the input function between 0.95 and 0.98, while the maximum enhancement differed by no more than 3.3%. The predicted output functions were similarly accurate producing R{sup 2} values between 0.92 and 0.99 and maximum enhancement to within 9.0%. The effect of ROI size on the arterial input function (AIF) was investigated in order to determine an operating range of ROI sizes which were minimally affected by noise for small dimensions and partial volume effects for large dimensions. It was possible to establish the measurement sensitivity of both the Toshiba (ROI radius range from 1.5 to 3.2 mm ''low dose'', 1.4 to 3.0 mm ''high dose'') and GE scanner (1.5 to 2.6 mm ''low dose'', 1.1 to 3.4 mm ''high dose''). This application of the phantom also provides the ability to evaluate the effect of the AIF error on kinetic model parameter predictions. Conclusions: The dynamic flow imaging phantom is capable of producing accurate and reproducible results which can be predicted and quantified. This results in a unique tool for perfusion DCE-CT validation under realistic flow conditions which can be applied not only to compare different CT scanners and imaging protocols but also to provide a ground truth across multimodality dynamic imaging given its MRI and PET compatibility.

Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comprehensive study of LASL Well C/T-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah, and applications to geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah, has been donated by Phillips Petroleum Company for calibration and testing of well-logging equipment in the hot, corrosive, geothermal environment. It is the second Calibration/Test Well (C/T-2) in the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. A study of cuttings and well logs from Well C/T-2 was completed. This synthesis and data presentation contains most of the subsurface geologic information needed to effect the total evaluation of geophysical logs acquired in this geothermal calibration/test well, C/T-2.

Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Attenuation-based estimation of patient size for the purpose of size specific dose estimation in CT. Part II. Implementation on abdomen and thorax phantoms using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate attenuation using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph (SPR) images in a series of thorax and abdomen phantoms. Methods: Attenuation was quantified in terms of a water cylinder with cross sectional area of A{sub w} from both the CT and SPR images of abdomen and thorax phantoms, where A{sub w} is the area of a water cylinder that would absorb the same dose as the specified phantom. SPR and axial CT images were acquired using a dual-source CT scanner operated at 120 kV in single-source mode. To use the SPR image for estimating A{sub w}, the pixel values of a SPR image were calibrated to physical water attenuation using a series of water phantoms. A{sub w} and the corresponding diameter D{sub w} were calculated using the derived attenuation-based methods (from either CT or SPR image). A{sub w} was also calculated using only geometrical dimensions of the phantoms (anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions or cross sectional area). Results: For abdomen phantoms, the geometry-based and attenuation-based methods gave similar results for D{sub w}. Using only geometric parameters, an overestimation of D{sub w} ranging from 4.3% to 21.5% was found for thorax phantoms. Results for D{sub w} using the CT image and SPR based methods agreed with each other within 4% on average in both thorax and abdomen phantoms. Conclusions: Either the cross sectional CT or SPR images can be used to estimate patient attenuation in CT. Both are more accurate than use of only geometrical information for the task of quantifying patient attenuation. The SPR based method requires calibration of SPR pixel values to physical water attenuation and this calibration would be best performed by the scanner manufacturer.

Wang Jia; Christner, Jodie A.; Duan Xinhui; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Anatomical database generation for radiation transport modeling from computed tomography (CT) scan data  

SciTech Connect

Geometric models of the anatomy are used routinely in calculations of the radiation dose in organs and tissues of the body. Development of such models has been hampered by lack of detailed anatomical information on children, and models themselves have been limited to quadratic conic sections. This summary reviews the development of an image processing workstation used to extract anatomical information from routine diagnostic CT procedure. A standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer has been augmented with an automatically loading 9-track magnetic tape drive, an 8-bit 1024 {times} 1024 pixel graphics adapter/monitor/film recording package, a mouse/trackball assembly, dual 20 MB removable cartridge media, a 72 MB disk drive, and a printer. Software utilized by the workstation includes a Geographic Information System (modified for manipulation of CT images), CAD software, imaging software, and various modules to ease data transfer among the software packages. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Margle, S.M.; Tinnel, E.P.; Till, L.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Durfee, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy is currently being studied for the treatment of osteosarcoma using a preclinical translational model in dogs to assess its potential efficacy and toxicity. In this study, dosimetry calculations are performed for Y-90 liquid brachytherapy in a dog with osteosarcoma using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. A total of 611.83 MBq Y-90 radiopharmaceutical is administered via direct injections, and the in vivo distribution of Y-90 is assessed using a time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT scanner. A patient-specific geometry is built using anatomical data obtained from CT images. The material properties of tumor and surrounding tissues are calculated based on a CT number - electron density calibration. The Y-90 distribution is sampled in Geant4 from PET images using a collapsing 3-D rejection technique to determine the decay sites. Dose distributions in the tumor bed and surrounding tissues are calculated demonstrating significant heterogeneity with multiple hot spots at the injection sites. Dose volume histograms show about 33.9 percent of bone and tumor and 70.2 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose over 200 Gy; about 3.2 percent of bone and tumor and 31.0 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET/CT scanners for the direct quantitative assessment of Y-90 activity concentration, and assessment of efficacy of the Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy.

Zhou, Jingjie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

x???N*A**? ZDK(mP?IH z *?CT"Hh?x*4* *??C*? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

x???N*A**? ZDK(mP?IH?z?*?CT"Hh?x*4*?*??C*???;G@ PBJ}???????IUu????`o?1\\?*N????x

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review  

SciTech Connect

As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Detection sensitivity of x-ray CT imaging for NDE of green-state ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved ceramic-processing methods that use pressure slip-casting and injection molding are being developed at Norton Advanced Ceramics, with a goal of producing reliable structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of ceramic parts at different stages of processing can provide useful diagnostic information to help improve processing techniques. For example, an evaluation of density gradients in as-cast green-body samples can be used to judge mold performance and make changes in mold design. Also, the ability to detect minute flaws (20 to 50 {mu}m), such as agglomerates, inclusions, and voids, in green-body, presintered, and densified parts is important in ensuring structural reliability of the final parts, because these flaws, above certain critical sizes, can lead to catastrophic failure. Three-dimensional microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for application to quantitative NDE evaluation of ceramics. This paper evaluates the detection sensitivity of the ANL X-ray CT system when used to determine density gradients, inclusions, and voids in green-state Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics. A theoretical account of key system- and sample-related parameters affecting X-ray CT detection sensitivity is given, and results of experimental evaluation are presented. Density calibration phantoms and net-shape-formed tensile rods with seeded defects were used in the experimental evaluation of detection limits. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Gopalsami, N.; Rizo, P.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Tracey, D.M. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Indianapolis, Indiana on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC

407

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

408

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Jacksonville, Florida on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY NC | OH | OR | PA | SC

409

Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in monochromatic images, the optimal energy was lower than that when minimizing noise level. When the total radiation dose was equally distributed between low and high energy in dual-energy scans, for minimum noise, the optimal energies were 68, 71, 74, and 77 keV for small, medium, large, and extra-large (xlarge) phantoms, respectively; for maximum iodine CNR, the optimal energies were 66, 68, 70, 72 keV. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the CNR was better than that in a single-energy scan at 120 kV for the same radiation dose. Compared to an 80 kV scan, however, the iodine CNR in monochromatic images was lower for the small, medium, and large phantoms. Conclusions: In dual-source dual-energy CT, optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on patient size, dose partitioning, and the image quality metric optimized. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the iodine CNR was better than that in 120 kV images for the same radiation dose. Compared to single-energy 80 kV images, the iodine CNR in virtual monochromatic images was lower for small to large phantom sizes.

Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

A robust geometry estimation method for spiral, sequential and circular cone-beam micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The authors propose a novel method for misalignment estimation of micro-CT scanners using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Methods: The proposed algorithm is able to estimate the rotational geometry, the direction vector of table movement and the displacement between different imaging threads of a dual source or even multisource scanner. The calibration procedure does not rely on dedicated calibration phantoms and a sequence scan of a single metal bead is sufficient to geometrically calibrate the whole imaging system for spiral, sequential, and circular scan protocols. Dual source spiral and sequential scan protocols in micro-computed tomography result in projection data that-besides the source and detector positions and orientations-also require a precise knowledge of the table direction vector to be reconstructed properly. If those geometric parameters are not known accurately severe artifacts and a loss in spatial resolution appear in the reconstructed images as long as no geometry calibration is performed. The table direction vector is further required to ensure that consecutive volumes of a sequence scan can be stitched together and to allow the reconstruction of spiral data at all. Results: The algorithm's performance is evaluated using simulations of a micro-CT system with known geometry and misalignment. To assess the quality of the algorithm in a real world scenario the calibration of a micro-CT scanner is performed and several reconstructions with and without geometry estimation are presented. Conclusions: The results indicate that the algorithm successfully estimates all geometry parameters, misalignment artifacts in the reconstructed volumes vanish, and the spatial resolution is increased as can be shown by the evaluation of modulation transfer function measurements.

Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany) and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

CT calorimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reactions can alter the temperature in various ways, producing a ... The four black items at right below the centimeter rule are ... That way, the immediate ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If these images are used for treatment planning, the average proton range uncertainty is estimated to be less than 1.5% for an imaging dose in the milligray range. Conclusions: The proposed method can be used to convert x-ray projections into virtual proton projections. The converted proton projections can be blended with existing proton projections or can be used solely for pCT reconstruction, addressing the range limit problem of pCT using current therapeutic proton machines.

Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT Shielding Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards.

Madsen, Mark T.; Anderson, Jon A.; Halama, James R. [Radiology, University of Iowa (United States)] (and others)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Detective quantum efficiency of CT reconstruction: the detection of small objects  

SciTech Connect

The loss of detection sensitivity incurred by any stage of image processing may normally be characterized by the frequency dependence of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of that stage of processing, provided the image is represented in continuous coordinates. However, limitations to the DQE concept arise when discretely sampled projection data are used to obtain discretely sampled computed tomographic (CT) reconstructions. The source of these limitations is the aliasing produced by the discrete sampling which mixes contributions from various frequencies. An associated problem is that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the detection of an object can depend upon the position of the object relative to the discrete reconstruction pixels. The effective SNR for discrete images must take into account this variation. While there may be no loss in the detection SNR for reconstructions in continuous coordinates (DQE = 100%), a reduction in the SNR will result from aliasing for discrete reconstructions. A simple one-dimensional model elucidates the characteristics of discrete CT reconstruction.

Hanson, K.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

CT-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Inferior Vena Cava Wall: A Posterior Coaxial Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 72-year-old man was referred to our department with an incidentally diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma of the right upper lobe. Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed an unexpected hot spot in the ventral wall of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Diagnostic biopsy of this lesion was performed under CT guidance with semiautomated 20G fine-needle aspiration (FNA) through a 19G coaxial needle. Cytology revealed few carcinoma cells, which led to the remarkable diagnosis of a distant metastasis to the IVC wall. Both the immediate postinterventional CT control and the further surveillance period of the patient were unremarkable; in particular, no signs of bleeding complications were detected. We conclude that coaxial FNA of an IVC wall lesion is technically feasible and may even help diagnose distant metastasis.

Kos, Sebastian, E-mail: skos@gmx.de; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland); Baumhoer, Daniel [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Pathology (Switzerland); Guillaume, Nicolas [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Jacob, Augustinus L. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Mexico Trinidad Canada Canada Nigeria Oman Qatar Trinidad Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Canada Trinidad Trinidad Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 13,623 Figure 8. Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 2003 (Million Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2003 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 366,224 655,731 666,614 633,960 144,284 43,869 536,776 63,133 36,848

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421

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2008 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 45,772 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates.

422

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,833 ,833 35 Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2009 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 111,144 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates

423

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 42,411 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 253,214 690,780 634,185 658,523 134,764 63,063 526,726 121,049 34,531 492,655 101,101 23,154 40,113 1,496,283 68,601

424

Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 14. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2010 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway India Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Yemen Japan Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 53,122 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Gulf of Mexico Canada Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates based on historical data. Energy Information

425

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 (Million Cubic Feet) 24,891 2,895 Nigeria WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico Algeria C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada N i g e r i a O m a n Qatar Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 2,986 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 335,380 634,982 664,318 612,297 125,202 33,223 531,868 103,624

426

Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online learning mechanism, the authors carried out a comparison between partial online update strategy and full online update strategy. Using the full online update strategy, the mean DSC was improved from 86.6% to 89.3% with 2.8% gain. On the basis of full online update strategy, the manual modification before online update strategy was introduced and tested, the best performance was obtained; here, the mean DSC and the mean ASD achieved 92.4% and 1.47 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed prostate segmentation method provided accurate and robust segmentation results for CT images even under the situation where the samples of patient under radiotherapy were limited. A conclusion that the proposed method is suitable for clinical application can be drawn.

Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang [Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou (China) and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou 510510 (China); Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed CT images using DICOM header information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose multiple logistic regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models constructed using digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header information in predicting the fidelity of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed abdomen computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and waived informed patient consent. Using a JPEG2000 algorithm, 360 abdomen CT images were compressed reversibly (n = 48, as negative control) or irreversibly (n = 312) to one of different compression ratios (CRs) ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Five radiologists independently determined whether the original and compressed images were distinguishable or indistinguishable. The 312 irreversibly compressed images were divided randomly into training (n = 156) and testing (n = 156) sets. The MLR and ANN models were constructed regarding the DICOM header information as independent variables and the pooled radiologists' responses as dependent variable. As independent variables, we selected the CR (DICOM tag number: 0028, 2112), effective tube current-time product (0018, 9332), section thickness (0018, 0050), and field of view (0018, 0090) among the DICOM tags. Using the training set, an optimal subset of independent variables was determined by backward stepwise selection in a four-fold cross-validation scheme. The MLR and ANN models were constructed with the determined independent variables using the training set. The models were then evaluated on the testing set by using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standard and by measuring Spearman rank correlation between the model prediction and the number of radiologists who rated the two images as distinguishable. Results: The CR and section thickness were determined as the optimal independent variables. The areas under the ROC curve for the MLR and ANN predictions were 0.91 (95% CI; 0.86, 0.95) and 0.92 (0.87, 0.96), respectively. The correlation coefficients of the MLR and ANN predictions with the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.76 (0.69, 0.82, p < 0.001) and 0.78 (0.71, 0.83, p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The MLR and ANN models constructed using the DICOM header information offer promise in predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed abdomen CT images.

Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Choi, Hosik; Jeon, Jong-June; Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Informational Statistics, Hoseo University, 165, Sechul-ri, Baebang-myeon, Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Statistics, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Intellectual Property Office, Government Complex-Daejeon, 139 Seonsa-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon, 302-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin [Department of Medical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Preferred Builders, Inc. Old Greenwich, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

430

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BPC Green BPC Green Builders New Fairfi eld, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

431

Automatic heart isolation for CT coronary visualization using graph-cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a means to automatically and efficiently isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomography (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visualized despite the proximity of surrounding organs such as the ribs and pulmonary blood vessels. Numerous techniques have been described for segmenting the left ventricle of the heart in images from various types of medical scanners but rarely has the entire heart been segmented. We make use of graphcuts to do the segmentation and introduce a novel means of initiating and constraining the graph-cut technique for heart isolation. The technique has been tested on 70 patient data sets. Results are compares with hand labeled results. 1.

G. Funka-lea; Y. Boykov; C. Florin; M. -p. Jolly; R. Moreau-gobard; R. Ramaraj; D. Rinck

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Multi-organ segmentation from multi-phase abdominal CT via 4D graphs using enhancement, shape and location optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. ... Keywords: 4D graph, enhancement, multi-phase CT, segmentation, shape

Marius George Linguraru; John A. Pura; Ananda S. Chowdhury; Ronald M. Summers

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Circle plus partial helical scan scheme for a flat panel detector-based cone beam breast X-ray CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flat panel detector-based cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) can provide 3D image of the scanned breast with 3D isotropic spatial resolution, overcoming the disadvantage of the structure superimposition associated with X-ray projection mammography. It is very ...

Dong Yang; Ruola Ning; Weixing Cai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantification of tc-99m sestamibi distribution in normal breast tissue using dedicated breast SPECT-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of Tc-99m-Sestamibi in molecular breast imaging is common due to its preferential uptake in malignant tissue. However, quantification of the baseline uptake in normal, healthy breast tissue is not possible using planar-imaging devices. Using ... Keywords: CT, SPECT, breast cancer, breast imaging, quantification, sestamibi

Steve D. Mann; Kristy L. Perez; Emily K. E. McCracken; Jainil P. Shah; Kingshuk R. Choudhury; Terence Z. Wong; Martin P. Tornai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Validation of mutual information-based registration of CT and bone SPECT images in dual-isotope studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The registration of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) images can substantially enhance patient diagnosis as it allows for the fusion of anatomical and functional information, as well as the attenuation correction of NM images. However, ... Keywords: Accuracy, Bone SPECT, Dual-isotope studies, Multi-modality registration, Multi-resolution, Mutual information, Precision, Qualitative evaluation, Quantitative validation, Reproducibility, Robustness, Sensitivity

Lisa Tang; Ghassan Hamarneh; Anna Celler

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Geophysics. · Caltech, Pasadena, CA. 2003-2007. Posdoc in Isotope geochemistry. Department of GeologicalHagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520 Plants: Physiological Role and Isotopic Composition. Adviser: Dan Yakir. Professional experience · Yale

437

Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs  

SciTech Connect

A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J. [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

SciTech Connect

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

443

Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

Lu, Jun (Salt Lake City, UT); Fang, Zhigang Zak (Salt Lake City, UT); Sohn, Hong Yong (Salt Lake City, UT)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mechanochemical transformation of mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} or P{sub 2}O{sub 5}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed comparative study of the mechanochemical transformation of two mixtures: Ca(OH){sub 2}-(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, milled in a mortar dry grinder for different periods of time was carried out. The phase transformations obtained at each milling stage were studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The transformations taking place during the first periods of milling are very different for both mixtures. However, prolonged milling, over nearly the same period, causes amorphization of both mixtures. DSC analysis of the milled powders showed the temperature of crystallization of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP). Calcinations of all the different milled powders at 800 deg. C for 2 h, results in the formation of hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP.

Gonzalez, G. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.ve; Sagarzazu, A. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Villalba, R. [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnologico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas. Aptdo. 21827 Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

445

SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors by directly controlling Zn{sup 2+} and NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O species in an emulsion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with tailorable interiors were synthesized by a facile one-spot microemulsion process using TEOS as silica source, wherein cyclohexane including triton X-100 and n-octanol as oil phase and Zn{sup 2+} or NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O aqueous solution as dispersive phase, respectively. The products were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction. It was suggested that the as-synthesized silica nanospheres possessed grape-stone-like porous or single hollow interior, and also found that the ammonia dosage and aging time played key roles in controlling the size and structure of silica nanospheres. Furthermore, the comparative results confirmed that in-situ zinc species [ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2}] acted as the temporary templates to construct grape-stone-like interior, and a simultaneously competing etching process occurred owing to the soluble Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2+} complex formation while the additional excessive ammonia was introduced. With the aging time being extended, the in-situ nanocrystals tended to grow into bigger ones by Ostwald Ripening, producing single hollow interior. - Graphical Abstract: Formation process of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres with porous and single hollow interior. Highlights: > ZnO/Zn(OH){sub 2} nanocrystals as the temporary templates shape the interior structures of SiO{sub 2} nanospheres. > Fabrication of porous and single hollow interiors needs no additional processes such as roasting or dissolving. > Tailorable interiors can be easily obtained through adjusting the aging time of temporary templates.

Liao Yuchao [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu Xiaofeng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen Yunfa, E-mail: yfchen@home.ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

Groheux, David [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)], E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr; Moretti, Jean-Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Baillet, Georges [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hennequin, Christophe [EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Department of Radiation Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hartmann Hospital, Neuilly sur Seine (France); Cuvier, Caroline [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); EAD Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, IUH, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Sarandi, Farid [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Unit, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential

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8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

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2000 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-99.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 20. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural

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2002 2002 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA 910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Commercial Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN W VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Source: Energy Information Administration

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$2.49 price category.